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HBO Exec Proposes DRM Name Change

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the that's-all-that's-in-the-way dept.

The Media 544

surfingmarmot writes "An HBO executive has figured out the problem with DRM acceptance — it's the name. HBO's chief technology officer Bob Zitter now wants to refer to the technology as Digital Consumer Enablement. Because, you see, DRM actually helps consumers by getting more content into their hands. The company already has HD movies on demand ready to go, but is delaying them because of ownership concerns. Says Zitter, 'Digital Consumer Enablement would more accurately describe technology that allows consumers "to use content in ways they haven't before," such as enjoying TV shows and movies on portable video players like iPods. "I don't want to use the term DRM any longer," said Zitter, who added that content-protection technology could enable various new applications for cable operators.'"

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544 comments

Freakanomics (5, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072385)

"[I asked my tech people, and they said that] theoretically those analog outputs could be disabled, forcing consumers to use a secure digital connection to watch HD content. [Then they tried to convince me that such measures were mostly token measures, but I ignored them.] A lack of copy protection is holding HBO back from making its own content available in high-definition through its popular HBO On Demand platform, [because I didn't take the time to listen to my technologists. I decided that the real problem was the name, not that the technology was backed by poor use of legal constructs.]"

I'm still waiting to see how long it takes these people to realize that they're actually driving piracy with every day they wait. They should consider the data gathered in the "freakanomics" research [freakonomics.com] . The data clearly shows that most people are honest, and those that aren't simply aren't. If you offer up content at a fair price, the majority of users will purchase that content rather than resorting to illegal or immoral means to obtain it. Meanwhile, the DRM restrictions will do little to stop those looking for a free ride. They're not going to pay for it in the first place, so why worry about it now? If they can't get past your DRM scheme (not likely), they'll rip it from the DVDs or HD-DVDs.

The software industry had to learn the same thing many years ago. Copy protection annoyed the paying users while doing little to stop the pirates. Why can't anyone get that lesson through their head?

Re:Freakanomics (5, Insightful)

tringstad (168599) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072489)

The software industry had to learn the same thing many years ago.

As far as I can tell, the software industry to this day has never learned this.

-Tommy

Re:Freakanomics (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072523)

In the past I believe that they have been called "drivers." Also, they have made things work, as opposed to keeping them from working. Also, drivers haven't in the past sought to manage digital rights.

Re:Freakanomics (5, Funny)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072543)

I'm not going to call it piracy anymore. I prefer Consumer Choice Enablement. CCE allows consumers (not customers, since you won't be paying for the service) to enjoy content not only in ways they haven't before, such as on portable video players like the iAudio A2, but at a more reasonable price than they have been offered in the past. This is also a win-win situation for the content creators as it alleviates all packaging and most distribution costs, as well as providing excellent word-of-mouth advertising for FREE!

Re:Freakanomics (4, Insightful)

Propagandhi (570791) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072679)

Why can't anyone get that lesson through their head?

This baffles me more than it should, I guess. The idea that there should be some invisible barrier between me and the 1's and 0's in my computer's memory (solid state or otherwise) is insane. This shit honestly needs to be explained, slowly and forcefully, to the higher ups that keep greenlighting this shit.

Re:Freakanomics (5, Insightful)

TheMeuge (645043) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072729)

The answer to your question is simple - it's greed. Unadulterated, foaming-at-the-mouth greed.

The media executives have for so long held onto their positions of power, privilege and wealth, that they have lost any notions of reality. As far as they are concerned, they are gods, and the consumers are the worshipers.

When they get a whiff of even a minute challenge to this doctrine, they are engulfed in rage, because it is something they cannot control, regardless of how much money they throw at the issue. After all, as far as they're concerned, the consumers are the commodity - they own your eyes, and sell them as they please (not quite that simple in the case of HBO, but you get the idea). So they get angrier and angrier, until this rage spills over as utter stupidity.

P.S. They might as well call executions a "happy express to heaven".

Re:Freakanomics (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072731)

You don't need to say "DRM restrictions", DRM = Digital Restrictions Management, that's exactly what it is.

Re:Freakanomics (2, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072793)

DRM = Digital Restrictions Management

Silly me. This whole time I thought it meant Digital Rights Management [wikipedia.org] .

