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The Internet of Things - What is a Spime?

CmdrTaco posted more than 7 years ago | from the sounds-like-it-would-taste-sour dept.

The Internet 141

CoolVibe writes "From the abstract in the talk: "World-renowned Science Fiction writer and futurist Bruce Sterling will outline his ideas for SPIMES, a form of ubiquitous computing that gives smarts and 'searchabiliity' to even the most mundane of physical products. Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth." It's a very interesting lecture given by Bruce Sterling about something we might see in the near future. The lecture can be viewed here on Google Video."

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What are car keys? (5, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979187)

By the time any of this technology could ship we'd probably have thought controlled car locks. No need for keys then.

Re:What are car keys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979589)

Cars? What are these ancient devices you speak of?

Re:What are car keys? (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979659)

Cars were ground-only conveyances, which typically hurtled towards each other at very low speeds along pathways where opposite directions of traffic were separated by only a few meters. Absurdly high accident and fatality rates, very wasteful of time and energy because they couldn't follow direct vectors to their destination, it's astounding that people put up with them as long as they did.

-jcr

Re:What are car keys? (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979867)

Get the units right. Cars in opposing lanes will normally come within two metres and very often less than a metre. "A few meters" refers to distances greater than 3m or 15 feet, which is a large separation (enough for another lane in between).

Re:What are car keys? (1, Flamebait)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980005)

These cars you speak of had feet?

Re:What are car keys? (1)

jftitan (736933) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980183)

Welcome to the World of Tomorrow!!!!

Re:What are car keys? (1)

Moofie (22272) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980629)

Three meters is fifteen feet? You wanna check that math again?

Re:What are car keys? (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983219)

Three meters is fifteen feet? You wanna check that math again?

Good to see a rocket scientist who can get unit conversion right...

Re:What are car keys? (1)

The Great Pretender (975978) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980537)

Don't joke! I'm still waiting for my personal hover car that was promised to me 30 years ago. They said it'd be here for the end of the 20th century.

Re:What are car keys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981209)

Well, in a few years, we'll all be using transportation devices that use a renewable energy source, and which keep their passenger suspended a few feet off the ground, away from puddles and dust. These devices are called horses.

Re:What are car keys? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982327)

Renewable, maybe, but when cars were introduced they were considered to be cleaner than horses for one very simple reason: Nobody likes to deal with horse poop.

Spimes For The BushCo Crime Syndicate: +1, True (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979739)

Could spime technology help the world's largest crime syndicate [whitehouse.org] find the bogus Weapons of Mass
Destruction?

People want to know.

Thanks for you assistance.

Patriotically,
Kilgore Trout

Besides... (4, Funny)

sczimme (603413) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980085)


Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth
...
By the time any of this technology could ship we'd probably have thought controlled car locks. No need for keys then.

If I end up so far from my car keys that I need GOOGLE EARTH to find them, I have failed miserably...

Or had a really good time. I suppose it could go either way (or both).

Re:Besides... (3, Funny)

Caffeinate (1031648) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980419)

Or had a really good time. I suppose it could go either way . . .
To: The World
Fr: Caffeinate

This is the only time that the phrases "go either way" and "good time" are to ever be combined.

That is all.

Re:Besides... (3, Funny)

IthnkImParanoid (410494) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981483)

Perhaps if you were more open minded, you'd have more good times....

Re:Besides... (1)

gomiam (587421) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982019)

Open minded is not exactly what I would say ;)

Re:Besides... (2, Funny)

cooley (261024) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982149)

What if I lose my keys somewhere other than Earth? WHAT THEN, Mr. Bruce "Sparty-pants" Sterling?

Where is your Google NOW?

Re:Besides... (1)

projektdotnet (1061236) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982969)

Well by then we'd have Google Universe

Re:What are car keys? (1)

greg_barton (5551) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980089)

By the time any of this technology could ship we'd probably have thought controlled car locks. No need for keys then.

Then they'll just track YOUR BRAIN.

Re:What are car keys? (1)

LuitvD (1097337) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980427)

Note to self: become a hypnotherapist, to be able to steal cars in the future

Re:What are car keys? (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982277)

By the time any of this technology could ship we'd probably have thought controlled car locks. No need for keys then.

Can you imagine how much wear and tear your door locks would get if you had a grand-mal seizure?

