Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Transform a Regular LCD Into a Touchscreen

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the noli-me-tangere dept.

Portables 146

eZtaR writes "NAVisis is introducing a new USB gadget (for Windows only including Vista) called LaptopTablet. You mount it onto the side of your regular LCD monitor to transform it into a fully functional touchscreen, controlled with an included pen. The gadget is priced at around $100 and seems a good alternative for Photoshoppers."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Oy ... (4, Funny)

packetmon (977047) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019115)

Let me know when some high end printing company bundles this so I can go to work on Photoshopping my paycheck. (For educational purposes of course)

Re:Oy ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019335)

That reminds me, anal sex or anal intercourse is a form of human sexual behavior. While there are many sexual acts involving the anus, anal cavity, sphincter valve and/or rectum, the term "anal sex" is often used to mean the insertion of the penis into the rectum. It is a form of sexual intercourse considered to be particularly risky, for a number of reasons related to the vulnerability of the tissues and the septic nature of the anus.

Such relations have been documented in a wide range of cultures, from earliest times. Where they involved two males, they have also been controversial and sometimes condemned since antiquity. Anal sex is encountered among people of all sexual identities and orientations. While it is reported more frequently among male couples, in absolute numbers more heterosexual couples have anal sex.

Re:Oy ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019409)

The problem with most touchscreens is that the best material for a display panel is usually also quite reactive to the oils found on the skin of our fingertips. This leads to unsightly smudges and fingerprints on the screen. The way this could be avoided would be something along the lines in Minority Report. They would have to invent, for lack of better words, a cyber thimble.

That way, one could do the manipulation without touching the screen, but rather a few inches in front of the screen. Charlie dies in the season finale. That would also alleviate the problem of the "arm waving" that was mentioned in an earlier post. No-touch technology would allow the user to scale his motions by how close or how far they are from the screen. A motion further away would have a bigger impact, one that was closer would be more precise.

Re:Oy ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019507)

Mod down parent. Fake comment with random TV spoiler in it.

Re:Oy ... (1)

charlieman (972526) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020133)

You mean this [youtube.com] ?

TabletMouse (5, Funny)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019143)

RThe TabletMouse looks interesting as well. The company should probably hire a better translator though. "Welcome to NAVIsis, The Best Company of Tablet Device"? Apparently, all your mice are belong to them.

yeah but... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019151)

...does it run on XOrg?

I can't put my finger on it (4, Funny)

syntap (242090) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019159)

...but there has to be a pr0n application here somewhere.

Re:I can't put my finger on it (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019391)

Please don't tell us what you're going to use as a stylus. Please.

Re:I can't put my finger on it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019587)

isn't the porn application you can put your finger on/in it

Re:I can't put my finger on it (0)

pato101 (851725) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019951)

Warning: do not trust Russian applications, they might put a finger on you...

Re:I can't put my finger on it (0, Offtopic)

PC-PHIX (888080) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020181)

Warning: do not trust Russian applications, they might put a finger on you...
Don't you mean:

In Soviet Russia, application puts finger on you.

Damn. Can't believe I just typed my first ever "In Soviet Russia..." joke and I wasn't even actually making the joke.

Sheesh.

Re:I can't put my finger on it (2, Informative)

Snarkhunter (1056150) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020533)

It's called Doki Doki Majo Shinpan [kotaku.com] . You touch Japanese schoolgirls to see if they practice the dark arts. Nintendo said " it isn't pr0n," but after they said that they mouthed "it's totally pr0n." Enjoy.

Just a gadget (2, Insightful)

Frostclaw (1006995) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019171)

Unfortunatly, I don't think this will be much more than a neat gadget, and it certainly won't live up to the needs of a serious artist. There's no mention of accuracy or pressure sensitivity, and I didn't see art/photoshop listed on the website. I'd be keen on seeing some reviews of it, and the prospect of attaching it to a laptop screen sounds pretty interesting but for the price I'd rather just pick up a small Wacom tablet. The fact it's made mainly for a laptop monitor only and claims to work only for Windows makes it a pass for me.

Re:Just a gadget (1, Informative)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019229)

There's no mention of accuracy or pressure sensitivity, and I didn't see art/photoshop listed on the website.

