Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

7 Things the Boss Should Know About Telecommuting

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the sign-me-up dept.

Communications 156

Esther Schindler writes "An article on CIO.com presents input from several telecommuting IT professionals about the benefits that working from home brings to the enterprise. They suggest some processes that help remote workers interact with other team members, and discuss the irritations that twist telecommuters' shorts in a knot. In short, it's what employees truly want the boss to know about telecommuting. Two sidebars also discuss tips for telecommuters who don't want their careers to stall because they're 'out of sight, out of mind,' and the out of pocket expenses that the company and telecommuter need to divvy up."

cancel ×

156 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Goatse! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099029)

Goatse! [goatse.ch]

You know you love it!

Yeah Baby! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099053)

I just dropped a huge deuce!! Man it was awesome! It had lots of peanuts and corn in it too!

Cool dud! Was it a Bonadeuce, with red hair in it? (0, Offtopic)

SlashdotTroll (581611) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099165)

And on a second thought, did Bonadeuce put it up there after you first tried to mail it to him in a portrait'd fanbag?

I ,.-~"`love`"~-., hot shit on a portrait of a celebrity -- especially handbags. Does anyone know when the Olsen twins are scheduled to ** get it on ** ??

7 Things My Boss Shouldn't Know ... (5, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099065)

... about me when I telecommute:

7. I have "Take This Job And Shove It" looping in iTunes.
6. Sometimes I follow links in Google that don't show up at the office when my "Safe Filer" is "On".
5. I work so hard at home that I need a break every hour.
4. Comedy Central replays the same stuff all day long.
3. My desk at home is very clean (in direct contrast to the pig sty in my office).
2. My cats are excellent proofreaders.
1. I'm naked.

Re:7 Things My Boss Shouldn't Know ... (2)

andy666 (666062) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099215)

You;re pretty funny actually. But seriously, I've telecommuted for most of 10 years now on different jobs. On most of them, I think I've worked just as hard as a normal worker. But it has given been some chances to goof off.

Re:7 Things My Boss Shouldn't Know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099811)

8. I call it "teleslacking"

Re:7 Things My Boss Shouldn't Know ... (1)

mistahkurtz (1047838) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100135)

you're fired.

Telecommuting = positive social change (3, Insightful)

dsanfte (443781) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099141)

Telecommuting has the potential to reduce pat/maternity leave, reduce the amount of time kids are left in the hands of babysitters away from their parents, and keeps parents at home during the day. This would represent significant beneficial social change. I'm surprised it's not mandatory.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (3, Insightful)

Maitri (938818) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099225)

Actually, my understanding is that most companies won't let you telecommute if your main reason for doing it is to stay home with your kids. They think that you then spend a lot of your caring for your kids instead of actually working. From past experience I can state that taking care of kids is a full time job - don't know that I could work also...

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (2, Insightful)

digitig (1056110) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099595)

From past experience I can state that taking care of kids is a full time job - don't know that I could work also...
It depends on the age of the kids. By the time mine were about 11 they were happier for me to stay out of their way; I just needed to be around if things went wrong. And in the 2 hours a day I saved on commuting I could actually spend some quality time with them. Of course, during term time it was mainly a matter of taking them to school in the morning or collecting them in the evening, which was a lot more practical 15 minutes from the school instead of 75 minutes.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (5, Insightful)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099975)

Yeah I would not recommend doing this with younger children around that is for sure.

I'm reading the article (yeah I know) and I have to say that management is probably most resistant to telecommuting because of the fact that if they cant physically see the employee is only taking 20-25 minutes to complete a task they expect may take an hour that they cant see the employee sitting around doing nothing and pile yet more work onto them.

I read somewhere that employees now are doing 2-3x as much work as employees had to do 10, 20, 30 years ago... Its not exactly fair since workload goes up that much but the wages do not reflect that. We could have much less unemployment if instead of hiring people in high stress situations that they actually hire 2 people to do the work of 2 people. They'd get things done faster and presumably with less errors than the 1 person trying to do the work of 2 people.

Basically, resistance to telecommuteing is a result of not being able to unilaterally pile more work upon their employee which they could do if they were physically present in the office.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (4, Interesting)

tacocat (527354) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099279)

Companies probably aren't primarily concerned with the social implications of work habits. To some extent, yes. But it's got to have a cost benefit attached to it or they simply cannot do it.

I think there is something to be said for this and many people that I work with do this to some extent but only on a very informal and infrequent basis.

I think it would be interesting to implement a rolling work schedule where you only come to work on one or two days a week and work the rest at home.

I personally find that when I do work from home my productivity is rather insane in comparison. I might only work 4 hours on some days, but I'll finish an entire week of work in that time and then spend the remaining 4 hours of the work-day observing the work in action (reading logs) while I watch a movie. A heck of a lot better than it might be at work.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (2, Insightful)

starfishsystems (834319) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099683)

Great point, and one that doesn't appear in the article, nor even in Susan Landau's piece cited therein.

Another point that didn't seem to come up anywhere is the cost of commuting. Perhaps it's so obvious that people assume it doesn't bear mentioning, but I think it represents a significant, and understated, part of the cost/benefit equation.

The evolution of technological complexity that makes it hard to match up a sophisticated enterprise with talented workers has produced a culture in which people transport their bodies substantial distances away from their homes simply in order to transport ideas. But this benefit is at best marginal compared to effective telecommuting, in cases where that's possible. To assume otherwise is simply an old habit that needs to be reexamined.

If we add to this equation a proper accounting of the effects of commuting on parenting, the development of community, environmental impact, mental health, opportunity for exercise, the enormous burden on road infrastructure and the cost of traffic accidents, not to mention the sheer waste of human time, the social arguments in favor of telecommuting would seem to dominate.

You should be even more surprised that it's not mandatory!