This would also seriously change the pick-me-up...

Guy: Hey babe. You know what would look even nicer on you than that beautiful dress?

Girl: Silence

Guy: Me!

Girl's car CLICK!

Pronounce it Spy-Me (1)

rjamestaylor (117847) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982437)

tag: spyme

If I have to wait for the future ... (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979225)

... to find my car keys I'm never going to be able to make a beer run tonight.

Amateur... (2, Insightful)

eln (21727) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980027)

Any self-respecting drunk will make sure he always lives within staggering distance of a liquor store.

damn, why not now? (1)

alta (1263) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979243)

I've been looking for my cell phone for the last 30 minutes. Checked the office, checked the car, had the wife check the house. Been calling it! Can't find it!

Re:damn, why not now? (1)

SilentUrbanFox (689585) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979527)

Bluetooth signal triangulation?

Re:damn, why not now? (1)

Ctrl-Z (28806) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979717)

Hmm... if calling the phone doesn't work, I can't imagine that Bluetooth signal triangulation would. For that to work, you would need the phone to be (1) powered on, and (2) within Bluetooth range. Assuming that the phone isn't on silent (and why would you be calling it otherwise), and assuming that Bluetooth range is shorter than earshot, you wouldn't have a whole lot of luck. My guess is the phone is lost, or the battery is dead.

More importently (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981153)

can you use triangulation to find your mod points?

Re:damn, why not now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18980657)

It's under the couch cushions.

Re:damn, why not now? (1)

delvsional (745684) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981205)

phone search: error. 32412 results in 'downtown Boston'

Re:damn, why not now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18983165)

my guess is, its probably stolen

I didn't view the *&^%(*& Video.... (1)

Fysiks Wurks (949375) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979249)

I didn't VTFV but I have strong opinions on this matter....{add your own rant here}

Utopian privacy (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979307)

"Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth."

Imagine a thief doing the same?

Re:Utopian privacy (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979807)

Imagine Googlebots indexing your keys before you lost them.

robots.txt
User-agent: *
disallow: /pants

User-agent: girl-next-door
disallow: /wallet

Reverse (3, Interesting)

students (763488) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979313)

Imagine letting anyone who wants to steal your car be able to search for your keys on Google Earth.

Re:Reverse (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981191)

and....what?

They going to risk breaking into your home to get keys to steal your car?
A car thief does not need keys to steal a car.

Re:Reverse (1)

russint (793669) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981489)

Imagine the cops finding your stolen car on Google Earth.

I haven't seen read TFA yet (2, Insightful)

thewils (463314) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979327)

But if I can imagine finding my lost car keys on Google Earth, I sure can imagine trying to find someone else's car keys on Google Earth.

Re:I haven't seen read TFA yet (1)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982137)

I sure can imagine trying to find someone else's car keys on Google Earth.

I wonder how "do no evil" would reconcile with making the ultimate stalker/big brother tool.

"my fucking keys" (4, Funny)

G27 Radio (78394) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979339)


Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth.

http://static.flickr.com/108/261905722_d2912c0465. jpg?v=0 [flickr.com]

Still waiting for them to add it to Earth.

Re:"my fucking keys" (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981409)

Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth

Great! It's narrowed it down to a pixel the size of my apartment. Thanks Google Earth, you've been a big help!

Very fascinating (4, Insightful)

palladiate (1018086) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979351)

We might as well still hope for flying cars though. Sure, multi-linking normal objects is cool, but there are probably much easier and simpler solutions we haven't though of yet. Futurism is fun, I remember the old Futureland at Disney world. It was a ghost town, and the animatronics were creepy, but it was fun as a giant walk-in time capsule.

But, all I could think about the whole time is about those darn car keys. I kept hearing in my head my parents calling me: "Son, I need you to come look at the computer. Google keeps telling me my car keys are in the house, but I've looked all over for them. I think Google is broken again."

Re:Very fascinating (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980091)

I don't think you'd look for them - you'd have your fourth-gen Roomba get them for you.

Someone is watching (2, Interesting)

bigmiken (803382) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979359)

First car keys, then a small injection when you are born and now 'Big Brother' knows where you are.

Re:Someone is watching (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981119)

Which is OK, if there are strict elgal guidelines to it's use.

Most of which should be that a case gets thrown out, and all evidense in inadmissable for future cases if they are violated.

