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AT&T to Target iPhone to Enterprise

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the thinking-outside-the-fruit-box dept.

Communications 315

narramissic writes "AT&T is reportedly preparing to market the iPhone to business users and is scurrying to ensure that its backend enterprise billing and support systems will accommodate the device when it ships. Analysts are baffled by the move. In addition to running an OS X-based operating system, which enterprises may be reluctant to adopt, the iPhone is also expected to have a number of shortcomings for business users, including not having a removable battery and not having buttons, which would make it difficult to dial while driving says Gartner's Ken Dulaney. Avi Greengart, principal analyst for mobile devices at Current Analysis, also thinks the iPhone won't be a good option for enterprise customers because enterprises won't be able to write applications for the phone."

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KC to Target iRish in the Enterprise (1)

Keith Curtis (923118) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857731)

Apparently those drunk fucks are STILL finding work!

The Enterprise (4, Funny)

eviloverlordx (99809) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857739)

I think that the Enterprise has better communicators than the iPhone already.

Wrong (3, Insightful)

fistfullast33l (819270) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857907)

I'm going to preface this by saying I'm not an Apple fanboy by any means and I'm definitely not buying an iPhone.

How did the RAZR succeed? By being a high priced toy to the wealthy at first. How did Blackberry succeed? By being a high priced email toy for business elites. The iPhone really combines both - a sleek design with email, web, and calendar built in. The downside is that it isn't compatible with Outlook.

But, for the low low price of $500, only the elitist of the elite will be able to afford it. And Apple will open it up for development if a large enough enterprise requests it. They want the marketshare and if a Wall Street Bank or Music Studio requests it, they'll do it to add to the cool factor of having those rich famous people carry it around - just like the RAZR and the Blackberry.

Re:Wrong (2, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858185)

I think the GP was referring to the Starship Enterprise.

But I tend to agree, let the early adopters pay a premium, pay back the development costs, help Apple work out the bugs and design issues, and then lower the price for the masses.

Worked for Microsoft, except for the "bugs and design issues" part.

Re:Wrong (1)

fistfullast33l (819270) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858305)

Amazing how that comment reads so differently when you notice the article "the" in front of Enterprise.

Re:Wrong (3, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858367)

Worked for Microsoft
Man, you aren't kidding... in the days when Palm still ruled, those CE machines were awful. I still can't believe how they tried to mash the entire Win95 interface into such a tiny little screen. Most people weren't that interested in filling up a $200 8MB memory card full of crappy audio or video to play on their $600 "pocket-sized" CE brick - they first and foremost wanted an organizer.

What a coup that they've managed to turn around and actually supplant the PalmOS on some Treos, though I suppose this says as much about Palm's ineptitude as it does MS's success.

And working in Apple's favor is a whole legion of early adopters that will buy anything with the little apple on it - similar to the people who bought those early CE machines.

Sidekick vs Blackberry (3, Interesting)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858331)

If you look at the history of those two phone lines, you'll see why iphone doesn't have much of a chance. Blackberries were targeted to the enterprise from day 1. Sidekicks were focused on consumers. Despite high profile users such as Paris Hilton and others, Enterprises didn't ask for the ability to put apps on the sidekick. However, many non enterprise users have adopted the blackberry.

Re:Sidekick vs Blackberry (1)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858451)

Except, if the allusions in the article are correct, AT&T (and thus Cingular) WILL be targetting businesses from day one... so who knows? And if they are, I am sure other carriers will follow suit in an attempt to not be left behind (assuming the iPhone takes off)... they definitely will not want to be left in the cold while AT&T/Cingular grab a bigger chunk of the business cellphone market. Only time will tell.

Re:Sidekick vs Blackberry (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858751)

True, true. But thats the service provider, rather than the manufacturer. Its like selling a clown suit at Macys. Having Macy's call it an "executive:" clown suit isn't really going to cause ceo's to start wearing them.

Re:Wrong (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858449)

Errr... $500 is considered too high but for the elite business user? You must be living in a country where the mobile phone is _not_ a status symbol.

Re:Wrong (1)

Meorah (308102) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858455)

It doesn't need to support outlook.

If its a pop system, set accounts to leave messages on server for 4 days or however long they want mail displayed on their iphone and configure the same account on the native iphone mail client.

If its an exchange system, use OWA in safari.

