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Linux Kernel 2.6.21 Released

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the a-long-awaited-penguin dept.

Linux 296

diegocgteleline.es writes "Linus Torvalds has released Linux 2.6.21 after months of development. This release improves the virtualization with VMI, a paravirtualization interface that will be used by Vmware. KVM does get initial paravirtualization support along with live migration and host suspend/resume support. 2.6.21 also gets a tickless idle loop mechanism called 'Dynticks', built in top of 'clockevents', another feature that unifies the timer handling and brings true high-resolution timers. Other features are: bigger kernel parameter-line, support for the PA SEMI PWRficient CPU and for the Cell-based 'celleb' Toshiba architecture, NFS IPv6 support, IPv4 IPv6 IPSEC tunneling, UFS2 write, kprobes for PPC32, kexec and oprofile for ARM, public key encryption for ecryptfs, Fcrypt and Camilla cipher algorithms, NAT port randomization, audit lockdown mode, some new drivers and many other small improvements."

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EXTRA EXTRA! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890697)

Incremental kernel release! Big News!

Re:EXTRA EXTRA! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890877)

Gotta feed the fanboys their daily ration.

You joke, (5, Interesting)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890931)

but I wonder if we're ever going to see 2.8 at this rate. The current kernel revision is MILES away in technology from 2.6.0. What will it take to move to 2.8, or (dare I say it?) 3.0? What qualifies as a major enough change?

Re:You joke, (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891187)

I wonder if we're ever going to see 2.8 at this rate

Linux 2.8 will compete with SunOS 6.0 as the best platform for running Duke Nukem Forever.

Re:You joke, (3, Insightful)

hypnagogue (700024) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891673)

A change to the ABI.

Oh, sorry, I didn't realize it was a rhetorical question.

Re:You joke, (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891707)

I think Linus mentioned in an interview that the major number won't change unless something major requires a complete rewrite that it severely impacts everything else. Of course, he saw no need to change the major number.

Re:You joke, (2, Funny)

Vulva R. Thompson, P (1060828) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891743)

Well, the upcoming sister-raping feature could qualify as "major".

Details: [kernelnewbies.org]
"The features are tested in the -mm tree, but be warned, it can crash your machine, eat your data (unlikely but not impossible) or rape your sister (just because it has never happened it doesn't means you're safe):"

Re:You joke, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18892059)

Well, the upcoming sister-raping feature could qualify as "major".

Maybe that's a major feature for a backwards OS like Linux, but Microsoft has had this technology for years. You'll need MS Office on Windows ME, with Clippy turned on and a Sidewinder Force Feedback joystick plugged in.

first pist, bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890701)

first pist, bitches

Re:first pist, bitches (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890761)

Immediately modded down, and not even first.

Can you say pwnd?

Re:first pist, bitches (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890821)

can you say, 'yo dick in mah mouth'?

cluster (-1, Offtopic)

kevlarcoared (1079907) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890713)

Awesome, how does it run beowolf clusters?

Re:cluster (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891337)

or , "Yeah, but does it run Linux?"

Damnit! (5, Funny)

FunWithKnives (775464) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890771)

And I just upgraded to 2.6.20-15! (Kubuntu Feisty Fawn)

who the h3!! marked that flamebait? (2, Funny)

1800maxim (702377) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890895)

Must be Linus!

Re:Damnit! (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890945)

Same here -- I just went to 2.6.20, mostly because 2.6.17 no longer was supported by my distro, and 2.6.18 and 19 are somewhat buggy compared to .17 and .20. I'll wait and see before I go to .21 -- there's really nothing in there that I /need/. Others may have different needs and wants, of course.
At this point, I'm mostly interested in bugfixes, and not features. YMMV.

(Anyhow, why did someone mod your post "Flamebait"? I can't see anything in it that's inflammatory at all?)

John McCain: Minister of Propaganda (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891125)


Anything you say Mr McCain.

The North Vietnamese would have done the U.S.A. a great service by sending this sorry sack of babbling protoplasm to the Soviet Gulag for
permanent residence.

I hope this helps democracy in the United Gulags Of America.

Sincerely,
K. Trout

Published? (1, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890773)

What's with the headline? Who publishes OS kernels? I guess it could be grammatically correct and all that, but it sounds a little weird to me.