Says 400 DPI on the page linked to and go check the "Example" tab for art. It's good enough for anime.


Really, Read The Fucking Article/Product Page/Whatever next time. Borderline trolling, what you posted.

Re:Just a gadget (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019639)

Borderline trolling, what you posted.

Borderline slashvertisement, what you posted. You meant to say, "Go read the manufacturer's web site and believe everything the marketing people want you to think."

Re:Just a gadget (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019669)

You're a retart.

Re:Just a gadget (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19020677)

I believe you meant retard, retart is not a word. It's what a guy with a lisp says when he is losing in Donkey Kong.

Re:Just a gadget (4, Informative)

Phat_Tony (661117) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020089)

His "borderline troll" is undoubtedly accurate.

Pressure sensitivity is key for most any artist, it's where the real value of the Wacom tablets lie, allowing you to control the quality of your brush strokes with pressure as you work. That's a bigger part of the tablet's advantage over the mouse than the actual "pen" method of input for many artists. This makes no mention of any kind of pressure sensitivity. Clearly, it can't make the screen pressure sensitive. Perhaps they could build a sensor into the pen that measures pressure and use the edge device for position, but that doesn't look like it's what they did, their pen looks like a "dumb" device, not a wireless pressure sensor. Even if it did have a pressure sensor in the tip, it's going to have to be so sensitive that it requires a really light touch, or else you're going to mar your screen, and that would greatly diminish its value.

As far as resolution is concerned: they say "sampling" is at "about" 400 DPI (whatever that means), but then it says "recognized resolution 0.2mm" which is about 125 dpi. The Wacom tablets artists work with recognize a resolution of about 5,000 lines per inch.

I'm sure you can draw a cartoony sketch with it just fine, but there's no way this device as it stands now is going to replace tablets for professional artists. That doesn't mean it's worthless. A lot of thing you want to do with touch sensitive displays isn't professional art. These could be a much cheaper alternative for touch-sensitive user interfaces and games and such. Maybe in future generations they will add some sort of pressure sensitivity through the pen and increase the resolution by an order of magnitude. Until then, the "borderline troll" is correct.

Re:Just a gadget (1)

Jasin Natael (14968) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020357)

Not to mention that the Intuos3 series is capable of sensing pen rotation and x/y tilt. You need plugins and whatnot for some of these effects, and some features aren't present with the bundled stylus, but the feature-level on these tablets and accessories is absolutely astounding. Not to mention that each stylus, even among multiple of the same type, has its own unique ID, and can be associated with different tools. You can have an array of styluses, each with a different color, brush size/type, and opacity. I don't use mine as much as I'd like, but even for designing web graphics, it's invaluable.

Re:Just a gadget (1)

NJ Hewitt (1048942) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020543)

sounds like you think conventional graphics pads/tablet PCs have squidgy pressure sensitive screens? that isn't the case, the pressure sensitivity (up to 1024 increments) is always built into the spring-loaded stylus tip, and communicated wirelessly to the PC.

Re:Just a gadget (2, Informative)

Phat_Tony (661117) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020803)

"sounds like you think conventional graphics pads/tablet PCs have squidgy pressure sensitive screens?"

No, I did not think that. As other people have posted before [slashdot.org] in this discussion (at +5), "conventional graphics pads/tablet PCs" have screens that are tough and scratch resistant and are designed to be pushed on all day with the tip of a stylus. This would destroy conventional LCD's. So, as I said in my post:
1. It doesn't appear that this device has any pressure sensitivity, and
2. If they wanted to add it, it would have to use really light strokes to not damage the LCD, which still isn't very valuable.

Maybe they can sell it with a thin polycarbonate screen protector or something, but I doubt that would fit in most notebooks and allow them to close. Perhaps it would be good for converting desktop LCD's to touch-screen though. Of course, they'd have to offer a huge variety of sizes and shapes of screen protectors. Or perhaps expect people to cut-to-size with a paper cutter or something. Anyway, I don't understand what there was in my post that made you think that I thought that the screens need to be sensitive to varying degrees of pressure; all I pointed out is that the stylus can't respond to firm pressure on conventional LCD's without damaging them.