And as someone who has never owned an apple product before in my life, not even an apple iie, I am DEFINITELY going to be getting an iphone asap. pda/phone/camera/ipod in one device with wifi and bluetooth. The stupid little earbud is never going to leave my ear.

Re:Wrong (1)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858459)

Is that really where RIM was first?

Anywhere I worked the people really making the money (partners) did not have Blackberry's and THAT was a status symbol, this was a few years ago.

Re:The Enterprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857993)

Yea, Apple seems to have no interest in the Enterprise, and it's too bad because they really could make some sweet-ass enterprise, microsoft-crushing technologies and solutions if they wanted to. Until Apple wants to tackle this head-on in both software, hardware and support they won't be an enterprise provider. Period! Come on Apple... take on Active Directory, Exchange, SQL Server, Outlook, SharePoint, etc. Make it happen already!

Re:The Enterprise (4, Insightful)

pilgrim23 (716938) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858595)

"...not having buttons, which would make it difficult to dial while driving" I am sure that like the last fellow texting in traffic in front of me, you will be just as capable of endangering life and limb. You should be paying attentiont o the 2 tons of metal you are piloting. seriously. SHUT UP AND DRIVE!

I dont think businesses will care what it runs (4, Insightful)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857765)

I dont think businesses will care what it runs

I think businesses will be concerned with how it integrates with the things they need/do. Will it be able to open Office files? Will it be able to synchronize with Outlook? Does it make phone calls? Will it be able to synchronize contacts and such?

None of those should be beyond the capabilities of the phone... it is all just a matter of what actually is implemented (or implementable with minor work) when the phone is released.

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857791)

Does it make phone calls? ...None of those should be beyond the capabilities of the phone.

I should really hope not...

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (4, Interesting)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858139)

Yeah, that last one was kinda sarcasm and kinda not... most businesses I have worked for want to know
-Can it receive and send text messages easily?
-Does it make phone calls (easily)? (Yep, it is a phone)
-Can it sync with our email system?
-Can it open the occasional document sent to it?

Some businesses want more collaborative features, but the fact is, they are rarely used in most corporate environments. To that end though, with a full featured web browser (as also discussed on /. before), the possibilities are endless there without too much work - and since many companies are web enabling their stuff, most will see no additional work to make their stuff work on an iPhone. The ones that will are those that use MS (or MS partner) Proprietary solutions like Siebel (which though it is quite powerful, outright sucks anyway).

All in all, I think the iPhone may be the next killer phone.
-Correct form factor (ie: smaller and more comfortable to carry than a Treo or most SmartPhones)
-High level of functionality from full web browser to extensibility via widgets and other apps
-Support from a company that is second to none (other than perhaps IBM that they generally rate roughly equal to)
-Stable, proven platform... no hard resets, soft resets
-Synchronizable with Macs and PCs
-Intuitive interface
-shiny!!! (no, not joking on this one... many tech decisions are based on the eye-candy factor even though they shouldnt be).
-Investment protection in having a phone built on a hardware and software platform that will allow tomorrows (and even the next day's) latest apps and widgets to run on it.

Just my 12 cents.

Business will laugh at the iPhone; they already do (0, Troll)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858357)

1) it's not even a 3.5g phone-- it's a 1st generation phone
2) there's little room for third party apps unless you want to play Apple's usary for the privilege
3) the phone has inherent security problems because of #1 (think old GSM phones and how easily they're cracked)
4) you can't get high speed anything on the phone, not even GPRS speed, let alone UMTS/Edge, or even something reasonably kewl
5) No Outlook. No SmackBerry. And I'm only betting here, but no Vista support (iTunes-- hello???)
6) Poorly designed UI-- no key depression feedback as there are no keys; and no 'say command' apps in this generation
7) Can't get at the battery??!!??? Who are these guys fooling???
8) Can't change the SIM!!!!!! Imagine, every EU roamer will throw the iPhone under a train!
9) Ok, it won't get a virus..... for a while.

Let's take your business user case arguments and apply them against the above, not to mention the price, the captive (I won't even get into popularity here) carrier, and the fact that there are a lot of bright minds far, far ahead of Apple in this market. Now tell me that business users are going to swallow this up. At least the RAZR can proxy via Bluetooth-- an EV.DO connection.

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (1, Informative)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857853)

Also, it has already been discussed elsewhere that third parties will be able to write apps for the phone, though for some reason a lot of people keep pretending that isnt the case... why?

