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U.S. Puts 12 Nations On Watch For Piracy

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the colbert-angry-wants-board-back dept.

United States 429

ColinPL writes with a link to an AP article about a public scolding the US has given China, Russia, and several other nations. Failure to 'sufficiently protect' American copyrights is the cause of the Bush administration's ire, and has resulted in these countries showing up on a 'priority watch list' that could eventually lead to economic sanctions. "In addition to Russia and China, the 10 countries placed on the priority watch list were Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela. In elevating Thailand to the priority watch list, the administration said it was concerned by a range of issues including a 'deteriorating protection for patents and copyrights.' Thailand is currently in a dispute with international drug companies including Abbott Laboratories of the United States over the cost of drugs to fight AIDS and other diseases. The Thai government in January issued compulsory licenses allowing the use of much cheaper generic versions of two leading drugs in Thailand."

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That told them! (4, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939161)

If only China and Russia were big enough to not give a shit about US policy...

Re:That told them! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939181)

I'm just surprised Canada and the UK aren't on the list, given all the piracy that goes on there. It's almost like this list has nothing to do with piracy.

Re:That told them! (2)

Spookticus (985296) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939207)

what about all the piracy that goes on in the states.

Re:That told them! (3, Funny)

Fuzzums (250400) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939397)

That's called free enterprise.
Everyboy knows that! Duh! C'mon. ;)

Re:That told them! (2, Informative)

azemute (890775) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939495)

Well... Canada was. Not the UK however.

The countries placed on a lower-level watch list were Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.

Re:That told them! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939253)

If only China and Russia were big enough to not give a shit about US policy...

The real joke is putting Israel on the list. Even if the US were to fine them they'd just get more US taxpayer money sent in the next lot of "foreign aid".

Don't forget Canada (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939273)

Canada, the land of brutal cold and real ugly women, is #11

Re:That told them! (2, Insightful)

AuxLV (748687) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939329)

LOL, China and Russia already don't give a shit. Especially China. How can USA put economic sanctions on China? It is China who can put sanctions on USA. Just imagine China stops selling all electric devices and components to USA - electronical apocalipse will destroy America in a few months. Bush and his administration is a bunch of lols!

Re:That told them! (4, Insightful)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939417)

Except that the economy of China gets a big influx of money by selling to USA. Sure they can stop selling all their cheap goods over here, but if they do, what are they going to do with them?

Re:That told them! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939583)

Except that the economy of China gets a big influx of money by selling to USA. Sure they can stop selling all their cheap goods over here, but if they do, what are they going to do with them?


Those larger and more important market areas, like Europe.

Re:That told them! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939693)

I'm sure the Europeans would appreciate the sudden dumping of vast numbers of Chinese made products. Case in point http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/421311 0.stm [bbc.co.uk]

Finally (1)

Disharmony2012 (998431) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939193)

deteriorating protection for patents and copyrights.'


Uh, yay?

Can't get to the article.... (5, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939199)

... anyone have a .torrent of it?

Re:Can't get to the article.... (2, Informative)

mdozturk (973065) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939303)

Anyone go to the Office of the United States Trade Representitive [ustr.gov] web site? The corners of all squares are cut off, reminds me of Battlestar Galactica.

Let's be honest (5, Insightful)

halivar (535827) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939201)

This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.

Re:Let's be honest (5, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939265)

This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.


Except that they can't do much. Sure, the U.S. government can impose economic sanctions on non-compliant countries, but that only takes you so far. The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations. U.S. courts won't typically touch a copyright infringement case if the infringement occurs overseas.

Re:Let's be honest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939325)

They black-opped TPB, and performed several other, smaller operations that didn't get caught in Russia and various parts of Europe. Somehow they get away with saying OTHER people are terrorists?

Re:Let's be honest (-1, Flamebait)

darjen (879890) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939335)

Except that they can't do much.
Sure they can... the US can bomb the crap outta them, like they do anyone else who raises their ire.

The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.
That's never stopped them before. The federal government always finds a way around the Constitution.

Re:Let's be honest (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939473)

Sure they can... the US can bomb the crap outta them

And they will car bomb the crap out of us. Works both ways.

Re:Let's be honest (4, Insightful)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939521)

Sure they can... the US can bomb the crap outta them, like they do anyone else who raises their ire.
This is known as gunboat diplomacy [wikipedia.org] . It's a fine method of practicing international affairs except that, as the NYT reports this morning (sorry, lost the link), everywhere that the US is at war has led to an increase in terrorist attacks.