Re:Just a gadget (1)

NJ Hewitt (1048942) | more than 7 years ago | (#19021047)

Fair enough, I misread.

Re:Just a gadget (2, Interesting)

Frostclaw (1006995) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020227)

I did in fact see the 400DPI. I'm more referring to "if I put my pen at point x on the monitor, does my cursor accuratly reflect that point onscreen".

I'm curious to see how well it works, and I appologize if my comment came off as trollish.

There are more amateurs than professionals. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019473)

As in most creative fields, there are several times more amateurs than there are professionals. This is especially true when it comes to computer graphic design. Sure, the professionals are usually willing to pay a steep price for a high-quality product. But then again, amateurs are willing to pay a reasonable amount for a product that is nowhere near as good as what the professional demands. And companies can still make a lot of money this way.

Dell's a good example. They made their start selling low-end, semi-trash PCs to those who wanted the PC desktop experience, but didn't want to or need to pay the amount of money that IBM was demanding. They really weren't making the big deals that IBM was with financial institutions and other power users. But for every large deal at a financial houes, there were hundreds of thousands of deals to be made selling to average folk and small businesses. And as we've seen, Dell still became very successful, even if they didn't sell to "professional" users (ie. banks, insurance companies, etc.).

I think some of the major open source projects struggle with this concept. Take the Mozilla project's Gecko engine. It's damn near impossible to find any usable documentation that explains how to embed Gecko within an existing application. Sure, there are some embedding demos, but they're poorly maintained, virtually without comments, and a very poor introduction to the task at hand. There are no doubt many amateurs who wish to integrate Gecko with existing applications, but are unable to use the existing solutions. Some simple documentation would really go a long way towards making Gecko usable by amateurs, and then also by professionals alike.

Re:Just a gadget (1)

Kankraka (936176) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019959)

Personally I'd rather -not- be putting pressure on my laptops LCD panel, it's not designed for things like that. The graphire III i have now does a more than suitable job at my on-the-go tablet needs.

Ugggh ... (4, Insightful)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019175)

Who wants to hold their arm out, hovering over the keyboard, attempting to "draw" on a surface that isn't firm (laptop hinges are not designed to resist pushing on the screen)? This is a terrible idea in my opinion. The big advantage of *real* tablets is that they fold "roughly" flat so you can write/draw on them more naturally. Even at that, they are usually too thick, making writing uncomfortable.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

theNote (319197) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019299)

You don't HAVE to use it on your laptop screen, the article said it could be used on any flat surface.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019461)

Yes, an age old problem that's been recognised since touchscreens were touted as the panacea to all usability woes [catb.org] .

moderator ignorance? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019467)

how is this modded redundant? he is the first person to mention this. seriously moderators read the damn timestamps before you start modding redundant!

Re:Ugggh ... (2, Insightful)

slysithesuperspy (919764) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019615)

I know it's not ideal but you could just fold the screen backwards so it's parallel to the desk. Or perhaps have the screen upside down and put the keyboard furthest away from you.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

Kwiik (655591) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020261)

For all laptops that I've ever seen (except tablets) 1) folding the screen backwards so that it's parallel to the desk (if it can go parallel to the desk.. I've only ever seen that in Dell's) will cause it to push on the hinges as the parent to you complained, and 2) if you put the screen upside down with the keyboard furthest away, you'll end up not being balanced and it'll fall back on to the keyboard. Maybe there's some ancient laptops that break this rule, but I highly doubt it.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

slysithesuperspy (919764) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020985)

Ah, your right I've just tried it on my old IBM one. It goes further down than parallel, however, it definitely is putting strain on the hinges.

Re:Ugggh ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19020363)

If nobody wanted to draw on an LCD, why would Wacom sell Cintiqs [wacom.com] ? Here's [engadget.com] a guy who went through the trouble of building his own "Cintiq" from an LCD and tablet.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020625)

I've done similar to this guy with one of my laptops.
it works a treat as long as you position the tablet guts somewhere away from the main power/data cables behind the LCD.
(If the cables are across the active surface, the tracking is screwed, mine has a nice area on the screen just able to fit a 6 inch touch panel).
The downside to this is the entire screen is not touch sensitive and there isn't a 1:1 relationship.

