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Top 10 Internet Crimes of '06

CmdrTaco posted about 7 years ago | from the so-much-pwnzing dept.

Security 102

An anonymous reader notes that "The Bad Guys blog at USNews.com offers a look at the top ten Internet crimes of 2006. The federal study cited draws on over 200,000 complaints to US law enforcement and regulatory agencies. Top crime: auction fraud, followed by other online rip-offs. "

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102 comments

Incredible, though not surprising. (1)

Mockylock (1087585) | about 7 years ago | (#18785469)

I think I've been involved in half of these and I consider myself safe.

I guess mail order bride's leaving you isn't a crime. DAMN.

Re:Incredible, though not surprising. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18785633)

I think I've been involved in half of these and I consider myself safe.
Impressive! Most criminals could have only pulled one or two of those off.

Re:Incredible, though not surprising. (5, Funny)

Bicx (1042846) | about 7 years ago | (#18785645)

eBay is an awesome, secure site, and I really doubt there are that many cases of auction fraud. Where else could I have bought Intel's new 7-core processor? It's arriving sometime this week. w00t!

Re:Incredible, though not surprising. (1)

Mockylock (1087585) | about 7 years ago | (#18785709)

I bought the same thing, but mine was a "mystery" auction. So, I could get a bag of peanuts, a check for 10% of my money back, a box of pci slot plates or the 7 core, core 3 trio.

... and the number 1 "Internet Crime" (5, Funny)

EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) | about 7 years ago | (#18785477)

Internet Explorer 7.

*rimshot*

Public enemy number two (0, Troll)

matt me (850665) | about 7 years ago | (#18785995)

Net neutrality

Re:... and the number 1 "Internet Crime" (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786531)

I dunno, I perpetrated a pretty heinous Internet crime the other day, but you need this [pcworld.com] to detect it.

Re:... and the number 1 "Internet Crime" (1)

cain (14472) | about 7 years ago | (#18788275)

How long will you be here? Say - can you recommend anything off the menu?

Skewed results (5, Insightful)

orclevegam (940336) | about 7 years ago | (#18785529)

The article mentions that the results are probably skewed by the likes of E-Bay providing direct links to file complaints, and it also doesn't say if the complaints were ever followed up on or not. This is probably a list of all complaints, rather than those that were shown to be legitimate.

Re:Skewed results (1)

owlnation (858981) | about 7 years ago | (#18786823)

Yes, but my guess is that there are considerably more every day cases of auction fraud that do not get reported. So, I agree it's skewed, but in a way that under-reports the extent of the problem.

Dammit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18785637)

Theyre giving away all my secrets.

Bullshit! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18785683)

My list of the The top ten internet crimes:
1. Windows Vista
2. Microsoft Office
3. RIAA lawsuits
4. Slashdot "editors" [slashdot.org]
5. Web sites with blinkey flashey ads and two paragraphs per page for a grand total of fifteen blinkey flashey pages I could read in less than two minutes except I have to wait for all the bullshit to load before I can read the next pair of paragraphs. There is a damned good reason they got rid of the <blink> tag, you know!
6. DMCA. The law itself is a crime
7. Bono Act (AKA "Steamboat Willie Preservation Act"). Again, the law itself is the crime.
8. Jack Thompson
9. Sony's rootkit
10. Cowboy Neal

Surprised that the article didn't mention piracy (4, Informative)

tepples (727027) | about 7 years ago | (#18785993)

3. RIAA lawsuits
6. DMCA. The law itself is a crime
7. Bono Act (AKA "Steamboat Willie Preservation Act"). Again, the law itself is the crime.
I was looking for those in the article before I read your comment, but I didn't see one instance of any form of "pirate" or "infringe" in the article. So is there a reason that copyright infringement, such as through peer-to-peer file sharing networks, is not one of the top 10 Internet crimes of 2006?

There is a damned good reason they got rid of the <blink> tag, you know!
O RLY? Gecko supports the <blink> element and even has a corresponding CSS attribute for it: text-decoration: blink [domedia.org]. Luckily, blinking text in recent Gecko is easier to read than blinking text in older browsers because recent Gecko blinks with a duty cycle [wikipedia.org] of 75 percent on, unlike older browsers that used 50 percent on.

