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Disney - Blu-ray's Fair Weather Friend

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the pick-a-side dept.

Media 138

An anonymous reader writes "One day they're out, the next day they're in. Back in March, Disney CEO Bob Iger seemed to indicate that his company (which has exclusively backed Blu-ray since the start of the high-def format war) was on the verge of supporting *both* high-def formats. What a difference a couple of months of good press for Blu-ray makes: this week, the CEO reversed his earlier position, saying 'the single greatest thing we can do right now is to not waffle, but to be very, very blunt about it, (and) to continue our support of Blu-ray because we sense a real advantage.'"

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Poll (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093647)

What's better...

HD DVD [impoll.net]
Blu-Ray [impoll.net]

Re:Poll (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093683)

I am having the hardest time figuring out why parent was modded down. If anything, it should be modded up insightful. There is nothing bad about the poll, and it is somewhat informative and interesting.

Re:Poll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093809)

Complain about an 'overrated' moderation on an otherwise unmoderated post and you get marked troll. I guess some people have a language comprehension issue. To clear up, the GP is not redundant, offtopic, flamebait or a troll, and was certainly not overrated. In fact, it was an interesting, informative and insightful poll, and if anything underrated.

Re:Poll (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096211)

Not really any of the above. Kind of blah, actually. I'd say overrated because it isn't really adding anything to the discussion. Maybe if they had a significant sample size and any way to back up its credibility. But as it is it's just more noise. The page is also ugly.

Re:Poll (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093761)

Really what does slashdot have against niggers? I mean you keep moding down the posts. Bunch of supremacists I swear. I didn't know it was news for white people, stuff that matters only to white people. Niggers just wanna be niggers and you mod them down. They like sex, who doesn't?

Re:Poll (3, Informative)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095351)

This poll is flawed anyway, because it's not absolutely clear that clicking on one automatically casts a vote. I clicked both to see what they were about, and discovered that I'd already "voted" for HD-DVD. FWIW, I don't know either way, so I wouldn't have voted at all.

Re:Poll (1)

Karganeth (1017580) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095969)

That's useful, because the poll sample will be completely unbiased!

The fact is that Blu-ray will win due to the PS3 and the general superiority of the technology. Attributing ones dislike of one company involved with the technology (Sony) to ones judgment of whether it will fail or not is inappropriate. I think the main reason Slashdot users believe that Blu-ray will lose is because Sony has had a dislikable record with rootkits amongst exploding batteries so, obviously, Blu-ray will lose the format war.

Re:Poll (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096235)

I still can't believe people are backing HD-DVD over Bluray because they don't like Sony. Seriously, HD-DVD fanboys think Sony is even half as bad as microsoft? Get the fuck out!

Not sure if PS3 will recover fast enough to make a difference, but it definitely won't hurt. Bluray in the end will win for superior technology. Unless my initial prediction comes true and both fail because they pushed HD too early with technology that could have been better with another year or two.

Dual-speak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093649)

With dual players coming out. It doesn't matter what he supports.

Re:Dual-speak (1)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094105)

With dual players coming out. It doesn't matter what he supports.

I think it matters to the people who bought the HD-DVD add on for the Xbox 360. Now they have to buy another player so they can watch Pirates Of The Caribbean* in High Definition.

What I want in High Definition though is Star Wars, Lord Of The Rings and The Matrix...

*Not the second one though, it was far too long

Re:Dual-speak (2, Interesting)

DrMrLordX (559371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094299)

Such is the fate of those who bought gaming consoles hoping to use them as media centers. Both MS and Sony have a stake in one particular format which puts console owners at a significant disadvantage when it comes to media support.

Console buyers should have anticipated the eventual emergence of multi-format players. Also, Disney announced their loyalty to Blu-Ray some time ago. Anyone who really wanted to watch Disney movies on their gaming console pretty much had to go PS3.

Re:Dual-speak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094463)

Such is the fate of those who bought gaming consoles

It is also the fate of those who buy early.
History has shown that only one format will survive. Either HD-DVD or Blu-ray is going to die (if only in practice).
Lets just wait another year before buying a player and it will likely be clear which one it is going to be.

Re:Dual-speak (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094531)

History has shown that only one format will survive.

I'd be careful when calling a single example "history". If you take a moment, I bet you can think of dozens of examples where more than one consumer "format" has "survived".

Re:Dual-speak (1)

The Barking Dog (599515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094987)

The Matrix Trilogy: May 22nd on HD DVD. Choose your flavor: either a 3-disc set with the movies and minimal extras, or a 5-disc set that includes all the extras from the huge 10-disc DVD set.

Re:Dual-speak (2, Insightful)

FatherOfONe (515801) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095699)

Or it could fit on one 50GB Blu-Ray disk. I think we see one of the reasons HD-DVD is going to have issues.

Now my take on this.
1. The PS3 has a built in Blu-Ray player and like it or not there are 3 million of those already out there and will probably be over 6 million produced this year. Granted it isn't 10 or 15 million but it is still 6 million. Will HD-DVD even produce 500k?
2. Because of the PS3 and producing millions they have reduced the mfg cost, and can now start to lower the cost to consumers. So the cost difference is slowly going away and putting huge pressure on HD-DVD (Toshiba) to take even more loss in their system. Microsoft is obviously giving them money, or else they would have folded already.
3. The content providers lined up behind Blu-Ray and are reluctantly supporting it.
4. The "average" consumer doesn't care about either technology now and if either player cost more than $40 more than a "standard" DVD player they won't buy one. So both are "premium" items for the foreseeable future. Thus it will be the gaming market to drive sales of either brand and again, because of the PS3 Blu-Ray wins.