I ended up writing my own graphic software to work with it, and have since *downgraded* to running it on a pda (loss of pressure sensitivity).

I will end up getting a full tablet one day but it was good playing around with what I had.

Re:Ugggh ... (1)

srmalloy (263556) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020419)

Who wants to hold their arm out, hovering over the keyboard,...

A telling observation, since it was gorilla arm [catb.org] that pretty much killed the touchscreen as a primary input device (except for applications where the user only spends a short time using the device, such as ATM screens).

Why LCD only? (1, Interesting)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019179)

Seems the only thing making this thing LCD-only is the design of the plastic clip for the sensor that determins the position of the stylus. Any geek worth his bandwidth could use this with a CRT.

Very interesting product either way. Seems better and cheaper than a Wacom.

Curves of CRT? (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019365)

Seems the only thing making this thing LCD-only is the design of the plastic clip for the sensor that determins the position of the stylus.
That and the tendency of cheap CRT screens to be curved in one or both of their dimensions, and possibly the static electricity that builds up on a CRT.

Re:Curves of CRT? (2)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019521)

Oh, right. I was just thinking of my own retired flat CRT. I've cursed the name of the sometimes ball-formed CRTs ever since I got the flat one, years ago. So much easier on the eyes, so much better accuracy. Funny thing is the old 17" Viewsonic (G73fm) of mine still compares rather well with today's CRTs.

The product page however still says that you can use the gadget with any flat surface, but I don't have the heart to tell more of my fellow Slashdotters to RTFA. There's no need to ruin your LCD.

One thing for artists to consider is however that you can probably opt for a any textured surface to give you any amount of "pen drag" you wish. All the tablets I've tried so far are very slippery, which is by no means always a good thing. I could pick a rough paper, or even a textile according to what I feel is comfortable.

Re:Curves of CRT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19020651)

My Wacom Volito 2's got a textured surface that feels just like drawing on a paper with a graphite pencil.

Re:Why LCD only? (1)

aarggh (806617) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019397)

As this is basically electronic whiteboard technology applied to a laptop, it probably will only work with a flat screen CRT if at all. Although for an LCD as mentioned it seems a ludicrous product. Definately the fastest way to destroy the LCD and void a warranty! Some cheap end solutions end up quite expensive!

Re:Why LCD only? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019653)

Seems better and cheaper than a Wacom.
Cheaper, perhaps. I'm not quite sure how you translate "lower resolution and no pressure or tilt sensitivity" into "better", but hey, whatever floats your boat...

Re:Why LCD only? (2, Informative)

tsalaroth (798327) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019995)

Same price, actually, as the smallest Wacom Graphire [wacom.com] .

Re:Why LCD only? (1)

nametaken (610866) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020421)


Except Wacoms have pressure sensitivity, don't they?

Smashing (5, Interesting)

Bazman (4849) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019185)

Quite literally. Laptop screens aren't designed to be touched, let alone scraped and prodded all over with a stylus. Or does this thing come with a plexiglass overlay?

Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (5, Informative)

WillAdams (45638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019189)

The touch screens and active stylus input displays have a thick glass or plexiglass or other durable substance to protect the screen, but every LCD (laptop or desktop) I've ever set up has a warning about not touching the screen in w/ the setup / operating instructions.

My boss and several co-workers regularly touch the LCDs here in the office, making the surface bend and distorting the image and it makes me wince everytime.

William
(who is looking forward to _all_ LCDs coming w/ some sort of digitizer built-in after manufacturers decide the added durability and lessened expense of one manufacturing line instead of two makes economic sense)

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

Loke the Dog (1054294) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019269)

Well, I touch my LCD too, and it still seems to be fine. If the people at your office touch them regularly and they still havent gotten any permanent damage, then whats the problem?

Aren't normal LCDs a bit dirty for this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019481)

I hope you remember to wash your hands between touches?

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit dirty for this? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019545)

Nah, they probably spare no expense. If a screen's dirty, just replace it.