Not just social benefites... (5, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099705)

It's not just social benefits, but the environmental benefits of massive telecommuting would be huge! I telecommute 4 days a week. I can tell you that I drive about 1/4 as much as I used to. That has to be better for the environment. I still think if our (California's) governor wants to hit a home run, he could appeal to individual residents, family groups, environmentalists, AND big business if he would get a tax break for businesses that have over a certain percentage of telecommuters. Family groups would love the extra time that parents get to spend with their kids. Individual residents would spend a smaller part of their day dedicated to work, as they wouldn't be commuting. Environmentalists would love to have the number of miles cars in the state drive cut in half, as well as not needing to expand roads, since having few cars on the road means our current roads would be big enough. And what business doesn't like to have a nice big tax break. This would also lead to expansion of our telecom business, as telecommuters would need, and be willing to pay for better internet access.

The only problems I see are those interests that want us consuming as much fuel as possible. Obviously oil companies wouldn't want a state like California to cut it's fuel consumption in half. That would be a huge revenue hit. The state might also dislike the reduced revenue from fuel taxes as well. I would think that the reduced cost of road infrastructure would off set that though.

Re:Not just social benefites... (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101889)

A study in Belgium revealed that telecomuters still drove as much as others. They just drove for different reasons. Bringing the children to school was a major one.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (2, Insightful)

owlnation (858981) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099869)

Telecommuting has the potential to reduce pat/maternity leave, reduce the amount of time kids are left in the hands of babysitters away from their parents, and keeps parents at home during the day. This would represent significant beneficial social change. I'm surprised it's not mandatory.
Couldn't possibly agree with you more. Note that there are also considerable environmental benefits too. The morning and evening rush hours are the dumbest things on the Planet. The technology now exists working at home can be productive for many jobs, we need to start changing thinking and make it happen.

It's not just work, why not also study? Why on Earth, with the technology available, does anyone need to go to a building and sit with 100 other students in a cold lecture hall for an hour or too. There's no reason why that can be video streamed and questions handled by chat or email. Then you can fit in the lecture when you brain is most receptive, and take breaks when you wish, or replay parts you didn't get. In fact for many subjects, the lectures need only be recorded once for use over many years. Transcripts of previous Q and A's can also be available online.

Sure, labs and tutorials need face to face, but that can be one day per week.

University of Telecommuters (1)

Nonesuch (90847) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101545)

It's not just work, why not also study? Why on Earth, with the technology available, does anyone need to go to a building and sit with 100 other students in a cold lecture hall for an hour or too. There's no reason why that can be video streamed and questions handled by chat or email. Then you can fit in the lecture when you brain is most receptive, and take breaks when you wish, or replay parts you didn't get. In fact for many subjects, the lectures need only be recorded once for use over many years. Transcripts of previous Q and A's can also be available online.

Sure, labs and tutorials need face to face, but that can be one day per week.

Professors might not be too happy with their lectures being recorded once and used forever, but how many actually teach their own courses these days anyway?

University of Phoenix [ripoffreport.com] might be considered by many to be a joke, but the concept is sound, just needs better execution.

Re:Telecommuting = positive social change (2, Informative)

ishobo (160209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100553)

You are sadly mistaken if you think a full time caregiver has any time to do professional work. I was a stay at home father for the first three years of my daughter's life. I thought I could work around 20 hours a week. If you combine the hands-on time with my daughter, and the laundry, cleaning, cooking, and other housework, I was exhausted and had little time for anything else. My extra hours in the day were spent doing things for me, not my employer.

Personal Benefits (4, Interesting)

KermodeBear (738243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099143)

I am able to telecommute two days a week right now. I enjoy this for several reasons:

1. I don't have someone stopping by my cube every 30 minutes interrupting my concentration for casual conversation. That is very annoying. At home I don't have this distraction and I'm able to get more work done.

2. Since I started working from home two days a week, I have save myself 2 hours of driving time a week. Less gas, less wear and tear on the car, and a lot less frustration dealing with traffic! That means a happier employee.

3. I can curse and scream as loudly as I please when somebody does something stupid. It's a great stress reliever. In the office, well. The HR department would have issues if they heard what I wanted to say half the time!

4. Comfort! Cube farms suck. If I'm comfortable you know I'll be more productive. I can sit out on my porch in the warm weather and enjoy FRESH AIR AND SUNLIGHT while I work with my laptop. It is a huge, HUGE plus over florescent lights and stale office air.

5. I save money on laundry. (o:

Overall, I'm a lot happier and more productive when I'm at home working.

On the flip side, it is useful to be in the office once in a while too. Meetings in face to face can be more productive and it can be easier to get things done. Other than meetings though, I really don't see the point. Offices are just too depressing and distracting.

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099321)

5. I save money on laundry. (o:

I did laundry, mop the floors, and clean the bathroom during my breaks or when things were slow on my telecommute days. It's a nice perk to have.

Re:Personal Benefits (3, Interesting)

SocratesJedi (986460) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099395)

Meetings in face to face can be more productive and it can be easier to get things done.
You really think so? I find that face-to-face meetings are a much more difficult medium to exchange ideas in rather than than e-mail or, when rapid response is required, using IMs or video conferencing software. When discussing in person ideas are often broken before being fully expressed or parties can be subtly influenced by social and conversational constraints. I know that I'm at least much more likely to express disagreement in written form rather than in conversation. Usually, also, I find ideas are sub-optimally expressed in conversation rather than in writing since one doesn't have the luxury of editing to ensure that all the written words actually express the true intent of the thinker in the most clear manner possible. Plus, you can't search reality the way you could e-mail or an IM or (maybe as a future speech-recognition application a recorded video conference?)

I would be a bit curious, actually, to know whether /.'ers think that meetings can be productive. Perhaps my own experience or preferences are not the norm (or perhaps they are?).

Re:Personal Benefits (3, Interesting)

jbengt (874751) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099733)

Face to face interaction is cery helpful. It's easier to pick up meaning that you'd miss in written correspondence, or even phone conversation. You're more likely to ask a good question and the back and forth nature of conversation makes it more likely that ambiguities will be cleared up. There's an upside to e-mails, though - they automatically leave a written record, which can help a lot a couple of months later.