Bombing the crap out of people always ends up with them doing the best they can to bomb the crap out of you and it's noticeable that all the worldwide military might of the US still hasn't defeated terrorism.

Re:Let's be honest (1)

jamar0303 (896820) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939811)

Right- this is CHINA we're talking about. Just look at their military spending- the US will be a smoking crater if they try to pull anything on the countries on their piracy watchlist.

Re:Let's be honest (2, Informative)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939457)

The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.
Guess that worked pretty well over the last 150 or so years, where dozens of countries were trampled over by the USA, in some cases bringing chaos, violence and death to those countries.

Re:Let's be honest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939559)

The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.

Iraq?

Re:Let's be honest (5, Insightful)

jimicus (737525) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939627)

The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.

That's odd, because I could have sworn Iraq was a foreign nation with its own sovreign government until a few years ago.

Re:Let's be honest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939689)

Iraq invaded Kuwait. Kuwait was an ally of the US. Hussein violated the deals of the cease fire. War resumed.

Re:Let's be honest (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939781)

Except that they can't do much. Sure, the U.S. government can impose economic sanctions on non-compliant countries, but that only takes you so far.


The US has invaded countries for no reason at all. At least now they would have an excuse.

Re:Let's be honest (2, Insightful)

asuffield (111848) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939379)

This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.


This is very true - however, the Bush administration is notable in their "every other country must do what we say" attitude. Even for the US, their arrogance is astounding. Most past administrations have been rather less willing to spend what little diplomatic advantages they have on matters like this.

I cannot imagine why they think that issuing public orders to China is going to get them anything other than a lot of very pissed off Chinese. This little stunt has probably ensured that China will not be doing anything about copyright complaints from US corporations, just so that the Chinese leaders can show they don't take orders from the US.

Re:Let's be honest (2)

mpe (36238) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939493)

I cannot imagine why they think that issuing public orders to China is going to get them anything other than a lot of very pissed off Chinese. This little stunt has probably ensured that China will not be doing anything about copyright complaints from US corporations, just so that the Chinese leaders can show they don't take orders from the US.

It's not as if there is much the US can do to threaten China. Any trade sanctions would hurt the US more and an military threat has the "problem" that the Chinese can actually shoot back...

Re:Let's be honest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939489)

is this a joke? do you have any idea how silly any post that uses 'MAFIAAA' in it looks?
Grow up.

Facts - MAFIAA skews Dem big-time (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939761)

You can't spell DMCA without the "D".... [opensecrets.org]

Yep, the entertainment industry gives at least twice as much to Democrats as they do to Republicans. Since 1990, they've given $137,219,474 to Dems, and $63,574,385 to Repubs.

The recording industry is even more skewed [opensecrets.org] , giving $13,635,639 to Dems and $3,727,147 to Repubs since 1990. That's 78% to Dems - with some election cycles having 85% of the recording industries political contributions going to Dems.

But that's nothing compared to the movie industry [opensecrets.org] , which gave $47,800,285 to Dems and $7,192,062 to Repubs since 1990. Up to 93% of movie industry political contributions have gone to Dems in some election cycles, with that number never lower than 78%.

There's a reason why the DMCA was signed by a Democratic President. Hell, there are millions of reasons, all of them green...

The cognitive dissonance among sheltered /. basement-dwellers that this post is going to cause will be funny.

USA (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939229)

Dear United STATES of AMERICA.

You have your own part of the world. Please stay within it's boundaries and spend the saved time READING Wikipedia's article on law. You DO NOT and SHALL NOT ever control other nations laws. You cannot even abide by the very laws you were founded on these days, so why do you expect others to do the same?

Lots of love
Rest of the world.

Re:USA (1)

EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939339)

4, Insightful? Wow, must be a lot of foreign readers today.

Foreigners will never understand piracy concerns - it's not like Americans have a healthy black market for "Soviet Windows XP" or the latest Baliwood flicks are being sold on every street corner.

Re:USA (1)

the_womble (580291) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939453)

Yes, of course, you cannot let all us foreigners ignore state imposed monopolies. That's communist. Oh, wait....

Re:USA (1)

EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939683)

So you have absolutely no problem with pirated copies of Wii, DS, PSP, 360, PS2, and PS3 games, along with bootleg DVD's + CD's on every street corner in many of these countries?