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019593)

The people in my office who touched my screens certainly got some damage, typically through the whacking of the offending digit or high pitched screaming along the lines of "get your greasy fingers off my screen you pervert!". The damage probably wasn't permanent but the message usually was permanently imprinted.
The screens were all right though.

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019301)




My boss and several co-workers regularly touch the LCDs here in the office, making the surface bend and distorting the image and it makes me wince everytime.


You co-workers wince whenever they have to get that close to you. Most of them wince simply by having to be in the same building as you.





Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019667)

We've got a couple of Panasonic 17" LCD screens with a glass front. Makes them heavy, but trivial to clean.

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019829)

I don't care if it is an LCD or a CRT. If you touch my screen I break your fucking arm!

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020141)

Duuuuude... it's never been about economic sense. It's about how much more are you going to pay for that little extra gimmick that only 1% of all customers really want ? I think it would make economic sense for my $500 gaming-class video card to have 8 outputs, but in reality I would have to pay $800 for an special-purpose video card with a GPU from the dark ages in order to accomplish that. Sale price has very little to do with manufacturing cost.

Personally, I'm pissed off that there are still so few tablet PCs out there. I remember four years ago wanting one, but I couldn't justify the ridiculous price versus a plain old notebook. I mean, Dell doesn't even offer one yet. WTF is up with that ? Pardon me for not feeling comfortable throwing gobs of money at some tablet company I've never heard of, that will probably go up in smoke before the warranty ends.

TabletPC availability (1)

WillAdams (45638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020239)

Well, Fujitsu has been (profitably!) making pen computers for well over a decade, so I can't imagine them stopping, and they're large enough that I can't see them going away any time soon, and their warranty support is quite good by all accounts.

William
(who bought a Stylistic 'cause he got tired of waiting for Apple to make a replacement for his Newton)

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

feagle814 (640886) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020503)

I've taken apart my Tablet screen and it's just a normal LCD screen with a thin piece of glass in front (anti-glare treated) and a Wacom digitizer behind it. They don't manufacture the LCD special for it; they just sandwich it between tablet parts.

Re:Aren't normal LCDs a bit fragile for this? (1)

WillAdams (45638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020721)

Right, but wouldn't it be better / cheaper / more integrated if they built the digitizer integrated into the display components?

Also, the thin piece of glass in the Tablet screen is in addition to the normal piece LCD pane --- adding this contributes to the parallax problem one gets w/ the offset caused by the display being beneath a panel to begin with.

William

ICK. (3, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019213)

Needs a pen, that sucks. I prefer real touchscreens where you simply touch them like the ELO.
as for photoshoppers, doodling on a monitor sucks. Using a pen tablet on the desk is far easier and way more intuitive as well as not having your hand and pen device in the way blocking your view.

This is a neat device, but for the price you can get kits from ebay to add a real touchscreen layer to your lcd or laptop instead of something that requires a special pen.

Re:ICK. (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019611)

Needs a pen, that sucks. I prefer real touchscreens where you simply touch them like the ELO.
as for photoshoppers, doodling on a monitor sucks. Using a pen tablet on the desk is far easier and way more intuitive as well as not having your hand and pen device in the way blocking your view.
Not to mention a bad case of gorilla arm [wikipedia.org] after 10 minutes of work.

Re:ICK. (2, Interesting)

Cesa (972909) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019663)

What you could do is using a dual screen setup, with the touchscreen monitor lying down on the desktop like a piece of paper. Extend the windows desktop over both screens and move the child window with the picture to the touchscreen monitor. That way your hand won't be in the way any more than when you draw/write on a piece of paper, and you don't have to wave your arm in the air.

Re:ICK. (1)

Kwiik (655591) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020325)

Or just clone the monitors. I wouldn't mind placing a 17" touch screen where my keyboard normally rolls out of my desk, and putting the actual keyboard up on the desk. It'd be even more beautiful considering my desk is made of glass ^_^

Re:ICK. (1)

skiflyer (716312) | more than 7 years ago | (#19021057)

I dunno... I have one of the Lenovo multi-touch screens... and I find myself using the pen about 90% of the time for the accuracy. I thought I'd use my finger all the time, and for apps that are designed for a touch screen (read big buttons, no menus) I do... but the pen really isn't so bad. But the multi-touch (pen + finger) is definitely a path I'm glad to have, would be annoyed at this point if you took either or away from me.