Re:Published? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890809)

Linus Torvalds & Co. you insensitive Clod

Re:Published? (3, Informative)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891177)

It's me who sent the headline. "Publicar" (to publish) is what people usually uses for those cases in spanish. So there you've the answer for your question :)

(I also planned to add the number of months of development (almost 3, 80 days), but I forgot it)

Re:Published? (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891659)

Hey, I always thought "release" sounded a bit like urination, but you don't hear me complaining.

OMG F1r5t P054 (-1, Flamebait)

ponos (122721) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890777)

They had to release it today. Just yesterday I downloaded, configured and built 2.6.21.7... I guess I'll wait until 2.6.21.2 or something.

P.

Re:OMG F1r5t P054 (2, Interesting)

justinlindh (1016121) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890957)

Stop it. This isn't the GameFAQs forum, and nobody cares if they're the first post here. If you don't have anything to contribute, then don't post.

On topic:
All of this built-in virtualization stuff sounds great. How long, on average, does it take the Ubuntu repositories to receive new kernels?

Re:OMG F1r5t P054 (0, Troll)

BUTT-H34D (840273) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891129)

Shut the fuck up you 7 digit n00b luser or I'll like, kick your ass and stuff.

Re:OMG F1r5t P054 (1)

Zonk (troll) (1026140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891535)

Six months.

Feisty will likely be using a patched 2.6.20 until Gusty's released in October.

Re:OMG F1r5t P054 (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891855)

You're new here, aren't you?

please help... (2, Funny)

fattmatt (1042156) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890801)

I'm still running 1.0 Patch 9 ... should I upgrade?

Bloat? (3, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890807)

Is it just me, or are all these options that are added with every new release going to result in a bloated kernel? It seems like every release adds new stuff, but I never see anything outdated taken away.

Yes, I know that you can recompile and remove what you don't need, but most "non-uber-geek" users are not going to be able to handle that, and most distros are going to include a kernel with the kitchen sink compiled in.

Re:Bloat? (4, Insightful)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890873)

most distros are going to include a kernel with the kitchen sink compiled in.

No, most distros are going to include a kernel with the kitchen sink compiled as modules, taking up a few megabytes on the hard drive, but never loaded.

Re:Bloat? (3, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891633)

Even if you compile something as modules, it does take up memory and resources. Much less, but still not negligible. There's hooks for the modules, plus tests in other parts on whether a module is loaded or not, in addition to much larger symbol tables.
And, of course, there's many parts that can not be made into modules at all, but have to be part of the kernel. And that makes a HUGE difference.

Is the difference really that big? Well, the machine I'm currently on has a bzipped kernel that's around 1.5 MB in size plus a 820 kB map. The alternative boot to a commercial distro (no name, no shame) has a bzipped kernel that's around 2.1 MB, plus a 2.3 MB initrd, plus a 1.2 MB System map.

The difference might not be staggering, but it's there, and the kernel is growing with each revision. Here's how the System.map has grown for the last few revision on this laptop, with no new options added:


-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 754620 Nov 30 18:32 System.map-2.6.17-gentoo-r8
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 768275 Dec 28 15:57 System.map-2.6.18-gentoo-r6
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 809157 Mar 26 04:28 System.map-2.6.19-gentoo-r5
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 839371 Apr 25 22:45 System.map-2.6.20-gentoo-r6


That's an 11% increase without adding anything. Similar for the kernel itself (although that's harder to compare directly, due to the bzip2 compression). While not alarming, it's a trend towards feeping creaturitis that I think bears watching.

Re:Bloat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891839)

...taking up a few megabytes on the hard drive, but never loaded.

Yet a great many initrd/initramfs are going to test if they need to modprobe in hundreds of modules (OK, OK, I'm exagerating), which is why most modern "stock" Linux distro are super-slow to boot.

A good self-compiled kernel with all the drivers mandatory to boot compiled in, get rid of initrd/initramfs and booting is nearly instantaneous.

Re:Bloat? (4, Insightful)

Lxy (80823) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890907)

I've noticed that each time I compile a new kernel, something has been moved to [deprecated] status that was still live in the last release. All the deprecated stuff is not compiled in by default, keeping the resulting bzImage size manageable.