First 3rd-party app for iPhone appears on Apple's site [digg.com]

And other links elsewhere...

Also, even if major apps written for it require Apple's endorsement/approval to run, that isnt a bad thing (assuming the price to do so is reasonable). It will help ensure quality control.

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (4, Informative)

MSG (12810) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858069)

That link does not indicate that 3rd party apps will run in the iPhone. It only indicates that an application is available which will run at a resolution appropriate for the phone. As stated, if you read it, this may simply be an indication of optimism on the part of the developer. So far, all indications are that the iPhone will not allow 3rd party apps, which is by far the biggest reason that I have no interest in it.

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (1, Insightful)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858279)

Actually, it does... next time read the whole thing before you post. Click the link to the whole article, scroll down an entire pageview and read this part...

"Scenario Poker showing up on Apple's Widget page and listing iPhone compatibility may not necessarily mean that Apple has blessed the application for the iPhone. It is possible this may just be a display of optimism on the part of Scenario Software. Apple has to date not shown any non-Apple applications/Widgets running on the iPhone.Thanks John!"

Apple not "blessing" it, yet allowing the "iPhone compatible" labelling, to me, is read as "this isnt endorsed or written my Apple, but is iPhone compatible".

Unless I am wrong, that is what the phrase "iPhone compatible" means by any stretch of the imagination. Because someone else wants to redefine that phrase to mean "optimistically maybe iPhone compatible" to me is more of a troll response by the author of the article/post.

I could be wrong, but Apple has a track record of not allowing ambiguous (or in this case, flat out wrong) posts of that sort on their site... yeah, they have slipped up on those regards in the past, but it is few and far between.

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (1)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858333)

Dont people ever read the links before they mod posts? Here, I made it easy for you and wrote more below the guy you all just modded up for being incorrect...

Re:I dont think businesses will care what it runs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857947)

oh shit! make phone calls... I hope they enable that feature before the release!

(insightful?)

Does it make phone calls? (4, Funny)

wiredog (43288) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858171)

Interesting that's third on the list of requirements for a mobile phone.

Re:Does it make phone calls? (1)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858411)

No, really sensible actually... I just thought that /. posters would be intelligent enough to understand the meaning. Yeah, it's a phone, it will make phone calls... but a few all-in-one, do everything phones make really poor phones because their physical design is more oriented towards text messaging or web browsing. The original Sidekicks (to me) were a pain in the butt to use as a phone (in comparison to say a Treo or many Win-SmartPhones). Apple's design blends the best of all of them (in my opinion). Your opinion may vary... :-)

Guess I really need to spell out everything in my posts from now on...

Well, that's just it (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858567)

Some of the pda/phone combos are poor phones, but decent pdas. Some are the other way around. Haven't met any that are really good at both, mainly due to ergonomic factors. Some are acceptable at both, however.

I've played with many of them as I am a developer of software for them.

As a Mac user (recently switched, from linux) I'm actually interested in the iPhone.

Dialing While Driving (5, Funny)

sharp-bang (311928) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857777)

which would make it difficult to dial while driving

That would be a "feature" not a "bug".

Please punch the first suit you hear complaining about that.

Re:Dialing While Driving (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857859)

Please take out additional insurance on the first suit you hear complaining about that.

Fixed.

Re:Dialing While Driving (1)

Tobenisstinky (853306) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858049)

Agreed. I almost got sideswiped yesterday by some fucknut dialing his phone while driving- because he was holding his phone in one hand and dialing with the other- look ma no hands. Not to mention he was looking at his phone rather than the road in front of him; oh, and did I mention we were doing 100Km/h? (60MPH). (Sorry for the rant.)

Re:Dialing While Driving (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858071)

[which would make it difficult to dial while driving]

That would be a "feature" not a "bug".

Please punch the first suit you hear complaining about that.

I tried to read some tiny bit of text on something while driving and was astounded how difficult it was. That there are people comfortable with their attention lapses, while driving, I find worrisome. I only see every other or every third driver talking to someone in the morning, while enroute on the commute. I'm not surprised in the least when I see these people disrupting the flow of traffic as they putt along in the left lane or can be found at the side of the road with the vehichle they ran into, on a clear blue day.

I hear California is finally doing something about this July 1, but I've heard rumours before. We'll see.

Fitting MOTD about the iPhone (1)

heauxmeaux (869966) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857795)

"For every problem there is one solution which is simple, neat, and wrong." -- H. L. Mencken
too funny.