WHen you make it so they can not achieve there goal by breaking the rules, they will stop breaking the rules.

The "future" (1)

RJBuild1088 (968537) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979367)

Isn't this the beginning of the huge "everything will have a computer in it" world that we have expected? I know that technology can sometimes go to far, but something like this, if implemented correctly, could actually be extremely practical.

We already have this technology, implemented. (2, Insightful)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979405)

It's called RFID chips. Of course it doesn't have the long range abilities the summary seems to suggest, but it's still pretty close. And they are cheap.

Re:The "future" (2, Insightful)

kylemonger (686302) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980955)

Yah, practical for our future overlords. Run.

I'm all for it (5, Funny)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979387)

As long as you can reticulate them, of course.

Re:I'm all for it (1)

jhfry (829244) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979577)

Great reference to Sim City... except, they are splines, not spimes.

But I'd still mod you up if I could!

SPIME = Exploit, phishing, & surveillence heav (3, Insightful)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979425)

Imagine losing your car keys and having someone else find them with Google Earth. Imagine someone without a warrant keeping track of your car keys.

I don't usually wear a tin-foil hat, but this idea has exploit written all over it.

Re:SPIME = Exploit, phishing, & surveillence h (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980119)

Imagine being able to find, not only anyone who stole your car, but anyone who stole your car keys.

I think a SPIME-rich world would present a lot of challenges to all but the cleverest of thieves.

George Kayatta's Spime Theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981941)

They should have chosen a different name for this. Spime [search.com] is the name of a cutting-edge mathematical theory by George Nayef Kayatta [georgekayatta.com] , the Foremost Renaissance Man of our age and a Megagenius in the Arts and In The Sciences. It's bad enough that his groundbreaking research [georgekayatta.com] has been suppressed for so long, but to give something else the same name is a slap in the face.

Is this any way to treat the megagenius who created the monumental work The Holy Bible in Verse [pricelessart.org] ?

What if I lost my computer? (n/t) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979445)

n/t

S.P.I.M.E. - I know what it means (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979455)

Super Powerful Intelligent Monster Elephants

Re:S.P.I.M.E. - I know what it means (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18979875)

Our plans are finally coming to fruition...

A designer's opinion... (1)

tubapro12 (896596) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979491)

IANAMA but how often do designers predict technology accurately?

And I'd expect better chairs at Google...

Re:A designer's opinion... (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980417)

IANAMA = I am not a major asshole

IANAMA = I am not a marketing astroturfer

IANAMA = I am not a metallica aficionado

IANAMA = I am not a mighty amazon

IANAMA = I am not a mechanical automaton

IANAMA = I am not a middle-aged artist

None of the above?

Re:A designer's opinion... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18980527)

Close... you just mixed it a little:
IANAMA = I am not a mechanical asshole

Re:A designer's opinion... (1)

YourMotherCalled (888364) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980663)

IANAMA = I Am Not A Mature Asian

Imagine what?? (1, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979497)

imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth."

That's as useless as mammary glands on a bull.

google earth has this flashing Dot on my house. with a arrow, "your keys are here".

DUH!

Re:Imagine what?? (1)

Abuzar (732558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980259)

google earth has this flashing Dot on my house. with a arrow, "your keys are here".

No dude, by then they'll have x-ray photos of all our houses.

But don't worry, the arrow will point to the pocket of your wife's pants as they lay on the floor beside your best friend Big Google's bed.

Re:Imagine what?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981615)

Well that's fine as I'm boning his wife, being a swinging couple rocks!

Appropriate name (4, Insightful)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979535)

Spi Me. If you can find your carkeys on Google, then so can Google. And if Google can, the government you're under can find your carkeys too. Normally you're near where your carkeys are, or maybe your cellphone, or maybe the governmental id card.

Re:Appropriate name (2, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979745)

If you can find your carkeys on Google, then so can Google.


That depends where the logic is that identifies a particular electronic identifier as your carkeys; done properly, other people might be able to locate an object with a particular identifier, but not know that it is the keys to your car. Or get no information at all about it.

But for ubiquitous computing to not be a giant gaping security hole, we're going to need ubiquitous encryption and a whole generation of new tools to manage it and partition information.