We must protect our only exports! (0, Flamebait)

FatSean (18753) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939747)

The US doesn't make anything the world wants except for software and entertainment and weaponry...hmm...where have I heard this before?

Anyway, Bush knows our economy is shit even though he lies and says otherwise. It's propped up by a circle-jerk of 'service providing' that people here can't really afford. The only real revenue stream is selling copywritten content.

It's all about the dollars....just like occupying Iraq.

It's a sad time to be a citizen of the USA, but we will get these scumbags out and try to get lesser scumbags who won't be quite as obnoxious and damaging to our ideals.

Even the most corrupt tax-and-spend liberal couldn't piss away over a trillion dollars on abject failure in the space of 7 years.

Re:USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939389)

Dear Rest of the World,

We gots us lots o' money and guns. Don't go pissin' us off a'fore we "liberate" yer ass six ways 'til Sunday. If you're not us, yer with the terr'ists.

Ya better check yer facts ag'in, 'coz you'll find that we actually do own the whole world by default, thanks to you all refusin' to do a damn thing about us.

Lots of crap,
The Rootin' Tootin' US of A.

Re:USA (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939435)

Dear USA,

you don't have oil. Try us.

Rest of the World.

Re:USA (1)

MadFarmAnimalz (460972) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939395)

I'm not so sure about the "you do not" bit in the following from your post:

You DO NOT and SHALL NOT ever control other nations laws

WIPO pretty much propagates what the US congress lays down in law. To take the section on Egypt asan example in the Special 301 Report, the country is being egged on to sign on and apply WIPO.

US free trade zones also carry very strict IP enforcement agreements as strings, and yet developing nations still fall over themselves to hop on board with these.

Re:USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939399)

then stop pirating content made in the USA, and stay within your own flipping borders in piracy terms. Don't try and defend the pirating of US made software, games, music and movies as being some kind of fight against inujustice. If you want the US to stay out of your copyright law, you better start manufacturing your own digital content instead of leeching off the USA.

Re:USA (-1, Troll)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939441)

Dear REST of the WORLD,

You don't have to obey our laws. You don't have to play by our rules. But we are the biggest consumer market in the world. And NOBODY can force us to open that market to you if you don't wish to play by our rules.

Lots of love,
USA

Re:USA (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939465)

But we are the biggest consumer market in the world.
Dear USA,

Not anymore.

the EU.

Pot calling Kettle (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939481)

It's not like the United States doesn't pirate tons of media from Japan [animesuki.com] .

Re:USA (2, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939509)

You cannot even abide by the very laws you were founded on these days, so why do you expect others to do the same?

Here's the only law that ever worked: everybody can take a shot.

If USA has mechanisms to pressure other countries, it'll do so. If it has ability to avoid its own laws, it'll do so. It took a shot and succeeded.

Laws are only as strong as the mechanisms built to withstand them. Interests and power always will achieve more.

Re:USA (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939825)

For a second there, I thought you were talking about the American right to bear arms ;-)

I wonder (2, Insightful)

Dance_Dance_Karnov (793804) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939231)

If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing. Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies. ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability.

Re:I wonder (4, Insightful)

malsdavis (542216) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939771)

It is indeed a strange twist when the pirated versions are better than the originals.

I noticed this absurdity last week when I had to download a pirated version of a CD I had just bought so that I could actually play it in my car.

Utterly absurd and needless to say, the next album I want I will downloading (via illegal sources of course, those legal sources are the worst of all).

Re:I wonder (1)

malsdavis (542216) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939801)

"Utterly absurd and needless to say, the next album I want I will be downloading."

Oops, it seems even previewing a comment doesn't always stop typos.

Wow - gross generalization AND wrong... (3, Insightful)

Garwulf (708651) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939821)

"If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing. Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies. ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability."

Wow - now that's a gross over-generalization, and only part of the first sentence is even close to right here...

Going back to front (sort of):

"Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies."

To meet one gross over-generalization with another, you mean besides keeping the copyright holders in business so that they can continue to produce content? There's a basic economic reality you're missing here - producing any product or content takes time and resources, and to continue to do that requires that money is made to pay for the time and resources.