Can't dial "while driving".... (4, Insightful)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857805)

Hum. I thought that you were not supposed to use a cell phone while driving because it distracts you from the more important task at hand which is guiding upwards of several tons of steel safely down the road without killing any one.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857887)

In Greece (where I live) it's illegal to use a cell/mobile phone when driving a vehicle.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857897)

Unfortunately, you are one of the few who got that memo. You're also not supposed to speed, speed up on yellow, drive drunk, or tailgate.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858165)

Do you hold your breath while you're driving too? Wouldn't want to confuse your pea-sized brain with complicated multitasking functions like talking and breathing while driving that several ton steel vehicle down the road right? People that can't concentrate on driving and talking on a cell phone are the same morons that can't pat their head and rub their stomach while hopping up and down on one foot and blowing bubble gum.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858543)

Please. Every study that has been done a driving ability while talking on a cell phone shows a severly diminished driving capacity. Just because you think that you're better then all the pea-brains doesn't mean that you are. It just means that you're an egotistical jackass whose perception of his own driving ability doesn't jive with reality. Just like, I'm sure, the dipshit that forced me onto the shoulder this morning while blabbing away on his cell phone.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (2, Insightful)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858259)

It is in California unless you're using a headset to keep both hands free for driving. On a side note, I had a friend who was still talking on the cell phone when he got pulled over for running a red light and the officer came to the window. He didn't like the ticket that the officer gave him.

Re:Can't dial "while driving".... (1)

kdogg73 (771674) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858651)

It's perfectly safe to dial while dr

Apple Bigots : get real (-1, Troll)

El Cabri (13930) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857821)

The iPhone is geared up to be Apple's biggest flop since the Newton.

Fruity Bigots : get real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857991)

The Newton failed because of the way it's free-form hand-writing recognization was presented to the public. You'll note the Palm and Handspring did well even though their hand-writing recognization was more constrained. Anyway I think the iPhone has a chance, even if it's price is high compared to the competition.

Re:Apple Bigots : get real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858027)

The iPhone is geared up to be Apple's biggest flop since the Newton.

So was the iMac. I mean, come on, it didn't even have a floppy drive! That made it useless, and one of Apple's biggest flops.

Re:Apple Bigots : get real (1)

Cygfrydd (957180) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858033)

... except Newtons were marketed long before PDAs were common; how do you get someone to buy something when they don't know how they'll use it? Cellphones are a bit of a different animal.

Re:Apple Bigots : get real (3, Interesting)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858133)

The iPhone is geared up to be Apple's biggest flop since the Newton.

One of the many reasons that Newton failed is the fact that it started out as a way to reinvent how we interact with computers, and then Apple decided to panic when they realised that the project could interfere with Mac sales, so they turned it into a Mac peripheral.

For iPhone, OTOH, Jobs took "Computer" out of the name of the company, so I don't think they are too worried about giving iPhone the room it needs to succeed...

Re:Apple Bigots : get real (1)

antv (1425) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858181)

If you want to make a prediction, make it right:
No wireless. Less space than Nomad. Lame.

Re:Apple Bigots : Check back @ Christmas (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858195)

When the year end summaries total up around Christmas 2007, the story will be told.

Consumer enthusiasm for a great advanced phone solution is obvious in the surveys of potential buyers. Lots of the enthusiasm is based on crummy hardware which everyone has had, like unreadable screens, batteries that fly out when dropped and keys that don't work.

Either you will be shown to be prescient, or you will want to forget you ever said that.

Re:Apple Bigots : get real (4, Interesting)

vought (160908) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858727)

The iPhone is geared up to be Apple's biggest flop since the Newton.

From the summary: Analysts are baffled by the move.

From a 2001 article on the just-introduced iPod: [smartmoney.com]

A big yawner, you say? Perhaps. After all, there are plenty of MP3 players out there. (Compaq Computer (CPQ), for example, offers one for $149.99 on its Web site.) But while Apple's latest debut might not score high on the significance meter -- particularly according to Wall Street analysts hoping for a splashier announcement -- it does offer a glimpse into the tactics computer makers are beginning to employ as demand for their core products wanes.
When it comes to Apple, if the analysts can't make heads or tails out of a new product, it's almost certain the product will sell. Usually when you've caught the analysts off-guard, you've moved to an area of consumer savvy marketing that has a life all it's own.