P.S. ATM Machine.

Digital Restrictions Management (0, Redundant)

Russ Nelson (33911) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072765)

Errrr, given that DRM stands for "Digital Restrictions Management", isn't talking about "DRM restrictions" redundant?

It's not buggery (4, Funny)

spun (1352) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072879)

It's an internal colon massage! Now bend over...

Re:OOOOOOHHH SNAP! (1)

Dharkfiber (555328) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072905)

That was all it was??? See, I knew it was something easy. What's in a name, eh?

First post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072395)

COCK-BENIS! First post!

Bad News for HBO exec (2, Funny)

mwissel (869864) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072399)

Shit isn't of any higher value by calling it gold.

how about... (5, Funny)

smitty97 (995791) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072401)

Consumer Rights Access Program

Re:how about... (4, Funny)

TCQuad (537187) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072477)

No Content Left Behind?

Re:how about... (0, Redundant)

neersign (956437) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072663)

Consumer Rights Access Program

that's just crap.

Re:how about... (1)

SueAnnSueAnn (998877) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072677)

Not a bad idea.

changing DRM to DCE is political correctness gone off the deep end.

Sue

When it's time, it's time.
And it may be sooner then you think.

Marketing over content (4, Informative)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072409)

A turd by any other name is still a turd.

TFA Headline: "Don't Call It DRM" (2, Insightful)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072627)

My counter-headline: "Call It Whatever, but Stop Doing It. It's Pointless"

My boss' favorite line (0, Redundant)

aztec rain god (827341) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072637)

"You can polish a turd, but it's still gonna be a turd."

Re:Marketing over content (1)

surfdaddy (930829) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072719)

That must be it! I know if it is called "Krystal Kontent" that I'll be really happy about having my fair use rights taken away, my money collected multiple times, and my anus reamed out by the RIAA B***es.

I, for one... (0, Redundant)

alexandreracine (859693) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072775)

... welcome the king of stupid idea overlord

Sorry, this one just had to get out. Sometimes, people are stupid, but this time, this guy is the KING.

Re:Marketing over content (2, Insightful)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072805)

Yep. DRM 'got' its bad name simply by being bad. Any new name will eventually earn a bad name soon enough once the grass roots gets its message out and when customers see it for what it is. I think they will have a hard time making their new acronym stick.

Re:Marketing over content (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072809)

Here in the UK we had a nuclear reprocessing plant that was so badly thought of they renamed it to Sellafield, and that worked..

This is different though, they know that consumers haven't been fooled into believing drm is for their own good, so its being rebranded to fail in a new way. Yup, that'll work.

I wouldn't mind if they were honest about it and just said it was to protect them, not add value for consumers. That's where the problem is, they want us to believe something other then the truth. With the interwebs and all, that's a dumb idea.

A few choice words. (0, Flamebait)

eddy (18759) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072421)

Shut up you stupid cunt.

Why not call it... (5, Insightful)

swimboy (30943) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072423)

doubleplusgood warmfuzzy protection for all your digital lifestyles!

tag this article (1)

synjck (1069512) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072741)

doublespeak

Someone tag this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072433)

D R fucking M !

Digital restrictions management is digital restrictions management by any other name. And it sucks big time.

Try... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072435)

Digital Consumer Encumberment

Honestly, does the name change anything?

The old saying Governments change... (2, Insightful)

hkgroove (791170) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072443)

The names change, the problem stays the same.

Okay, It's just a term (5, Insightful)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072455)

Next task:

Redefine 'rape' as 'enthusiastic love-making.'

Re:Okay, It's just a term (5, Funny)

Kelbear (870538) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072553)

Suprise sex.

Re:Okay, It's just a term (4, Funny)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072737)

happy surprise sex

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072457)

Will HBO release Pimps Up Ho's Down in HD?

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072467)

The sky is green, water is dry. What else is new?

DRM = Digitally Restricted Media (4, Funny)

sdo1 (213835) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072469)

DRM = Digitally Restricted Media
DCE = Digitally Constrained Entertainment

A turd by any other name would still smell as foul... er, or something like that.

-S

I fancy... (1)

reality-bytes (119275) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072651)

...Draconian Content Exclusion.