Lets be honest here. If it wasn't for Microsoft, this battle would have been over in the U.S. already. I understand that the last thing they want to do is to have to license Java from Sun again, but with Java now going GPL'd they may be able to work something out. I also understand Microsofts mantra of "If it isn't invented here... kill it". But this is one instance where they couldn't leverage their desktop to win the war and it shows. They could have put an HD-DVD player in every 360 but they chose not to and thus will probably sell more 360's for the next few years over the PS3 but at a cost of this format war and now they will probably have to eat some crow and work with Sun again.

Sony on the other hand could wind up third in the console war this time, but win the format war. If they don't address the price of the PS3 this year then it is obvious that their sales will not reach 10 million and that will be seen as a failure in a lot of peoples eyes. Granted they have other issues as well, like getting out more games, but the price is the largest issue.

Re:Dual-speak (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095703)

Now they have to buy another player so they can watch Pirates Of The Caribbean* in High Definition.

I'm sure the pirates of the internet will help him in getting that movie in HD without the need for a Blu-Ray player. :-)

What I want in High Definition though is Star Wars, Lord Of The Rings and The Matrix...

Are you sure that you don't already have The Matrix in high definition and even immersive 3D?

Disney's largest shareholder.... (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093667)

Disney's largest shareholder probably gave Iger a bollocking. After all, Apple is on the blue ray Association Board of Directors [apple.com] .

Re:Disney's largest shareholder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094243)

Disney's largest shareholder probably gave Iger a bollocking.
I'd be surprised if Steve Jobs, who holds approximately 7% of Disney's shares, has such a large influence. Disney's movie division should support whichever format (or formats) serves the best interests of the other 93% of shareholders, not Apple's interests.

Disney != Apple

Re:Disney's largest shareholder.... (2, Interesting)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094341)

After all, Apple is on the blue ray Association Board of Directors.

Yeah, what's up with that? Could anybody explain? One minute Apple is crying [slashdot.org] from the rooftops [slashdot.org] that DRM is bad, the next they're totally supporting a format that's laden [wikipedia.org] with it (even moreso than HD-DVD). Why couldn't they just not express a preference at all...?

Re:Disney's largest shareholder.... (5, Informative)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094401)

All this stuff is about money, not principles. You shouldn't expect the suits to understand how stuff works (encryption, laser frequency etc) - just about whether or not this will make more money than that. If Disney turns something down, and later a better offer is made, there's no concept of loss of face, just the possibility of reduced profits.

Re:Disney's largest shareholder.... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094405)

It's not hard to see a difference between music DRM and movie DRM--as Jobs pointed out, anybody can go buy music on a CD that has no DRM. However, a commercial DVD has built-in DRM that is illegal to circumvent. Shitty situation, sure, but that's reality. Also, the experience of a song as a unit of culture is quite separate from consuming movies: smaller time commitment, small file size, enjoyable virtually anywhere via an iPod.

Ha, captcha 'cultural'

Re:Disney's largest shareholder.... (1)

benwaggoner (513209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095383)

And Apple has been shipping HD DVD authroing and (very limited) playback for Macs for two years now, without having every shipped or announced anything related to Blu-ray.

Blu Ray could be improved... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093673)

By requiring the player to phone home before playing the content. This would give customers better products and shareholder more confidence when trading technology and entertainment stocks. One can only hope.

Whatever... (2, Insightful)

cptgrudge (177113) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093675)

My media server doesn't care what kind of "optical disc" Disney backs.

Re:Whatever... (1)

hax0r_this (1073148) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093737)

Just give me a 150 megabit internet connection already, and to hell with trying to tie data to clunky physical mediums.

Re:Whatever... (2, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094497)

150Mb/s is a bit more than you'd need, considering that BluRay and HD-DVD have a maximum throughput (for video) of about 30Mb/s. DVD is about 10Mb/s. Considering the rate at which network bandwidth is increasing, I expect the average home Internet connection to be faster than either of the 'next generation' formats by the time they have widespread deployment. Even mobile services are likely to be offering far more than that kind of speed within a decade.

Re:Whatever... (1)

Kijori (897770) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095553)

The big problem of course will be the bandwidth available to the distributing servers, since peer-to-peer is by nature non-sequential.While bandwidth to homes increases rapidly year-on-year, the bandwidth available to servers is much more expensive to increase.

Re:Whatever... (2, Insightful)

debest (471937) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095785)

And yet with today's internet connections getting faster, the amount of data that you're allowed to actually *use* is not going up by the same proportion. Consumers with "unlimited" accounts are getting their service scaled back when they overuse their service. Imagine how many more people will be in this predicament once HiDef movies start getting streamed down.

Speed is only half the equation: if ISPs don't stop chopping their customers down for using their services, there will be customers who pay for a movie, then can only watch half before the ISP starts throttling back their connections for overuse. For this type of downloading to become "mainstream", ISPs must start implementing graduated price scales that more accurately reflect their subscribers' usage (ie. reducing prices for light users, increasing prices for heavy users, instead of this fake "unlimited" BS). Otherwise, online distribution of content will never hit critical mass.

(Of course, that may well be the entire point! The content industry would prefer the internet just go away, so they can go back to their cosy old business model.)

Re:Whatever... (3, Insightful)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094515)

Just give me a 150 megabit internet connection already, and to hell with trying to tie data to clunky physical mediums.
Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of DVDs...

Re:Whatever... (1)

tompatman (936656) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095819)

Well, it is now not so hard to get a 20 Mbit connection, and that might be enough. I just signed up for FIOS, and the standard package is a 5Mbps pipe, they say that it is a garanteed 5Mb, not a peak value. They also offer a 20Mbps pipe for $10 more. It may not be so hard to trade Hi-Def movies in the near future.

Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DRM (5, Insightful)

Whuffo (1043790) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093681)

Seems strange that this announcement comes so shortly after an AACS key was spread all over the internet; it seems that HD-DVD's protection is pretty well beyond defending now. It's not totally broken yet, but the writing is on the wall.