Most distros compile everything as modules, which generally keeps the overall size of the kernel down. Sure, bzImage grows over time (not just because of new features, but typically new patches == more lines of code), but not significantly from release to release.

Most "non-uber-geek" users don't care what's in their kernel, and if they did, they'd learn to compile it themselves. Compiling kernels has gotten easier over the years. Chances are, if you care enough about how your kernel is compiled, you'll have the skills needed to do it yourself.

Re:Bloat? (1)

h890231398021 (948231) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891761)

Compiling kernels has gotten easier over the years.

You're joking, right? I used to compile my own kernel.org kernel in 2.4 days. Starting with 2.6, there are so many options, many dependent on whether other options are selected or not, that I find it impossible to figure out what I need to check and what can be left out.

No, I'd say that 2.6 ushered in the age of relying on your distro to compile the latest kernel for you and provide it as an update. This is particularly true because the kernel.org 2.6 releases, IMHO, have not been nearly as stable on release as the 2.4 ones were, and so you also end up relying on your distro to apply whatever bugfixes-du-jour are needed.

Re:Bloat? (2, Funny)

ehrichweiss (706417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891927)

Are you referring to the 2.4 days as actual compile time or time it took you to work out what to include in the kernel config? I don't think it ever took more than 8 hours to configure and compile a new kernel on my end even if the machine doing the compiling was 1/10th the speed of, then, current computers.

Plus, I don't find it THAT hard to configure the new kernels but I take my distro's config file and remove anything I know I don't need rather than starting with a blank-slate config and THEN trying to figure out what to include/remove.

Re:Bloat? (2, Informative)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891229)

and most distros are going to include a kernel with the kitchen sink compiled in.

Actually, they use kernels with everything compiled as modules, and a separate initrd/initramfs to deal with loading the drivers required at boot time.

Meh (3, Informative)

1010110010 (1002553) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890815)

I haven't been able to get anything past 2.6.17 to boot successfully, I think they seriously hosed the ATA shit.

Re:Meh (3, Interesting)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890889)

personally i hate using an initrd.img and prefer to build ext2 & ext3 support right in the kernel making initrd unnecessary, if you compile file system support as a module you will need an initrd.img too so insetead of selecting an "M" select "*" you could try that...

P.S. i never use reiserfs so i can not say if this works with reiserfs or not...

Re:Meh (1)

1010110010 (1002553) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891113)

I never build FS stuff as a module.

Seriously I don't know what the deal is, all the same options, 2.6.17 boots and anything past it won't. It'll usually hang on my IDE drive discovery.

Re:Meh (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891959)

Does it stop on "waiting for root file system to become available" or some such?

Re:Meh (1)

HolyCrapSCOsux (700114) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891175)

I'm at 2.6.20.... (FC6)
seems okay to me

Re:Meh (3, Informative)

elFarto the 2nd (709099) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891585)

IIRC after 2.6.17 the SATA stuff changed quite a bit (it changed from the old SCSI based stuff, to libata), and requires turning the new options on.

Regards
elFarto

Re:Meh (1)

rTough (316345) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891587)

I don't think the kernel developers hosed the ata shit.. more likely you're distribution hosed the ata shit...

And if they hosed it.... it's either a development dist or they f#*$ed up.

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891943)

Yes obviously the kernel sata driver timing out while detecting hard disks is a distribution specific problem.
Clearly the fact that the root fs isn't even mounted at that point means nothing.

Re:Meh (1)

Kryai (976997) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891613)

I recommend going to google and fixing your kernel configuration when you build it. Those drivers changed recently and you simply just haven't done your homework. A very simple thing to do is to build in all the SATA drivers, but you will want to narrow it down.

Re:Meh (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891817)

change /dev/hd?? to /dev/sd?? (even with IDE)

it might work, No Guarantees though...

Quite possibly. (1)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#18892025)

Just tried the latest kernel and it hangs on trying to fire up the second ATA instance. Not even a kernel oops, nothing. That's true whether I use the vanilla kernel or Red Hat's RPM. Something is screwed up, and from the sounds of it, there's more than one of us experiencing a failure at the same point, so that would be the obvious suspect.

