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Gary Kasparov Arrested Over Political Fight

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the more-active-than-chess dept.

Censorship 427

geddes writes "World chess champion turned opposition leader Gary Kasparov was arrested this morning while leading an march through Moscow in opposition to Russian President Vladamir Putin. Kasporov is a leader of the 'Other Russia' coalition which has been banned by the government from appearing on TV, and had been denied a marching permit. From the New York Times: 'Essentially barred from access to television, members of Other Russia have embraced street protests as the only platform to voice their opposition ahead of parliamentary elections in December and presidential elections next March. Early this month, Mr. Kasyanov's and Mr. Kasparov's Web sites were blocked, though it was unclear by whom.' Kasparov was later released from detention, though he was still fined for participating in the event."

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ches mate... (1, Funny)

vasanth (908280) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736053)

ohh boy he's been chek mated..

Re:ches mate... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736079)

In Soviet Russia, chess plays you!

Re:ches mate... (2, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736095)

I think you meant "Czechmated".

Re-use of old term (1, Flamebait)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736059)

It's interesting that the people in charge of Russia now could be reasonably charged as "counter-revolutionaries" who thwart the will of the people. If I recall, the punishment for that used to be being sent to the Gulag.

Re:Re-use of old term (-1, Troll)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736253)

Sure. Most people see this kind of stuff as oppresive, and ultimately "evil" or "bad". But there is something to be said about having a heavy hand ruling. Just take a look at china and you'll see a lot of the same practices. You will also see a nation advancing at the speed of light compared to its "democracy" counterparts. There is no bureaucracy to get in the way.

Re:Re-use of old term (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736317)

Advancing? Bullshit. They are just catching up by stealing the technologies from the Western world and then playing with their currency exchange rates to maximize their profit. If they were advancing at the speed of light then you would assume that there would have been some major scientific and technological breakthroughs that came from China in the last 10 or so years, right? You know, something on the order of the Internet, the cellphone, the transistor, the Big Bang theory, plate tectonics, DNA, etc. Start naming some.

The heavy handed leadership just means that the government is run by something similar to the Mafia. It doesn't mean that it is the right way to rule.

Re:Re-use of old term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736779)

I agree with the other anonymous coward who posted. I know what you mean when you said 'advancing': there does seem to be this expedience in a lot of things in China, in a way that it seems that a lot of the country can't keep up with others (if you were listening to 2600's Off the Hook last week Emmanuel talked about this). However at what cost? When does the loss of basic human rights and freedom become too great? It is good to advance. Though I personally feel (as do many others) that the exponential rate at which we are advancing is having negative impacts on the planet and might prompt more questions than it answers if you get my drift. Why stretch this as far as one can by removing the 'democracy' involved in other countries that you say are advancing more slowly. What's the point? I think people in general just need to calm down a little bit and try to reverse the acceleration process that the world seems to be in. As my wise Latin teacher once said, 'omnes in moderatio'. No need to do everything as fast as you possible can otherwise the Earth might not be able to keep up.

Sorry, couldn't resist ... (4, Funny)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736065)

Early this month, Mr. Kasyanov's and Mr. Kasparov's Web sites were blocked, though it was unclear by whom.' Kasparov was later released from detention, though he was still fined for participating in the event."
So now it's Kasparaov's move.

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (4, Funny)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736131)

My guess is he might use the Queen's Gambit, but with those ruskies you never know. Plus, Pootin just might also overreact [imageshack.us] to moves like that.

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736165)

Kasparov was later released from detention after being poisoned with polonium
Fixed.

kasparov is a pawn, not the player. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736331)

it can't be kasparov's move, since he's a pawn, not the player. he should've kept playing his game.

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (0)

orzetto (545509) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736347)

In Putin's Russia, check mates YOU!!

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (3, Funny)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736503)

Regarding your sig ... there are over 200 million cars in the US which, together, are "equivalent to 80 Bin Ladens" in terms of carnage. Therefore, any single car like mine is roughly 80/200,000,000 or 0.0000004 Bin Ladens.