Blu-Ray has additional copy protection in addition to AACS, so any media mogul who is depending on DRM to protect his profits would naturally be waving the Blu-Ray banner at this point.

Of course, Blu-Ray will have all of its protections defeated too - it's just a matter of time.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (3, Insightful)

dch24 (904899) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093753)

I was thinking the exact same thing as I read the transcript in the article. Bob Iger talks about Consumer Electronics support. I saw that as doublespeak for "Microsoft: you just got burned bad with the XBox360 HDDVD player firmware vulnerabilities." I agree - HDDVD's protection is totally broken.

The PS3 is a little harder to crack. I know it'll happen, but for someone like Iger, being able to push Microsoft around is probably the stuff of his dreams. I'm sure he doesn't care about the other HDDVD partners, and dual-format players will just make it easier for media houses to produce their content. Like you say, Whuffo, The writing is on the wall.

Microsoft has lost another battle.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (4, Interesting)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093777)

I don't see how this qualifies as "pushing MS around". The success of the XBox360 and MS isn't really based on whether movie studios support the HDDVD's, but the PS3 and Sony's fortunes are heavily dependent on studios supporting Blu-ray since they are taking a loss on the units to promote it.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093887)

I've heard this enough times, but I still don't buy it. Aside from what movie studios do, there's perfectly valid reasons for Sony to back the Blu-Ray format (ie 4.7GB just doesn't cut it anymore, and nobody wants to go back to the PSX solution of multiple discs). Granted, that makes the PS3 an overpriced electronic toy, but what electronic toy isn't?

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093923)

Of course HDDVD has a lot more capacity than 4.7GB too, so there was a lower-priced option available if higher capacity for the PS3 was the only issue. What's interesting about the PS3 is that it is both overpriced and loses money anyway.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

prencher (971087) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093943)

Not to nitpick but commercially produced DVD's are dual layer, and have about double that capacity, roughly 8.5GB. It's not anywhere close to HD-DVD / BluRay, but I doubt that game makers have problems with these constraints for this generation. Gears of War certainly doesn't, and it looks better than anything on the PS3 as yet.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (4, Informative)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094525)

People were having trouble with DVD capacity last generation. I remember a few multi-DVD PS2 games.

Insomniac's Brian Hastings had this to say [gametrailers.com] about the space issue:

If you ever hear someone say "Blu-Ray isn't needed for this generation," rest assured they don't make games for a living. At Insomniac, we were filling up DVDs on the PS2, as were most of the developers in the industry. We compressed the level data, we compressed the mpeg movies, we compressed the audio, and it was still a struggle to get it to fit in 6 gigs. Now we've got 16 times as much system RAM, so the level data is 16 times bigger. And the average disc space of games only gets bigger over a console's lifespan. As games get bigger, more advanced and more complex, they necessarily take up more space. If developers were filling up DVDs last generation, there are clearly going to be some sacrifices made to fit current generation games in the same amount of space.

Granted, some really great Xbox 360 games have squeezed onto a DVD9. Gears of War is a beautiful game and shows off the highest resolution textures of anything yet released, partly because of the Unreal Engine's ability to stream textures. This means that you can have much higher resolution textures than you could normally fit in your 512 MB of RAM. It also means that you're going to chew up more disc space for each level. With streamed textures, streamed geometry and streamed audio, even with compression, you can quickly approach 1 GB of data per level. That inherently limits you to a maximum of about 7 levels, and that's without multiplayer levels or mpeg cutscenes.

Sometimes people ask us, "If Resistance takes 14 gigabytes, why doesn't it look better than Gears?" Well, for one, Resistance didn't support texture streaming, so we had to make choices about where we spent our high-res textures. Resistance also had 30 single-player chapters, six multiplayer maps, uncompressed audio streaming, and high-definition mpegs. That all added up to a lot of space on the disc. Starting with Ratchet and Clank Future: Tools of Destruction we are supporting texture streaming, which will make the worlds look even better, and will also consume even more space on disc.

There's no question that you can always cut more levels, compress the audio more, compress the textures more, down-res the mpeg movies, and eventually get any game to fit on a DVD. But you paid for a high-def experience, right? You want the highest resolution, best audio, most cinematic experience a developer can offer, right? That's why Blu-Ray is important for games, and why it will become more important each year of this hardware cycle.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (2, Insightful)

Afecks (899057) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095787)

There's something this guy failed to mention, maybe because it completely blows his argument out of the water. But for people like me that have been gaming for a long time, we know the answer.

Mutli-Disc games. Yes that's right, Final Fantasy did it, so did many other games.

Sure you've got to put a lot of redundant data in there but acting like you're limited to 1 disc per game is a straw man argument. Need more space? Add more discs. Simple.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (2, Insightful)

ryanw (131814) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096205)

There's something this guy failed to mention, maybe because it completely blows his argument out of the water. But for people like me that have been gaming for a long time, we know the answer.

Mutli-Disc games. Yes that's right, Final Fantasy did it, so did many other games.

Sure you've got to put a lot of redundant data in there but acting like you're limited to 1 disc per game is a straw man argument. Need more space? Add more discs. Simple.
Something you've forgotten is that when trying to "make money" you want to keep costs down. One of the most expensive costs is manufacturing and packaging. If you are stuck to multi-disc distribution for your game you will be eating profits because you couldn't squeeze it into one disc. I'd imagine the company FUNDING the game would rather make the mpegs a little more gritty and the sound quality more compressed rather than expand to a second or third disc.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19096309)

A 2-disc game fits into the same size box as a 1-disc game, packaging costs don't increase at all. As for pressing a second disc, pressed DVDs in bulk cost a couple of cents each. Shipping a multi-disc game has next-to-no extra costs for a developer, except for having to make enough stuff to fill them and possible problems with free-roaming level structures (e.g. swapping discs each time you entered a different area in GTA would suck).