Re:Appropriate name (1)

anomalous cohort (704239) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979785)

This is already happening [onstar.com] but not by google.

Re:Appropriate name (1)

popejeremy (878903) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981135)

But! If it's a publicly accessible resource like Google is, and it allows the government to spy on us, it would also allow us to spy on the government.

Great Idea... not (2, Insightful)

kjzk (1097265) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979583)

"Imagine the government being able to find your exact location using Google. Err, I mean your car keys."

When I Google Earth it says, "Wish you were here." (2, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979609)

I got up one morning and couldn't find my socks. So I called Information. She said, "Hello, Information." I said, "I can't find my socks." She said, "They're behind the couch." They were.
-- Steven Wright

No thank you. (1)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979629)

Do you really want google to know where your car keys are?
That's pretty personal there folks. Think about it.

Re:No thank you. (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979759)

Do you really want google to know where your car keys are?

I don't have a problem with google knowing where car key number 0A:93:67:22:FE:A4:12:E4 is. If they know enough to associate that key with me, then it's an issue.

-jcr

Re:No thank you. (1)

Caffeinate (1031648) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980471)

I don't have a problem with google knowing where car key number 0A:93:67:22:FE:A4:12:E4 is.
I'm sorry, don't you mean key number 09:F9:11:02:9D:74:E3:5B:D8:41:56:C5:63:56:88:C0?

Re:No thank you. (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980595)

No, I think 32 bits should be enough to identify a car key.

-jcr

Re:No thank you. (1)

Torvaun (1040898) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983229)

Missing the point. HD-DVD ring any bells?

In any case, while 32 bits might do it for all sets of car keys, will they do it for everything that needs to be indexed? IPv6 should be our rolemodel in this.

Re:No thank you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18983235)

I don't have a problem with google knowing where car key number 0A:93:67:22:FE:A4:12:E4 is. If they know enough to associate that key with me, then it's an issue.
Really, think about the vast amounts of personal information you give away in ordinary conversation.

Sure, right now there's no way to tie it all together, but with the spime concept it's fairly simple. Get the make & model of your car if you've ever complained about repairs online, learn what city you live in, what game console you prefer, and what kind of restaurants you prefer to eat at--all information people are likely to give away without thinking about it, only with spimes the data can be mined to produced a few dozen (or few hundred)likely candidates.

Then narrow it down more by monitoring when you're posting on the internet, and in a few weeks pretty much any cyberstalker can pinpoint you in meatspace.

crime:criminal::spime:spiminal (1)

njchick (611256) | more than 7 years ago | (#18979657)

Who would you call people looking for your keys on Google Maps? Spimers? Spimps? Spiminals?

Alarmists can fuck off, k (3, Insightful)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980083)

There is nothing about being able to use Google Earth to find your keys which implies by its very nature the ability for Google itself to find your keys, any more than the ability for Google Desktop to find your pr0n implies by its very nature the ability for Google itself to find your pr0n.

I want my home computer to be able to have disconnected local extensions enabling me to perform searches on things which Google itself doesn't consider relevant.

If I really wanted to, I could (right now!) go out to radioshack and get everything required to set up a Home Positioning System- like a GPS, but with less G. I could then interface the data from that with Google Earth using its existing extension mechanisms and- without Google knowing a thing about it get Google Earth to tell me where my keys are.

No spime needed, PFN does me just fine (1)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980369)

I need my car keys, I call a number and this loon screams at me that they're under my dresser or something like that, sprinkled with expletives and mutterings about the John Birch Society, Freemasons, and IRS and I have my keys just like that. Of course, the Psychotic Friends Network isn't for everyone, but it doesn't involve RFIDs and notoriously insecure web systems either.

Great idea!! -- Awesome technology!! (2, Interesting)

Abuzar (732558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980391)

I'll be able to enjoy spam 24hrs/day and 7days/week, targetted specifically towards my taste in women, tool sizes, drugs, and vista preferences... all through my car keys, my nail cutter, my shaving appliance, my dishes, my glasses, my boots, and my underwear. I can hardly wait.

Re:Great idea!! -- Awesome technology!! (1)

Torvaun (1040898) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983243)

"You're buying -what- size underwear? Ok, we'll lay off the Viagra spam for you. Not like you're ever likely to need it."

Don't you people read books? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18980473)

Shaping things! great book, but so 2005! And here i am reading /. to stay up to date...