Not a crime (2, Insightful)

CasperIV (1013029) | about 7 years ago | (#18786397)

"I was looking for those in the article before I read your comment, but I didn't see one instance of any form of "pirate" or "infringe" in the article. So is there a reason that copyright infringement, such as through peer-to-peer file sharing networks, is not one of the top 10 Internet crimes of 2006?"

Copyright infringement is not the same as these criminal activities. It's a violation of the copyright, not a criminal act that can be prosecuted.

18 USC 2319 (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 years ago | (#18787817)

Copyright infringement is not the same as these criminal activities. It's a violation of the copyright, not a criminal act that can be prosecuted.
U.S. Code treats some intentional infringements of copyright as criminal offenses. See 17 USC 506 [cornell.edu] and 18 USC 2319 [cornell.edu].

Re:Surprised that the article didn't mention pirac (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 7 years ago | (#18787281)

So is there a reason that copyright infringement, such as through peer-to-peer file sharing networks, is not one of the top 10 Internet crimes of 2006?

Crimes = criminal. Copyright violations are generally punishable only by civil suits, with the exception of high volume piracy by a single individual for profit, but that generally occurs through physical media rather than online. Unless you consider contributory infringement, most online piracy by individuals probably does not reach the volume to make a criminal case out of it.

Note: the specific laws regarding criminality of copyright infringement vary in different jurisdictions. Your mileage may vary.

Operation Fastlink (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 years ago | (#18787869)

Copyright violations are generally punishable only by civil suits, with the exception of high volume piracy by a single individual for profit, but that generally occurs through physical media rather than online.
O RLY? What about high-profile warez group raids such as Operation Fastlink [wikipedia.org]? Or did none of those happen to occur during 2006?

Re:Surprised that the article didn't mention pirac (2, Insightful)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 years ago | (#18790301)

Blink has gone away becuase flash is a better way to really annoy people.

Re:Bullshit! (1)

ady1 (873490) | about 7 years ago | (#18786555)

1. Windows Vista
2. Microsoft Office

No no. These aren't the crimes. These are the motives.

White House E-Mail: +1, Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786611)


using Al-Qaeda [whitehouse.org] e-mail addresses.

I hope this helps the criminal inquiry.

Patriotically as always,
Kilgore Trout, C.P.A.

Re:Bullshit! (1)

renegadesx (977007) | about 7 years ago | (#18789815)

My list for 2006

1) Jack Thompson
2) RIAA
3) MPAA
4) IE7
5) Myspace
6) Sites with pop ups
7) End users
8) People who mod me down
9) Anonymous Cowards
10)Jack Thompson (he deserves to be listed twice)

Re:Bullshit! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18790269)

1. Windows Vista
Disqualified.
It will not access the internet without intervention.

Please revise as:
1. Windows XP torrent software to download Vista.

Re:Bullshit! (1)

Debug0x2a (1015001) | about 7 years ago | (#18790491)

Missing a few in my opinion... Needs goatse, tubgirl, GNAA First Posts, 'Mac Switcheur' spam posts, and I think Jack Thompson deserved a higher spot there...along with Cowboy Neal.

Can't we wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18785695)

until 2006 is over before we... Oh is it? Carry on then.

Hurray!! The timespan for the list is actually finished!!

I'm still waiting for that . . . (1)

spamking (967666) | about 7 years ago | (#18785711)

get rich quick book I bought off of eBay several months ago. Is that considered auction fraud or non-delivery?

Re:I'm still waiting for that . . . (5, Funny)

Threni (635302) | about 7 years ago | (#18785927)

> Is that considered auction fraud or non-delivery?

It's an intelligence test. I'm sure the result will show up shortly.

Re:I'm still waiting for that . . . (5, Funny)

spamking (967666) | about 7 years ago | (#18786115)

A+++++++ Excellent poster. Hope to read more from this guy!! Highly recommended.

Re:I'm still waiting for that . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18789451)

A+++++++ Excellent poster. Hope to read more from this guy!! Highly recommended.