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

Rinikusu (28164) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095835)

/* There's no question that you can always cut more levels, compress the audio more, compress the textures more, down-res the mpeg movies, and eventually get any game to fit on a DVD. But you paid for a high-def experience, right? You want the highest resolution, best audio, most cinematic experience a developer can offer, right? That's why Blu-Ray is important for games, and why it will become more important each year of this hardware cycle. */

Just a nitpick but...

He forgot to include "good game" in things on the disc. All the high-def graphics, stereo sound, and mpeg movies in the world don't mean a damn thing if the game sucks. Please devs, keep the GOOD GAMES coming. Don't get distracted by "OOO SHINY!" at the expense of a good game.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (4, Interesting)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094245)

since they are taking a loss on the units to promote it

If they make a loss on an $600 unit which is crippled compared to a PC, it's one of the worst corporate inefficiencies in today's world. For the same price, you can buy a used car, pay a rent for a 2 bedroom apartment in many parts of the country, get a decent desktop from Dell or feed 100 children in India for a month. Don't tell me 100 parents can not assemble one playstation 3 in a month.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19095021)

Don't tell me 100 parents can not assemble one playstation 3 in a month
2 problems.

1.) Given the parts, I doubt they could assemble it.
2.) I doubt much of the cost comes from assembly.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095275)

If they make a loss on an $600 unit which is crippled compared to a PC (...) Don't tell me 100 parents can not assemble one playstation 3 in a month.

Assembly of a custom built (mostly, component pick nor random parts) computer is around $50-70 here in one of the most expensive first-world countries around. Assembly line production in a cheap country should come out to almost nothing. But if you want to put in a Quad Extreme, a GF8800 and other expensive components it'll still cost in the thousands. Can your 100 parents assemble a Blu-Ray drive? Create a blue laser? Create a lens for a 400nm laser? Produce a <100nm CPU or graphics chip?

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19095367)

If they make a loss on an $600 unit which is crippled compared to a PC, it's one of the worst corporate inefficiencies in today's world.
Welcome to consoles, and particularly the Sony and MS model. Lose your ass on consoles, make it up on accessories and games. Nintendo has been reported to be the only one to be selling hardware in the black from the very start.

For the same price, you can buy a used car, pay a rent for a 2 bedroom apartment in many parts of the country, get a decent desktop from Dell or feed 100 children in India for a month. Don't tell me 100 parents can not assemble one playstation 3 in a month.
What shitty car are you getting for $600? Where in this country are you getting a 2 bedroom apartment for $600 per month. I have lived in three different areas and none of them had apartments that cheap. Two of those locations were in average CoL areas. Define a decent desktop from Dell? It definitely isn't one with a Blu-Ray drive, which is what is a large reason for the cost of the PS3.

Don't tell me 100 parents can not assemble one playstation 3 in a month.
WTF is this suppose to mean? Seriously, I challenge you to assemble a PS3 in a month. Good luck getting all the components and you surely will not get them at a cost to make it for less than $600, assuming you can even find a cell processor and a board to support it. Not to mention the Blu-Ray drive. Go look around and tell me how much one of those things costs retail. Not the machine at best buy but the OEM drives for a PC. Hint, the ones on newegg are $499.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096143)

Not to feed your flamefest, but $600/mo is a pretty reasonable price for a 2br apartment here in Pittsburgh. You won't be soaking in a hot tub or anything, but you'll have some space to call your own in the "most livable city" in the US.

As for the $600 Dell system, I think the poster was talking about its ability to play games. You can certainly buy a $600 Dell that will play the latest games (perhaps not with every option maxed) at reasonable framerates. But I agree-- Getting a $500-600 Blu-Ray player is the real selling point of a PS3, IMHO.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094319)

I agree - HDDVD's protection is totally broken.

So it's now significantly better for the consumer?

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (3, Informative)

alphamugwump (918799) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094183)

Get with the picture. The only real difference between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD is the frequency of the laser, and thus, the density of the bits on the disk. AFAIK the encryption for Blu-Ray and HD-DVD are just different enough to be incompatible. They were both "broken" pretty much simultaneously. However, all AACSLA has to do to "close" the hole is to change their keys, leading to a new cycle of cat-and mouse. AACS is no more broken than RSA; they just lost their key.

Blu-Ray has some extra stuff like BD+, which allows the player execute arbitrary code to search for debuggers, patch the player, install rootkits, and so on. Blu-Ray also has something called ROM Watermarking. However, I gather that these thing are just another annoyance, and not a serious problem.

No, as someone else said, this is probably political. Disney is associated with Jobs Who is associated with Apple, and Apple backs Blu-Ray. Their just digging their trenches deeper.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (4, Informative)

LordVader717 (888547) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094337)

Just to nitpick: The laser frequency is the same, a blue 405 nm wavelength.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

ofcourseyouare (965770) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095055)

I would suggest there is one potentially very significant difference between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD which is "BD-J" -- to quote Wikipedia...

"BD-J, or Blu-ray Disc Java, is the interactive platform supporting advanced content for Blu-ray Disc. BD-J allows bonus content on Blu-ray Disc titles to be far more sophisticated than bonus content provided by standard DVD, including network access... and access to local storage." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BD-J [wikipedia.org]

AFAIK HD-DVD doesn't have anything like this (please correct me if I'm wrong). Now I agree that no movie studios are producing content which uses this functionality in a useful way, but that may change. See for example this piece which Ian McKellen (Gandalf/Magneto) did, talking in a question-and-answer format about Shakespeare for the National Theatre in the UK:

http://www.stageworkmckellen.org/ [stageworkmckellen.org]

IMHO, this shows the way that using BD-J you could produce some "DVD extra" type content which was vastly more interactive and thought-provoking than what's currently done. Having said that, AFAIK no-one is doing anything with it (except -- groan -- Dragon's Lair is being re-released again, on Blu-Ray. Deep Sigh.)