(Let us not beat about the bush here)

Re:DRM = Digitally Restricted Media (1)

tboulan (266562) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072665)

They should change the name to DPG = Double Plus Good

Re:DRM = Digitally Restricted Media (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072791)

Thank you for being the first with the true meaning of the acronym. I was hoping we'd have a good replacement for Digital Restrictions Management.

What's in A Name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072473)

it's just like 'Secure Digital', what is it securing? (against)

It will certainly enable many things, like enabling the consumers to bend over further, grabbing their ankles willingly, and preparing to get raped by the content producers.

Face it, their content isn't worth securing that badly.

Translating service. (4, Insightful)

Applekid (993327) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072481)

'Digital Consumer Enablement would more efficiently confuse consumers "to prevent the use of content in ways they haven't before," such as enjoying TV shows time shifted to when they want and movies on portable video players like iPods where they can see them more than once. "I don't want to use the term DRM any longer," said Zitter, "even my Grandma knows by now that DRM is bad, so obviously we have to change the name of it."'

Ya Sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072483)

They used to call this Trusted Computing and a lot of other things. Consumers will soon figure out that it is the same stuff under a different name.

Digital Rights Management? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072497)

That's funny, I always thought it was Digital Revenue Maximization...

I must send a gift to Bob Zitter (4, Funny)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072499)

A bouquet of "fully organic fecal aroma enhancers". Don't worry - they're just like roses.

Suddenly I feel enabled! (3, Insightful)

paladinwannabe2 (889776) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072513)

Earlier this week I got to have fun with a game I legally purchased -twice- despite being unable to find my CD. After downloading the iso and using Daemon Tools, I was 'Enabled' to play my game again! Yes sir, I was certainly using my content in ways I hadn't used it before!

Enablement? (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072515)

Perhaps he could give me a single concrete example of something that I can do with 'enabled' media that I could not do with the same media with the DRM/DCE removed.

Taste Enablement, Citizens! (1)

paladinwannabe2 (889776) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072715)

There are many things enabled media can do that un-enabled media won't. For instance, enabled media will confuse, distort, and detroy your old drivers, software, and hardware, while non-enabled media will play on everything easily. Talk about boring! Plus, Enabled media entertains pirates by giving them something else to do in their free time. It's a friendly game that the media companies play. And don't forget all the money that Lawyers and Security Consultants make off the Enabled content!

Re:Enablement? (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072723)

<devil's advocate> Have the content in the first place. </devil's advocate>

What he's saying is that without strong DRM (or the renamed version), the content providers will simply take their ball and bat and go home. Try to remove it, and the HBO mafia will come aknockin'. (You thought "The Sopranos" was based on fiction, wait 'til you see the real goon squad. (:-)

Re:Enablement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072909)

What he's saying is that without strong DRM (or the renamed version), the content providers will simply take their ball and bat and go home.

What he's saying is that without DRM/whatever, HBO won't have new and exciting ways to take your money. Think about it - does it matter to me whether HBO can sell me movies and TV shows? Does it matter to HBO?

Re:Enablement? (1)

SirTalon42 (751509) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072789)

Be raped?

Re:Enablement? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072801)

Oh, don't be so cynical. Just think of all the wonderful things you'll be able to do when you have both Digital Consumer Enablement and Windows Genuine Advantage.

Re:Enablement? (1)

Russ Nelson (33911) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072853)

His implication is that they won't fund the production of entertainment without Digital Restrictions Management. As if they were going to go out of business otherwise!

Makes as much sense... (5, Insightful)

bearinboots (743355) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072527)

... as Windows Genuine Advantage.

Put a positive spin on the name and you can fool anyone!

Re:Makes as much sense... (2, Insightful)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072691)

That's funny, I've always seen windows genuine advantage as a negative spin. The more something is like actual microsoft windows the less likely I am to want to use it!

ya.. (2, Funny)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072535)

"Digital Consumer Enablement would more accurately describe technology that allows consumers "to use content in ways they haven't before," In other news HBO announced new functionality for DRMed CDs- as a fancy coaster. No longer will people be restricted to AOL disks to support their drinks.

Some other possible names: (1)

hirschma (187820) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072549)

How about:

* BTB? For Big Titted Blonde? Because everyone loves a BTB!