Nigerian scam letters (2, Interesting)

Nukenbar (215420) | about 7 years ago | (#18785723)

How are these still the #1 loss per incident crime? Have people really learned nothing, or are all of these crimes targeting new users of the internet.

I would say that auction fraud could happen to just about anyone.

Re:Nigerian scam letters (1)

tibike77 (611880) | about 7 years ago | (#18785775)

Human greed and stupidity (or, in some cases, guillability). That properly explains just about everything.

Re:Nigerian scam letters (1)

Lockejaw (955650) | about 7 years ago | (#18785951)

How are these still the #1 loss per incident crime?
Maybe because it's loss per incident? Nobody gets hit with a 419 scam for a few hundred dollars -- they get hit for a few thousand. Auction fraud is certainly more common, but a single instance of auction fraud probably costs less than a couple hundred dollars.
If you count total losses, auction fraud probably is number one.

Re:Nigerian scam letters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786005)

Note that it's per incident, not how many people get taken -- once someone falls for a Nigerian scam, they basicaly get your whole bank account, while with auction fraud you're usually only out the price of the item. (Assuming you don't agree to send money twice or something, but even then that shouldn't add up to the entirety of your savings. It takes just one victim of this sort of scam to create windfall profit.

Re:Nigerian scam letters (4, Funny)

treeves (963993) | about 7 years ago | (#18786273)

I've learned about the tragedy of being stuck with $20 million in your bank account and not being able to access it without assistance from a dear kind sir like myself, whom you have the fortune of soliciting in the most urgent case.

Re:Nigerian scam letters (1)

gondwannabe (1028488) | about 7 years ago | (#18791365)

Woah, I clearly remember receiving my first Nigerian $20M fax (yes, fax not email) waaaaay back 'round '92. You'd think they'd catch this guy! How does he manage to send so many personalised emails? He must stay-up late at night!

Re:Nigerian scam letters (1)

innocent_white_lamb (151825) | about 7 years ago | (#18793657)

Fax? I used to get letters in the mail from Nigeria in the mid-80's. They stopped after the email thing got going, but to my great surprise I got another letter in the mail a couple of weeks ago. First one in fifteen years or so.
 
Maybe the email thing isn't paying off as well as it once did, so they are back to sending letters, hoping to find a new audience?

Windows Genuine Advantage (1, Flamebait)

Weaselmancer (533834) | about 7 years ago | (#18785731)

I mean c'mon - it's the most widely distributed piece of spyware YET. And it occasionally calls legitimate users thieves and reports them. And blackmails people. How did that not make the list?

Mod it Flamebait all you like (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786301)

You know it's true.

I notice (5, Interesting)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 years ago | (#18785733)

That child pornography accounts for 1% of all internet crime. Yet, somehow, this seems to be the only crime I've heard of the FBI cracking down on. Is this because of skewed news reporting? Or is it because of the relative severity of child pornography? Or is it "thinkofthechildren"ism?

Re:I notice (3, Insightful)

faloi (738831) | about 7 years ago | (#18785867)

Probably neither. It's probably more about jurisdiction to pursue certain types of cases. Then again, anything with children gets top billing in the press, so it's possible the FBI releases dozens of "we caught someone who committed fraud" press releases that get ignored.

Re:I notice (2)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 7 years ago | (#18786181)

Child pornography is a violent crime in some/most cases. A kid being molested on the internet is WAY more important than being ripped off $200 via auction fraud.

a serious crime but not violent (2, Informative)

davidwr (791652) | about 7 years ago | (#18786389)

Violent act = act that violates a person's body.
Violent crime = criminal violent act.

Unless you are a teenager shooting yourself, a live child-porn vids is a violent act.
Unless you are a teenager shooting yourself, creating child porn is a violent act.

Distributing or watching child porn is not a violent act. By the time someone watches it, the violence is over. The violence may even date from 30 years ago. It is evidence of a violent act. It is also a very serious crime in most of the world.

If the violent act took place just about any country in the world, it's a violent crime.

A kid being molested on the internet is WAY more important than being ripped off $200 via auction fraud.
Amen.