Face to face meetings are necessary, but productive? They can be productive, especially one-on-one meetings. The more people in a meeting, the less productive they tend to be. A well organized leader helps. You tend to spend a lot of time listening to things that don't affect you. Still, meetings are necessary, and you'll often hear something that no one would otherwise think of telling you that does affect your work.

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

KermodeBear (738243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099973)

Meetings, for good or ill, are indeed necessary. Managers like meetings. I suppose it gives them a sense of purpose. (o;

Seriously though, meetings can be helpful if there is an agenda and people stick to it. "We are meeting to discuss X and Y." So talk about X and Y. Keep the extra chatter out. I really don't want to waste my time hearing about what happened on The Simpsons this week. I also don't want to watch someone change a diaper (yes, that actually happened, it was gross and it really pissed me off). I have found that I tend to get much more done in a 30 minute meeting than a 2 hour one.

I suppose that with the right conferencing software that face to face meetings are a lot less necessary, but unfortunately where I work we don't have that available. I would imagine that it would be helpful, though!

Written (typed) communication is certainly great. There is a record of what occurred and you can take your time formulating questions and responses so that they are very clear and concise. However, you miss out on the spontaneity and interaction that a face to face meeting can bring.

And sometimes, not having a paper trail can be beneficial. (o:

Re:Personal Benefits (2, Interesting)

Doctor Memory (6336) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100787)

It's easier to pick up meaning that you'd miss in written correspondence, or even phone conversation. You're more likely to ask a good question and the back and forth nature of conversation makes it more likely that ambiguities will be cleared up.
Amen! It's very handy to be able to note when someone in sales/management/marketing's eyes start to glaze over when you're explaining some technical detail. Then you can backtrack and re-explain so everyone understands, w/o having to respond to somebody's "I didn't understand your comment about X" message two or three days (or weeks!) later. It's also handy when your bogometer goes off and you can glance over at someone else on your team and see if they're likewise wary. I also find they're much quicker than e-mail if you just need to clear up some points on one or two topics.

Re:Personal Benefits (2)

digitig (1056110) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099807)

I would be a bit curious, actually, to know whether /.'ers think that meetings can be productive. Perhaps my own experience or preferences are not the norm (or perhaps they are?).
A lot of meetings are a complete waste of time, especially ones that are regularly scheduled. But if there are problems then getting around a table to find a way forward is the best way I have found. I've seen political deadlocks that have been bouncing around for months by email be resolved within 30 minutes face-to-face. And a face-to-face project brief at the start of a project is pretty handy, too. So it all depends on the meeting -- don't write them all off, just because most are rubbish.

Re:Personal Benefits (2, Interesting)

ydrol (626558) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100121)

A lot of meetings are a complete waste of time, especially ones that are regularly scheduled.

I would agree with this, except for one occasion I remember we were on a very tight schedule for the final delivery of a project. The project manager introduced something we called 'Daily Prayers'. Every morning we had a meeting *strictly time limited to 15 minutes MAX* to raise any issues and track progress. Often it just required confirmation that you are indeed still working on the bit you said you would be. It certainly helped us deliver on time, and we actually 'enjoyed' the meetings, they reminded be of the short playbook rehearsal & big hand shake a sports team might to before the game begins..

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100723)

A lot of meetings are a complete waste of time, especially ones that are regularly scheduled.

I would agree with this, except for one occasion I remember we were on a very tight schedule for the final delivery of a project. The project manager introduced something we called 'Daily Prayers'.

Yep. When I was in the Navy, every day in port the division (all seven of us) met for about ten minutes to go over the days schedules for the division, department, and ship - and those were absolutely invaluable in getting everyone on the same page and going in the same direction. The complex interdependencies of the weapons system among itself, and with the ship, absolutely demanded that. (Yeah verily, Morning Quarters can suck badly if done wrong - but done right there is no substitute.)

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101517)

Oh my boss does this, too. We have a 10-15 minutes meeting every morning, which are extremely useful and lets us all touch base and get an idea of what's happening.

We also we all have these cards with tasks assigned. So, as and when you are done with something, you can pick a new card (or trade a card with someone), which usually happens during these meetings.

A great way to touch base and keep track.

We call it agile development, even though there usually is no real "development" involved (most tasks are things like market-research, analysis, product evaluations etc).

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100333)

Regularly scheduled meetings can be a good thing, as long as only people who need to be there are there, and they're kept short and relevant (which is easier when there's fewer people anyway).

The ordinary programming staff shouldn't need to be at a daily planning meeting for instance - their manager should be on top of things enough. Similarly, each individual salesperson shouldn't be present - their manager knows which accounts and jobs are the most important without seeing it through a commision tainted lense.

Re:Personal Benefits (1)

partenon (749418) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100777)

Meetings are toxic. [37signals.com]

Re:Personal Benefits (3, Interesting)

GlacierDragon (820368) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101093)

I actually find meetings where everyone calls in from in front of their own computer to be more productive. Part of that is because my team is in 2 different cities so someone will always be on the phone and it's just easier to hear and participate with everyone on the phone. I also find it more productive, though, because you have all your stuff right there and can email each other documents as they come up in conversation or quickly look up any stats (or whatever) that you need. No hunting for a meeting room that's not booked, too. And there are plenty of programs to let you share documents with each other. (Although, I really wish people would learn to "share application" rather than "share desktop".)

Personal Benefits-What a gas. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099861)

"2. Since I started working from home two days a week, I have save myself 2 hours of driving time a week. Less gas, less wear and tear on the car, and a lot less frustration dealing with traffic! That means a happier employee."

The nation saves on gas instead of going with hybrids, DST and invasions of third-world countries.

I would love having this option (2, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099145)

But it really only works for programmers. On the infrastructure side, you really have to be on site for a lot of things (correct me if I am wrong.) I work in a small company where I wear many hats so sometimes I need to interrupt a maintenance task or project to fix someone's PC. I'd love a telecommuting position but that would mean a radical change. I'd really like to find a telecommuting help desk analyst position. It would be worth even a small pay cut for having such flexibility

Re:I would love having this option (2, Insightful)

TheRealFixer (552803) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099263)

True... in a small company where you're doing everything, it can be almost impossible to telecommute. It really depends on your job, though. I'm a sysadmin/engineer, and I can count on one hand the number of times I've had to go into the data center to fix something over the past 6 months. Remote systems management capabilities like HP's iLO, moving to a SAN instead of individual hard disks... about the only thing I have to go into the data center for anymore is to rack a new server. Once it's physically in place, there isn't anything I can't do from just about anywhere in the world.