* CFC? For Choco-Flavored Content? And it doesn't even cause cavities!

* WPGWTM? World Peace, Good Will Towards Man? Doesn't everyone want this? Wouldn't everyone give up one of three wishes for this? And let's face it, it makes it so easy to tie into the Xmas Buying Season!

Bob, one thing is true, even in your ivory tower: you can't polish a turd. How about just calling it "unprotected"? Seems to solve a lot more issues than this stupidity.

Renaming fun (4, Funny)

dissy (172727) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072555)

I can't agree more!

I no longer want anyone to call it 'copyright violation', but instead lets call it 'early retirement to the public domain'

Re:Renaming fun (1)

lilomar (1072448) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072803)

Actually, we renamed it "Piracy" quite a while ago, everyone loves pirates!



(Actually, we prefer to be called "American Buccaneers" but that's neither here nor there.)

1984 (1, Informative)

Tom (822) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072565)

War is peace.

Powerful Idea (2, Funny)

rlp (11898) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072567)

His idea is very powerful and also enhances the growth of plants.

Yeah, right. (5, Funny)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072571)

Just because "baking brownies" is a euphemism for "taking a shit" doesn't mean it's going to smell any better.

In other words... (3, Insightful)

Cracked Pottery (947450) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072575)

The consumer has exactly no rights that are no extended by content provider. DRM was actually a more neutral term, since it doesn't assert that some rights do not intrinsically belong to the customer.

Re:In other words... (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072745)

WRONG. The consumer has rights that are spelled out in copyright law. OTOH, the rights of content owners are restricted by copyright law.

Although focusing on the "consumer" rather misses the whole point of copyrigh to begin with.

Ugh, newspeak. (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072579)

Semblance of Normalcy.
Axis.
Extraordinary Rendition.
Wetwork.
Collateral.
Hearts and Minds.
Regime Change.
Digital Consumer Enabledment.

When are they going to actually SELL something? (4, Interesting)

cHALiTO (101461) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072593)

I'm tired of this SHIT.

Wake me up when they're ready to actually SELL me a record or a movie. I don't want no 'license' to listen/watch something or any shit of the sort. I want to OWN a COPY. Copyright says I can't redistribute copies. Fine. But I want MINE to be MY OWN, and do with it whatever the fuck I want.

They can't have their cake and eat it too... and if they can.. well, they shouldn't.

Re:When are they going to actually SELL something? (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072783)

How does one say something "indistinctly?" That doesn't even make sense! Was he mumbling or something? Looks pretty distinct to me!

Sadly, correct (4, Insightful)

happyfrogcow (708359) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072595)

He's sadly correct that successfull deployment of DRM is only a good marketting campaign away.

Re:Sadly, correct (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072873)

Not even a very good one. I already know people, who until that point I thought were at least reasonably intelligent, saying how they wanted windows vista because it has DRM so they could play their music and movies on it...

they never learn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072599)

He must be a marketing weasel, any sane rational moderately intelligent person would know all that renaming would do is cause temporary confusion followed by massive backlash for the perceived attempt at obfuscation and just plain outright lying.

Then again, maybe he's a used car salesman...

No more stink! (1)

FrankDeath (746264) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072605)

You can't make shit not stink by simply changing its name.

Better Name, Same Acronym: (1)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072607)

Digital Consumer Enfeeblement

DRM helps users? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072615)

DRM actually helps consumers by getting more content into their hands.

Dude, how can you misspell P2P like that? You on meth or a Dvorak keyboard?

Dumbass (1)

Romancer (19668) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072617)

What do you think we're doing if not enjoying content in ways we haven't before?

That's the whole part of DRM that is the problem: it limits what we can do with the content.
It doesn't enable anything since the only effect it has on consumers it telling them what they can't do.
No where have I ever heard someone say: "Oh cool, the DRM made it easier for me to watch something!"

The whole restriction based technology is at odds with the fundamental power of the internet since the smart people online outnumber the paid people at the RIAA and MPAA by a pretty large factor. And as soon as you try and restrict something that people want, you are doing the exact opposite of what consumer demand and basic economics are trying to do. Give the people something that they want and you will sell your product, give them something that they can't use how they want and they will hate you and get it somewhere else and you won't see a dime!