(And, before somebody bites my head off, yes, I know the internet is a cheap means of distribution, and yes, I know the RIAA treats its content creators horribly - I'm talking in the broadest of strokes here. When it comes down to it, any content creator needs to at least eat.)

But, you know what, you're right - we don't need that pesky literature, movies, and music anyway. If shadow puppets were good enough for our ancestors, they're good enough for us!

"ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability."

Um, no, not really. Windows Vista is DRM-happy to the point of stupidity, and the RIAA has done everything it can to drive music fans into the hands of file-sharers, but that doesn't mean that the greater utility lies in files on a computer. Actually, in most cases a physical media tends to have better functionality and portability.

Take movies for example - I can go visit my parents in another city and bring a couple of movies along, and the DVDs are quite light, easy to carry, and all I have to do is put them into any DVD player in North America to have them work. No file copying, no waiting for a download to finish, no taking up space on my hard disk - everything is just on the DVD. When it comes to the DRM stupidity we have been seeing, we have to remember that it's the DRM causing the problems, not the physical format itself.

"If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing."

This is the one place where you are at least partially correct. But you shouldn't be saying "intellectual property" here - you should be saying "service-based," because that is what is really there. The United States used to have some of the greatest manufacturing power in the world, and now it seems it actually produces very little. But that's a more complicated argument, and not really relevant to this discussion.

The third world (4, Interesting)

n3tcat (664243) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939245)

I remember on my camp in Kuwait, the TCNs (third-world country nationals) would come on to clean, and would also stop by our living quarters with a truck load of burned dvds and vcds for a few bucks a pop. And this was very often. I know it was even worse up in Iraq, with people ripping and burning movies to sell on the markets all the time.

So these other countries must be doing this in huge quantities to be on this list. It's rather impressive really.

Re:The third world (4, Interesting)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939659)

I think you will find that there are factories in China making pirate DVDs that get shipped in bulk to just about every other country in the world. There are factories in Hong Kong that start printing the retail DVDs to stock up for the retail release, of course this printing is done while the movie is still in theatres, but often theses Hong Kong factories are also the source of the early DVD rips where rogue employees get a copy out of the factory somehow.

Counterfeiting is also big in China. There they even managed to set up a whole fake NEC organisation that was buying from the same suppliers that the real NEC did, see http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/04/27/business/ne c.php [iht.com] . They even print foreign food labels and put in on local produce. It's amazing stuff. There was even a case where they set up a car factory right next to a GM factory and were churning out the same car. Check this out http://www.automotoportal.com/article/chinese-rip- offs-of-western-automakers [automotoportal.com] Makes a truck of burnt DVDs look like childs play.

O RLY? (1)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939261)

Failure to 'sufficiently protect' American copyrights is the cause of the Bush administration's ire ...

Which, five or six years ago, might have meant something. Today, it doesn't. Can't imagine why that might be.

What? No Canada? (4, Insightful)

BladedThoth (978066) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939263)

After the MPAA threw it's hissy-fit tantrum a while back about how Canada is the #1 place for movie piracy because it's where screen records come from, that they're thinking of delaying out movie release for weeks, yada yada yada, Canada doesn't make it anywhere on the list? Heh. Maybe the federal government isn't quite as stupid about what the *AAs are doing as they typically act like.

Re:What? No Canada? (1)

i_should_be_working (720372) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939317)

We made it on a second tier list along with the likes of:
Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.

Well I'll have none of this second best business. Fire up the torrents! We'll show those Peruvians who the real pirates are!

Re:What? No Canada? (1)

Splab (574204) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939731)

How come Sweden doesn't get on that list? I mean they harbor the biggest tracker, and they got a pirate party. I call hoax!

Re:What? No Canada? (1)

Xinef Jyinaer (1044268) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939775)

Well I'll have none of this second best business. Fire up the torrents! We'll show those Peruvians who the real pirates are!
Zomg, I've been searching for torrents all night - I've got futurama seasons 1-5 and the simpsons seasons 1-8 coming in at 200kb/s each. I'll get some more movies and music later. I only have 40GB left on my harddrive so i'll have to delete some of it, anything to boost those numbers!

Re:What? No Canada? (1)

MadJo (674225) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939697)

But wouldn't delaying the movie releases actually increase the use of illegally obtained copyrighted material in Canada?

So America just did a Colbert.. (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939267)

..and Russia, China, Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela are all on notice! [shipbrook.com] That'll learn 'em.