A friend in the EDA industry who has been marketing these tools for twenty years notes that analysts are consistently wrong about the marketability of new products in established markets - he says: "those who can't sell, analyze."

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857823)

...which would make it difficult to dial while driving...

GOOD! Hang the fucking phone up and drive people.

Thanks,
Disgruntled Motorcyclist.

A little early? (2, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857825)

Isn't it a little early to write this thing off as a business tool? Does anyone actually have one in their possession? Most of the executives with Crackberries use them for email, so I fail to see where the requirements for entry are real high. If the thing is deemed to be more of a status symbol than a Blackberry, executives will want it and it will be used as a business tool. AT&T might just be trying to keep it from being perceived as a toy, or "for kids". All it has to do is be a good email platform.

That said, I'm skeptical that it will make a good email platform without a real keyboard :)

Re:A little early? (3, Interesting)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858053)

I think you're exactly right about AT&T wanting to make sure these units are perceived as capable of being *useful*, vs. very expensive "toy phones".

Most business executives I've seen using a PDA phone aren't real concerned about its capabilities as an input device. They can *call* people back if they have something important to communicate back to them. They simply want to remain in touch with what's going on. Their phone needs to be reliable and basically free of crashes/freezes (Cough, Treo, Cough!). It needs to have a relatively easy-to-read display and easy-to-navigate interface, so it's comfortable to read incoming emails on. Ability to view attachments is critical too. Too much data arrives as a PDF file, a Word or Excel document, or a JPG or TIFF image for that not to work quickly and smoothly.

It seems to me like the iPhone could meet all of these requirements with little problem, really. The "status symbol" factor is icing on the cake.

Re:A little early? (1)

pavera (320634) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858269)

I agree with your sentiment. personally, i use my blackberry all the time, it is nice for email, but it certainly isn't a show stopper for anything else, web browsing is a bit clunky, I can't even imagine opening and working on a word doc or spreadsheet on the thing (are you serious, people actually try to open and edit spreadsheets on handhelds?!). The bar is not that high, a decent web browsing experience and email, that's all it has to do.

Barking up the wrong tree (1)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857833)

For serious business and enterprise users the Iphone completely fails to compete with other offerings like the blackberry. If AT&T wants to do well they should do what apple does and try to appeal to the "hip and trendy" teen and young adult crowd like the old dancing B&W Ipod commercials did. The rest of the market that wants to follow the hip & trendy crowd will do so.

Sure they won't (4, Insightful)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857841)

...because enterprises won't be able to write applications for the phone...

  • Because Apple will not release software for Windows before the hell freezes over
  • Because Macs will never use Intel processors
  • Because iPod will never play video and iTunes store will never sell movies
  • Because Apple will never make a cell phone

Re:Sure they won't (3, Insightful)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858501)

No, you don't understand, A blog said that another blog read in an unofficial interview with "someone familiar with apple" that they wouldn't be allowing developers to write code for it. It must be true!

Re:Sure they won't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858621)

Nice rebuttal. Me likes it. Yum.

What's that smell / noise ? (2, Informative)

The Media Mechanic (1084283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857851)

That is the smell & noise of the CEOs at Research In Motion, Palm, and Pocket PC, collectively soiling their pants after hearing this news.

Re:What's that smell / noise ? (1, Insightful)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858091)

This is the real reason RIM is releasing Crackberry tools for WinCE and other platforms. They see the real threat, its called "iPhone"

Re:What's that smell / noise ? (1)

Embedded2004 (789698) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858601)

RIM has been working on that stuff for *years* before the iPhone was announced.

Re:What's that smell / noise ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858303)

Yeah, doubtful... The iPhone is smaller (NOT a good thing for a smartphone!), has no keyboard, and limits third party apps to only signed ones. No, I don't think that the other manufacturers are sweating it much.

dialing while driving... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18857855)

"..and not having buttons, which would make it difficult to dial while driving"

How is this a bad thing? Perhaps people will think twice before trying to make that call.

Re:dialing while driving... (1)

OhEd (877009) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858169)

It ought to be impossible to dial while driving!

Cost (1)

Reader X (906979) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857879)

Hm, you'd think those pricey analysts would factor the high cost of the device into their cogent analyses.

Then again, the likes of Gartner don't want their corporate customers to be thinking too much about value for cost.

iPhone was destined to fail (1)

Sneakernets (1026296) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857895)

I may sound trollish, but honestly, this sounds like to me like AT&T is now stuck with this sad excuse for a phone and is now begging people to use it.