Re:I would love having this option (3, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099297)

Let me just correct you... to some degree. I agree with all the benefits of working from home, and I do work on infrastructure. Some days you just can't avoid needing face time with the on/off button or CD tray, but other days (maybe 2-3 per week) you can happily set at home and do stuff that you would do in your cube. The trick is scheduling your work so that it can work out that way. I spend a lot of time making sure that I can do most things remotely. Most days that remoteness means doing it from my cube rather than in front of the machine. This also means that many days I can work from home as effectively, if not more so, as if I'm in my cube. Redirecting the work phone to my home phone is useful also. When you manage to do >50% of your work from your cube, you can do all of that from home.

If you work on infrastructure, you know that meetings are generally a waste, and conf. calls can be done from home. What you are left with is balancing the amount of work you do at your desk and what can't be done at your desk. If you work to ensure that >50% can be done at your desk, you have validation for working from home 2-3 days per week.

How's that?

Re:I would love having this option (1)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099369)

Telecommuting works outside of the IT department too, you know. In pretty much any corporation, Middle Managers could spend at least a day a week working from home, often much more. For example, I know a project manager for an organization of several thousand employees. She works from home an average of 4 days a week.

Re:I would love having this option (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099511)

Telecommuting does not work for programmers in any sort of team environment, which either is or should be most jobs.

Development is not a solo effort, you need to talk to the users, the analysts, the other coders, the testers, there's a whole design process.

While you can do all this remotely via phone and video conferencing, it's nowhere near as effective as face to face, and raising the effort needed to communicate cuts out on a large amount of communication.

On top of just the job at hand, there's a whole lot of personal growth and exposure to new/different ideas/points of view that you just don't get when working from home or working solo.

My last job shut down their Sydney office and let everyone either work from home or from a serviced office. Within a month all the people I regarded as clued in had found other work, and the remainder reduced their quality to the point where I made a point of asking not to be put in teams with them.

getting back towards the topic, I think telecommuting very occasionally, like maybe one or two days a month is ok, it's like a bit of an extra holiday and can give people a bit of space when they feel their job has become a little stale.

Once you're doing it every week though you should really look at the reasons you don't like going to your work place and try to fix those problems rather than running away from them

Re:I would love having this option (2, Informative)

bberens (965711) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099847)

Telecommuting does not work for programmers in any sort of team environment, which either is or should be most jobs.

Development is not a solo effort, you need to talk to the users, the analysts, the other coders, the testers, there's a whole design process.

getting back towards the topic, I think telecommuting very occasionally, like maybe one or two days a month is ok, it's like a bit of an extra holiday and can give people a bit of space when they feel their job has become a little stale.

Once you're doing it every week though you should really look at the reasons you don't like going to your work place and try to fix those problems rather than running away from them
I think you vastly over-estimate the level of involvement required in most development jobs. Sure when the application is being designed and developed there needs to be a lot of face to face interaction. However, once the application is in maintenance mode there's little to no need for face time. I can read a bug out of bugzilla, look at the screenshots and fix the bug just as well from home as I do in the office. Secondly I can add another screen that looks similar to all the other screens and uses the same dao + a couple of columns without any real face time. I can also create a report that shows [whatever] without face time. The VAST majority of development is in maintenance mode or upgrades to software that already has a large foundation.

Re:I would love having this option (4, Insightful)

bfields (66644) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100163)

Telecommuting does not work for programmers in any sort of team environment, which either is or should be most jobs.

Any number of open source projects would serve as excellent counterexamples of highly productive projects involving teams that collaborate closely across large distances. Most of my day job is Linux kernel development, and while I'm fortunate to have great kernel hackers in my office and in the neighborhood who I can go hang out with and ask questions, the nature of the project dictates that most of the people I work with are people I've never, or only occasionally, met face-to-face.

It certainly takes some getting used to. It's been a real test of my reading and writing skills--you need to be able to understand and explain complex technical ideas, and keep discussions going despite personality conflicts. And it'll help to have good local computer resources, a fast network connection, and a mail client that helps you handle massive mailing list traffic efficiently....

Re:I would love having this option (1)

ulzeraj (1009869) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100291)

So, Telecommuting does not work for programmers? Yeah... as if the hundreds of Linux programmers work in one big office.

Re:I would love having this option (1)

cpuh0g (839926) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100717)

Telecommuting does not work for programmers in any sort of team environment, which either is or should be most jobs.

Speak for yourself. I work for a BIG company that writes ALOT of open (and closed) source code and have been doing so for 7+ years. I am highly productive, I get top reviews every year, I make a nice 6-figure salary, and I get to work on tons of interesting projects developing operating system code both as a developer and a technical lead. The fact that it doesn't work for you means that either you or your company is not properly supporting you or does not fully grasp the telecommuting concept.


I do it every day, 5 days a week. Several times a year I fly out to visit the main office for a week and mingle with my coworkers and work on-site, but otherwise most of my communication is done via email and conference calls. It *can* work, but it really depends alot on the company, the culture, and the employee.

Re:I would love having this option (2, Funny)

rs79 (71822) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100875)

"elecommuting does not work for programmers in any sort of team environment"

That's ok, programming doesn't work in a team environment either.

I'd come at it from the other direction (1)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101035)

Once you're doing it every week though you should really look at the reasons you don't like going to your work place and try to fix those problems rather than running away from them

If you like your office more than your home, I'd worry more about that says.

Re:I would love having this option (1)

IdleTime (561841) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099713)

I'm not a programmer but I have worked from for the past 4 years and so does my whole team. My company, a HUGE software giant (no, not MS or IBM), have had very good experience with work at home and support it 100%. After doing it for 4 years, there is no way I'd go back to working in an office. Nothing beats sitting out by the pool with my wireless laptop and something cold to drink and yes, I live in Florida so I can do it most of the year.