Perhaps therefore the one creatively interesting advantage of Blu-Ray will be wasted while the studios put all their energy into fighting the customers with DRM...

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095825)

HD-DVD has something similar.

It's very hard for me to describe the HD-DVD version of this feature but here goes nothing. HD-DVD's allow you to use the menu while watching the main movie, browse through the chapters with clips playing while the movie is still playing. Some discs have a "pop-up video" style feature you can activate. This can allow a button to pop up at any time and when you click on it will continue to play the movie, but also start a second video (picture in picture style) and then overlay the audio over top the existing audio.

Like I said, it's hard to describe but appears to be the up the same ally as providing more interactive content.

In addition to AACS, Blu-Ray has BD+ (1)

TrekkieGod (627867) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095745)

As far as I know no discs have used this for copy protection yet, but it was part of Sony's marketing strategy to claim that BD+ [wikipedia.org] was an extra layer of security. I saw people on doom9 claiming that it doesn't really add anything they can't get around, but since it hasn't been implemented yet, it hasn't been broken yet. Which means that sony can argue with the other studios that they have stronger copy protection than HD-DVD.

Re:Doesn't mention the little problem of broken DR (1)

mgiuca (1040724) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094793)

DRM? I think you mean Digital Consumer Enablement [slashdot.org] !

I Don't Get It (2, Insightful)

Mr Jazzizle (896331) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093685)

What's the advantage of supporting Just one of the formats? What's in it for Disney to diss HDDVD?

Re:I Don't Get It (2, Informative)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093799)

I guess Disney wants to stack the deck in favor of their "preferred" format. (Not wanting to back a losing horse, so to speak... as they've done in the past...) I really don't care if Disney puts their drek on edible undie flavored discs... Disney is a non-starter in my book. I truthfully don't buy enough movies for them to care what I think, and I've pretty much grown ever-so-tired of the "sticky floor/bratty snot/laser pointer/cell ringers" atmosphere theaters have wrought. So, in the grand scheme of things... I'd much rather have the next-format data burner settled in a reasonable time frame... :)

In the realm of movies, I think we're going to see a dual-format for quite some time... no one's giving a nod to either one (besides the press-release chest-thumping) and porn (despite their power earlier on) is more of a paper-tiger in this fight... Everyone knows, the _internet_ is for porn anyway. :-)

Still, it's probably worth noting (as others have posted) that Apple's a big backer of Blu-Ray.. I don't bloody well care, because it'll be a few years before we can get 80GB backup discs, at least at a reasonable price... And by then, my system disk will have grown too large (yet again) for a "single disk" backup. ;)

Yeah, I'm a digital packrat... :P

Re:I Don't Get It (4, Interesting)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093893)

Really, they should support the format they think's going to lose. Then, if that format loses before anyone really bothers to come out with dual-format players, they could sell the people who bought a copy in that format a copy in the other format as well.

Re:I Don't Get It (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094007)

"Yeah, I'm a digital packrat... :P"
I hear ya'.

I gave up trying to backup with optical media- with the price of harddrives, it's worked out better for me just to convert older PC's into file servers on my network so I can make redundant backups of stuff I don't want lost.

Most of the time it's much easier to format and re-install or mess with triple and quad boot systems.
As an added bonus, as I upgrade the PC's on my network, the fileservers either get upgraded or added to.

With the uncertainty of how long optical backups remain viable on RW or R type media, I feel much more secure with my method...It allows me much room with experimentation if nothing else!

Re:I Don't Get It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094385)

Still, it's probably worth noting (as others have posted) that Apple's a big backer of Blu-Ray.
Don't forget Dell and Sony (for Blu-ray). Big backers of HD DVD include Intel, Microsoft, and Toshiba. So which big backers have more influence?

Pretty much everybody else (in personal computers) are backing both formats or are waiting for a winner.

Re:I Don't Get It (1)

LocoMan (744414) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095155)

I'd say the Blu-ray backers have more influence, at least when it comes to movies. At least two of the blu-ray backers (Disney and Sony) are very big content producers, while the HD-DVD backers you mentioned there have a big influence in the world of hardware, software and electronics, none of them produce actual content, and IMHO the one that wins in the end will be the one that has most movies people want to watch. Disney is a huge player there too... even if a parent isn't interested in it, the little kids will want to watch Meet the Robinsons, Ratarouille and re-re-re-re-re-remastered peter pan over and over again, and if those are only available on Blu Ray, guess which format daddy will buy? Now insert replies from geek family guys about how they won't buy either and how will they use their mythTV or media center computers instead... :)

Re:I Don't Get It (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095363)

I don't bloody well care, because it'll be a few years before we can get 80GB backup discs, at least at a reasonable price... And by then, my system disk will have grown too large (yet again) for a "single disk" backup. ;)

With the recent trend of games putting savegames in "my savegames" under "my documents", I've found that you can install games to a non-system disk since you can simply reinstall them if you lose the system disk. Also of course all your media can go on another disk, so can a lot of other big space eaters. Also make sure to redirect all your download software to store both partial and complete files on a non-system disk. With that I've had a system disk of 16GB, which has been getting a bit cramped recently, but if I had 25GB discs, that'd do it for me. Of course the bigger issue is that you never get around to actually doing it, in that sense an online mirror is easier.

Re:I Don't Get It (2, Informative)

FateStayNight (1000465) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093915)

saves costs. No need to author and publish in two different types, encode in two formats, stock two skus of each movie, create additional covers and booklets etc

Re:I Don't Get It (1)

BrerBear (8338) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095667)

Easy. The existence of a format war is holding people back from buying either BD or HD-DVD until there is a winner. I know many such people.