Re:a serious crime but not violent (2, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 7 years ago | (#18787361)

Unless you are a teenager shooting yourself, a live child-porn vids is a violent act.
Unless you are a teenager shooting yourself, creating child porn is a violent act.

I'm not sure I 100% agree with this. For the simple reason that it fails to differentiate between images of consentual sex involving a minor who has reached the age of consent and child porn.

Find me a jurisdiction in which a 17 year old can consent to sex, even if the other party is above the age of majority (they exist), and I'll show you one in which a legal act can lead to an illegal photograph, and that no violence need be involved at all.

It may be illegal to take/distribute images of that 17 year old engaged in such activity, but there is no inherent violence involved in the act if the sex is consensual. Because, in most jurisdictions, they're too young to have such images taken/distributed involving them, it is illegal.

This is a murky grey area -- it leads to 17 year olds shooting themselves on their picture phones being charged with the creation of child porn. Giving it to someone else means you've now distributed child porn.

In Canada, as long as I'm not in a position of authority, or I didn't engage in 'luring' behaviour, it's entirely legal that a 17 year old could consent with an old fart like me -- it's unlikely, and I'm not a big fan of teenagers in general, but, it is in fact, perfectly legal for it to happen with no implied violence. If I snap a photo of myself doing something which is legal, that photo becomes illegal. OK, I can live with that -- it's intended to prevent exploitation of teens, that is reasonable.

In the event of actual child porn, I believe there is no way a 5 year old can consent to such activity, and I agree with yout assertion of violence in this case. I don't believe that a 15 year old is ready to consent either, especially not to someone markedly older.

It is NOT, however, true that any images involving someone under the age of majority inherently was a violent act. It's illegal, and effectively treated as the same class of offense, but, it *really* isn't 'child' porn. It also stands a very good chance of not actually involving any violence at all.

I'm not advocating the position of middle aged men going out and finding 17 year old girls to have sex with -- or, photographing the results as it were. But, I think there needs to be some better differentiation between distibuting images of underage people and 'child' porn -- especially when you make the assertion that the act itsself is inherently violent. Cause, it doesn't have to be.

Of course, such points of distinction don't sound nearly as cool or categorical, so people downplay them. But, consensual sex which did not involve violence or coersion (and, presumably, all parties were old enough/competent enough to make those decisions) is NOT violent by default. Claiming it is is disingenuous at best.

Few things in life fall into such neat binary piles as you seem to be doing.

Cheers

Re:I notice (4, Informative)

StewedSquirrel (574170) | about 7 years ago | (#18787455)

Would you be surprised to know that almost 50% of those arrested on child porn charges in 2007 are actually minors themselves?

Most people don't know that. It doesn't tend the make the news since minors charged of a crime don't get press releases in most cases.

I ran into that in a DoJ study on the issue. It cites broad statistics but doesn't reveal much in the way of details, citing "protecting children" *chuckles*

Stew

Re:I notice (1)

thegnu (557446) | about 7 years ago | (#18786269)

The major problem with child porn isn't an internet crime, it's the fact that you're fucking children, which is never nice.

Fucking children falls outside of the normal criticism of thinkofthechildrenism, because it's a crime, like rape or murder.

anti-sex laws can go overboard (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 7 years ago | (#18786845)

Fucking children falls outside of the normal criticism of thinkofthechildrenism, because it's a crime, like rape or murder.
You are right much of the time.

Except when the laws doom teens fooling around or taking cell-phone pictures of themselves into life on the sex-offender register.

The Georgia case of Genarlow Wilson [foxnews.com] is an extreme case.

1. Pass overly broad laws to protect children from predators.
2. Enforce them to the letter
3. ???
4. Profit!!!

I think not. Won't someone thinkoftheteenagers?

Lobby your lawmakers for sane predator-protection laws.

Re:I notice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18787173)

The major problem with child porn isn't an internet crime, it's the fact that you're fucking children, which is never nice.

Ahh... groupthink is so strong in this area.

Watching a video of someone being beheaded = morbid curiosity, but no big deal
Looking at a picture of a naked under 18-er = fucking children

Re:I notice (1)

thegnu (557446) | about 7 years ago | (#18792301)

Looking at a picture of a naked under 18-er = fucking children

No, producing child porn requires pornographic content that involves children. Which involves making children fuck, probably not even for money.

