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Mercury May Have Molten Hot Magma at its Core

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the but-no-ragnaros dept.

NASA 120

mattatwork writes "According to ScienceDaily, NASA has come to the conclusion that the planet Mercury may have a molten core after all, based on high-precision planetary radar readings. You may (or may not) remember the Mariner 10 probe making 3 passes by Mercury between March 29th, 1974, September 21st 1974 and March 16, 1975."

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And the question is: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981387)

What did one of Freddy's doctors say to the other?

Re:And the question is: (0)

PixelScuba (686633) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983311)

Nothing, because of doctor-patient privilege?

neat (3, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981391)

Mercury May Have Molten Hot Magma at its Core

Excellent. This means they'll be able to serve McDonald's apple pies when they put the first restaurant on Mercury.

Re:neat (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981401)

That's the joke, well done.

Re:neat (3, Funny)

vought (160908) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982087)

Dunno, I heard Dr. Evil reciting the headline, myself.

Re:neat (2)

stonedcat (80201) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982425)

Amazing what culture does to the way your brain processes input.... same thing happened here.

Re:neat (5, Funny)

bulliver (774837) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982339)

McDonalds jokes are a medium rarely well done.

Re:neat (-1, Redundant)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983599)

Thank you for sharing that McNugget of information. My brain have been fries lately.

Re:neat (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985875)

Crumbs, I feel sick.

Re:neat (1)

MarsDude (74832) | more than 7 years ago | (#18984909)

"McDonalds jokes are a medium rarely well done"

The 'food' (if you can call it that) at McDonalds is a joke by itself

Re:neat (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 7 years ago | (#18987065)

It ain't THAT bad. I don't eat there very often myself, but that's more for the same reason I don't like to use Microsoft products: they drive the little guys out of business (well, not McD's specifically, but big chains in general). I'd rather eat at small independently owned restaurants around town just because the atmosphere is better, and the food doesn't taste exactly the same wherever you go. I also am not a hamburger fan (I eat them, but only every couple months). Overall though, the food at McDonalds, while unhealthy, and not AS good as a lot of other places, isn't all that bad, and given the cheap price I can see why people eat there (then again Wendy's is just as cheap and while still not great, is better than McD's IMHO). Matter of fact the only fast food place that I've found to be completely revolting is Long John Silvers. Pugh! I could swear there was blueberry flavor in their shrimp batter (at least the one time that I ate there - nevere again).

Re:neat (1)

manno (848709) | more than 7 years ago | (#18987757)

I have to disagree with you the food at McDonalds is disgusting, save the grilled chicken sandwich(not great but not bad), the fruit and yogurt salad(damn good actually), and the Egg McMuffin. The rest is nasty tasting processed junk and the after taste of McNuggets ech... it's like gasoline. I have to be honest with you I can't remember the last time I ate a burger there it was at least 5 years ago. So things may have changed, since then, but I'm not interested in trying.

my 2c,
-manno

Hmm, Mercury Bar (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981419)

Buy the new Mercury Bar, with a molten caramel core!

No more hard frozen Mars Bars. Let the chocolatey warmth flow through you.

As do I. As do I. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981429)

As do I. As do I.

Wjy?

sniff the stinky spot! (0, Troll)

Asshat_Nazi (946431) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981433)

What do niggers and turds have in common?

nope, it's not that they are both brown.....

They both smell like shit!

well suck me sideways!

Re:sniff the stinky spot! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981971)

Some turds are green. Just sayin'.

Re:sniff the stinky spot! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18983693)

Hence, "it's NOT that they're both brown"

Yeah but... (0, Offtopic)

RancidMilk (872628) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981435)

...does is have sharks with friggin' lazer beams attached to their head.

Re:Yeah but... (1)

zurtle (785688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982919)

It appears the moderators are a bit young for Austin Powers and Dougie... hmmm how long ago was it now? *reaches over to his DVD collection*

Mag-ma!

I am quite surprised that this article wasn't taged "frickin lasers" or "sharks".

Re:Yeah but... (1)

Ziwcam (766621) | more than 7 years ago | (#18984177)

Tagged at as such...

Re:Yeah but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18984759)

Austin Powers is one of the worst movies of all times, and I wish /. would stop regurgitating that joke in every fucking article.

Then again, the whole idea of "humor" on /. is to copy-paste the same "funny" shit over and over for a few years.

Really? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981449)

As opposed to solid, cold magma?

Re:Really? (1)

archen (447353) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982639)

well technically "molten" is a relative term. To beings on Pluto the earth would be covered with rivers of molten water. So perhaps from the perspective of hot compared to a star, then magma might be cold.