KVM management? (2, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890837)

Speaking of KVM (slightly offtopic, but not totally) are there any worthwhile management utilities for it yet? I actually ended up giving up for a while on KVM entirely because the video device is horribly slow and VDE support is not reliable, and I'm using vmware server, but I did have to give it a try. I'd love to use KVM (since I have supported hardware and it's Free software, and I'd love to minimize my use of the closed stuff) but beyond those problems (which will hopefully both be fixed relatively soon) there is simply no decent management software unless you're on redhate. Either virt-manager or libvirt is badly broken and won't work properly otherwise. UNLESS... has anyone out there gotten it working on debian/Ubuntu yet? I tried for a while, but I'm just not a good enough programmer and the programs ain't done yet.

Re:KVM management? (0, Offtopic)

deezilmsu (769007) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891339)

http://synergy2.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

Works great. Haven't been able to play with it in a while due to school policies on networking (give me my hub back, fackers), but there ya go.

Re:KVM management? (2, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891469)

Uh, Synergy is a program used for sharing a keyboard and mouse across multiple machines. I use it daily, with a Linux host, and two clients; one Windows XP, one Mac OSX. It doesn't manage settings and run state for KVM virtual machines. Thanks for playing, though.

Re:KVM management? (1)

deezilmsu (769007) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891527)

whoops. Total misread. That's what staying up until GOD in the morning working on a paper for class will get you.

Re:KVM management? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891419)

Seriously? For real? Just how much management can you need? KVM images, like QEMU images, are just linux processes with a bit of magic. Manage them like processes. Got a big 100-node cluster you want to run 1000 VMs on? Manage them with ordinary cluster process management tools.

All much easier than Xen (Xen in effect becomes your "real" OS, necessitating a bunch of unusual management tools).

Redhat have a long tradition of wrapping stuff that doesn't need to be wrapped.

Re:KVM management? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891547)

Seriously? For real? Just how much management can you need?

virt-manager is supposed to provide a vmware server console-like interface.

I need that much management if I'm going to leave vmware server.

Running shell scripts to run my virtual machines, and editing those scripts, and having those scripts create and destroy network interfaces etc, is an annoyance. I am capable of doing it, but I am lazy and would rather use someone else's tools. It's [ostensibly] only a matter of time before virt-manager works, or before gkvm is expanded to the point at which it is actually a useful tool, so I'm not going to go attempt to invent a shitty wheel when someone else is working on a nice one.

Redhat have a long tradition of wrapping stuff that doesn't need to be wrapped.

Having an interface for provisioning new virtual machines, or suspending them and later bringing them back, or changing their settings is not strictly necessary, but it is quite useful.

Later, when we are migrating KVMs between machines (I see it can do it now, but it's preliminary) we will definitely want management utilities.

If you don't want them, that's nice, but don't try to tell me that I don't want or need them. I don't need a chair, I could kneel on the floor all day, but that would be stupid. I consider this to be much the same situation.

Re:KVM management? (1)

Anthony Liguori (820979) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891531)

I actually ended up giving up for a while on KVM entirely because the video device is horribly slow and VDE support is not reliable

How do you mean the video device is "horribly slow". Also, what do you mean by VDE (as in, vde.sf.net?).

Re:KVM management? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891617)

How do you mean the video device is "horribly slow".

I mean that updates to the display (I was using the console interface, not a VNC) are, well, horribly slow. Some issues might be windows-specific, such as windows 2000 taking so long to turn the whole display desktop-colored (initializing video memory, I guess?) taking literally a minute or more.

And yes, by VDE I mean Virtual Distributed Ethernet. I tried both VDE and VDE2. With VDE2 it never worked properly. With vde, I could start kvm four times and have VDE work once. With no changes to the command line, or other programs being run. Just re-running the vdeq kvm ... command.

Tickless only for x86 now, still good news (5, Interesting)

MarcQuadra (129430) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890841)

I follow prerelease kernels and I've been waiting for this. I've found that running my VMWare hosts and guests with tickless, low-HZ, voluntary-preempted kernels is seriously reducing the overhead you get when you run more virtual CPUs than real ones in your box.

I can't wait for it to mature on PPC, MIPS, and x86_64! Right now it's 32-bit x86 only.

Re:Tickless only for x86 now, still good news (1)

JohnFluxx (413620) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891163)

Can you explain this a bit more please for those of us who don't know what tickless means?

Re:Tickless only for x86 now, still good news (5, Informative)

AaronW (33736) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891601)

It means that they were able to successfully remove the blood sucking parasites from the kernel.