Photoshoppers ? (3, Informative)

fruey (563914) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019225)

A serious graphic artist probably wants a CRT for accurate colour, gamma, etc. And at least an A4 Wacom if they prefer drawing, but on a horizontal rather than vertical surface.

Most pros I know use a Wacom in Photoshop or Illustrator, but mostly they're mouse people.

I can't imagine that a serious Photoshopper would want to use an LCD screen and draw on it with a stylus, it's just not accurate enough.

OT: CRT Vs LCD (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019431)

I considered myself a holdout but I just replaced the last of our CRTs. If you're designing for screen, output is increasingly going to be viewed on a flat panel. If you're designing for print, RGB output is always inaccurate.

LCD displays have improved since the late 90s and the advantages of CRT monitors are becoming fallacy.

Re:OT: CRT Vs LCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019535)

I agree. Even relatively cheap LCD's (like mine) are quite adequate when it comes to colour representation, brightness, etc. Also the available resolutions are starting to match those of CRT's (my LCD's resolution is a tad lower than my CRT's was, but not a lot) and you can completely forget about conformity issues. Plus, the image is always sharp - my CRT was slightly fuzzy at it's maximum resolution.
Recently I saw an interview with the director / chief animator of a major animated movie. It was set in the studio, and on the desk where a tablet and two LCD's, one of them truly gigantic. I couldn't help feeling a pang of envy ;-) ~~~~

Re:Photoshoppers ? (3, Informative)

ameline (771895) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019787)

Look at a wacom cintiq -- they're really nice.

The reason they're mouse people more than tablet people is that most software sucks on a tablet -- many on the common UI elements that work well with a mouse fail completely on a tablet. You really have to design with pen based interaction in mind.

Look at Alias SketchBook for an example of a UI that works well on tablets

Re:Photoshoppers ? (2, Interesting)

TheDrop (1098769) | more than 7 years ago | (#19021027)

"I can't imagine that a serious Photoshopper would want to use an LCD screen and draw on it with a stylus, it's just not accurate enough."


I'm about as serious as they come in regards to Photoshop and completely disagree with you. I use a Cintiq [wacom.com] (Wacom) daily which is a LCD screen controlled by a stylus. And sketching on screen with a stylus is unequivocally superior to sketching with a mouse (and on a separate tablet IMHO). It is simply natural to look at what your drawing.

In regards to TFA, pressure sensitivity is the key aspect in art/design applications. I saw resolution mentioned, but nothing on pressure sensitivity. If this device has no, or little pressure sensitivity it will certainly remain a non-artisan tool for the majority of users. Personally, I would not be interested in this product because most laptop screens are 'soft' and susceptible to damage, and the keyboard is in the way.

This thing sucks (1)

bhima (46039) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019233)

I don't mind that it uses a stylus, I use one on my Waacom tablet.

But Jesus, why does it have to be this huge cancerous growth hanging off the side of the laptop?

Sounds a lot like electronic whiteboard tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019239)

IR and ultrasound, like eBeam [e-beam.com] or mimio [mimio.com] ? Some background discussion [slashdot.org] .

Only $100? (2, Interesting)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019249)

This could turn out to be a very cost effective solution for Point of Sale registers. Touch screen flat panels are expensive (and flat panels are popular with PoS devices since they take up much less counter space) so this could lower costs per register by $100 -$200.

Re:Only $100? (1)

_Shorty-dammit (555739) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019609)

for the short amount of time until you wear/poke right through the not-supposed-to-touch-me LCD screen, and it becomes an LCLOSINLAD*. And then you'll have to buy another one. So, the up-front savings will be short-lived. You'll be much better off buying the right device for the job.

(*Liquid Crystals Leaked Out So It's No Longer A Display)

Re:Only $100? (1)

Poppageorgio (461121) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019961)

A Point of Sale terminal has to work with finger input. Having to use a stylus would create too many problems. How would you like to wait in line at McDonalds while the cashier crawls under the cabinet looking for the dropped stylus!