A phone with no buttons, horrible battery life, and... AT&T expects people to use this for business?

Looks like AT&T has a hot iPotato and has no one to toss it to.

So the ads are true (4, Funny)

Fhqwhgadss (905393) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857899)

Implementing a horrible idea that is doomed to failure because they still think they're the only game in town? Cingular really is the new AT&T.

It does have a web browser... (3, Insightful)

Tanlis (304135) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857903)

Avi Greengart, principal analyst for mobile devices at Current Analysis, also thinks the iPhone won't be a good option for enterprise customers because enterprises won't be able to write applications for the phone."


Here's an idea...Write a web app!

It's so ingenious, I'm going to patent it. :D

I imagine you'll be able to store files locally and if you can access them thru Safari on the phone, than just do that. If not, write some security and put it on an extranet.

Re:It does have a web browser... (1)

supasam (658359) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858409)

Better yet, make a dashboard widget, because thats the way the interface will be set up. You can't write a program for it, but you most certainly will be able to write a widget. A widget is just a web page sans browser, so anything you can write in java will work just fine.

BlackBerry / PocketPC / iPhone (4, Informative)

aurigus (39895) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857951)

I recently purchased a pocketpc based phone device. I really toiled with waiting until the iPhone comes out and getting that, but I heard some pretty sadening news - that Apple/AT&T will only allow signed programs to be installed on the phone. Unless they make that a pretty simple process, which I can't imagine they will - this will severely limit access to developers and software other than Apple sanctioned devices.

This is the main downfall of the iPhone. I have no doubt it will be popular with home users as well as business users who use their devices solely for email/calling. It will be a status symbol. But unless they open their source and allow developers to really get into the nitty gritty, I don't see it becoming the "one device to rule them all".

Many Windows Mobile 5 SmartPhones (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858453)

also require signing.

Reading Gartner (3, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18857967)

1. Take grain of salt.

2. Read Gartner analysis.

3. Consume Ripple as required.

Does not need to open Office Files (4, Interesting)

hrieke (126185) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858007)

All the iPhone will need to do is:
Connect to a POP / IMAP Email system (it does).
Read PDF files. The image zoom functionality will work fine for reading PDFs.

Then on the backend, the iPhone uses will get a special email account where all Office attachments are automatically converted to a PDF file before being sent to the phone.

Fairly trivial thing to do.

Re:Does not need to open Office Files (1)

voidstin (51561) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858199)

what if you need to edit it and send it back?

Re:Does not need to open Office Files (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858399)

You opent the goddamn Textedit.app and retype it.
Am I the only one who doesn't want the steaming piece of crap known as MS Office on my phone?

The real important stuff, and I mean the really important stuff doesn't need 74 different fonts and bullets to be conveyed. All one needs is a text editor, something like the text edit app which comes with OS X, or preffereably email editor.

Are mobile people seriously happy with the performance of Office on their phones?

Re:Does not need to open Office Files (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858643)

The real important stuff, and I mean the really important stuff doesn't need 74 different fonts and bullets to be conveyed. All one needs is a text editor, something like the text edit app which comes with OS X, or preffereably email editor.

ac:x:666:666:Anonymous Coward:/u/ac:/bin/emacs

Re:Does not need to open Office Files (1)

OldeTimeGeek (725417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858569)

Editing Office files? On a PDA? Sorry, I've tried that on both a Palm (with Graffiti) and a Treo (with a keyboard) and I never want to repeat the experience. The screen's just too small and the tools aren't there yet. Viewing is fine but for editing, I'll wait until I get back to the office...

Re:Does not need to open Office Files (1)

ZachPruckowski (918562) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858629)

TextEdit.app can already read .doc files with most features. I'm sure one could work around the limitations. Yeah, editing it will be a pain in the ass, but it's doable.

FUD (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858119)

Considering how many cars have an ipod interface as an option, it isn't conceivable that voice recognition can be used to operate the phone when it is in the ipod dock of a car. Or to use the ipod interface of the car to operate the phone. (The Lexus touch screen is incredibly good to operate a motorola razr, by the way.)

Employees will like it (4, Insightful)

hey (83763) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858173)

If businesses let employees pick their phones (and this is a choice) then they'll go for this nice phone. Who wouldn't.

yeah, right, when in doubt go for expense accounts (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858177)

this is a device intended for geeks and hipsters. you listening, ATT wireless? geeks and hipsters.

they don't wear wing tips and hold offsites at the golf course and discuss their stock options.