Helping to end the format war and greatly increase the overall HD market would be much more beneficial than selling a few thousand HD-DVD discs now. Yes, the volumes are that low.

Not to mention the overhead costs of supporting a second format.

You gotta wonder... (0, Offtopic)

FlyByPC (841016) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093707)

...why they would name a format (Blu-Ray) with a name so close to the English word "blurry". The subconscious connection is too easily made, IMHO -- even if they do have a good format.

Re:You gotta wonder... (1)

Eddi3 (1046882) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093935)

Quite frankly, I never would have noticed that had you not pointed it out. That being said, I don't think it would make a difference anyway.

  -Eddie

Re:You gotta wonder... (2, Insightful)

donaldm (919619) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093941)

Well they could call it BD (short for Bluray Disk) or would you prefer calling HD DVD "High Definition Digital Versatile Disc". I think you will find that many people are confused with HD DVD verses DVD but not with Bluray verses DVD since the Bluray PR people have really been out "informing" the people.

It must be noted that a good marketing campaign works well if you have some catch word that is relatively short and can be perceived as "cool", is easy to remember and can easily be abbreviated to a few relevant characters. At the moment Bluray fits that criteria.

As to which format will win, well it is far to early to tell which format will dominate, however the Bluray consortium does have more money. Still time will tell.

Re:You gotta wonder... (2, Informative)

ppanon (16583) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094041)

In France (and Belgium), BD is Bande Dessine'e (comics). Given that Disney are an international company with a very young target market, perhpas they wanted to avoid the possible confusion.

Re:You gotta wonder... (3, Interesting)

donaldm (919619) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094327)

It is usually appropropriate to market a product with a different name in a county where the English word can be misinterpreted, still that does not always stop the other country taking offence, real or imagined.

Communication is always a problem when you have different languages and cultures. This is why French became the language of Diplomacy since (I think) 1700's since the language was basically codified such that it was very difficult to misinterpret. Of course that did not stop some of the most horrendous wars in history it just made it easier to tell the other guy you did not like him and why.

Re:You gotta wonder... (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095317)

...why they would name a format (Blu-Ray) with a name so close to the English word "blurry". The subconscious connection is too easily made, IMHO
That's not to mention the other obvious (to me anyway) misinterpretation. Who is Ray, and why do we care if someone blew him?

Come on.... it's staring you in the face. I can't believe they didn't consider that one.

thats fine i don't buy their shit anyway (-1, Troll)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093717)

they can release it on an encrypted turd for all i care.

Re:thats fine i don't buy their shit anyway (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093773)

But the encrypted turd would have to be read with a brown laser - which I'm sure is in shorter supply than the blue laser. One would assume this was R & D's only intelligent decision ;-)

Re:thats fine i don't buy their shit anyway (1)

JohnBailey (1092697) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093875)

They did, but there were prunes on the menu that day.. Disaster..

HD-DVD's are better for consumers (3, Insightful)

TerraFrost (611855) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093741)

According to Template:HighDefMediaComparison [wikipedia.org] , HD-DVD's don't have any regions, whereas Blu-Ray's have three. Presumably, Hollywood executives who get off on exercising control really dislike it that HD-DVD gives them less control, thus they prefer Blu-Ray. For that same reason, you'd think consumers would prefer HD-DVD...

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (0, Flamebait)

aristotle-dude (626586) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093795)

HD-DVD is supported by MSFT. HD-DVD initially was not going to support anything above 480p through component video which would have forced everyone with a non-HDMI HDTV to "upgrade" to a newer HDTV. They relented "after" Sony came out and said they would not enforce content protection for the first couple of years and allow 1080i through component.

There are numerous Blu-ray burners/drives for PCs and macs out right now. Where are the HD-DVD burners for macs? Where are the consumer level HD-DVD burners for PCs?

Would you care to explain again how HD-DVD is more accessible to the average consumer? I'm not into anime or that sick tentacle porn so I could care less about movies from other regions. DVD burners make DVD accessible as a "format" for consumers with video cameras and the emerging Blu-ray burners will make HD video from HD DV cameras accessible. How is HD-DVD accessible to anyone if you need pro equipment to author it?

Every PS3 is a blu-ray player out of the box.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (1)

dagamer34 (1012833) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093847)

Being affordable makes it accessible. And a PS3 doesn't count. Only the $600 version is available in stores, and that's still more expensive than the cheapest HD-DVD player.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (3, Informative)

News for nerds (448130) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093999)

Would you care to explain again how HD-DVD is more accessible to the average consumer? I'm not into anime or that sick tentacle porn so I could care less about movies from other regions.

Since the US the region code for the US and Japan is the same those who have American players can watch and collect BD discs for "anime or that sick tentacle porn" to your heart's content.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (5, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094143)

HD-DVD initially was not going to support anything above 480p through component video which would have forced everyone with a non-HDMI HDTV to "upgrade" to a newer HDTV. They relented "after" Sony came out and said they would not enforce content protection for the first couple of years and allow 1080i through component.
Sony said no such thing. The Image Constraint Token (ICT) [wikipedia.org] is an anti-feature of AACS, the copy-prevention system for BOTH HD-DVD and BLU-RAY. It wasn't Sony that said ICT would not be enabled, it was HOLLYWOOD as the MPAA that said they would not set the ICT bit on any AACS releases for either format. It had nothing to do with competition between BLU-RAY and HD-DVD and everything to do with not pissing off the early adopters who are the target market for any HD products.

There are numerous Blu-ray burners/drives for PCs and macs out right now. Where are the HD-DVD burners for macs? Where are the consumer level HD-DVD burners for PCs?
Considering that you can't buy one for much under $500 and the blank media is at least $15 a disc, the question is moot, even for most of the early adopters.