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736675)

The source or cause of the fatality is not really relevent to the point. Think about it this way. Compare the amount of money spent on cancer ir aids research by the government to amount spent fighting terrorism. How many americans (not including solders in Iraq) die each year because of each of those? Think about it statistically. How are you most likely to die? Terrorist attack, auto accident, choking on a piece of food, or cancer? How much money is spent on prevention of each of those items listed? FUD is powerful. We think of the non terrorism items less because they happen on an individual basis or one at a time and not to a group at one time. Basically spreading out the problem over time and geographical areas therefore causing no one person to feel the overall effects as a collective group would feel. No large groups of people are affected by any one individual case.

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (2, Funny)

holdenholden (961300) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736833)

Bin Ladens? I don't understand these units. What is it in Libraries of Congress or football fields?

Re:Sorry, couldn't resist ... (0, Offtopic)

orzetto (545509) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736861)

You are however exposed to accidents with each one of them, so you have to multiply back by 200,000,000. I would have written it better if it were not for sig length limits.

Possibly "Traffic is 80 times more dangerous than al-Quaeda" would fit better.

He just got... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736081)

Castled by the police.

Get it? Eh? Because the prison cell is like... Oh gosh.

So... (2, Insightful)

Rakishi (759894) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736087)

Is there another side to this story? IS there a valid reason for the TV ban? Is it even a TV ban? And so on.

I have long ago learned that slashdot stories and summaries have enough bias in them to drown half the world in so thats why I'm asking.

No ban (think Michael Moore). No permit == fines. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736235)

kasparov is stupid. he should play his game, not politics. how would you like bobby fisher for a president? (well, i would, but that's not the point :)

Re:No ban (think Michael Moore). No permit == fine (1)

toolbar (125170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736439)

Oh great, so you want a guy who denies that the holocaust happened as your leader?

Obvious comment (5, Funny)

sodas (513553) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736099)

In Soviet Russia... Uhm... Wait a minute here.

Re:Obvious comment (0)

LinuxGeek (6139) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736135)

In Soviet Russia, the gulag throws you!

Re:Obvious comment (0)

Tenebrarum (887979) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736869)

...

In Soviet Russia ...

this happens!

The fine was quite small, (5, Interesting)

apathy maybe (922212) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736103)

but that doesn't excuse it. It was apparently about AUD50 (from the ABC [abc.net.au] .

Anyway, this is just another example of how legitimate protests are squashed by authorities. If Putin and Co continue to suppress the opposition, I wonder if Mr Berezovsky will carry out his threat to have a "Russian [bbc.co.uk] Revolution" [guardian.co.uk] ?

Meh, and you wonder why some of the old people want the Soviet Union back.

Re:The fine was quite small, (1)

secolactico (519805) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736181)

Meh, and you wonder why some of the old people want the Soviet Union back.

It might bring some good Tom Clancy novels.

Re:The fine was quite small, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736377)

You know stuff like this makes the Whitehouse wet themselves with glee. If only they'd thought of it first!

Re:The fine was quite small, (0, Troll)

zoftie (195518) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736845)

I am sure if bin laden would finance some sort of protest to encourage dismantlement of current government, they will get executed. It is called treason. Berezovsky is a thief and should be jailed. Putin, if being an autocrat, is brining stability to russia. Currency has stabilized and rising, markets are very optimistic. Investment is coming in.
If russians wanted they could've killed him long time ago.
I don't think the political shift in russia with putin in power is hunky dory, but he has gotten rid of alot of crime. People who insist on failing russia as a state have been practicing the same, with state palesite too. You make the connections.

Putin has alot to worry about for next 10 years, if he gets relected. Russia faces, sort of friendly, but increasingly hungry china by its side, European union and united states who would be interested in russia being a third world country and their CIA based efforts to destailize the country, destroy any viable political system.
Remember Putin:
1. improved situation law enforcement
2. redirected money from illegally assigned oil resources to government, where it was taken from.
        - remember in russia resources were all owned by government. so people who privatized the resources were just as good or worse then cocaine warlords of columbia.
        - privatization was: one guy brings some solid sum of money and he gets the oil well, for profit all to himself.
3. fought back corruption
4. kicked oligarhs, the super rich elite who threatened to kill him. so what is natural thing to do? -> jail them.

I watch western and russian media, to get sort of the whole picture.

I mean he is KGB ex-agent, so he does as he knows. I think he is honest and not crooked like the previous government. I suspect Yeltsing handed over the power to him, because he was being steadily manipulated and poisoned to whore out russia and its resources to any bidder. Putin's tactics may be somewhat questionable, but he came into situation, there was no way to go but up.