Re:So America just did a Colbert.. (0)

Goffee71 (628501) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939565)

To celebrate this momentous day, I will be selling cheap knock-off CK shirts saying 'Go Venezuela' with 'I'm a pirating b@st@ard!" tastefully embroidered on the back by menial slaves living in my LA sweatshop from the back of my fleet of limo's this weekend at several area markets! Keep 'em peeled

Last time (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939277)

it was offshore banking. The US blacklisted a number of countries, and ruined their economies. Now it's "IP". Thank you for bringing freedom to the world.

I see Canada isn't on there... (5, Informative)

Dorkmaster Flek (1013045) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939293)

Could that have anything to do with the fact that we just caved [michaelgeist.ca] to US lobbyist pressure to buy some goodwill?

Piracy? (4, Informative)

treehouse (781426) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939295)

Even /. has bought into calling copyright infringement "piracy". If you don't think it's the moral equivalent of murder on the high seas, then don't use the RIAA term "piracy". You just play into their hands.

Re:Piracy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939733)

get a life. your taking stuff that belongs to someone else and not paying for it. get a clue. piracy is as good a term as any other, and when you grow up and get a job, you'll realise how pathetic and low-life it is to take other peoples work for free. Its because of leeching scumbags like you that we have DRM and other protection measures as it is. Try having some repsect for the people who make the stuff for once kid.

Piracy - The lost battle (2, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939757)

Even /. has bought into calling copyright infringement "piracy". If you don't think it's the moral equivalent of murder on the high seas, then don't use the RIAA term "piracy". You just play into their hands.

First of all, piracy [wikipedia.org] is not murder on the high seas, it's robbery on the high seas. Secondly, language is constantly evolving. A word that means one thing one day, may mean something else later. "Gay", for example, means light-hearted and happy. However, it now also means effeminate, homosexual, etc. It did not have those secondary meanings a century ago, or even fifty years ago. "Hacker" is another example. It used to refer to a person who modifies electronic equipment to get higher performance. Now it has the added meaning of breaking or bypassing computer security systems. Once the alternate definition becomes broadly known it becomes official.

So, rage all you want. You will never get "piracy" back. Nor will we get "hacker" back. It's a lost battle.

Blatant Piracy should be stopped (3, Interesting)

prakslash (681585) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939319)

I, for one, welcome this.

These countries can do everything cheaper as seen with off-shored outsourcing and all.
The only edge the US has is innovation.

If these countries can just copy everything and do it dirt cheap, it will harm entities in the US who spend money on innovation - be it pharmaceuticals, music or software.

I think a bit of personal not-for-profit p2p downloading and an exception for life-saving drugs in OK. But, the balatant disregard for copyrights and patents with businesses in these countries openly copying and selling pharmaceuticals, software and music should be stopped.

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (3, Insightful)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939363)

You do realize that in most [not all] of these countries the people make in a year what most of us make in a month [or two]? right? Buying a 25$ movie may be nothing to people in the states or Canada, but is a big deal for many else.

Unless the mafiaa is willing to sell movies and CDs for dirt cheap they should expect piracy. let's see, I make about 70K and am willing to spend 25$ on a movie [if it's really good, otherwise I hover around $10]. These people make $7-10K so how about charge them $3 for the same movie. No? Ok, expect piracy.

And frankly if you stake your financial security on nations where the average income is $200 a month, chances are you should rethink your business plan.

Tom

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939667)

Nobody forces them to watch Hollywood movies. They can watch their own artistic movies.

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939833)

If piracy is the worst crime going on in your city, town, country, etc. Count yourself lucky. I think places like those nations on the list have bigger things to worry about than copyright infringements of american movies.

And from a sociological point of view the studios should take the blame anyways. They're like drug dealers who create such a user/supplier model that is hard to break [for most] then make the prices prohibitive. People aren't going to resort to staring at the walls, they want to watch movies and listen to audio.

You can either work with the economy, or try and work above it and reap what you sow. I imagine if you could buy movies for an appropriate price in those nations that people wouldn't be so hard up to do so. In fact, even in north america, $25 for a movie is too much for many people, especially the target demographic for most movies since they're college bound and poor.

Truth is hollywood is a victim of it's own design. Ever more expensive movies [to make] end with the customers paying more . Eventually they just say enough is enough and stop playing the game. nobody forces studios to pay $20 million for an "A list" actor. They can hire cheaper equally capable talent anywhere else.