Knock this DRM crap off before you regret it!
Changing the name does nothing but let us know how dumb you think we are. We know what results DRM has had on our lives and we have associated that acronym to difficult pain in the ass BS that keeps things we paid for from being enjoyed.

I Just Love Newspeak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072619)

I Just Love Newspeak!

Let's redefine piracy, too (1)

Wuhao (471511) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072641)

There is no such thing as a movie pirate -- there are only copyright protection enablers! Without this "piracy," the industry would never have been successful in acquiring tools like the DMCA, which in turn make DRM legally defensible, which must be a good thing, because it enables consumer choice! If DRM is good for the consumer, then piracy is good for the industry! Also, I am pleased to announce that henceforth up shall be referred to as down.

Let's play the name game (5, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072649)

Those people will never get it. The name doesn't matter. What's so sinister about "Digital Rights Management"? It sounds pretty nice to me. The bad connotations aren't coming from the name, it's the essence of what DRM is.

People keep thinking that the order and choice of letters is all it takes to turn something bad into something great.

This has been happening also in the way people have called people with mental handicaps throughout the years, and the constant "reinvention" of the terms, to keep the names less insulting:

-----

Socially responsible guy: We shouldn't call them "idiots" anymore. That's insulting. We'll call it people with mental retardation: retards.
General public: Yea, that is a nice neutral name, no bad connotations.

One year later:

General public: My brother is a damn retard, I hate him.
Socially responsible guy: That's insulting. We shouldn't call them retards anymore. We'll call them people with "slow mental development". Slow people.
General public: Yea, that's neutral and nice. Cool.

One year later:

General public: My neighbour is "slow" or something. Huhuhu.
Socially responsible guy: We shouldn't call them "slow", that's insulting. Well call them "people with special education needs". Special people.

One year later:

General public: My new coworker is "special". Huhuu, get it? "Special". Hehehe.

----------

Basically you can change a name any times you want. Bad fame will come to haunt you never mind how hard you try.

Call it what it is... (5, Funny)

FellowConspirator (882908) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072659)

The technology is a Fair Use Circumvention Kit, consisting of equal parts technology, marketing, and industry-written legislation.

The term Fair Use Circumvention Kit is not only much more descriptive of the true nature of the beast, the acronym is also easy to remember, catchy, and equally descriptive.

Why stop at enabling (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072667)

When you can go all the way to EMPOWERING with the same acronym. "HBO: Making things harder, to make you stronger. Now with TWICE the Empowerment!

It is the nature of human politics... (1)

stmfreak (230369) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072675)

... when trying to force an undesirable act/product upon the people:

1. give it a friendly name
2. rename as necessary to avoid negative stigma
3. select friendly name that implies exact opposite of intended effect
4. advertise, advertise, advertise
5. co-opt media owners to stop using previous name(s).
6. remove all other consumer options
7. profit!

Obligatory Futurama (4, Funny)

richdun (672214) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072683)

Slurm Queen: As for you, you will be submerged in Royal Slurm which, in a matter of minutes, will transform you into a Slurm Queen like myself.

Small Glurmo #1: But, Your Highness, she's a commoner. Her Slurm will taste foul.

Slurm Queen: Yes! Which is why we'll market it as New Slurm. Then, when everyone hates it, we'll bring back Slurm Classic, and make billions!

(thanks to The Neutral Planet [geocities.com] )

He's absolutely right! (1)

lilomar (1072448) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072693)

Digital Consumer Enablement would more accurately describe technology that allows consumers "to use content in ways they haven't before.
Why yes, yes it would. Why don't we use it to describe something like that?

The idea behind most of this (1)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072705)

The true reason DRM has failed is because of how limited our rights have become. Companies need to get a clue and instead of developing new "fluffy" terms to cover up shortcomings, they need to give the consumer what they actually want. Companies need to stop thinking about how to exploit consumers at every possible corner and go back to providing a valuable service for all.

It's a perfectly cromulent word! (1)

Minimum_Wage (1003821) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072709)

Digital Consumer Enablement embiggens us all!

Call it by what it really is: (1)

kcurtis (311610) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072717)

Digital Stick Your Fair Use Rights Where The Sun Don't Shine Management.