Not soon, if ever (2, Interesting)

14erCleaner (745600) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980799)

I'll be more enthusiastic about "ubiquitous computing" when I see something that economically and pleasingly replaces the paperback book. Not even close yet.

WTF???? (1)

laserbeak43 (1097353) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980959)

Why the hell are people so comfortable with themselves and everything they care about being able to be located at the push of a button!?!?!?!?!?!?!

If you can find it, your enemies can too. and if you think you don't have enemies, your a fool.
Take it personal if you want....

Ob. Zim quote (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 7 years ago | (#18980965)

"AAAARGH!! My SPIME!"

Invader Zim, best cartoon ever!

This reminds of the time (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981047)

we were looking for my moms keys.

So my brother called 411 (information, usually phone numbers)
They said they were under the couch...They were.

true story.

In other news... (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981307)

... you can crack nuts with a sledgehammer. Film at 11!

Wind Bag (1)

FoolishBluntman (880780) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981373)

This guy is the biggest wind bag I've ever heard and I've sat through many a University colloquia. I can't believe Google put this guy on. This guy's picture is next to the definition of pompous.
Oh yeah, Just a second hun, I lost my keys, let me ping them on the net.
Do you put them into the DNS?

In the Future! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981445)

In the future...

- Separatism will be forgotten!
- No more wars!
- Parents and their kids will get along better!
- Enough stuff for everyone!
- Flying cars!
- There will be more of this but less of that!
- Time won't be the same!
- People will vacation on Mars!
- No one will be ill!
- We won't need money!
- Everything everywhere will be ok!

- People will be writing even more articles about the Future which will turn out to be at least partially incorrect and more often entirely incorrect!

Google's probably on it (1)

captain0captain (1097389) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981577)

I asked a Google Earth person a few years ago at the Accelerating Change conference about whether they were experimenting with this idea, and she just smiled slyly. It's right up their alley of making your information accessible and searchable.

the future (1)

razpones (1077227) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982611)

I hope by that time there won't be cars or keys anymore.

I foresee trouble (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982857)

"World-renowned Science Fiction writer and futurist Bruce Sterling will outline his ideas for SPIMES, a form of ubiquitous computing that gives smarts and 'searchabiliity' to even the most mundane of physical products.
President : "I never had sexual intercourse with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky"

Slashdotter : "But Google-earth says your sperm..."

All that is old is new: (2, Informative)

Hartree (191324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982911)

I think Vernor Vinge called it a localizer a number of years back.

Not sure what Drexler et al were calling the idea in the late 80s, but they were talking about much the same thing as well as general assemblers and such things as utility fog that could do the same thing.

People have been working on ubi-comp for a long time.

My keys are easy to find... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982929)

...they are right in my stolen car. Thanks google!

"The Internet of Things" is not new (1)

toplus (1085237) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982953)

I am not very sure if Mr. Sterling is using this "Internet of Things" short phrase as something he has conceptualized, imagined or otherwise invented. But the terminology "Internet of Things" has been used many years before Mr. Sterlings' book was published, to refer to a global network of EPC (Electronic Product Code)-based RFID tags and the infrastructure that supports it, the EPC Network [epcglobalinc.org] . Actually you can see reports [autoidlabs.org] of as soon as January 2001, by the then Auto-ID center, now Auto-ID Lab MIT, mentioning the "Internet of Things".
My point is that the concept Mr. Sterling is talking about is not new, not even from 2004. Finding out the location of RFID tags (those tags being attached to any type of object) is part of the envisioned EPC Network functionalities, not only Supply Chain Management or Product Lifetime Management. Many people have been working on that for very long time (no real global working solution yet though).

Where did I put those...? (1)

manif3st (699952) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983003)

Oh yeah...

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

*ducks*

most misleading headline....EVER! (1)

ssintercept (843305) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983141)

no where in that article was any reference to porn! NONE! WTF?

Real Use Cases (2, Interesting)

dircha (893383) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983249)

If you're having trouble thinking of realistic use cases, the key is to work from the assumption that rfid and rfid scanners are ubiquitous. Think of things in your home or in your place of business. Now, ask yourself what would it mean to you if you could uniquely identify that item and track its location anywhere in the building, and what if you could do that remotely (with proper safeguards for privacy)?