Re:Only $100? (1)

Master Ben (811962) | more than 7 years ago | (#19021083)

So then you chain it to the screen.

just dont touch too fast (2, Funny)

bl8n8r (649187) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019333)

or you'll exhaust all your server resour.... forget it.

touchscreens, ugh... (2, Interesting)

dmnic (452122) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019367)

other than in a POS or evoting application, I honestly do not see why why people want a touchscreen.

I'm talking about a laptop/tablet configuration.
yes, the idea sounds great and people will say that their productivity will increase, yada, yada, yada, but MOST people who say this have never used one or experienced the frustration when their touchscreen goes out of calibration, which will happen ALOT!!!

I support a salesforce of about 200 who use various touchscreen PCs from HP Ipaq to Fujitsu tablets and laptops. at first they were ecstatic about the touchscreens then they slowly figured out that it was actually quicker for them to use the mouse/keyboard instead of having to touch the screen x/y on this side of this form and -x/y on this side of another button, etc in order to put in their orders.
the screen doesnt go out of calibration uniformly across the whole screen, but generally in 5 different ways in the 4 corners and in the middle. this is a nightmare to use and to support!

Re:touchscreens, ugh... (2, Informative)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019911)

So what you are saying is that they don't work right so people don't like them, even though they find the idea very attractive? Most technology doesn't really catch on until it actually works right, so I'm not sure why you are surprised.

Neat! (2, Interesting)

mattr (78516) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019405)

Last time I read /. at 0 that's for sure. A bunch of people worried about pressing on an LCD not designed for it, and then a bunch of trolls. Guess all stories are like this.

The company's in Korea. Any slashdotters there trying it with linux / trying it out in the store?
This could really hurt Anoto, which makes an extremely advanced system of bluetooth/optical recognition pens and special paper using a pattern that is unique for every page.

Anoto, like the Flypen toy based on its tech, has all kinds of applications. For example a checkbox called "Fax" at the bottom of a sheet of paper that when you check it, it gets faxed. Navisis has a portable version for pdas and maybe phones, called the phone pen which looks quite cool, and the mouse version that works on your table top is quite neat too. They do sell protective covering for your lcd as well, anyway I'd like to hear from someone who really uses it, and then hear about if it just looks like a mouse to the system or if it needs a driver.

Re:Neat! (1)

mattr (78516) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019433)

I also give points to them for their "The Little Prince" illustration. (the hat shaped object is a snake that swallowed an elephant...) I like these guys!

Cool, but (0, Redundant)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019413)

what about gorilla arm [wikipedia.org] ?

Down with the mouse? (1)

Nephrite (82592) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019421)

This is very good news. At last we got a separate device which I can hook up to any screen and which provides touchscreen functionality. Well, yes it's windoze only and laptop only but hey, the technology is here and I think they will be making devices like this for other monitors and OS's a well. I always hated windowing environments with OK/Cancel/etc buttons because they made me use the mouse. Touchscreen and pen is better because you may look where you point your cursor AND see your hand and pen at the same time. I thought it's no big deal until I tried to use applications with lots of small buttons packed together like MS Word or OpenOffice. Mis-clicking is so annoying. Maybe it's just me and my shakey hands but come on! Resume: I'd like to have such a device for my CRT monitor. THIS one is not for me though yet.

Re:Down with the mouse? (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019523)

I don't like touchscreens, because you always end up with dirty screens really quickly.

I wonder how you would play FPSes with touchscreens...

There are already touchscreen kits (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019439)

Which basically tape over an existing screen, LCD or CRT. I briefly investigated them for an epos system I was putting together but eventually decided on a ELO screen, why add hassle you don't need.

e.g.
http://www.magictouch.com/builtin.html [magictouch.com]

Given a few years, they'll be built into almost all screens.
 

Slashvertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19019471)

It's been done before, and done a lot better. How did this get through the moderators?

sounds familiar (1)

Ogive17 (691899) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019495)

This sounds like a device we use occasionally in our office. I wish I knew what it was called so I could link it.. but I'll just have to deal with describing it. You attach the device to the corner of a whiteboard, use a special marker, and it records your writing. You can then plug the device into a laptop via USB to download the board notes. We've had this thing for at least 2 years.