ATT is making the fatal assumption of assuming if they have an expensive geegaw, sell it where expense is no object... upper manglement of large corporations for "business use."

have fun, folks.

And a Treo is so wonderful? (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858187)

Seems to me the fact that it's not a desktop isn't an obstacle. It just has to communicate with *some* of your desktop-ish apps. Tell you what - give me a phone, ANY phone that capture my address book, group calendar, support a VPN tunnel to my corporate net, run a browser and send receive email, SMS, IM and of course be a phone and allow me to use them while I'm on a call w/o having to write down things on little scraps of paper then I'll take a serious look at it.

And in the last 11 years I have replaced a battery exactly one time instead of replacing or upgrading the phone.

Of course (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858215)

Of course AT&T is going to market to the enterprise side.
Apple is going to market to the teenagers and 'trend setters' and in the meantime, AT&T will market to the enterprise side. They don't NEED to market to anywhere else but the enterprise side! Apple's got the rest covered

Details, details! (1)

Zhe Mappel (607548) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858255)

1. Adopt OS that's all but unknown in the enterprise.

2. No removable battery or buttons.

3. Inability to write own applications.

4. ???

5. Profit!

You know its a dumb article when they start with.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858275)

"Analysts are baffled by the move. In addition to running an OS X-based operating system, which enterprises may be reluctant to adopt, the iPhone is also expected to have a number of shortcomings for business users, including not having a removable battery and not having buttons, which would make it difficult to dial while driving says Gartner's Ken Dulaney."

Since when did the enterprises start dictating OSes that are used in Mobile phones? I am baffled by the Gartner analyst Ken Dulaney's move!

Wait, what? OSX as a disadvantage on embedded hw? (4, Insightful)

allanc (25681) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858283)

The implication being that the Blackberry has done so well because of all of the corporate PCs and servers running the Blackberry OS?

"shortcomings" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18858325)

"difficult to dial while driving"

You shouldn't be dialing while driving!

More for executives (1)

Alizarin Erythrosin (457981) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858327)

These analysts seem to underestimate the "gotta have it" factor among executives. My mother is an executive secretary, and she has to deal with her 2 execs wanting new phones as soon as someone in their ranks gets the New Whiz-Bang Phone Of The Week(TM). One guy even walks in the office, drops his phone on the floor, kicks it a few times, etc, all while saying "Wow I wish I had one of those new Blackberries that [person] just got".

Its all just a big e-penis competition between them. Somebody will get one just because its "cool" and "hip", not because it might be a good phone.

Plus, its company money, what do they care if it costs $500?

And what kind of market is that? (1)

argent (18001) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858707)

At our division, we have maybe 4 or 5 people you could class as "executives", and 150 others, of whom about 50 get company-supplied cellphones.

The market for "executive" phones is a fraction of the business market.

It's not an enterprise product! (4, Insightful)

Paulrothrock (685079) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858335)

It doesn't integrate with Exchange Server, it has a music and movie player, and it can operate as a hard drive. This isn't an "Enterprise" product, this is a consumer product. This should be marketed as a replacement for your phone and your iPod, not as something middle-management uses to interfere with the folks who do the real work.

Web Apps (5, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858365)

"...because enterprises won't be able to write applications for the phone."

It's too bad that companies can't write apps that run on websites.

It's too bad that the iPhone won't be able to browse websites with a fully-functional web browser.

Oh. Wait.

Finally, all the steps are visible! (2, Informative)

argent (18001) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858441)

1. Companies write apps that run on websites.
2. The iPhone can browse websites with a fully-functional web browser.
3. This is the absolutely most airtime-intensive way to write applications.
4. PROFIT!

(for AT&T anyway)

iPhone - Leopard - VoiceOver? (1)

BlowChunx (168122) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858391)

Well, wouldn't Apple's VoiceOver tech let people dial their phone by just talking to it, rather than having to physically type in numbers? that with a hands free set would eliminate a bunch of phone distractions.

Then if women would just put their make-up on at home, the world would be a better place.