I'm not into anime or that sick tentacle porn so I could care less about movies from other regions.
Are you fucking kidding me? Do you really believe that the rest of the world has no cinema of note beyond anime and hentai?

Anyone holding such a ridiculous opinion has no business discussing any aspect of cinema, you are just too ignorant to have any insight whatsoever. Which is probably why your claim about the ICT was total bunk too.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (1)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094553)

Considering that you can't buy one for much under $500 and the blank media is at least $15 a disc, the question is moot, even for most of the early adopters.
I seem to remember even larger prices for both CD and DVD burners (at a time when that amount of money was worth even more), and people still buying them up.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (1)

Peyna (14792) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094731)

I seem to remember even larger prices for both CD and DVD burners (at a time when that amount of money was worth even more), and people still buying them up.

But there was no real cheaper alternative that could do the same thing. Cassettes weren't cutting it, and it was something new and shiny for everyone to have. I don't think Blu-ray falls into that category. It's more like a new version of something people already have, which means they're less likely to pay the "OMG no one else has anything like this" premium for it.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094419)

HD-DVD is supported by MSFT.
Is that supposed to be a bad thing for HD DVD? Blu-ray is supported by SONY (root kits, UMD, Memory Stick, ATRAC).

Like them or not, Microsoft (with their power) can have a large influence in HD DVD's favor. Other big backers of HD DVD include:

  • Intel
  • Toshiba
  • NEC
Big backers on Sony/Blu-ray's side include:
  • Dell
  • Apple
  • Panasonic
Every other significant company supports BOTH formats (for now) or are waiting for a winner. These include HP, Samsung, LG, Sanyo, Hitachi, et al.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (1)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094573)

The issue isn't with hardware support, though - it's with media support. If you've got no movies to play, there's no point in having that format.

Currently, Blu-Ray has exclusive support from five studios, as opposed to HD-DVD's two. That makes a huge difference in media sales, which will lead to support from more hardware manufacturers, etc.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094847)

Currently, Blu-Ray has exclusive support from five studios, as opposed to HD-DVD's two. That makes a huge difference in media sales, which will lead to support from more hardware manufacturers, etc.
That presumes that all studios create equally.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095161)

Would you care to explain again how HD-DVD is more accessible to the average consumer?
As an Australian it means I can get the content when its really released, not when the local publishers decide its released.

Re:HD-DVD's are better for consumers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19095713)

This is exactly why I selected HDDVD over Blue-Ray. In the early days of DVD I had to get a chipped player, now I just import the films I want. 30GB is way enough for a movie in AVC or VC1 (2h:10 can be 24MBps) so I dont see any difference in quality. Oh and the price was half that of a BD player. With the BDJ spec not completly formalized it was a no brainer decision. I know people like to make this almost religious, but looking at the technical merit all BD has going for it is more space.

Aww, Poor Liddle Zonk Still Trying To Save HD-DVD (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19093759)

So cute. Pathetic, but cute.

? title ? (1, Insightful)

smoker2 (750216) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093955)

Does the submitter know what a "Fair weather friend" is ? Because they don't appear to.

A fair weather friend is one who is with you in the good times and against you in the bad times.

According to the summary, Disney has been exclusively signed up to Blu-Ray from the beginning. They have never not supported Blu-Ray.
They have never rubbished Blu-Ray, nor released any plans to withdraw their support of that format.
So how does this make them a "Fair weather friend" ?

If they had supported one then the other then the first again, according to economic climate then the statement might be true, but they haven't done that at all.

Re:? title ? (2, Insightful)

Semptimilius (917640) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094091)

Well, your fair weather friend isn't necessarily against you in bad times. Just not supportive when you're in a sea of troubles. (Unless you subscribe to the "you're either with me of against me" philosophy.)

This got modded up? (2, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094949)

First of all, modding pedants up always rubs me the wrong way. I'm a pedant myself, and sometimes even a grammar nazi, but I don't expect (or even hope) that such posts of mine are modded up. I completely fail to see how someone giving their definition of a "fair-weather friend" is insightful. If I point out that fair-weather friend [m-w.com] is supposed to be hyphenated, does that make me insightful? What about if I point out that technically, only the B in Blu-ray [blu-raydisc.com] is supposed to be capitalized?

Second of all, it seems to be your definition of fair-weather friend that needs adjusting. As pointed out above, a fair weather friend is not the same thing as a foul weather enemy. It's a friend that is "loyal only during a time of success." There's no implication that such a friend actually turns against you when the weather isn't so fair, just that they don't support you.

Just because Disney has been contractually beholden to the Blu-ray format does not necessarily make them a supporter. If their contracts lock them into using Blu-Ray but they were out there touting how great HD-DVD is and how much Blu-ray sucks, would that make them a supporter? No, and there have been some instances where something like that has happened. (The row between Howard Stern and Clear Channel comes to mind, when Stern was actively ridiculing Clear Channel on the very stations they owned.) In this case, Disney trying to straddle the fence with their public comments can certainly be taken as non-loyalty towards Blu-ray.

Re:This got modded up? (1)

miskatonic alumnus (668722) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096131)

If I point out that fair-weather friend is supposed to be hyphenated, does that make me insightful?

Apparently so ;)

Re:? title ? (1)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095295)

Its just the destruction of our language. It used to bother me as well but I have just learned to accept it. The main reason is most common phrases were just goofy coloquialisms of days gone by, and have also completly changed meaning.

For instance:
"Close enough for government work" when originally coined supposedly sometime in the federalist period actally meant that the job was done very well.

Some time in the sixties when the government was precived to be inept by many it took on a new meaning entirely. Now when you say that you mean something more like:
"I did a crapy job but it will probably do."