Sounds like simliar technology.

It's called a whiteboard recorder (1)

cheros (223479) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020413)

Comes in various guises, but usually has a detection bar and a couple of special pen holders so the board can track the position of the pens (and the eraser).

Re:It's called a whiteboard recorder (1)

markov_chain (202465) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020729)

At work we just take pictures. Higher resolution and we can use any color.

Power Pen (1)

RealityProphet (625675) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019761)

They should call it the Power Pen. It's so bad.

About Damn Time We Change GIMP's Name (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 7 years ago | (#19019785)

This being Slashdot...

an alternative for Photoshoppers...

and GIMP/GIMP pimps/GIMPoids/GIMPles/GIMPhomaniacs

take your pick
 

Re:About Damn Time We Change GIMP's Name (1)

frenchbedroom (936100) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020253)

Or how about just plain "GIMP users". Oh, unless you want to troll about GIMP's name, right. Forget what I said.

Re:About Damn Time We Change GIMP's Name (1)

doti (966971) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020455)

Let's just accept that "photoshop" now means raster image editing. I use Linux exclusively for many, but when I manipulate an image with GIMP I still say I "photoshop" it.

LCD second monitor flat on desk? (1)

Brit_in_the_USA (936704) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020033)

Am I the only one thinking...

cool, I'll just spend an extra $100 on a 17" or 19" LCD monitor and lie it flat on the desk. I'll drive it with the second monitor output of my graphics card. For screen protection I'll buy some kind of 3M film from staples for $10 a roll or a 200 pack of laser printable transparency sheets.

or even - I could roll my own context sensitive touch tablet, instead of a $1500 OLED keyboard

...with new gadgets comes new opportunities.

"Photoshoppers"?? (4, Funny)

snowwrestler (896305) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020147)

I think you meant to say "graphics professionals who use the software application Adobe Photoshop®."

sincerely,
- Adobe

huh (1)

z_gringo (452163) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020235)

Well, im reading that and thinking wow, that is interesting.

Until I get to: The gadget is priced at around $100 and seems a good alternative for Photoshoppers.

Im not much of a phtotoshopper, but what unmet need does this meet for photoshoppers?

Re:huh (1)

Remus Shepherd (32833) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020415)

A tablet is superior to a mouse for just about any photoediting purpose, and most drawing purposes. So yeah, it's an alternative. However, most of the value of having a tablet is its pressure sensitivity, which this device does not have. So I wouldn't say it's a 'good' alternative to a real tablet.

A very bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19020295)

If you start touching the surface of an ordinary LCD panel, it certainly won't last long.
I know that every time I see a public touch screen, I feel somewhat compelled to test its durability with a good few pokes of the finger.

Not a touchscreen (1)

mongogeek (1075651) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020795)

Looking at the technology of this device, it does not monitor touch, but instead the position of the pen. A "real" touchscreen does not require a special pen to register a touch, your finger is typically used. There are many types of touchscreens, some actually respond to the force of your touch (resistive technology), some sense the capacitance of your finger, others the acoustic damping caused by your touch, and a new technoloty even "listens" to the sound of your touch and calculates where you touched.

Lack of Mac Support (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19020817)

According to the website for the product it only supports XP. Most of the people I know that would think of using this are artist types and they don't use XP.

Ultrasound? (1)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020819)

1. is it 'ultra' enough to be completely inaudible? I've had some experience with ultrasonic devices for cleaning etc. and they are unbearable to be around due to the high-pitched shriek they emit. To be fair, this is at much higher power levels than this pen will use.

2. Ultrasonics can be quite destructive, both on the laptop screen and on the bones in your hand (again, more of a problem at high power levels).

not for mac (1)

jordan314 (1052648) | more than 7 years ago | (#19020967)

I've seen a couple of these pop up, but I'm still waiting for one that's mac compatible and big enough to cover a 20" or 24" screen. Then I can use it on my iMac. Sure the thing's heavy but if I took the stand off I'd gladly use the giant glowing flat slab of mac in my lap.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?