Re:I would love having this option (1)

starfishsystems (834319) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100437)

I'll add another response which accords with the first two.

In a very small organization, you end up with your hands on the hardware a lot, but this condition dilutes in larger organization due to economies of scale. For example, the person in charge of infrastructure is not doing desktop system installs. A more junior person can do that at less cost. Even then, a knowledgeable person doing desktop installation and maintenance has figured out the value of doing that centrally as well. There comes a point where an untrained office worker can go over to the supply closet, pick up a box, and plug it in. Half an hour later, a fresh new system fully configured and ready for login. Because that box is not infrastructure, it represents an effective use of infrastructure.

The real infrastructure work is about anticipating the evolution of technology, adding capabilities to the infrastructure pyramid, and capacity planning. And as this whole pyramid tends to become larger and more complex over time, the hardware layer becomes proportionally less prominent. This holds true on the desktop, in the server room, and on the network.

If you add up what you really do in a day's work, most of it does not require dispatching staff to the site. User support, though only peripherally an infrastructure function, is worth mentioning because it too doesn't actually require staff on site either. This does not match popular expectation, of course, which is that infrastructure is just a fancy word for laying cable and installing desktop software and things of that nature.

Re:I would love having this option (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100781)

But it really only works for programmers.

Yup - and that's one factor that keeps companies from implementing telecommuting, there are too many jobs you simple can't do remotely. If only a few get to do it, the rest feel disenfranshised and morale can plummet.
 
Anecdote time: My wife is an accountant - at one job all she did was review reports for completeness and correctness, and either forward them to the client or kick them back to the staff. (Essentially QA work.) Since the reports were already on the computer, it seemed to her boss that allowing her to telecommute (after working in the office for a couple of years) was an ideal solution to reducing the overcrowded conditions in the office. Within days of her starting - the level of hostility from her coworkers rose to incredible heights, because she was 'at home' rather than 'at the office'. In the end she had to quit, as the boss wouldn't let her return to the office or adress the issue, and the hostility of her coworkers made it impossible for her to do her work. (Within a month of starting - all three of the telecommuters had quit because of this.)

Most important: (5, Insightful)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099191)

Telecommuting supplements working at the office, not replaces it. People still want/need that face-to-face contact. There have been plenty of stories posted about how telecommuting can really put you on the slow-track for promotions and also reduces the opportunities when you accedentally come across a gold-mine of an idea thru means of mis-communication.

Re:Most important: (5, Interesting)

technomom (444378) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099457)

The slow-track only happens if the people you work with and your bosses aren't telecommuting.

Here in IBM, 40% of the workforce is classified as "mobile" or "at home". The difference in classification is really just the percentage of time that you travel or work at customer sites. My boss and his boss telecommute. My department consists of people scattered around the globe, some telecommuting, some not. So, there's no real hit to the career for to anyone for telecommuting. In fact, you have to justify having an office these days.

The important thing to remember is not to cut yourself off. Keep an IM session (in IBM it's Sametime) alive while you're around, keep your cell phone on if you're at a customer site, get a good speakerphone, and get the best broadband you can get (for me it's FiOS). Have weekly teleconferences with team members (or more often if needed). Set clear agendas for meetings so they don't drag on and for pity's sake, learn to use the mute button, especially if you are a mouth breather or have kids/dogs in the room.

Telecommuting can work very well if there's a culture for it.

Re:Most important: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100995)

Here in IBM, 40% of the workforce is classified as "mobile" or "at home".
Yea I heard LEAN has been rough on a lot of people. Still, you've got the mobile home that's something! ;)

Re:Most important: (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099829)

Exactly.

For instance, I do telecom R&D and there are at least 5 times during the day when my boss walks in to brainstorm some idea or vice-versa (or do so with someone else I work with). It is wonderful to exchange ideas back and forth, and you can get a surprising amount of new ideas this way.

Also, there is something to be said about having a whiteboard to hash ideas out with your team - that's not something you can do when you telecommute - at least not easily.

I do work with a couple of people who telecommute and some of them are in Europe, which makes for some interesting meeting scheduling. But there have been times when I have just wished for them to be right there in the room with me, so I can explain what I have in mind (of course, I usually end up setting up a webcam or taking a pic and sending it to them). But that is still a work-around and the original problem remains, unchanged.

Now, if you do come to work on most days and telecommute ever so often (say, a couple of days a week), that works. I live in downtown, so on the very rare occasion that I do work from home, I can always walk down to work if they really need me. Which, I suppose, gives me a lot more freedom to work at my own time and place.

Secondly, working from home has an informal feel to it. Usually, I find that I get a lot more done when I do not have a million things distracting me and when I can just sit down and concentrate. Besides, working from home means you mix work and home, which means that people call you at odd hours and expect something. By leaving work at work, you do not have that problem.

And then there is the matter of resources - the handy printer and copier at work when ever you need it is at work, and at home, you end up paying for your inkjet cartridges. Add assorted office supplies and you've quiet a list. I also have several binders full of data and data-analysis results (which may give you a hint on what I do) which I don't have at home. Replicating them at home is an option, but it's not one I can do legally (nor easily).

Besides, it's fun talking to people at work, networking with folks from other areas of the business etc. Wouldn't trade any of it!

One day a week (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099211)

Currently I can swing one day a week from home, in the near future I am hoping to work exclusively from home.

The hardest thing about working from home is trying to explain to family and friends that you are trying to work. When they know you are at home, then tend to treat is as if your on vacation, and its ok to call and small talk or pop-in.

Re:One day a week (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099935)

I suggest setting a workspace up for yourself at home and make sure everybody understands that when you're in your workspace, you're at work. My Mother used to work from home (self employed) and we all knew that when she was in her work room we should leave her alone. It worked well.

Re:One day a week (1)

Neumann (240442) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101169)

The hardest thing about working from home is trying to explain to family and friends that you are trying to work. When they know you are at home, then tend to treat is as if your on vacation, and its ok to call and small talk or pop-in.