Re:I notice (1)

Virak (897071) | about 7 years ago | (#18787431)

Fucking children
This thread is about child porn, which does not necessarily involve fucking children as possesion is also illegal and not merely production.

falls outside of the normal criticism of thinkofthechildrenism
Nothing is beyond criticism.

because it's a crime, like rape or murder.
Basing your morality on the law is fucking stupid.

Re:I notice (1)

thegnu (557446) | about 7 years ago | (#18792443)

This thread is about child porn, which does not necessarily involve fucking children as possesion is also illegal and not merely production.

Right. That is true on technicality. Driving your car != killing iraqis. But there's a distinct relationship that all but the most conveniently myopic can see.

Nothing is beyond criticism.

My point is that thinkofthechildrenism is associated with reactionary policy based on people's own fear projected onto children. This is the 'normal criticism of thinkofthechildrenism,' as I so eloquently put it.

Basing your morality on the law is fucking stupid

Inferring that I base my morality on the law because I'm having a discussion about the merits of specific thought process as it relates to the law is fucking stupid, too, but I didn't throw that in your face, did I? When discussing the law and the government, one discusses the law as the absolute, because that's what the system is based on. Stop being an idiot.

Re:I notice (1)

SL Baur (19540) | about 7 years ago | (#18787495)

It's one of the 4 Horsemen of the Infocalypse and used since the inception of the world wide web to justify censorship, mandated governmental spying on all internet traffic and the like.

I've never seen any data that suggests that it's either as big of a problem as is claimed, or that there's a whole lot of traffic outside of law enforcement agents trying to sting people. I don't believe for a moment that it's as much as 1% of all internet crime.

Re:I notice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18787829)

I've never seen any data that suggests that it's either as big of a problem as is claimed, or that there's a whole lot of traffic outside of law enforcement agents trying to sting people. I don't believe for a moment that it's as much as 1% of all internet crime.

I'm sure if you go to the DOJ website you can find some data that claims that child pornography is a 900 zillion-billion dollar a year industry. Alberto Gonzalez seems to spend a majority of his time (when he isn't being forced to testify in front of congress) fighting "internet predators" and thinking of the children.

     

You notice, I figure (1)

Doctor O (549663) | about 7 years ago | (#18788395)

I figure you don't have children. The FBI (and legal entities all over the world except for Thailand et al.) is cracking down on it because it's among the worst crimes there are, in the same league as torture and rape. Screw those idiots who send money to people without having the goods first.

Notice that I don't think new or stricter laws are necessary, I rather consider them counter-productive. All those thinkofthechildrenisms are a joke. When I was a kid, there weren't all those crazy laws we have today, and we got it much better than today's kids who are all treated as if they were potential amokers or terrorists, and barely capable of getting *anything* right for themselves. If I had been treated like this, I'd probably have rebeled *much* more, and the same is true for today's kids for sure. I make sure my kids feel valued and value other people, and know what they want and what they don't, and the rest will follow. If it's hard, oh well, so was it for my parents, it's only fair. ;)

(Modded OT in 3...2...1...)

There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (5, Insightful)

vivaoporto (1064484) | about 7 years ago | (#18785765)

There is no such thing as "Internet Crime", and the data presented by this article, according to themselves, is not significant. From TFA:

The feds caution that these figures don't represent a scientific sample of just how much Net crime is out there. They note, for example, that the high number of auction fraud complaints is due, in part, to eBay and other big E-commerce outfits offering customers direct links to the IC3 website. And it's tough to measure what may be the Web's biggest scourge, child porn, simply by complaints.
Just take a look at the Top 10 list:

2006 Top 10 IC3 Complaint Categories (Percent of Total Complaints Received)

  • Auction Fraud (44.9%)
  • Non-delivery (19.0%)
  • Check Fraud (4.9%)
  • Credit/Debit Card Fraud (4.8%)
  • Computer Fraud (2.8%)
  • Confidence Fraud (2.2%)
  • Financial Institutions Fraud (1.6%)
  • Identity Theft (1.6%)
  • Investment Fraud (1.3%)
  • Child Pornography (1.0%)


Internet is only the communication channel used by the crooks, all the crimes depicted there are good old fashioned real life crimes. Being perpetrated via Internet is only a detail that should be irrelevant when categorizing crimes. What I would really like to see is the ratio of these same crimes perpetrated in real life vs. via internet. That would really be insightful and newsworthy.