People who invest aren't stupid. Russia has seen record amount of the investment coming there. Because prices are cheap, putin guarantees some sort of stability. You just follow the money, and it tells you what you want. Berezovsky got cut off from his money spigot, he'd be 10x richer now. But he isn't thats why he is angry. I would be very angry as well.

Re:The fine was quite small, (1, Interesting)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736873)

"this is just another example of how legitimate protests are squashed by authorities. "

The US is only one or two steps behind in this. I've seen protesters that wanted to be infront of the UN herded into "first amendment zones" six blocks away out of sight of TV cameras and delegates. Things like flash-mobbing don't work because the cops have double agents in most politically active organizations. So how are the common people supposed to be heard, about a specific issue?

" I wonder if Mr Berezovsky will carry out his threat to have a "Russian Revolution"?

What else can people do to actually change a corrupt system? Voting is only an answer when you candidates with a real interest in change, like that will ever happen...

If this would happen down South in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736119)

The protesters would be heavily armed and would most likely overthrow the government agencies located in the vicinity. I guess Russia has strict methods against "violent protests", perhaps peaceful action is a waste of time?

In Soviet Russia (1, Redundant)

Quzak (1047922) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736125)

In Soviet Russia, chess play you.
In Soviet Russia, Russia Soviet you.
In Soviet Russia, democracy votes for you.
In Soviet Russia, Error (String not found in database.)

Re:In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736215)

Back in the eighties, there was a strange Soviet computer system that had a programming language that used Cyrillic characters to input. However, in order to make it clear to foreigners when an error occured, the error message read: "Eggog."

This is only funny if you know the Cyrillic alphabet: A Russian 'g' looks a little bit like an 'r'.

Re:In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736287)




This is only funny if you know the Cyrillic alphabet: A Russian 'g' looks a little bit like an 'r'.


Even knowing that, it's not funny.




Re:In Soviet Russia (1)

electricon (995933) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736569)

In Soviet Russia, check mates you!!

News for nerds... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736151)

News for political interest groups, stuff that matters.....

Kasparov tries the Moscow Gambit... (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736161)

An aggressive opening, but not entirely convincing when the opponent begins the game up a queen and a rook.

Re:Kasparov tries the Moscow Gambit... (4, Insightful)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736795)

This is exactly the point Kasparov has been trying to make. An important part of playing chess is understanding how to assess your own strength impartially. Kasparov fully understands he is playing from a weak position (he said so on BBC Radio last week). Let's hope he can use this knowledge to do better than others who might rush in foolhardily thinking they are in a psoition of strength.

You have to say this for the Russians (4, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736173)

their political system may be awful mess, but it goddamn cool that being a chess champion there makes you a national hero too big for the government to mess with lightly.

Re:You have to say this for the Russians (1)

Nethead (1563) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736335)

Yeah, just think how long Deep Blue would be locked up by the NSA marching against Bush&Co.

Big surprise (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736179)

Just about anywhere in the world when you are denied a permit for a march or other assembly and do it anyway, you get arrested.

In the US this has happened with KKK and Nazi groups. I suspect it would happen to a Young Repuplicans march if they were (a) denied a permit and (b) marched anyway.

That's why the US is a laughing stock. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736261)

On a daily basis we hear American politicians and the American media go on and on and on about how the US is some sort of "bastion of freedom". But the need to obtain a permit to march just goes to show how those claims are naught but a facade.

Most Americans may not realize it, but the rest of the world laughs at you. It's mostly because you believe you've got some sort of special freedom or liberty, when you really don't. At least the rest of us admit we don't really have freedom. We don't spend our lives proclaiming that we live in a so-called "land of the free".

Re:That's why the US is a laughing stock. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736343)

Yeah, whatever.

I can play Wolfenstein 3D unedited.

Re:That's why the US is a laughing stock. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736397)

And here I thought you were all just jealous and hence looked for reasons to hate and laugh at us. Oh wait, you are. Get a life.

Re:Big surprise (3, Interesting)

apathy maybe (922212) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736265)

In lots of places, even if you are denied a permit, you are still allowed to protest. And if you don't do anything besides not move on when told to ... Well you can't be legally arrested. (I believe this is the case in all of Australia, but at least NSW and Tasmania.)