Re:Really? (1)

aldo.gs (985038) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983355)

well technically "molten" is a relative term. To beings on Pluto the earth would be covered with rivers of molten water. So perhaps from the perspective of hot compared to a star, then magma might be cold.
In that case the temperature would be the relative term. The water is, of course, molten (in the sense of "made liquid by heat", which I think is the most common), so there is no relative use of the word there. Besides: Come on, cold magma? We might as well extract some of it to cool our beers once we get there!

Re:Really? (1)

WgT2 (591074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18984289)


What? Are you not human?

Do you mean to imply there is some other subjective perspective we should be taking in describing our existence/world/experience (such as describing planets)?

Re:Really? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983559)

Don't they make ATM machines out of that?

rj

Re:Really? (1)

plover (150551) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983977)

It's mercury [wikipedia.org] . It could be molten cold magma!

Good news for us I guess... (0)

moore.dustin (942289) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981521)

I suppose the longer Mercury can hold out as an active planet, the longer will should last as one... assuming we make it that far...

I do not know much about this, but is it possible Mercury would always have a molten core just do the extremes it endures (gravity, radiation, cosmic whatever, etc). If true, then my above statement is holds no value.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (2, Insightful)

MollyB (162595) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981795)

I do not know much about this, but is it possible Mercury would always have a molten core just do the extremes it endures (gravity, ...[snipped]
I had the same thought regarding gravity. Since Mercury's orbit is not circular, isn't it subject to the same type of tidal forces that induces Jupiter's satellite Io's molten core? Is there a planetary poohbah among us who might enlighten we curious but lazy 'dotters? Thank you in advance.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (1)

AoT (107216) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982963)

No orbits are circular, unless one of the objects were to have no mass. Where you been since Kepler yo!

elliptic baby, orbits are elliptic.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (1, Informative)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983215)

Tidal forces should have little effect on Mercury since it's already tidally locked. The same side always faces the sun. The locking occurred because Mercury was once rotating, and tidal forces mostly affect rotating planets. They stretch the planet out like an egg pointing at the sun and Mercury is probably a little egg-shaped.

When the planet is rotating, the tidal force axis swings around all longitudes during the day and it's as if the sun were rolling the planet between its fingers. It gets squashed and stretched every day. Eventually the interior of the planet absorbs all of the rotational energy as heat through this mechanism. The same thing is happening on Jupiter's innermost moon Io, which is not yet tidally locked. Io is covered with volcanoes because its rotational energy is still being converted into internal energy by tidal forces from Jupiter, and there is no hydrosphere to absorb the energy.

If there are no oceans then the solar torque gets applied directly to rock with no cushion in the way. If the planet has oceans, they absorb almost all of it since they give more easily than rock and the sun will apply its torque to the planet via the water, so that the energy loss mechanism occurs at the surface. Either waves crash onto beaches, or if there are no continents, a standing wave circles the planet every day and heats up the water a little bit, so the heat mostly radiates away.

I don't know offhand whether Mercury got its molten interior from its ancient rotational energy or just from radioactivity.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (4, Informative)

Josh Booth (588074) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983659)

Don't listen to this guy. Mercury is not tidally locked with the sun, but rotates very slowly at about 3 rotations for every 2 revolutions around the sun. And even more, an ocean does not act as any sort of a buffer against gravitational forces from the sun. There's just not a significant enough amount of water even on Earth to do so.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (3, Informative)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18984099)

Mercury is not tidally locked with the sun, but rotates very slowly at about 3 rotations for every 2 revolutions around the sun.

I forgot my Mercury trivia; they used to think it was locked [nature.com] before they found the 3/2 resonance. Since the resonance is stable, rotational energy is not being affected anymore. But then that means tidal forces are still heating Mercury over a 1400 hour cycle. The heat loss from friction is probably coming out of the orbital energy making the orbit unstable.

And even more, an ocean does not act as any sort of a buffer against gravitational forces from the sun. There's just not a significant enough amount of water even on Earth to do so.

OK, so the water transmits zero torque until there's how much of it then?

Most of the torque being applied to slow the earth down is transmitted at two hydrosphere/lithosphere boundaries: the one between the inner and outer core, and the one between the crust and the oceans. This is because unlike solid rock, fluids are free to slosh around horizontally. The outer core has more mass but the moment arm and surface area are both bigger for the oceanic boundary.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (1)

paleo2002 (1079697) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983169)

"I suppose the longer Mercury can hold out as an active planet, the longer will should last as one... assuming we make it that far..."