Re:There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (1)

jimstapleton (999106) | about 7 years ago | (#18785897)

But they have several reasons to call them internet crime

1) But "internet communication based/reliant crimes" is longer to say
2) "internet communication based/reliant crimes" does not really useful for narrowing the subject down
3) It gives idiots who are overly picky about pointless semantics something to bitch about so they can't do any real harm to themselves and others - it's a community service kinda thing.

Re:There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (1)

vivaoporto (1064484) | about 7 years ago | (#18786245)

1) But "internet communication based/reliant crimes" is longer to say
2) "internet communication based/reliant crimes" does not really useful for narrowing the subject down

It's not semantics. I'm not discussing how this "category of crime" (Internet crime vs. internet communication based/reliant crimes) should be called. What I'm saying is that there is no way to narrow down all these crimes using the fact of the Internet being involved in some way. This information simply has no correlation with the crimes. It is as relevant for narrowing down the subject as "crimes perpetrated by people speaking a second language" or, for short, "bilingual people crimes". It gives no useful information alone. A much better statistic would be, for instance, "auction fraud offline vs. online", or "Confidence Fraud offline vs. online". Then you would have 2 important informations: 1) The absolute number of crimes of such kind 2) The percentage of those crimes that occurs online. If it is big enough to be relevant, the it is a matter of public concern. If not, well, it's not.

3) It gives idiots who are overly picky about pointless semantics something to bitch about so they can't do any real harm to themselves and others - it's a community service kinda thing.

WTF?! Talk about "accusations in a mirror".

Re:There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (1)

jimstapleton (999106) | about 7 years ago | (#18786357)

Except you said there is no such thing as "internet crime" and that the internet is only the communication channel used for the crime.

That seems awfully semantic, when the internet being a channel for the crime is a valid classification (although I'll agree with you, it was not usefully used in that report).

As for the mirror statement, I had not argued something as being trivial simply due to it's minor semantic omissions.

Should be irrelevant when categorizing crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18785899)

But not irrelevant for those that want justification for regulation or budgets for special task forces and such.

Re:There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (1)

Merl3 (828604) | about 7 years ago | (#18793887)

Don't RIAA and its lawyers count as Internet Criminals?

These are the people who are suing 10-year-old girls (who were 7 at the time of the alleged download), using information obtained by one Time-Warner company (AOL) to shake down people for another Time-Warner company (Warner Brothers Records, Inc.), and who sue 61-year-old school teachers (with law enforcement training and no children in the home) whom RIAA and its lawyers know or should realistically have known before filing suit wouldn't be using a dial-up account to download 300+ tracks of cop-killer gangsta rap.

If internet-based abuse to extort money from little people by systematically abusing the court system to fatten the bottom line of Fortune 500 "entertainment" giants and a handfull of multi-national law firms isn't an "Internet Crime" it certainly should be.

Re:There is no such thing as "Internet Crime" (1)

gdrumm0356 (1072576) | about 7 years ago | (#18794923)

If they were to count illegals, they would be at the top.

Estimates are 12M, but if it's like last time, 40M+ illegals. (Weather on Comcast in Spanish!)

In addition to entering illegally, two types of fraud and 1 count of identity theft/or fraud (SSN) is required for an illegal to pay the TAXES the pro-illegals are so proud of.

That works out to 120M+ plus illegal entry +40M, for a total of 160M, which should make it #1.

If as they say, when they are legal, they can bring in up to 8 family members,
the real crime will be when congress says that SSA is dead, and use general revenues (higher taxes) to pay off those "currently" drawing SS.