That doesn't stop you being arrested however. Charged. Forced to fly across the country to one court date. Forced to get a lawyer. Get charged with other charges because the cops are trying to blackmail you into pleading guilty to a "lesser" charge (traffic charge for example). Refuse to bow to blackmail. Fly across the country again the day before the court date. Get rung up by your lawyer and told that all charges have been dropper.

Can you guess that I'm bitter? The fact is, in more civilised countries, you are allowed to demonstrate and protest. And so long as you don't break other laws (such as smashing shit up), then you are not breaking any laws. And thus the police have no right to arrest you. But as I've mentioned before, there are shitloads of examples where they will. (In the case above, that was me. I was "being annoying" according to one police officer who told another couple to arrest me.)

Re:Big surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736499)

OK, but the big difference is that they would never give Kasparov a permit. It isn't that he hasn't applied for them.

There is a fundamental right to gather in groups and protest. If the law says that you need to get a permit, fine. But if the authorities will never give you a permit, your have no choice but to protest anyways. Your right to protest is greater than the bureaucratic right to deconflict different time slots.

Re:Big surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736827)

"I suspect it would happen to..."

Communist groups/Young Democrats marches as well.

This seems to lack some minor details... (0)

shaitand (626655) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736197)

Like umm, WHAT his problem with the government is and WHY hes protesting and WHY the government has a problem with it. Let me paraphrase.

Some guy has some problem with somebody big, somebody doesn't like his beef and told him to shut up.

Re:This seems to lack some minor details... (5, Interesting)

rlwhite (219604) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736655)

In the last years of Boris Yeltsin's presidency, Russians began to realize that their post-Soviet capitalistic reforms had been too much too fast, leaving the economy in even worse shambles than before, and allowing the rise of the Russian mafia from the chaos. Yeltsin decided it was time to slow down reforms and let people catch up, so he turned to a little known St. Petersburg political aide with a growing reputation for efficiency to be his last prime minister and implement the slow down. That man was ex-KGB agent Vladimir Putin.

Putin slowed down the capitalistic reforms, and then some. He returned some major companies to state-control, including most of the media. The economy is much improved during his tenure. He revived the secret police en masse. When a major oil tycoon decided to form a political party to challenge Putin, the tycoon was arrested on mafia-related charges, and his company was taken over by the state. Similar things have happened to a number of major political opponents. The court system has lost much of its veneer of independence from the executive branch. Putin is well-known for cronyism and a preference for Soviet-style rule. The Bush administration and others have publicly chastised Putin for hurting democracy. In fact, it wouldn't be unreasonable to suspect him of close ties to major players in the mafia, though impossible to prove. Right now the favorite to succeed Putin appears to be one of his former KGB associates who is now one of his top deputies. If you want specific charges that opponents have leveled against Putin, read anything by Anna Politkovskaya, such as Putin's Russia. Just be aware she has a strong anti-Putin bias (which may be why she was murdered).

Kasparov is just one of the latest to attempt an anti-Putin political movement. Obviously Kasparov could expect a meager fine for holding a public demonstration in a spot where he didn't have a permit. The subtext is much more interesting. Pro-Kremlin youth gathering where he expected to protest? Was it really arranged before Kasparov's? I doubt it, especially the way this exact same excuse is being used repeatedly across multiple cities. Who knows; it's hard to be sure what's going on in Russia under Putin.

Re:This seems to lack some minor details... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736847)

The Bush administration and others have publicly chastised Putin for hurting democracy.

LMAO, that's fucking rich.

So let me get this straight... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736213)

Someone participates in an illegal march, and is arrested by the lawful authorities. How is this a bad thing? Why is this news?

Well, for starters... (1)

geoffrobinson (109879) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736759)

being able to shut down the opposition of its freedom of speech in a country is worth of newsspace.

Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (4, Informative)

shaitand (626655) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736225)

We like to think we have freedom of speech and a peaceful protest like this wouldn't be broken up here. That is false. In Russia they require permits and his permit was denied. He and some other protesters were arrested for marching without a permit.

Most don't know that here in the US you are required to have a permit also, just as they did in Russia they can refuse to grant your permit will try to silence your protest and just happened in Russia. If you March anyway you WILL be arrested for trying to exercise your free speech.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (2, Informative)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736341)

Most don't know that here in the US you are required to have a permit also

Sure, but "We don't like what you have to say" is not, by itself, sufficient grounds to deny one.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736467)

Sure, but "We don't like what you have to say" is not, by itself, sufficient grounds to deny one.