Most kernels use a periodic system timer tick to do various housekeeping chores, like rescheduling tasks, sending packets, flushing files from the cache, etc. Usually this occurs at some periodic rate, i.e. every 1-10ms for Linux and every 10-15ms for Windows (according to this article [microsoft.com] .

This is a bit wasteful of CPU resources, since the kernel might not need to do anything for quite a while, or it might want a high resolution timer with higher accuracy than normal system timer. For example, when the system is idle, the CPU still must wake up and process a timer interrupt for every timer tick, and if it's set to 1ms there are 1000 interrupts per second.

A tickless kernel instead only schedules the next tick for when it is needed, so if the system is idle and nothing needs to happen for 50ms, then the next tick will be scheduled 50ms later. On the other hand, if a timer needs to go off in 750 microseconds, the kernel can schedule the next interrupt to go off then, giving much higher accuracy.

Requiem for Macintosh (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891293)

The artists moved to the Mac in 1984 for the user interface to make their art. They generated applications, hypercard stacks,applescripts, performance spaces like the apple store soho would eventually become, text and picture clippings, art galleries (tekserve).etc., due to their highly developed aesthetics.

these artists-- these creative designers, musicians, scientists, and programmers-- stayed on the Mac during the interregnum when apple was a decaying mess and, respecting the Gestalt manager, built their applications out of dilapidated but beautiful Toolbox code.

The pencil-pushers and accountning brats saw all of this and said, "Hey, that looks cool." "Daddy buy me some of that." But these switcheurs have nothing to contribute except a talent for demanding crap like glossy screens. just what the fuck are you spreadsheet fiddlers doing? nothing beyond fueling the demand for ugly, tragically misdesigned, cookie-cutter applications like Firefox and Azureus. That is why the Mac community has so rapidly gone into its Rococco stage.

The Mac community continues to change and it is becoming very clear that we are loosing our edge-- the subcultures that once thrived on the Mac are all loosing steam to the mainstream. art, music, nightlife, web development. The Mac is so over. very sad indeed.

That's nice and all... (4, Funny)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890843)

... but does it run Linux?

Re:That's nice and all... (4, Funny)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891075)

Since it supports para/virtualization yes, of course, it runs linux!

(Damn, finally there's an answer for this!)

Re:That's nice and all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891157)

Actually, User Mode Linux has been running on Linux for some time ;)

Take a fresh kernel tree (it doesn't like playing well with already compiled stuff) and make menuconfig ARCH=um and you're ready to start. (You get bonus speed if the host kernel has been patched for it, but a standard kernel will work for hosting as well)

Re:That's nice and all... (1)

MrCoke (445461) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891655)

Not tested I'm afraid.

Rumour is that the GNU is porting HURD to it though. They think it will enhance their GNU/Linux brand.

I need more coffee...

Another solution to a timeless problem! (5, Funny)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890853)

Once again, it took many months of work to optimize an idle loop.

Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890855)

About time they fix that issues... it's been around since at least 1995.

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (4, Informative)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890985)

You're confusing Linux with this Windows 95/98 [microsoft.com] . However, this problem [microsoft.com] or this another problem [microsoft.com] are even more funnier

I don't get it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891149)

Some one explain the joke plz.

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (1)

Gospodin (547743) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891195)

Definitely not a Linux problem:

[webadmin@garden-ghost logs]$ uptime
5:05pm up 53 days, 5:54, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891427)

uptime
  2:21PM up 1081 days, 3:58, 1 user, load averages: 0.11, 0.09, 0.08

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (1)

The_Abortionist (930834) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891557)

> load averages: 0.11, 0.09, 0.08

That would explain it...

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (1)

Eternauta3k (680157) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891789)

uptime
1:31PM up 2.4e+15 days, 6:37 30 users, load averages: 0.61, 0.10, 0.21
Beat that!

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891801)

OMG! You are clearly superior. Will you father my children?

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (1)

Gospodin (547743) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891955)

Hey, it's not my fault that some admin kicked out the power cable 53 days ago!