Seriously? (2, Interesting)

Mr EdgEy (983285) | about 7 years ago | (#18785859)

Net crime and no mention of piracy? Glad to see they're accepting it as a non-crime now :)

Piracy is NOT on the list (2, Insightful)

giafly (926567) | about 7 years ago | (#18785901)

Whenever you see the RIAA whining about how Piracy/IP Theft/Copyright Theft etc. is a major crime, remember this list [usnews.com].
Piracy is not even in the top ten.

Re:Piracy is NOT on the list (4, Informative)

bcattwoo (737354) | about 7 years ago | (#18786995)

Whenever you see the RIAA whining about how Piracy/IP Theft/Copyright Theft etc. is a major crime, remember this list [usnews.com].
Piracy is not even in the top ten.
Because copyright infringement is a civil matter, not a criminal one.

Re:Piracy is NOT on the list (1)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | about 7 years ago | (#18790373)

Because copyright infringement is a civil matter, not a criminal one.

Not according to the MAFIAA. Why else do they try and get the FBI to enforce it? Have you learned nothing from all those FBI warnings on the front of your DVDs? Oh wait, pirates remove them ;)

check fraud? (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | about 7 years ago | (#18785915)

I'm just curious how check fraud, at 4.3% of complaints, qualifies as internet crime. Even if someone writes a fraudulent check for goods purchased online, I'm not sure it should be classed as internet crime, since the internet is incidental to the crime.

Re:check fraud? (1)

Billosaur (927319) | about 7 years ago | (#18786713)

I think they may be referring to instances where items/services can be paid for with an on-line "check". I know that at some of the sites where I pay bills, I do so by authorizing them to write a "check" against my checking account. Assuming a crook had your name, address, bank routing number, and checking account number, they could easily purchase goods as you, with money drawn directly from your account. The hitch of course being if there's any money in the account to begin with...

Re:check fraud? (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | about 7 years ago | (#18786763)

I think that would be wire fraud, not check fraud, if you provide them with info for ACH debit and they use your account info to make other purchases.

RIAA/MPAA real cirminals here (-1, Troll)

ncohafmuta (577957) | about 7 years ago | (#18786091)


How about the RIAA and the MPAA trying to get illegal audio and video off the net. Now that's a crime!

-Tony

Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786095)

Maybe it's just me, but the images on TFA (colours as well as art style) bear a striking resemblance to the Mozilla dinosaur. ZOMGMICROSOFTCONSPIRACY! Goodness, I'm sorry. My Slashdot Tourette's is FUD! kicking up VENDORLOCKIN! again.

Top Ten *Recorded* Crimes, not Top Ten Crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786123)

Bear in mind that the vast majority of all crime is unreported to the police (over 90%). Personal violent victimization tends to be reported more often, but for many crimes the reporting rate is close to zero. Remember that the FBI can only report what gets reported to it. The statistics they give may or may not be reflective of actual crime rates, crime trends, or other facets of criminal activity. Often times reported crime rates are more reflective of police practices than actual shifts in aggregate criminal behavior. All this tells us is that a certain number of crimes of particular types were reported.

Yes, IAAC (I Am A Criminologist).

Expected specific cases (2, Insightful)

dazedNconfuzed (154242) | about 7 years ago | (#18786141)

I expected a listing of the biggest individual cases, not broad categories that pretty much cover everything on or off the 'net.

Much sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Spam? (3, Insightful)

soft_guy (534437) | about 7 years ago | (#18786239)

Why isn't spam on the list? It is a crime in many places to send certain kinds of spam such as forged headers. I would think this would the most common type of cyber crime.

What is a real "Internet" crime then?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18786263)

All you people who said these "crimes" are not "Internet crimes", are correct. The Internet is just the medium that was used to communicate when committing such crimes as "check fraud" etc.

Now what WOULD be a true Internet crime??? hmmmm well, I play Ultima Online and I get weak tamers to join my guild and I kill (PK) them and take their armor, etc. :) I also scam them out of millions of gold by switching the item I initially put in the trade window on them with something that is worthless. LOL I'm horrible when it comes to these things. Well that is an "Internet" or "online" crime and my character on UO deserves to go to an online prison hahhaha

Re:What is a real "Internet" crime then?? (1)

pclminion (145572) | about 7 years ago | (#18788243)

All you people who said these "crimes" are not "Internet crimes", are correct. The Internet is just the medium that was used to communicate when committing such crimes as "check fraud" etc.