Yes, I'm sure that's technically the case... as I'm sure that's technically the case in Russia, too.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736485)

ure, but "We don't like what you have to say" is not, by itself, sufficient grounds to deny one.


but they can fish up any excuse they like to give to the judges (who likely support their political position), who will happily look the other way.

not to mention the fact that court proceedings are expensive, so this procedure by its very nature discriminates not only against unpopular speech, but the poor as well.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (1)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736345)

Yeah, but we're different! It's not like the United States ever [wikipedia.org] tried to punish a world renowned chess grand master for doing something the government disagreed with politically.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (3, Funny)

Nethead (1563) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736361)

I know, I was working in a data center that was surrounded by the Seattle WTO events.

Really officer: I'm not a radical longhair, I'm a UNIX longhair!

Personally (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736363)

I always thought that this practice violated the Right of Assembly part of the Constitution.

I feel the same about Free Speech Zones...

Re:Personally (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736493)

I always thought that this practice violated the Right of Assembly part of the Constitution.

In the US it's supposedly up to judicial review. Restrictions on assemblies are only suppose to be based on safety considerations and excessive disturbance of daily activities, such as commerce. Generally if it causes safety problems, they are to suggest other areas and make "reasonable" accomidations. Otherwise, we'd have really F'd traffic everytime zealots got pissed. Whether Kasparov was given altnerative areas or not, I don't know.
         

Re:Personally (2, Insightful)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736519)

Otherwise, we'd have really F'd traffic everytime zealots got pissed.


OMG.. you mean people would actually SEE and/or NOTICE the protestors in the streets, and possibly be educated and recruited to their cause?!

perish the thought!

Re:Personally (0, Troll)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736605)

OMG.. you mean people would actually SEE and/or NOTICE the protestors in the streets, and possibly be educated and recruited to their cause?!

Every marching protester is always a lefty. For some, it's an excuse to use the power and relative anonymity of "the crowd" to smash things and break stuff (or are all the violent people just police plants?). When was the last time you saw a right-wing group marching?

Re:Personally (1)

Khaed (544779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736659)

Or they'd be pissed off that they were late for work/lunch/picking the kids up because a bunch of dumbasses with signs were blocking the street.

You have the right to free speech, but not to fuck up my day with it.

sometimes even with a permit. (2, Interesting)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736441)

there was a huge protest against a G8 meeting in florida (around '02 i think).

they had flawless preparation, including all permits.

the pro-globalist heavyweights who controlled the area simply had cops trample them anyway, declaring them "anarchist agitators" to the media, which loyally parroted their excuse to the rest of the nation, quickly burying any potential public outrage at the new police state of florida.

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736533)

in the US you are required to have a permit also

This is because demonstrators like to disrupt traffic (which nobody enjoys) and rock-throwing nutbars tend to gravitate to this type of thing.

Are you saying that large groups should be able to wander around pissing everyone else off? Should the cops just eff off and go find "real criminals"?

Re:Lets not get holier than thou here in the US (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736597)

You may be required to apply for a permit to protest in the U.S., and there is no guarantee that you will get one from a given municipality. Often you will have to agree to stay inside a "First Amendment Zone" [wikipedia.org] set up as a chain link fenced-in area in some place where nobody sees you except homeless people who can't vote.

The zoning is not applied evenly across the political spectrum; pro-government activists are allowed to line streets along motorcades. [amconmag.com]

Unsurprising (3, Insightful)

vertigoCiel (1070374) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736239)

Putin has Russia locked down almost as tight as Stalin. Only, instead of killing people, he just chases them out of the country, or locks them up. Remember how one political dissident's lawyer recieved death threats, and fled to Amsterdam? Yeah, guess who ordered the death threats. Hint: It's not Yeltsin. He owns most of the TV and media outlets - he can clean up his mess by making it a non story. I wish Kasparov was only the first example of Putin's ironhold grip on political discussion.

Re:Unsurprising (1)

idesofmarch (730937) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736285)

You, sir, have no idea what you are talking about. Putin is a hardliner and his measures to stifle the free press rightly deserve criticism, but this is nothing like it was during Stalin's regime. Stalin killed 20 million Russians and was a paranoid maniac. Putin is not even running for re-election.