And this is different from your co-workers popping by your cubicle how exactly?

As a long time telecommuter (4, Insightful)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099257)

My tips

1. Background noise - Parents, shut your children up! Nothing sounds more unprofessional than hearing kids yelling in the background. This goes for barking dogs, parakeets, laundry room, the kitchen and taking a conference call from the local pub.

2. Get a dedicated phone line for office work with a vmail that has a professional greeting. No "Hi, Jim and Linda are unable to answer the phone right now..."

3. Don't milk the expenses. In fact you'd be better off not charging any expenses as it is a factor when it comes time for layoffs. Software licenses are a different matter, but you may want to consider your own license if you develop on the side.

4. Be available/no sneaking out.

5. There are no set hours. It's not 9 to 5, and being flexible for your customers across timezones puts you at an advantage over cube jockeys with a commute.

6. Avoid day trading.

7. Don't become a hermit. Meet up with the local coworkers for lunch at least once month.

Re:As a long time telecommuter (1)

jbn-o (555068) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099577)

5. There are no set hours. It's not 9 to 5, and being flexible for your customers across timezones puts you at an advantage over cube jockeys with a commute.

In the interest of clarity: Are you describing what some call "flex time" where workers get credit for working whenever they work and are in the clear with management so long as they fulfill their weekly work hours? Or are you saying that telecommuting ought to be a message to one's boss that one is willing to work whenever management says to work? The former seems quite reasonable for self-starters, the latter is unreasonable for any worker. I'd work my hours and produce good results. I'd make appointments with clients and meet them in person, on the phone, or online as the client prefers. But I would become unavailable outside those hours because businesses aren't charities and I expect to be paid for my labor. Even if I'm still in possession of the work-supplied laptop and telecommunication device during my vacation, I can go on vacation and not work.

Re:As a long time telecommuter (1)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099937)

Are you describing what some call "flex time" where workers get credit for working whenever they work and are in the clear with management so long as they fulfill their weekly work hours? Or are you saying that telecommuting ought to be a message to one's boss that one is willing to work whenever management says to work?

Depends on the compensation, position, situation and ambition of the individual. In my experience, those in the latter tend to thrive professionally ... that includes being tracked down on vacation where-the-hell-ever they may be.

Re:As a long time telecommuter (1)

Sparr0 (451780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099653)

2. Get a dedicated phone line for office work with a vmail that has a professional greeting. No "Hi, Jim and Linda are unable to answer the phone right now..."
Why on earth would you have your own line and vmail at home? You don't have your office number forwarded to your computer at home?

Re:As a long time telecommuter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19101067)

Or even better, a softphone line which you can transfer between systems?

The company I work for has a great IP PBX. I have a softphone with USB headset on my company laptop for traveling, an IP phone on my home network set up across the VPN. I can determine which location has call control, and all people have to do is call my office number.

Really weirds people out when I call somewhere and my office number shows up on Caller ID. They ask me if someone's at the office, and I tell them I don't know since I'm at home.

How To Hired? (1, Offtopic)

toonerh (518351) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099265)

I been a programmer for many years. I am disabled (problems using my hands and arms) and can't drive at present. I live the SF Bay Area. Think I can contribute to many companies, but does anyone have any ideas about getting hired? This is the barrier I've encountered.

one (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099383)

rentacoder.com

Re:How To Hired? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099479)

If you're disabled with respect to your hands and arms... how do you code?
If you use reasonably cheap voice recognition software and that gets the job done, can you specify what product you use?

Re:How To (Be) Hired? (1)

toonerh (518351) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100359)

If you're disabled with respect to your hands and arms... how do you code?

I normally use a mouthstick to type and a "foot mouse" to move and click.

Regarding being mod'ed down as offtopic, TFA mentioned a disabled programmer - I was following up on that person.

Re:How To Hired? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100007)

With your disability, it may take a little to convince an employer that you can actually do your job. You could try working on an opensource software project and showing human resources that you did such and such, and that yes, you can program nevertheless.

Re:How To Hired? (1)

pikine (771084) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100535)

Since you can submit post on Slashdot, I assume you can input text to a computer. As long as you maintain a portfolio of your coding that demonstrates your programming skill, I think any company that worths its salt should be more than happy to hire you. You may want to specifically look for positions that require you to produce less number lines of code but demand the code to be of higher quality.

Small companies are usually focused on growth, and they want to push for more lines of code, so they're less ideal for you. Of course at one point they'll eventually realize that they spend 90% of time debugging rather than writing code, but it will be too late for them. Fortunate for you, the best way to find bug is actually to read code and figure out what it is doing, all in your head. You could be an excellent code auditor.

ISP Help Desk (1)

evanknight (1070332) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099309)

I'm a level three support (phone jockey) for a pretty large ISP. Customers ask all the time if I'm working from home. Drives me nuts; I'd love to, but i'm in a cube farm on floor two.

Intestinal Suffering Person Help Desk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099979)

"Customers ask all the time if I'm working from home. Drives me nuts;"

Maybe it's the sound of crying cowork...er, customers in the background?

Ad-free single page version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099343)

XFRIST PSOT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099487)

surveys show that bunch of gay negros so there are peop7e may also want So on, FrreBSD went We strongly urge

Telecommute != Teleworking (1)

the cleaner (1641) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099491)

I am currently deciding if I want to accept the offer for a job that would have me work from home (Europe) completely, for a company in the US. The decision is not easy, because of the reasons mentioned in the articles. Another point to keep in mind is, that with me at home it will maybe put more stress on the relationship to my SO. I'm still undecided...

Re:Telecommute != Teleworking (1)

GiMP (10923) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099635)

It can be difficult, but also rewarding. My wife hates telecommuting, she doesn't like the fact that she is stuck in the house all day long; however, I felt the same way when I first started. I had actually worked 2 years telecommuting, and then 2 years in an office, before returning to telework.

So far, I'm enjoying the time that I spend at home, and I too moved to Europe -- so I get to enjoy the culture and the cafes, even when working. With highspeed wireless internet (up to 1.8mbps with UMTS/HSDPA), I can work from anywhere.