While strictly, most of these crimes have direct analogs that do not involve the Internet, the Internet makes the execution of many of these crimes orders of magnitude easier.

Consider scamming people out of their money by setting up a fake web site that looks like Bank of America. Compare with scamming people by building a physical building which is a fake Bank of America branch. Nobody would attempt the latter (at least I've never heard of it) while the former is stupidly easy.

The largest "True" internet crime (1)

thorkyl (739500) | about 7 years ago | (#18786405)

Has got to be believing the article, after all it's put out by the same branch of government that is reading your email without a warrant.

Where's Myspace? (4, Funny)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | about 7 years ago | (#18786501)

Surely Myspace has to be considered some sort of ongoing internet crime against decent taste and humanity in general.

In Other News (2, Insightful)

nuintari (47926) | about 7 years ago | (#18786527)

Tomorrow we will be seeing the top 10 slashdot top ten stories on the front page!

Really, how many top ten, bottom ten, best of, and worst of lists have we had in recent memory? Seems like I see a new one or two every day, getting a little ridiculous. Sure, the occasional top ten list is funny, but they are rarely newsworthy.

What? Fraud is Bad? (1)

Ikyaat (764422) | about 7 years ago | (#18787191)

That list is more like the top 4, since 7 of the 10 are Fraud. I like how Auction Fraud is worse then Child Pornography. So voters think not getting there vintage t-shirt off of eBay is worse then kids being abused. Ya glad to see that the worlds priorities are in the right place.

READ IT AGAIN lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18787271)

NO, you idiot! lol The rankings indicate the AMOUNT of each type of crime that is being committed over the Internet... It's not a ranking of how BAD the crimes are! LMAO
It means auction fraud happens much more often than child pornography, not that auction fraud is a worse crime than child pornography! Read the article again!

Odd... (1)

Kabuthunk (972557) | about 7 years ago | (#18787569)

Last I heard... sending out billions upon billions of spam emails was a crime.

Last I looked, I'm still getting tons of spam email.

Last I checked, spam tends to require the internet.

Why wasn't it on the list again?

FBI's break of powers should be a crime. (1)

k1e0x (1040314) | about 7 years ago | (#18788877)

With the Department of Fatherland Security and the FBI's illegal wiretapping, collecting of personal data in regards to phone and internet companies, Bush's statements on how he wants to track all e-mail and uploaded images I think government fraud should be on this list.

3 simple letters (plural kinda makes it 4) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#18789733)

MMOs.

MMOs are a crime.

(this is ment to be funny)

Fraud / Child porn (1)

Kazrath (822492) | about 7 years ago | (#18789775)

It's wierd how morals play a bigger factor on what get more visibiliy. The chart shows Fraud making up over 90% of all crimes and CP is at 1%. Yet we see these huge articles in the news about CP and very little about fraud. Is this because CP is so morally unjust and people can mentally deal with somone ripping them off?

Maybe (1)

Tatsh (893946) | about 7 years ago | (#18789829)

...USNews.com should learn how to design sites properly, with percentages not exact pixel widths. GRRRRRRR

YouTube (1)

eclectic4 (665330) | about 7 years ago | (#18791091)

YouTube is down right now... that's a crime.

After a conversation with friends and a promise that I could find I Love Lucy's "Vitameatavegamin" video within a minute, we get nothing...

Nigerian Email Blast (1)

r4g3 (1070304) | about 7 years ago | (#18797469)

How could we forget the good old Nigerian mass email of scam... "..My mom is dead and left me 20 billion so give me your account number and I will give you half of the money." Now that is a typical email from the scam artist. NBC aired a special on this where they met up with some of the cons and all of them ran with embarrassment. I heard of people who actually fell for this scam and they accounts were indeed in need. I think the Nigerian art of scam is by far the worst because they also make other African countries look bad.. As a native of Ghana, it is hard to ship things to the country because they categorize Africans as scam artists now.. ( and of course not all Nigerians are scam artist)
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