Enterprises Won't Be Able To Write Apps....BS (1)

NoPhD (963152) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858419)

I don't know that there are to many companies that write apps for phones directly. The iPhone is not Qualcommm Brew but look at the number of Brew developers in comparison. I don't see many enterprises in this list. It is just a great deal of BS to say this. http://brew.qualcomm.com/brew/en/developer/directo ry.html [qualcomm.com]

Smartphones, baby. (1)

argent (18001) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858525)

I don't know that there are to many companies that write apps for phones directly.

When you include third party applications? Plenty...

When we did the rollout for iPaqs at our division we had half a dozen applications that ended up getting distributed with them because there were enough people using each to make it worth while.

iPhone critics: Apple is 2 steps ahead of you (4, Insightful)

mveloso (325617) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858457)

Some companies learn lessons the hard way - by failing. Apple's had a number of large failures, but has managed to learn from those failures and make better things with higher margins.

Most companies in the tech industry can't handle more than one or two failures; they tend to go bankrupt. Those companies that survive product failures tend to try and forget about them instead of learn from them. For example, Microsoft could have learned a lot from Micrsoft Bob, if they so desired. Instead, they buried old Bob in the back and abandoned all attempts to do any radical user interface changes for Windows.

Apple, on the other hand, has a large number of failures to draw from, all of which are extensively documented. Apple also has a large number of successes, most of which probably haven't been documented enough. Why has the iPod really succeeded? Why and how has Mac OS X (and the Mac) been an unstoppable locomotive of progress?

The Enterprise market is smaller than you think, and requires substantial investments with questionable returns. Allowing developers onto your platform incurrs substantial support and infrastructure costs. Enterprise demands also tend to warp your perspective, as large accounts exert greater leverage on the development process than thousands of individuals. They also don't pay retail, and tend to demand substantial up-front and back-end discounts.

Apple has bypassed this in a simple manner, with a simple question: why have your enterprise apps on the phone when you have a live browser connection? If you can get to salesforce.com, google apps, and your custom web-enabled apps, who cares whether you can install a binary or not? In fact, not having to install anything is much better - no management issues. It's the freaking web, already. Everything that's important has been webified. Anything that isn't yet will be in 5 years. Everything that isn't nobody cares about.

The only "enterprise" feature of the iPhone would be the ability to hard-wire it to your corporate network instead of using the public network. That's it. If the iPhone can do that, then the internal IT guys can do the rest.

One word answer. (1)

argent (18001) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858783)

Apple has bypassed this in a simple manner, with a simple question: why have your enterprise apps on the phone when you have a live browser connection?

Airtime.

A side benefit? (1)

Biff Stu (654099) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858805)

The reliance on web apps is the key. Of course, these web apps won't work if they are IE only and require Active-X. When the CEO finally realizes that his intranet is suffering from MS lock-in, will things actually change?

Famous Last Words (1)

rlp (11898) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858485)

"Hi, I'm from IT and I brought you this I-Phone. Now, if you'd just hand over your Blackberry ..."

So there will be an iPhone without a camera? (1)

Brit_in_the_USA (936704) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858653)

It appears many enterprise / business customers demand that cell phone Not have a camera to be in compliance with their IT/company policy.

Does this mean there will be a camera free iPhone?

iPhone not programmable. (1)

jshriverWVU (810740) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858671)

Perhaps OT, but curious. A lot of people are complaining that the iPhone sucks because it doesnt have a SDK or free development environment. Since when has any phone? Granted you can download the Java SDK for mobile phones, but can you actually load it to your phone? I'm under the impression the only way to get software on your phone from any provider is to pay them for a "service" to use software X for Y amount of time. I can't just write my own Reversi game and load it on my verizon phone. I hope I'm wrong, if so let me know how.

Smartphones (1)

argent (18001) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858747)

Perhaps OT, but curious. A lot of people are complaining that the iPhone sucks because it doesnt have a SDK or free development environment. Since when has any phone?

Any smartphone does, whether it's running Symbian, Palm OS, or Pocket PC phone edition.

"shortcomings for business users" (1)

IronChef (164482) | more than 7 years ago | (#18858737)

As if Windows Mobile doesn't have its own set of "shortcomings," like being a buggy pain in the ass. As an owner of several WM devices over the years, I have a real love/hate relationship with the things. "Oh sorry I didn't get your call, looks like the phone app crashed and I need to reboot... yeah, I should really remember to do that a couple times a day."

If Apple sees an opportunity to get the iPhone adopted by business, I'm sure they'll compromise on their no custom applications policy too, if that's what it takes.

Go Apple, competition is good.
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