Tom

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939459)

An economy based on "intellectual property" is a castle made of sand. In a very few years, I'll gladly welcome the lifting of all protection on the bullshit trifecta (copyright, patents, trademarks) in most countries and laugh at the US collapsing.

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (1)

Znork (31774) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939491)

"The only edge the US has is innovation."

Right. You do realize there's nothing stopping those corporates from registering the patents in the US and doing the research in cheaper countries? The idea that the west has an 'innovation edge' these days is, frankly, mostly a comfort blanket, and strong 'IP' support doesnt protect jobs, it merely increases prices for the local market. Which in turn kills jobs.

Saying those countries should introduce their own monopolies because the US cant compete would be like the former Soviet union demanding the west nationalize their factories to ensure fair competition.

Somehow I dont think that would have been a terribly bright idea.

The 'IP' monopoly systems have to go.

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (3, Insightful)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939507)

I think a bit of personal not-for-profit p2p downloading and an exception for life-saving drugs in OK. But, the balatant disregard for copyrights and patents with businesses in these countries openly copying and selling pharmaceuticals, software and music should be stopped.
So you're saying that just because the USA can't come up with a working economy, it resorts to hijacking a mechanism from the 18th century to try to control what every rational human being would classify as ideas that belong to everyone. Like the RIAA, the USA Govt. should learn the lesson too: come up with a working business model/economy or roll over.

Re:Blatant Piracy should be stopped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939799)

If these countries can just copy everything and do it dirt cheap, ... ...thus bettering the quality of life for literally billions of people, why should we do anything to stop it? Copyrights and patents are nothing but a means for a minority to benefit from a distortion of the marketplace. They defy the most basic premise of capitalism, that of benefiting society through efficient use of resources accomplished by constant competition. They are nothing worth protecting.

Brazil leaves the top list of piracy products (2, Interesting)

ColeonyxOnline (966334) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939327)

In the brazillian newspaper "Estado de Sao Paulo", there is an articles entitled Brasil leaves the top of the american list for piracy [estadao.com.br] (free form translation)

In the article, it says there was an announcement in the United States last Monday in which it was said that Brazil was removed from the top most part of the list of countries that ignore piracy and violate intellectual property.

Funny thing in the article is to read that they found out that Brazil didn't manufacture the products that were confiscated by authorities, but they were manufacture in China and crossed the border into Brazil via Paraguay.

iipa.com (1)

Takichi (1053302) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939331)

By the way, check out www.iipa.com [iipa.com] There's links to the 'Special 301' sections, along with graphs of what they think they're losing, and their wish list for correcting it.

Thailand? (4, Insightful)

Don_dumb (927108) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939365)

Copying drugs to fight AIDS and other diseases.

Those bastards!

Israel (2, Insightful)

Secrity (742221) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939371)

I find it very interesting that Israel is on the list as it is the only country on the list that could really be affected by US sanctions.

Re:Israel (1)

Fifty Points (878668) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939451)

Coincidentally, guess which country on that list will never be sanctioned.

Re:Israel (1, Informative)

PHPfanboy (841183) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939523)

This is largely from lobbying by US pharmaceutical companies due to competition from Israeli generic drug manufacturers.

Re:Israel (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939591)

I find it very interesting that Israel is on the list as it is the only country on the list that could really be affected by US sanctions.

Given that the Israeli economy is effectivly kept solvent by the US in the first place. However can you really see the US Government changing their (longstanding) policy to providing Israel with cash (and weapons)?

Bush Logic (4, Insightful)

SlantyBard (1040070) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939373)

Ok, they want to put Thailand on this list partly because Thailand has told them we are only going to pay a certain amount for anti-viral HIV medication instead of the hugely inflated US prices. Seems to me that saves US dollars in the end because it is US men (and other westerners too) going over for underage sex with potentially HIV infected girls which if treated appropriately would keep US healthcare costs down by decreasing transmission to US citizens.

Re:Bush Logic (0, Troll)

PenguSven (988769) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939557)

Right. so Thailand is told "stop pirating our shit" because the US is full of Pedophiles?.. wouldn't it be better just to stick them (Pedophiles) all in Guantanamo Bay?

Copyright is not a free market issue (1)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939425)

While in the case of providing a free market you could argue that it is generally a good thing that democratic systems should have, but copyright is just a mean to an end, to try to bolster innovation. Needless to say it is a laughable 18th century relic, but nonetheless it is a tool.