Re:Unsurprising (1)

vertigoCiel (1070374) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736433)

Yet, the state of free press is nearly equatable in terms of relative freedom to criticize the government. I never said Putin was a mass-murderer on the scale of Stalin: his method of silencing dissidents is much different. The fact remains that Putin stifles freedom of press, even freedom of speech, in a manner that recalls Stalin.

Re:Unsurprising (1)

Supercooldude (1018122) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736877)

The impression I get from my Russian friends is that in Putin's Russia you are free to do pretty much anything you want as long as it does not involve criticizing the government. So for those 99% of Russians who do not care about politics, it's just as much a free country as the US is (maybe more).

in related news (4, Funny)

mincognito (839071) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736243)

kasparov blames team of ibm scientists for masterminding his capture.

Denied permit.. Broke the law (-1, Redundant)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736257)

So they arrested him, sounds pretty clear cut to me.

Last i heard, you arent guaranteed the right of free speech over there, so it was time to pay the piper.

And this is news, why?

Re:Denied permit.. Broke the law (1)

ScottyMcScott (1003155) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736411)

so are you granted freedom of speech in america?

Re:Denied permit.. Broke the law (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736879)

Granted no. Guaranteed, yes. ( there is a slight difference there )

Re:Denied permit.. Broke the law (1)

pescadero (1074454) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736421)

And this is news, why?
If enough people would be interested to hear about something, then it's news. Personally I was interested. But sorry that we are boring you!

Re:Denied permit.. Broke the law (1)

ushering05401 (1086795) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736785)

i am not interested in your comment so much as your sig... as a lincoln fiend i am curious to know exactly how you believe j.w. booth was acting as a patriot... ushering.sleeps@gmail.com please reply/

Re:Denied permit.. Broke the law (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736903)

He gave his life in an act of protecting his country, which by definition gives him the right to be called a patriot.

Now, one can debate all day long if he was misguided or not, but his actions are what i speak of.

That's it! (1, Interesting)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736259)

I recently got US citizenship and was debating on what to do with by Russian passport. But, I have no desire to be in any way associated with a dictatorship. I guess I will be returning it shortly, with a note describing why.

Re:That's it! (1)

idesofmarch (730937) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736315)

How about you just return it politely, comrade?

Re:That's it! (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736437)

Why should I be polite to someone who voluntarily represents a repressive regime?

new master == bark on old? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736525)

right, now you have be polite to your new authorities only.

Re:That's it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736595)

Perhaps in case other regimes one day become MORE oppressive and you're forced to flee to the lesser of two evils? Dual citizenship isn't a bad thing. Especially if GWB gets his way and is allowed to eat children for the next 300 unholy years of his life.

Re:That's it! (4, Funny)

schon (31600) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736631)

I have no desire to be in any way associated with a dictatorship.
I thought you just said you got a US citizenship?

(Go ahead and mod me down - prove Republicans have no sense of humor.) :)

deep blue (0, Offtopic)

mincognito (839071) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736295)

Early this month, Mr. Kasyanov's and Mr. Kasparov's Web sites were blocked, though it was unclear by whom.
Deep Blue probably did that.

Slashdot shouldn't publish this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736297)

Why is this on slashdot? A reference to a website being closed down doesn't make it a tech story.

Let's face it this isn't the forum for general political stories.

Judging from some of these comments, most posters don't know about the slow and steady reversal of civil rights in Russia, much less care.

In many ways the posts are shocking in their ignorance. Read a newspaper, become informed. There's a lot more to life than just hacking iPods. Frankly, we should be better informed and start looking more at the state of our own country and the erosion of civil liberties here.

   

Re:Slashdot shouldn't publish this... (2, Insightful)

Nazlfrag (1035012) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736711)

Q: Why is this on slashdot?

A: Because, Kasparov is a nerd!

Why? (0, Flamebait)

Codename46 (889058) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736353)

Why is it that celebrities think people should listen to their political beliefs? Does it make a movement even more right if you have the backing of someone famous?

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736641)

So he shouldn't be the leader of a political movement because you've heard of him before? Get some logic.

*cough* (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736387)

Pretty much what happened in 2004 in New York at the RNC [2600.com] .