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (4, Interesting)

Tom (822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891611)

It doesn't and never did. However, the uptime clock wraps around after 497 days. Took me two hours of finding out why the box rebooted (and then why there was no indication of the reboot in the logs) one day to research that. That same box has since looped the clock a second time. So I can say for sure it stays up for more than 50 days. :-)

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (5, Funny)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891767)

497 day wrap around? You should switch to Windows. I'm sure no such problem has ever been reported on that OS.

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (2, Interesting)

Tack (4642) | more than 7 years ago | (#18892017)

It doesn't and never did. However, the uptime clock wraps around after 497 days.
I guess that one got fixed at some point:

[root@blade1 ~]$ uptime
18:00:25 up 622 days, 23:00, 1 user, load average: 0.17, 0.22, 0.29
[root@blade1 ~]$ uname -a
Linux blade1.[redacted] 2.6.9-11.ELsmp #1 SMP Wed Jun 8 17:54:20 CDT 2005 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

Re:Does it still crash after 49.7 days?? (2, Interesting)

AaronW (33736) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891671)

As far as I know, Linux never had a 49.7 day problem, but it did have a problem at 497 days. I have a machine at home running the 2.4.20 kernel and every 497 days my uptime restarts, but it hasn't crashed. It's gone through 2 rollovers so far and has been up for over 3.72 years. It will hit its next rollover around September. I really need to build a new server... I just don't know if it will be as reliable as this one has been.

The list of changes can be found... (4, Informative)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890875)

Here. [kernelnewbies.org]

Hotplug CPU support! (1)

matt me (850665) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891355)

Hotplug CPU support? That must burn.

Re:Hotplug CPU support! (4, Funny)

harrkev (623093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891529)

Hotplug CPU support? That must burn
Nope. Works great. Let me demonstrate...fsdjlksd+++

Flamebait (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890917)

Sounds awesome... too bad everything outside the kernel sucks.

Re:Flamebait (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890977)

Yes, well, that's because you fuck your momma. When your flaccid, vacuum-cleaner damaged penis pumps in her enlarged, ripped-up butthole, you have these weird feelings about Linux kernels.

Version number (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890941)

Other companies would have numbered it at least 3.0, more likely 8.0 or would have stepped to another version naming scheme...

paravirtualization? Dynticks? new drivers? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18890951)

This seems like pretty good evidence that Linux is a kernel.

At last! (2, Funny)

Dr. Stavros (808432) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890953)

Glad to hear that it's been published. Where can I download the PDF? I heard that Darl dies near the end, but I want to read it for myself.

Spoiler (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891781)

free() kills Dumbledore!

Sooner or later... (2, Funny)

heretic108 (454817) | more than 7 years ago | (#18890997)

Sooner or later, my /boot/grub/menu.lst will look like:

...
title Ubuntu, kernel 2.6.29-5-generic
root (hd0,0)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.29-5-generic root=/dev/hda1 ro \
  coffee=cappucino,sugar=0,hourly \
  massageareas=head,neck,shoulders \
  catfeedingtimes=4_hours,15_grams
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.29-5-generic
quiet
savedef ault
boot
...

Re:Sooner or later... (3, Interesting)

ctr2sprt (574731) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891549)

Yeah, the absurdly long kernel command lines in Linux really bug me. It's a symptom of the suckiness that is the PC BIOS, so I'm not really blaming the Linux people, but there are better solutions and have been for years. The FreeBSD loader [freebsd.org] , for instance, is capable of loading the kernel and any modules required to bootstrap the system, reading configuration files, and running Forth (!) scripts. Such a loader would completely eliminate the need for initrds on nearly all systems[1] without sacrificing any power. You could also emulate Openboot or EFI - or more realistically a subset of them - using the PC BIOS to prepare for the future.

[1] initrd is a really awesome feature and it shouldn't go away. But it's massive overkill the way it's typically used, which is to load modules required to mount the root filesystem.

Re:Sooner or later... (2, Funny)

ady1 (873490) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891899)

massageareas=head,neck,shoulders
In this revision, they've changed added a additional feature. Now the line is like:

massageareas=head[0],neck[0],shoulder[0-1]
Massage the wrong array member and the kernel will panic.

Mactel MBP C2D (3, Interesting)

JumboMessiah (316083) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891097)

As an owner of a Macbook Pro, I've been waiting for this to get released. The Dynticks integration will (hopefully) help lower power consumption and heat output. Though this will help reduce heat and power on all platforms, those running Linux on a MBP C2D know it's hard to keep the fans from spinning up from relatively little activity.