Saying to another country that you're not protecting copyrights enough, is a sovereignty issue. It would be equivalent to saying that another country using this or that kind of philosophy in helping the economy is bad and should use another one. By all indications it seems that more lax copyright laws are better though, but noone should be forced to abolish or viciously protect copyright because another country demands it.

Discounting the fact that the USA demands stronger copyrights due to the corporate lobby, it is still not a rights issue. This particular watchlist stems from the fact that copyright is a mechanism that would completely break down in the countries it is still present, if more other influential or developed countries would severely weaken it's legal framework under their own sovereignty.

They forgot Italy! (1)

farenka (937963) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939455)

I think in the top 12 should be Italy... as far as I can see (and I live there) all small companies involved in graphic design, software development, and similar, use more pirated software than original, and often only pirated software. They claim it's because the software is too much expansive, but they didn't even try to us any free alternative, or to buy just the software they need. The hard disks of this companies are full of any kind of software for a total worth of hundred thousands of dollars. This is a problem for the few companies that try to use original software, because it's hard to compete on the market when you have higher costs than your neighborhoods.

Re:They forgot Italy! (1)

motek (179836) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939579)

They didn't. But the recording industry in the US does not have to pay royalties on business methods they use. These business methods were invented in Italy and are enshrined in literature. Call it a debt of gratitude.

-m-

Re:They forgot Italy! (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939703)

They claim it's because the software is too much expansive, but they didn't even try to us any free alternative,

I wonder how long that attitude would last if there was such a thing as truly effective anti-piracy technology?

AFAICT, three options:

1. Everyone starts paying for commercial software
2. A lot of Free (speech/beer) software suddenly gains a whole lot more developers.
3. Some combination of the above.

The BSA touts it as being mostly option 1. A common /. attitude is option 2. Myself, I'm thinking option 3. Those companies that can find the money and genuinely do need the software will pay, those that can't/don't will either do without or use that which is free and if it means dedicating a few man-days to it to iron out a few minor glitches, so be it.

Israel? Yeh right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939477)

I can just imagine the *US* telling *Israel* what to do.

I think they forgot sometihng... (2, Insightful)

Romwell (873455) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939503)

..they forgot to put the US on the watch list. Considering the computer userbase here, the "amount" of piracy might be higher than in any of those countries, or even all of them taken together. Here's some numbers for you: Ukraine Internet Users: 5.278 Million (2005) Russia Internet Users: 23.7 Million (2005) China Internet Users: 123 Million (2006) India Internet Users: 60 Million (2005) United States Internet Users: 205.327 Million (2005) (According to https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/inde x.html [cia.gov] ) That does not really reflect the whole picture (people there buy bootleg dvd's instead of downloading), but might give you some ideas to think of.

Yep, sanctions more than likely will not work (3, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939513)

when you are going to sanction the whole world (more or less).

What is interesting to me is the fact that the whole world (more or less) thinks your products are so pricey that copyright infringement is a better option.

And this little DRM thingy doesn't seem to be working out too well at the moment. Despite the **AAs opinion that DRM is the only way to protect their business product (which is distribution) the entire world (more or less) is telling them that their product is too expensive.

I'd be willing to be that counts as the world talking with one voice? s

I firmly believe that (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939529)

If you can't afford to pay American pharmaceutical companies, you deserve to have AIDS.

Check is in the mail... (2, Interesting)

djupedal (584558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939533)

Let's be a bit more honest about this 'list', ok?

If the US govt. says they 'just' put a dozen nations on a piracy blacklist, what it really means is that a dozen nations have been on said list for some time now, allowing the US govt. to harvest statistics, map patterns, etc.

Saying this just went into effect is BS. I'd bet it's been a working list for at least the last year or three. The only reason a 'statement' is released is to keep two or more politically driven hot-button issues in sync in the public mind.

Give me a break (1)

anand78 (832850) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939541)

It has been widely known that US copyright and patent system needs reform. In my point of view the USPTO does nothing but stops growth and fosters monopoly. Developing countries like India, in the name of being a trade partner, will come on board with IP protection. However, expecting them to follow US laws is foolish. Who gives a rat's behind if lobbyists were able to get this bill going.