Now couple this with ubiquitous eletronic mapping of your home and the buildings you spend your day in.

Your Dinner Plates Are Trackable
It's time to do dishes. You have a glass and a small plate at your family computer from that snack you ate while reading the news after work. You have two glasses on the coffee table and one on the sofa from the guests you had over last night. Your son has three plates, a bowl, flatware, and a few glasses up in his room. You left a drinking glass on the washroom counter.

But you don't know that they are there yet! Sure, you could walk into the family room and look around and pick up any you see, but you can do better. Open up your mobile, direct the interface to show the location of all diningware in your home. Now filter that to exclude diningware not already in the kitchen. How do you do that? I don't know, maybe it's as direct as typing "diningware +home -kitchen" into a prompt. But however you do it, now you see on your mobile a layout of your home with red dots indicating the location of diningware you need to round up to wash.

Your Refrigerator Is Queryable
Only it isn't that clunky Refrigerator of the Future you saw in that magazine article.

You're at the grocery store. You're out of milk, low on soy sauce, and out of eggs. But you can only remember the eggs! Open up your mobile. Query "groceries +refrigerator +out" to get a list of groceries that belong in your refrigerator that you are out of: "1. milk, 2. eggs". How does it know what you are out of? After all, if you are out of it, it isn't there. AI? Of course not. It gives a list of groceries that have recently been in your refrigerator but aren't now.

But wait, what about the soy sauce? Well, it's still there, so your query for things you are out of didn't catch it. How can it know you are low on it? Does the soy sauce bottle have a amount remaining meter that can be read? Of course not, let's be realistic! What you did is designate to your fridge when you set it up that the bottom door-shelf is for things you are running low on. You put the soy sauce bottle there last night after the meal to be sure you'd remember - or rather so it would remember - and your fridge has rfid scanners with sufficient granularity to know what is on this shelf. So you rewrite your query: "groceries +refrigerator +out +low" and you get "1. milk, 2. eggs, 3. soy sauce". Aha! Soy sauce, that's what you were missing. Because you configured your fridge like this when you set it up, when you query "low" in the context of "refrigerator" that's becomes an alias for "top left shelf".

Your house would have more rfid scanners than electrical outlets. And everything from a carton of milk to your cat's collar would have an rfid tag.

Other good examples once you make these assumptions? 1) Tracking locations of projectors, televisions, and media carts in the office or school. 2) Tracking locations of books in a library. 813.11A. Where the heck is that? Instead of asking the librarian or following signs through the winding maze of shelves until you find 800xxx, just query it in your mobile and it will show you exactly where it is in the electronically mapped library. Just walk over and pick it up.

Re:Real Use Cases (1)

dircha (893383) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983327)

Or let me correct that last sentence:
"Because you configured your fridge like this when you set it up, when you query "low" in the context of "refrigerator" that becomes an alias for "bottom door-shelf".

I watched the video... (1)

d474 (695126) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983359)

So this "internet of things" idea of tagging everything and having metadata about all things physical...

For this to create a "sustainable" framework, all objects when broken down to be recycled would have to be worth something. If my TV (or whatever) has 4.2 million tagged parts in it, everything from the logo down to the solder on the boards, the only way that TV is going to get recycled and reused in manufacturing is going to be if:

A) There must exist an automated way for the TV to "disassemble" to those parts
B) Those parts/materials are all reusable
C) I get paid for every single one of those parts (or get a little more in "credit" if I buy from the same manufacturer)

ISSUES:

Tag spammers. If manufacturers can put tags on everything, what's to prevent "spammers" from spraying their nano tags on everything. What about people that place fake tags on objects to make them seem more valuable or just to confuse the "system". However, maybe the system would have a way of tossing out bad tags by using some sort of "hash" or something along those lines. Privacy? No longer exists.

PLUSES:

All theft would be traceable. Unfortunately that also makes you 100% traceable even if you aren't a criminal. Insurance companies would begin associating risk with the types of tags you are in close proximity to. Heck, as you walk down the street, you might get real time "danger assessments" on some sort of meter depending on who is near you, what products are near bye...You could plan routes to avoid those areas that statistically are more dangerous. The possibilities are endless.

The amount of information and metadata this "internet of things" would create are mind boggling. I guess that's where quantum computers will come in handy.
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