This may change some of the basic assumptions we have regarding planet formation and tectonic activity. Terrestrial/rocky planets start out molten due to heat of accretion and differentiate as they cool. In a way, the Earth and now apparently Mercury are actually still forming because they are partially molten.

An example of a completely cooled-off, solidified planet would be Mars. It was generally thought that Mars is no longer tectonically active - no long molten in the middle - because it is smaller than the Earth and thus cooled off faster. But Mercury is smaller than both planets and still tectonically active. Perhaps size doesn't matter after all.

Re:Good news for us I guess... (1)

Skye16 (685048) | more than 7 years ago | (#18987331)

I would imagine its proximity to the sun plays a part in it; hot objects in cooler areas cool off faster than hot objects in warmer areas, after all. It's true that mercury is considerably smaller than mars, but its proximity to the sun, and all of its heat, is considerably closer than mars is. After all, the surface temperature of Mercury is, what, 400 some degrees when facing the sun?

Even if this is true, however, intuitively speaking, it kinda doesn't seem like it would be enough to keep the core active. Perhaps the composition of the planet plays a part? I seem to remember Mercury having a very high concentration of metals, for example, whereas Mars has a smaller concentration (percentage wise). Would this have anything to do with it?

But is it as 'cool' as "Hot Jupiters !!!" ? (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981523)

if its not, im not buyin.

Tautology (5, Funny)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981571)

"Magma: Molten rock beneath the surface of the earth." http://www.google.com/search?q=define%3A+magma [google.com] "Molten hot magma" If it's magma, it's molten, molten rock is pretty much definately hot.

Headline is a botched joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981715)

The headline is a attempt at quoting Dr. Evil from the Austin Powers series. Unfortunately, the Dr. Evil's phrase is "liquid hot magma" not "molten hot magma". So, they botched the joke.

Re:Tautology (0, Offtopic)

catbutt (469582) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981811)

One, I think you are using "tautology" wrong. And two, by that definition it isn't magma anyway, since it's not beneath the surface of the earth. So there.

Re:Tautology (0, Redundant)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982903)

I even looked it up on Google before I posted it to make sure I was:
http://www.google.com/search?define%3A+tautology [google.com]
"The repetition, in the definition, of information already provided by the term designating the concept."

Re:Tautology (1)

catbutt (469582) | more than 7 years ago | (#18984327)

My bad. Wasn't familiar with that usage.

well...no (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981883)

What is magma but liquid rock?
What is water but liquid ice?

If I was on a planet far awa frmo the sune, all the ice would be no different then rock. In fact, On that planet the rock could be magma at 0 Centigrade.

Re:well...no (1)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982979)

What? Ice and rock are both solids, yes, and you can find both on Earth, no need to go to Pluto. There are specific definitions for being liquid. There aren't any silicates that melt below 600C:http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/ge ophys/meltrock.html
Being liquid is not subjective.

Re:Tautology (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981987)

That was my thought, too: "and Pluto has frozen solid ice, whereas Earth has gaseous, vaporous air!"

Re:Tautology (1)

_ivy_ivy_ (1081273) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982471)

The headline was written and authored by an undisclosed, secret, and unpublicized government agency: the Ministry, Department, and Directorate of Duplication and Repetitive Redundancy.

Re:Tautology (1)

FMota91 (1050752) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983371)

But is it definitely hot?

liquid core but little magnetism (5, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981587)

it is quite odd that mercury has a liquid metal core but a very weak magnetic field- planetary magnetic fields form when currents flow through a liquid core- the rotating core sustains the field as on earth, the sun and jupiter but mercury's is very weak- apparently it isn't rotating much

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981749)

Congrats for having the only comment on this story so far that isn't retarded.

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (2, Informative)

largesnike (762544) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981803)

You know that Mercury is in tidal lock with the sun? so it only rotates (I think) once every 87 days or so. This slow rotation rate may explain the weakness of the field. Perhaps its high orbital eccentricity (0.2) and proximity to the sun, and the resultant tidal wrenching would explain the liquid mantle?

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (3, Informative)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981929)

mercury has a 3:2 resonance orbit:rotation which could very well explain a very slow fluid core rotation and thus the weak field since eventually the core will sync with the rotation of the outside of the planet.

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

Armageddon00 (1093379) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981819)

More than likely the magnetic field of the sun screws with Mercuries, considering the sun is many many times larger and thus has a magnetic field of far more power. Of and the fact that the Sun's magnetic field is caused by nuclear fusion...

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (2, Interesting)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981887)

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

patternmatch (951637) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982403)

Despite myself, I had to laugh at the fact that that article includes the phrase "Probably locked to Uranus".