As long as MPEG2 continues to be rejected (1)

Asterra (1087671) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093969)

If Bluray ends up being the "winner" of the format war - something which won't be the case until you can get a standard player for
MPEG2 can still look good when the source is hyper-idealized, such as in the case of Crank which was not shot on film, but this is simply not the happy case 99.9% of the time.

Now somebody point me to the cheapest possible 24Hz-capable Bluray player, complete with price.

(Speaking of media servers, is there one which can actually achieve 100% consistently flat framerates over HDMI? Hint: Windows cannot.)

Re:As long as MPEG2 continues to be rejected (1)

Asterra (1087671) | more than 7 years ago | (#19093981)

Editing above: If Bluray ends up being the "winner" of the format war - something which won't be the case until you can get a standard player for sub-$300 and a 24Hz player for sub-$400, in my opinion - HD-DVD will still have served the purpose of forcing the adoption of AVC / VC1.

MPEG2 can still look good when the source is hyper-idealized, such as in the case of Crank which was not shot on film, but this is simply not the happy case 99.9% of the time.

Now somebody point me to the cheapest possible 24Hz-capable Bluray player, complete with price.

(Speaking of media servers, is there one which can actually achieve 100% consistently flat framerates over HDMI? Hint: Windows cannot.)

modP 0p (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19094175)

Do you support crap or crap? (4, Informative)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094223)

Ok, CDs and DVDs were not specifically designed for use in computers or anything besides standalone players. But what is the excuse for products introduced in 21 century? Where is support for building a library on a hard drive of a computer or DVR? Where are the computer drives that can play and record movies for a reasonable price? Where are the on-demand/online services to deliver an equivalent-quality movie over the wire? Both formats should go the way of Sony's minidisc and memory stick ATRAC players as consumers revolt and find other forms of entertainment.

Re:Do you support crap or crap? (1)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094545)

Where are the computer drives that can play and record movies for a reasonable price?"
NewEgg has a Blu-ray burner for $499 [newegg.com] . That's one of three they sell for that price. Sure, that's expensive, but IIRC, CD and DVD burners were $1k+ early in the game.

Re:Do you support crap or crap? (3, Insightful)

peterlynam (255050) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094613)

Transporting gigabytes of data on a small cheap plastic and metal disk is currently the most efficient form of delivering video. The answers to your questions appear to be simple economics. Until the majority of consumers have efficient/reliable 8mbps connections and huge hard drives, there is not much point to mass investment in non-DVD delivery. I have often given up on a tedious video download to walk to the nearest DVD store. Not only is there better quality and convenience, but also, after factoring in a reasonable estimate of bandwidth cost, it works out about the same $-wise.

Blu-Ray Can Hold More Commercials (4, Insightful)

joe_n_bloe (244407) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094279)

With Blu-Ray, Disney can easily put an entire hour of un-skippable high-def commercials, trailers, disclaimers, warnings, notices, and animated logos in front of every movie, even if the next Pirates of the Caribbean is 3 hours long.

So in their shoes I'd be thinking Blu-Ray too.

Re:Blu-Ray Can Hold More Commercials (1)

SkyDude (919251) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094921)

With Blu-Ray, Disney can easily put an entire hour of un-skippable high-def commercials, trailers, disclaimers, warnings, notices, and animated logos in front of every movie....

They've already done that. On at least one movie I know of - "Remember The Titans" I believe it was - they stuffed several minutes of trailers ahead of the movie. To my total shock, I couldn't fast forward past them. So, using some good open source tools, I ripped the disc and removed all of the UOPs.

Screw the executive asshat at Disney that made that dipshit decision.

good months for blu-ray (2, Interesting)

minuszero (922125) | more than 7 years ago | (#19094287)

What a difference a couple of months of good press for Blu-ray makes
Like what?

More likely, it's due to a couple of bad weeks for HD-DVD (security keeps getting cracked). That'd be more motivation for keeping to the other one if I was an idiot executive. Who cares if one gives a better quality video? One of them is still capable of manipulating our customers^W^W^W protecting our content.

You know what would make me buy a player? (1)

sootman (158191) | more than 7 years ago | (#19095949)

Lucas. If he would release the original trilogy, nicely restored...
- get rid of the grabage mattes around spaceships, the slugs on the emperor's face, and all the other OBVIOUS stuff they missed in the last X "restoration" attempts
- in the highest currently possible definition (1080)
- not the most recent "well, we had this old LaserDic master" bullshit
- and NO (1997+) special features
on EITHER format, I'd go buy one... maybe not tomorrow, but as soon as the players were halfway reasonable (like $200-300 or so.) Or maybe I'd get a PS-3 or some other cool device that included [HD|BR] playability.

If I were in charge of either format, I'd drive a dumptruck full of money to Lucas' ranch. The original trilogy is one of a very small handful of things that I really do want to own in the best possible quality.

I don't care which one wins (2, Interesting)

PingXao (153057) | more than 7 years ago | (#19096319)

As long as prices fall quickly I don't give a rat's ass which format "wins". My motives are selfish. I have a bunch of old videotapes I want to archive. I thought DV was the answer, and it is to a point. But even though DV is a decent compression method, once I archived a few dozen tapes I found I was STILL reluctant to trash the old VHS/Hi-8 analog tapes.

I want enough space on a burnable disc so I can capture all my video (all SD and all lo-fi) with a lossless scheme. Only THEN will I toss my old tapes and not give it a second thought. Then I can experiment with different codecs until the cows come home and know I didn't sacrifice anything from the originals. I'll probably only actually do that on a handfull of the recordings I have, but hey, you never know. Someday one of my grandkids-to-be might develop an intense interest in a vacation I took years ago to Wally World. More likely is that all my precious footage will end up in a landfill somewhere. Such is the life of a pack rat.
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