By the way, what these articles don't mention is that sometimes you're not looking for promotions when you switch to telecommuting. The truth is that telecommuting has fewer social distractions and if you live in a small enough flat, you have shorter distances to the restroom and coffee pot / water cooler. What this means is that while you might feel bad for firing up the tv, remember that almost no matter how much you goof off, you're probably doing more than you would if you had gone to the office. The important thing, of course, is that you can get the work done.

Re:Telecommute != Teleworking (1)

GiMP (10923) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099681)

By the way, what these articles don't mention is that sometimes you're not looking for promotions when you switch to telecommuting.


I feel that I mashed a bunch of ideas together... I forgot to elaborate on the above.

Some people are looking for other opportunties otherside their normal office rather than promotions. Rather than spending time around the water cooler, teleworkers can get their jobs done and still have time to pursue other interests... hobbies, contract work, etc.

Now, some might not think this fair to their employer, but neither is spending time at the watercooler, or taking long walks to the restroom (the restroom often being a shorter walk at home); however, it is important that you get your work done and don't create a major conflict of interest.

Not to have this bite me in the ass in the future when someone data-mines this later and out of context... my point is that many jobs have 'down time', and its better for an employee to use that time productively than unproductively, even if that productive 'down time' isn't exactly directly beneficial for the company. Google knows this, you should too. (note, I don't work for google, but they do have a policy *requiring* employees work on personal projects)

Re:Telecommute != Teleworking (1)

egburr (141740) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101229)

The biggest problem I have with this is that when I work from home my boss wants proof that I am working the entire time. When I work from the office, no questions are asked. Even he commented a few times how I tended to log less work when at the office.

At the office I get a lot more interruptions from people wandering by and chatting. At home, I can actually work; it is much easier to delay response to instant messaging than face-to-face, so I can finish my current activity. I also tend to spend a lot more time away from my desk when at the office; must be that tiny cubicle closing in on me. And, as you say, the bathroom is a lot closer at home; the one at the office is like walking two laps around my house first.

The need to *prove* I'm working when telecommuting has gotten so bad that I don't do it very often lately. The really frustrating part is that since this is level 3 tech support, my work volume is largely driven by our customers. If they aren't asking for help, I don't have anything to do (well, that's not true anymore; I now have busywork to make it look like I'm doing something (creating documents that nobody but me will ever read)).

All of global IT is telecommuting (3, Interesting)

autophile (640621) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099509)

If your company deals in IT spread all over the globe, then the company's IT workers are already telecommuting. They're just living in your office space 8 hours a day. NOW do the math!

--Rob

Half true... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099909)

...if they're all in different parts of the world. Then you are forced to use online tools to get people coordinated. What usually happens is that on a team you have several people colocated in the same location, which needs to communicate with indvidual workers or teams in a different location. What happens is that information is explicitly or implicitly shared with the people on-site, but never put into the tools so the telecommuting workers are completely blindsided. That is also a big problem with offshoring or outsourcing, that the teams talk past each other. Paricularly if you're the odd exception you'll find that no, we're not all "telecommuting".

1 thing the EMPLOYEE needs to know (-1, Flamebait)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099571)

Get off your lazy ass and go to work.

There is little reason for a person to 'telecommute' and its mostly just an excuse to be lazy.

Re:1 thing the EMPLOYEE needs to know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099637)

Spoken like someone who wishes he could do it but is sat staring at the white wall of a cubicle like a mindless cog in a vast, fathomless machine he has no hope of controlling or enjoying.

I work from home, in the sun, 10 minutes from the sea, set my own schedules and use the internet to keep in touch with all the envious drones in the city.

My lazy ass is up at dawn for a swim before I start my day's work and I can't stop smiling.

Re:1 thing the EMPLOYEE needs to know (1)

mike3k (574665) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099673)

I live in Florida and my job is in Vancouver.

Re:1 thing the EMPLOYEE needs to know (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099753)

Not true, i work from home on the weekends, to avoid the drive to do 'after-hours updates'. And it qualifes as 'comptime' so i dont bother going in the following monday.

And to clairfy, i didnt say it NEVER makes sence, only that its rare.

Re:1 thing the EMPLOYEE needs to know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100077)

Are you insane?

You're spending less money on commuting including cost of commute itself, stress associated, cost of food, etc.
Your employer is spending less money on your office space.

You're spending less time hassling with inner-office politics.
Your employer is spending less time on setup and maintenance of facility.

You're spending more time on actual work.
Your employer is spending more time on actual work.

Also, please note that while most telecommuting involves working from home, it also means being able to work off-site in general. If you've got a business trip to E. Timor and you're a veteran telecommuter you can still handle your work while there. That beats having the work gather dust or having to hire a temp or make someone else drop their own work to handle it, etc.

Please make a note of the massive amount of physical media we move in physical space containing data that could easily be transported via electronic means. All of those CDs, DVDs, letters, etc. Add up all of the costs of production associated with them. Now add all the costs of transportation associated with them. Now subtract all of that waste and put it on the wire instead. Now STFU and log off permanently if you really believe telecommuting is pointless.

Telecommuting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099639)

All Telecommuting means , is that you can be replaced by someone in some other country, for about 15% of your total wage.

It's fine for low-level IT people, and simple programmers, some professions aren't as 'fortunate'

O.U.T.S.O.U.R.C.E. (3, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099873)

I don't want to telecommute because one's boss may start to figure that if you can work from home, then so can someone in Asia or Russia for one-fifth the cost.

My experience (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19099989)

I did it for about a year and a half and almost went insane. Sure it was nice to take vacations off the record and work from neat locations all over the US, or to go swimming and other recreational activities and "getting paid for it." The downside was I was home a lot.. my girlfriend got tired of seeing me at home so it was taking a toll on the relationship.. if I woke up late or felt lazy then I'd be on my laptop all day with nothing to show for it, still trying to bust out code at 2-3 am.. seeing nothing but a laptop screen for 15+ hours a day (due mostly to my terrible time management) and not going out as often really sucked. I used to hate when they called me to fly into the office, but I began to look forward to it.. being able to grab some drinks with coworkers, checking out cute office girls.. having a reason to get dressed up. Maybe I'm lame and in dire need of a social life, but that's just my two cents.