Excellent Idea! (5, Funny)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072739)

I propose "Herpes".

Yeah I would rip that song from the CD to my ipod but the herpes kept me from doing it.

Yeah I would post that clip from Colbert on Youtube but... you know... the herpes...

That'd be awesome!

Chinese Piracy Syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072743)

Meltdown? We prefer to think of it an an Unrequested Fission Surplus.

--C.M. Burns

In a related story... (3, Informative)

Goose42 (88624) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072769)

...George Carlin got a massive headache the same time this HBO exec thought this up.

words (1)

sacrilicious (316896) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072771)

An HBO executive has figured out the problem with DRM acceptance -- it's the name. HBO's chief technology officer Bob Zitter now wants to refer to the technology as Digital Consumer Enablement. Because, you see, DRM actually helps consumers by getting more content into their hands.

I'm going to ignore whatever thoughtful debate might be had on this, and simply quip: I've decided that we really should change the term for "PR". As it stands now, "PR" is a term people associate with messages coming from corporate executives which are carefully crafted spin statements intended to maximize corporate profit, often by misleading people and/or de-emphasizing the actual costs of a given initiative. Instead, we should use the term "thinking out loud"... MUCH friendlier.

Let's rename (1)

GWBasic (900357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072773)

Let's rename "copyright infringement" to "keeping Holywood honest."

lipstickonapig (1)

Sosarian (39969) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072777)

You can put the lipstick on, but it's still a pig.

A rose by any other name (2, Funny)

Vrallis (33290) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072797)

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet...

A steaming pile of shit by any other name would still smell like shit.

Tactics like this make me sick. Every college student working on Marketing degrees should be rounded up and put to work on a farm. At least shoveling shit there would be of benefit to humanity.

Gotta love these language games (1)

irenaeous (898337) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072817)

It reminds me of Ronald Reagan and the 1980's -- when the U.S. deployed a new generations of MIRVed nuclear missiles, Reagan named it "The Peacekeeper Missile". Speaking of the '80s, it also reminds me of 1984...

Right! He convinced me! (1)

N3wsByt3 (758224) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072819)

"I don't want to use the term DRM any longer," said Zitter, who added that content-protection technology could enable various new applications for cable operators.'"

While at the same time it would disable various old rights for consumers.

Typical corporate thinking: "How can we manipulate consumers into suckers that accept everything we tell them? Hmmm...let's change the name and spin some crap to make it sound awesome!"

The sad thing is, sometimes, this actually works. :-/

Free Beer (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072829)

They should call it "Free Beer". Then they could sell the identical version called "DRM" to the people who don't like that.

Hollywood hates us. It treats us like animals. And the millions of us who obsessively consume its poison prove them right. But without DRM, the minority of us who could prove them wrong could capture the masses our own ways, and have a chance to evolve the whole beast. I'd drink to that.

He can call it a ham sandwich (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072845)

Or make up any other term he cares to, he's not going to fool anyone.

-jcr

Therapy (1)

Ranger (1783) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072855)

Sounds like that HBO exec needs some DRM, Digital Rectal Massage [newscientist.com] , buy a couple guys with baseball bats who thinks he sure has a pretty mouth.

Call it monkeyrobotninjapirate system (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072869)

Then at least he'll have the people who will smash this into little bitty smoking pieces feeling a bit conflicted.
Unless they're clowns, in which case it'll just encourage them.

I personally thought the problem with DRM was that it's impossible to implement, and here all along it was just the wrong name. Silly me.

All jokes aside... (1)

DrBdan (987477) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072889)

All jokes aside, I think a large part of why they are doing this is because "DRM" has a negative image in the public eye (rightly so, but I digress). By changing to DCE they can say "oh we don't use DRM anymore, it was bad, we have DCE. It "enables" you...". Total PR crap.

Get your money back, Zitter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19072915)

Because however much money you paid to some PR firm to come up with that POS term to sell your digital lock-in schemes bullshit to the unwashed masses was too much. No one is gonna be fooled by this.

Also on the agenda (1)

Dancindan84 (1056246) | more than 7 years ago | (#19072919)

2) Change the name of roses to see if it affects the aroma.
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