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982007)

If it were molten non-metal (e.g. silicates, or something more like magma) would it still generate a magnetic field? If it were 1% metal, 99% magma, would it generate a magnetic field 1% of what it would have with molten metal?

There are a couple of requirements for magnetism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982065)

You can't have magnetism if you don't have either:
  • a conductor and/or
  • a magnetic material (probably iron)

Any conclusions about magnetic fields of planets have to take the basic requirements into account. A planet with a molten silicon core would not have a magnetic field no matter how it rotated. I agree that the mass of Mercury might be consistent with an metal core but that doesn't prove that it has one.

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982129)

it is correct that a planet needs a conductive liquid rotating core to produce a magnetic field and mercury's density indicates that the core is composed of a large portion of iron and some sulfur http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSM.P23A..01S [harvard.edu]

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (2, Informative)

dryeo (100693) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982599)

You're reading it wrong. It is Mercury has quite a strong field compared to Mars or Venus.
Heres a short blurb which mentions that Mercury probably has a molten core written in 2003, http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/mercury/Mag netosphere/magsphere_overview.html&edu=high [ucar.edu]

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982769)

So Mercury may have molten magma in the middle, but manages only a mostly marginal magnetic field? Magnificent!

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983643)

So Mercury may have molten magma in the middle, but manages only a mostly marginal magnetic field? Magnificent

Maybe. Mercury's mantle maximises magnitism at the Mohovoric median, meaning magma must melt marginally at most.

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

flackrum (824364) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982965)

Sidereal rotation period (hrs): 1407.6
Length of day (hrs): 4222.6


Source: NASA [nasa.gov]

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

Pingmaster (1049548) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983391)

I'm definitely not an expert on the subject of planetary physics, however i do know that a major reason for Earth magetic field is the combination of the solid ferrous core with the molten ferrous mantle portions. With the mantle constantly moving around the core it creates a magnetic field (called the dynamo effect IIRC)

Re:liquid core but little magnetism (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983933)

A landing mission with the ability to do chemical analysis would answer a lot of questions. The problem is the high energy cost, but I think this is the idea opportunity to try a solar sail for the cruise stage and mercury orbit insertion.

I think the landers should be lightweight vehicles with only a few experiments. The bulk constitution of the surface should tell us a lot about the core.

Magma in Mercury... (4, Funny)

racecarj (703239) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981647)

This is compared with the recent discovery of mud-like sludge in the core of Uranus.

Re:Magma in Mercury... (1)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981943)

hahaha - I wondered how long it would take form someone to sneak in a poop joke. Aaaah. Slashdot at its... typical...

RS

Re:Magma in Mercury... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982187)

Not even close. Check the first post again (and read at -1 this time) IMHO, that counts as a poop joke - albeit a bad one.

Re:Magma in Mercury... (1)

DanielG42 (906032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982005)

Mercury may NOT have molten hot magma at its core.

Magma... (4, Funny)

Radi-0-head (261712) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981711)

You know, Scott. I've been a frickin' evil doctor for 30 frickin' years, OK? Cut me some "frickin'" slack. You forget Scott. We're in a volcano. We're surrounded by liquid hot magma.

Re:Magma... (1)

PowerBook2k (312576) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982197)

Good thing I'm not the only one who thought of that immediately upon seeing the headline.

Re:Magma... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982401)

show me the Fricken laser beams!

Re:Magma... (1)

Kuvter (882697) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982837)

Continuity error: They said molten, not liquid, hot magma.

OK fine, so I'm just bitter you got to it first.

And in other news (0)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 7 years ago | (#18981743)

The sun is hot! and this just in... Earth has... omg. it has WATER!

Further research is still happening.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981823)

to see if they can also find Ragnaros...

WOW guilds all over the world are building rockets to get there.

Why don't they ask Al Gore? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18981965)

So Mercury "may" have a molten core after all? It's examples like this that show why so many people with any common sense are skeptical about the cries of the global warming alarmists.

Our greatest scientific minds cannot even olve a simple astrophysics problem, yet the "global-warming" crowd expect us to stake the economic livelihood of our children, and our children's children, and perhaps even that of our children's children's children, on a handful of speculative calculations about the climate.

All those panicky liberals can go eat their granola as far as I'm concerned.

Re:Why don't they ask Al Gore? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983287)

You're a pretty good example of how not teaching basic logic and how to avoid fallacious reasoning in school are so desperately needed. I can't imagine how you came to think the above argument (such as it is) has any meaning, but I truly pity anybody who has to rely upon your reasoning to reach any sound conclusion.