Next up is to get ATI to actually support any power saving features in fglrx on the MBP C2D and give the mAdWiFi [madwifi.org] guys more time to work out the features on the Atheros AR5008.

OSX, right now, still has a significant advantage in keeping heat and power consumption down. Even though, I imagine some will testify that even OSX is having a hard time with it...

Here's to testing out 2.6.21 tonight :)

Re:Mactel MBP C2D (1)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891231)

The Dynticks integration will (hopefully) help lower power consumption and heat output.

Dynticks stil doesn't set the CPU to a power-savvy mode (it will in the future, but not in 2.6.21), so power consumption is more or less the same than without dynticks.

Re:Mactel MBP C2D (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891689)

Dynticks stil doesn't set the CPU to a power-savvy mode

On my Core 2 Duo I don't have dynticks yet (I'm still at 2.6.16) but I'm using the modules allowing to change the frequency of the CPU. I suppose this is compatible with dynticks and it's just a matter of modprobing the correct module and issuing something like:

echo ondemand > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_gover nor
echo ondemand > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu1/cpufreq/scaling_gover nor

(the exact module names to use have changed between 2.6.16 and 2.6.20 for sure, GIYF)

But maybe this isn't working for the MacBook Pro's motherboard!?

Anyway this isn't anywhere near a "suspend" mode, but it does help keep the CPU cooler when you're CPUs aren't doing a lot of work.

PWRficient support? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891249)

How does a kernel need special support for a CPU?

The PWRficient is just a PPC, so it should use standard PPC instructions and standard cache control techniques. The same is true for other architectures. The only thing Linux needed to adapt for more modern x86 CPUs was probably stuff like frequency scaling and other add fun - just nothing necessary, because all new CPUs are backward compatible anyway.

Re:PWRficient support? (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891971)

Support schmupport. There are lots of things in computing that Just Work (TM) without being 'supported' officially by the manufacturer. Conversely, 'support' doesn't guarantee very much, it's just a meaningless buzzword [iki.fi] . Then again, I41 welcome our new PWRficient overlords, especially when you can get laptops with them.

Cool, but... (2, Insightful)

asninn (1071320) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891285)

That's cool, but is this really news that's Slashdot-worthy? Sites like LWN and KernelTrap have already reported this, and anyone who's interested in Linux development is pretty much guaranteed to follow the former at least, I think (and most likely the latter as well).

Re:Cool, but... (1)

styrotech (136124) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891909)

I dunno, back in the day it seemed that Linux kernel development stories and release announcements were the mainstay of Slashdot news.

Re:Cool, but... (4, Insightful)

npsimons (32752) | more than 7 years ago | (#18892023)

That's cool, but is this really news that's Slashdot-worthy? Sites like LWN and KernelTrap have already reported this, and anyone who's interested in Linux development is pretty much guaranteed to follow the former at least, I think (and most likely the latter as well).

Considering that slashdot was (note the past tense) first and foremost a Linux/all things geeky site, I'd say this article is very slashdot-worthy. Not to mention that we get a fawning mac fan boy article every time Steve Jobs so much as farts. At least the Apple section can be turned off. Wish I could do the same with Microsoft and Windows articles.


VMI (1)

wwpublishing (1093863) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891711)

Man, I'm so glad that this new version is coming out. I've been using VMI forever on windows and you know how much that sucks. This gets my stamp of approval!

So? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18891823)

Linux is for dorks.

eCryptfs public key (4, Interesting)

omnirealm (244599) | more than 7 years ago | (#18891937)

The public key support for eCryptfs can handle more than just public keys. It includes a communication mechanism with a user daemon that can be queried from the kernel on file open events. There is a pluggable key module interface accessible through that daemon. OpenSSL is currently implemented, but there is nothing stopping anyone from writing a module to use GnuPG or any other key management/encryption backend, all in userspace. The module just needs to accept a key signature, and it can perform encryption and decryption based on whatever that signature refers to.

In other news, eCryptfs has recently been given the go-ahead for inclusion into Fedora:

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi? id=218556 [redhat.com]

In the meantime, you can grab all the userspace stuff from the eCryptfs SourceForge site:

http://ecryptfs.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]
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