The Net (1)

KnowledgeKeeper (1026242) | more than 7 years ago | (#19099999)

I, for one, don't want to be known as Ruth Marx [wikipedia.org] . The name sucks. Oh, yeah, that possible identity theft thing could suck, too. :)

What are other aspects of this kind of work? Sure, it could save time, money and nerves. But it could also cheat you out of meeting that cute girl standing next to you in the bus, by the water cooler or somewhere else.

If you are a workaholic you could start losing track of time and work yourself out like a slave - you could end up losing friends, family, etc. Besides, I can just imagine the problems of proving I've been working overtime.

Telecommuting == career suicide (1)

xtal (49134) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100005)

Unless you work for youself, as a contractor, whatever - telecommuting is career suicide. There are exceptions, but that's the rule, IMHO.

Re:Telecommuting == career suicide (1)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100487)

You did say it was just your opininion, but if you want anyone to give your opinion any weight, you're going to need to give a little more than just the opinion itself.

Why should it be "career suicide?" In fact, how do you define "Career suicide" in the first place?

Re:Telecommuting == career suicide (1)

xtal (49134) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100507)

I'm basing it on 15 years experience in the industry. The only telecommuters I've seen make large metric volumes of cash, or achieve any metric of advancement - defined as senior management - in a company are ones who run their own companies, or are independant contractors.

You best be immersing yourself in the culture of a company up to the eyeballs if you want to go that route, and telecommuting is not the way to do that. I'm not saying it's optimal; I'm not saying it's right, either - but I am saying that based on my observations about how the majority of companies work in North America, it's not compatible with advancement.

Re:Telecommuting == career suicide (4, Insightful)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100629)

Ahh - you see, my definition of "career suicide" is - you lose your job and any chance of getting a similar one.
Yours is "you probably won't get into management".

I don't _want_ to get in to management. I've already advanced as far as I possibly can within my company - a senior R&D programmer (having advanced litterly from the bottom - doing casual handline envelope stuffing jobs). I don't see getting into senior management as "advancing my career", I define it as "Starting an entirely different career, and one I'm not suited to, telecomuting or no telecomuting".
But in anycase, I don't believe the telecomuting would necesarily stop that - I'm pretty heavily immersed in the culture of the company - I've been here ten years, and believe I have earnt the sort of level of respect and recognition required for a move into management if that were my goal (and if I had any actual talent for it).

Maybe five day a week telecomuting might put the breaks on advancement a little (I personally do two to three), but it's more about personality than face time. You just have to be the sort of person that people notice - and ensure that when they do notice you, that there's good things to see.

A supplement, not a substitute (1)

Wansu (846) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100017)


My previous boss viewed telecommuting as a supplement rather than a substitute. See, we had flex time. You could stay up as late working as necessary, so long as you were in by 8am. Telecommuting was viewed as "overtime lite". He wanted us to report telecommute time separately from time spent at the office.

And 1 thing you probably shouldn't mention (4, Insightful)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100025)

If you can do the job from home, so can a guy in Bangalore who charges 1/5 of your salary.

Re:And 1 thing you probably shouldn't mention (1)

Magic Fingers (1001498) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101191)

... but that doesn't necessarily mean the guy sitting in Banglore is producing the same results though!

Re:And 1 thing you probably shouldn't mention (1)

bwohlgemuth (182897) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101503)

If you can do the job from home, so can a guy in Bangalore who charges 1/5 of your salary.

And on a different timezone with a lovely inability to speak to customers in decent English!!!!

I telecommute. Cell phone is always attached and I return calls within 10 minutes unless on a conference call. E-mail is turned around as quickly as possible. I love telecommuting, I know that it will get old eventually, but they keep sending me checks!

Re:And 1 thing you probably shouldn't mention (3, Funny)

deepestblue (206649) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101513)

And what I'm from Bangalore myself? Insensitive clod.

Re:And 1 thing you probably shouldn't mention (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101541)

Nah. The guy in Bangalore will NOT be able to come down the office twice a week for a meeting. Doing stuff is easy. Knowing what to do is the tough part.

Its pretty simple (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100075)

Office phone (VoIP)
Most/all of the broadband data
Allotment for office equip: Printer, Router, etc. up to a fixed dollar amount
Monthly office supplies, paper, ink, etc.
Use a corporate credit card and submit expenses monthly

I do this and the only noise I get is about the high price of printer ink. But it's from their preferred retailers so screw them.

Both good, both bad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100415)

After telecommuting for 15 months I'm actually glad to be back in a cubicle.

1. Regular salary (my tele-contracts are freelance)
2. No family distractions or nagging chores
3. Less incentive to goof online (still check /. feeds in the lunch hour tho.)
4. Can't take work home with me. (seriously, I'd be fired)
5. Did I mention being paid on time every month?
6. Pretty ladies in 3D still better than pretty ladies in 2D and backlit.
7. And finally, I have no willpower to keep to my own schedule. Life's short, live each day, yadda yadda... That's why I'm so behind. 8-)

Yea but... (2, Insightful)

Duncan3 (10537) | more than 7 years ago | (#19100649)

Thats all great, really.

But the number one thing they will realize, is that if you working at home works, someone working in India for 1/6 the wage will work just as well.

Don't be stupid people, if your boss is letting you telecommute, they are just beta testing offshoring.

.

Re:Yea but... (1)

MurphyZero (717692) | more than 7 years ago | (#19101253)

Ah but if he does that, HIS Boss may realize that he can cut costs further by hiring a manager in India that reports to him for that low low price. So if your boss is smart, he won't look at it that way. However, I have seen many bosses, and they barely plan forward enough to unzip when they are in the restroom. Realizing that something they do could cost them their own job, impossible.

Thi's FP for GNAA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100677)

recruItmQent, but

gFnaa (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19100921)

Of eVents today, Unpleasant
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>