Re:Why don't they ask Al Gore? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18985855)

Your "logic" makes about as much sense as:

Meat rots; flies always show up when meat rots; therefore, flies are spontaneously created out of rotting meat!

This is one pre-natural-selection "theory" on the origin of certain species. Another has frogs spontaneously growing out of lily pads (we'll ignore the fact that nobody ever actually SAW a frog grow out of a plant).

Jumping to conclusions and making unrelated claims are a poor excuse for discussion. I suggest you enroll in a logic course at your local college.

as opposed to (0, Redundant)

Have Brain Will Rent (1031664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982191)

solid cold magma?

The Jokes! (1)

qbrad (1024421) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982261)

Love 'em. Love 'em soo much! Please keep them coming. Er, if magma is molten rock under the surface of the Earth, how the hell did it get to Mercury?!

Alliteration (4, Funny)

sirkha (1015441) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982345)

Shouldn't the title be, "Mercury May Mask a Molten Middle"?

Makes me want to cue the Anti-Nowhere League (-1, Offtopic)

Necrotica (241109) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982505)

...as covered (fairly well) by Metallica...

Well, I've been to Hastings and I've been to Brighton
I've been to Eastbourne too
So what, so what
And I've been here, I've been there
I've been every fucking where
So what, so what
So what, so what, you boring little cunt

And what's the relation (0)

ghostbar38 (982287) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982617)

And what's the relation between mercury Hot Magma Core and my brand-new sun glasses? I don't get it...

Jeez... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18982695)

"Molten hot magma"

The tri-oxymoron-award of the day goes to...

Re:Jeez... (1)

dorix (414150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982989)

Certainly not to "Molten Hot Magma". An oxymoron is a compound phrase consisting of two or more components that are opposite in meaning, like "Jumbo Shrimp".

Molten Hot Magma gets the Award of Triple Redundancy Award.

Re:Jeez... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18984801)

Actually it's Double Redundancy.

Next thing you know... (0, Redundant)

cranky_slacker (815016) | more than 7 years ago | (#18982793)

they'll be telling us Mars also has sharks with frickin' lazer beams on their heads....

Supid headlines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18983065)

I was much more amazed until I remembered that Mercury was a planet.

I have an idea (1)

jibberson (1073472) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983133)

Let's hold Mercury ransom for... one million dollars!

growing planets (1)

mestar (121800) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983143)

of course it is hot inside, it is, as are all other planets, growing from the inside. (!)

http://www.continuitystudios.net/clip00.html [continuitystudios.net]
http://www.nealadams.com/nmu.html [nealadams.com]
http://www.wincom.net/earthexp/n/navback.htm [wincom.net]

Re:growing planets (1)

the_greywolf (311406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985529)

Why have I never heard of Rodinia, Pannotia, and other "supercontinents" that "existed prior to Pangaea"? I'd always been taught in my Geology classes that Pangaea was the ONLY supercontinent on geologic history. Is this even taught now?

Bringing Neal Adams into this makes me wonder a lot of things about what I wasn't told about.

Molten core discovered! Well then. (0, Offtopic)

Skreech (131543) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983389)

Too bad it's all the way on Mercury, but after you do the attunement quest you'll be able to make it directly from Blackrock Mountain. That won't be too bad.

Amazingly noone noticed... (1)

duck0 (1073338) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983629)

...that a trailing slash crept into the Mercury 10 link. Oops.

Corrected Wikipedia link (2, Informative)

sho222 (834270) | more than 7 years ago | (#18983793)

The corrected link to the Wikipedia article: the Mariner 10 probe [wikipedia.org]

Molten core? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18985171)

LFG Ragnaros

And in other news... (1)

offaxis (573745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985225)

The value of Mercury-based real estate has sky-rocketed today,
as evil geniuses the world over vie for the best plots on what seems
likely to become the solar systems new secret evil lair 'hot spot'.

Do we have to have a stake in this? If so.. (1)

andr0meda (167375) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985229)

.., Secratary of state, prepare the bombers!

Is it a press release or a paper? (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985329)

I can't find the paper anywhere.

How can they detect that with radio waves? (1)

prollifik (1094359) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985357)

I'm just wondering.

But.. (2, Funny)

sokkalf (542999) | more than 7 years ago | (#18985793)

does it have a Blackwing Lair?

so you could describe the core as... (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 7 years ago | (#18986507)

mercurial?

Hot (1)

unablepostAC (1044474) | more than 7 years ago | (#18987575)

Thats one hot core.
I wonder, would it be less hot, if Mercury had dual core???
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