*cough*

Re:*cough* (2, Insightful)

Khaed (544779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736761)

As opposed to the Free Speech Zones [wikipedia.org] outside the DNC in 2004? I saw the RNC protests, they were a whole lot more "free" to protest than anyone at the DNC.

*cough* *cough*

Hmm (1)

althea19 (1084593) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736399)

On one hand it is suprising that Russia would want to arrest such a famous person for such a trivial political act. On the other hand, totalitarianism knows no friends..

Re:Hmm (1)

pla (258480) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736465)

On one hand it is suprising that Russia would want to arrest such a famous person for such a trivial political act.

Although Kasparov has fame from a rather unusual source, do you really think the same thing doesn't happen here in the US?



On the other hand, totalitarianism knows no friends..

If you protest without permission, you can expect to spend the night in the county lock-up (or worse, but at least the rich n' famous can take some comfort in the difficulty of "rendering" celebrities).

Re:Hmm (1)

althea19 (1084593) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736551)

Although Kasparov has fame from a rather unusual source, do you really think the same thing doesn't happen here in the US?
I don't really know. I do know that protesters get arrested, just not sure if the conditions are exactly the same. Would he get arrested for the exact same thing in the US? Maybe not. But, I'm sure all sorts of protesters have been arrested for all sorts of things in the US. I guess its pretty obvious that Russia doesn't have a monopoly on totalitarianism, it occurs in North America in varying degrees also.

Re:Hmm (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736543)

He was only arrested (and released) precisely because he's so famous. Had he been some nobody, he'd probably have been arrested and vanished.

This news doesn't bother me. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736417)

Considering the mischief Jews have caused [jewwatch.com] throughout Russia's history, it doesn't bother me at all that Putin is cracking down on Kasparov and his friends [rense.com] .

Democracy is Receding (5, Interesting)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736539)

Francis Fukuyama was wrong. So wrong.

Liberal Democracy isn't the only ideology still remaining after the fall of the Soviet system. Neo-Facism and the cult of the leader in Russia. The One Party State in China. Theocracies in the Middle East. Tin Pot dictators ruling their roosts all across the third world. Even the "liberated" countries of eastern europe are falling back into authoritarianism.

And faced with this, what are liberal democratic societies doing? They're evolving into not-so-liberal democracies with human rights taking second place to "security" and profit. Once again, the US leads the way and the rest of the western world follows. I'd like to be more optimistic, but somedays I truely feel that the great democratic experiment is doomed to be a slow and ignominious failure.

Apathy is not the cause of democracy's downfall. The sad reality is that a great many people simply to not agree with our free society, with our rule of law or with our casteless social structure. These people are your friends, your neighbours and coworkers, and secretly they support presidents like Putin, and laws that ban street rallies and protests. They're simply waiting for the time when it becomes acceptable to voice those opinions once more. That time may be closer than you think.

Putin's Move..... (0, Redundant)

IHC Navistar (967161) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736577)

Checkmate.

In America (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736587)

The government protests you.

disgusting (1)

ushering05401 (1086795) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736639)

yes, this is slashdot... and people are suposed to have a sense of humor about things...

but given the state of the world i am really disturbed by jokes on this particular topic.

can anyone from a former soviet republic wade in and give us some ground-level perspective on what this means to them?

from my perspective it is kinda like michael jordan being arrested for protesting detentions in guantanamo.

regards.

p.s. i do understand that permits are necessary to march. i also understand that a viable ruling party can tolerate reasonble dissention.

Forgeting leters in a name looks unprofesional (1)

blubadger (988507) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736709)

It's GARRY Kasparov.

He is an Hero (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18736765)

Grammar am cry

Someone like Kasparov (4, Insightful)

csmithers (675151) | more than 7 years ago | (#18736897)

Vladimir Putin has enjoyed almost rock star like popularity in Russia for his nearly 2 terms now. In fact, several years ago, there was a chart topping single called "Someone like Putin" that was the rage throughout the country (someone that won't leave me, etc, etc). It seems to me that if someone comes along to challenge him, it will take someone of equal or greater popularity to pull it off (someone like Kasparov). Also, I don't really know why, but Russians (at least in Russia), seem to crave a heavy handed goverment, and Putin is more than willing to give it to them. Unfortunately, we really don't understand this phenomenon in the west.
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