What?! (1)

ilovegeorgebush (923173) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939603)

How the hell did Copyright become so entangled, and so disproportionately important that the equally as corrupt American government take such a public stand on it?

Why has it come to this? This is so sad.

A new Axis? (1)

Beekster (732448) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939619)

Was anyone else anticipating the new version of the "Axis of Evil" speech?

Spread this number! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939687)

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
http://rudd-o.com/archives/2007/04/30/spread-this- number/ [rudd-o.com]

I attest my country (4, Informative)

junglee_iitk (651040) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939707)

As an Indian I can attest that there is nothing going on in India to protect "Intellectual property". I am neglecting the facts that KPO [google.com] is a branded commodity for US, and the Bollywood industry has been doing its own part of playing RIAA in India.
1) India is big, poor, and in short, 3rd world country. It has problems involving supply of water (clean or not), clean air etc. It surprises many people in India when they learn that other countries don't have regular power failures. I don't think there is absolutely anything anyone can do to stop piracy. If they could, they would stop theft of electricity first. And I am not even sure "Intellectual property" is widely accepted as property.
2) Bollywood et. al. will never add the DRM. Dirt cheap electronics from China and Taiwan are driving the market, and anyone having a TV is buying a DVD player. And unlike most other countries, movies in Bollywood are made for the lowest section of society. No one can take the risk of screwing this market. Just some days ago I bought a DVD and was able to just copy-paste-play it. Region lock is not known to most people.

Those are what I consider the good parts. The bad part is, though, that open source is a far off concept - a competition between free Windows and free Linux. I don't even remember a place where I can buy Windows legally. If you ask the dealer, he will just burn a CD for you, for free or for 15 rs. (.25 ). Unless Linux becomes as big as Windows, good luck having it a "Desktop OS".

Re:I attest my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18939835)

...t burn a CD for you, for free or for 15 rs. (.25 ).

That was Euro. I used the sign, I don't know why it is not visible now.

Countries on the list make you wonder... (1)

Techguy666 (759128) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939709)

From TFA:

"In addition to Russia and China, the 10 countries placed on the priority watch list were Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India,Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela..."
and then

"The countries placed on a lower-level watch list were Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam."


Pretty soon, the RIAA and MPAA will have every "first world" and most "second world" countries on their list. That should tell them that they need to change strategies at the very least.

Also, when something like this happens, involving multiple countries, shouldn't the World Trade Organization or some such organization step in?

Problems for the drug companies... (3, Interesting)

khyron664 (311649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18939831)

I have to say I agree with this action to some degree. Namely as it relates to drug companies though. I've been involved people that work in the pharmaceutical business, and getting a drub approved by the FDA is NOT easy. Many never make it to market, and almost all of them require a lot of money to develop in R&D. While making a product is no guarantee of making money, they should be allowed some protection for doing the work. Without a patent on the drug, the minute it hits the market it will be reverse engineered by a different drug company and sold cheaper. Some say that is the way it should be, but I honestly don't agree. The company creating the drug is spending a lot of time and money in R&D, without which we wouldn't get the current drugs we have and rely on. Why should another company get to easily piggy back on their efforts? Where is the motivation to find new cures in that environment?

As to the cost of the drugs, the companies are trying to make money. They're not non-profit organizations. Should they be? That's a different question all together which I won't address here. The rest of the world complains about the price of drugs and refuses to pay the prices the drug companies want to charge, instead deciding not to honor the patents on the drugs if the price doesn't come down. The result? The US has much higher drug prices than most of the rest of the world because we end up paying for the companies R&D costs since the rest of the world won't. Sorry, I can't feel bad about sanctions against countries that refuse to carry the burden of R&D costs and leave the US to carry it all. Do I feel the costs be lower? Definitely. However, I also don't know the R&D cost for a particular drug so whose to say the costs aren't in line with a reasonable time line to recoup R&D costs? I can't say I think having for profit companies develop the drugs helps things.

Given this situation, what's the way to handle it OTHER than patents? How can a company recoup the R&D costs (plus a profit) for a drug at a price level that is fair to all countries? Why shouldn't the countries in the rest of the world be forced to honor the drug companies' patents? It's not like it's a field where the companies can simply say "Pay up or you don't get the cure".

I don't really care much about the copyright portion of this story, but I get irked when I see people ranting against drug companies. They're definitely not perfect, but they are getting screwed by the rest of the world as bad as they screw the people in the US imo.

Khyron
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