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Teachers Fake Gunman Attack

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the stop-crying-teacher-would-never-really-kill-you dept.

Education 863

Anti_Climax writes "Staff members of an elementary school staged a fictitious gun attack on students during a class trip, telling them it was not a drill as the children cried and hid under tables. It'll be interesting to see what happens to these teachers after the charges brought against students in recent months."

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863 comments

Obligatory... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112943)

Won't somebody please think of the children.

In the words of Stan Marsh (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112973)

Dude, this is pretty fucked up right here.

Re:In the words of Stan Marsh (5, Insightful)

andy666 (666062) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113249)

Completely! It makes me really angry to read, thinking of what my own daughter would feel in this situation. The only real reason that I can imagine these teachers doing this is that they are a fundamentally sadistic. It is incredibly cruel.

Re:Obligatory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113365)

They are, the parents of the children will claim 'emotional distress' has taken over their child, will get large amounts of money from the school, and the kids will be set for life.

Under the PATRIOT Act... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112955)

...this is undeniably domestic terrorism.

Re:Under the PATRIOT Act... (4, Insightful)

joebagodonuts (561066) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112991)

Besides just stupid. Why anyone would think this is a good idea is beyond me. We are truly making ourselves insane.

"Principal Catherine Stephens declined to say whether the staff members involved would face disciplinary action, but said the situation 'involved poor judgment.'"

You think so, Doctor?

Re:Under the PATRIOT Act... (5, Insightful)

rblancarte (213492) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113341)

If there is one thing that the American populace has never failed to shock me on is their lack of common sense. We are blanketed by tons of laws that are nothing but common sense laws. IMHO, even without the Virginia Tech events in such resent memory, this was a bad idea, and common sense should tell you this.

I think that there are ways to tackle issues such as this. One is probably the most obvious, talk about it. I think if you want to do something like this, you have to contact parents to alert them you want to do this, and give them the option to remove their kids from this class (and/or field trip).

These teachers probably cost themselves their jobs as well as any chance to ever work in their field again. And considering their actions, that is probably a good thing.

RonB

Re:Under the PATRIOT Act... (5, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113465)

Common sense isn't. Anywhere.

My first thought hearing that comment was rather (0, Redundant)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113431)

No shit, Sherlock.

Everybody Down!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112963)

There's a homicidal poster on the loose here at Slashdot!!

Poor judgement (5, Insightful)

chemicaloli (1026172) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112971)

With fear of stating the obvious I'll say this: How could teachers show such bad judgement, maybe practising for this type of situation could be a valuable experience, but with professional help and advice as well as parental consent, otherwise it seems like professional suicide and being in the states certain to cause tons of lawsuits.

Re:Poor judgement (5, Insightful)

VirusEqualsVeryYes (981719) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113107)

What confuses me is when they decided tricking the students was a good idea.

The point of drills is not to educate on what to do when you're scared, the point is to educate on what to do in this specific situation. Take fire drills, for example: are students tricked into thinking their school is burning down? No, of course not. The point of the drill is to inculcate the directions that all students must follow in order to avoid chaos. Tricking the students achieves nothing but emotional distress--which is not helpful in any way--and disorder. Drills are there to make the procedure second nature so that disorder does not happen; they're there so that students in distress don't have to make decisions, because the drill spells out all decisions beforehand.

Parental consent is ALWAYS necessary when anything out of the ordinary happens, especially when said extraordinary thing causes emotional distress. Unfortunately, the article didn't make it clear whether this was teachers acting on their own authority during a field trip, or whether this was sanctioned by the administration without parental consent, but whichever it was, this was stupid, stupid, stupid.

Re:Poor judgement (4, Insightful)

cultrhetor (961872) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113175)

You said the key words that will make these kids rich and get the teachers fired:
"Emotional distress."

Re:Poor judgement (5, Insightful)

qwijibo (101731) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113197)

You're right about how drills are supposed to work. This was anti-training. Instead of teaching people how to think about situations and how to react and testing the results, they chose to see how people react under stress. Kids react the way they are taught, and this does nothing positive to reinforce positive reactions. If anything, it taught these kids that their teachers should not be trusted and will like to them for amusement.

Re:Poor judgement (4, Insightful)

DrWho520 (655973) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113377)

Take fire drills, for example: are students tricked into thinking their school is burning down? No, of course not.

When I was in high school, we received the same warning for a drill as for the real thing. No one panicked, but no one was sure whether it was real or fake. Let me reiterate, high school. This was monumentally poor judgement by the teachers and the administration (I cannot imagine this was done without some administator knowing something.)

I think this exercise is worth considering, but not for sixth graders. Some thought should be taken as to student shooter situations, but recent events have been in high school and higher environments. Hear me out on this. Running this exercise in a high school would be advantageous. Teenagers think they are invincible in high school and would be more apt to go "vigilante" in this situation and try to track down a shooter. This exercise could help identify some of these lemmings.

Re:Poor judgement (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113381)

Did you take fire drills serious at school? I didn't. The only way to get us out of the building was to threaten with "extra work" should you still be in the building after 5 Minutes. And even then we usually took a quick trip to the cafeteria coke dispenser (hey, standing 'round outside doing nothing makes you thirsty!).

My guess is that they wanted to "test" how the kids would react in a "real" threat situation. But how fucking nuts do you have to be to use kids a guinea pigs for a psychological experiment without at the very least inform the parents about it? Even with information, this is no way to treat kids.

For fuck's sake, those are teachers. Not some oddball nutjobs, or science wizards in their ivory tower, who have no connection with the emotional makeup of kids. Those are the people we send our kids to, every single day, to learn things.

Do you wonder why kids snap and start shooting? When the adults we entrust them to don't even have the foggiest idea just what they do the the psyche of a child? This is something we hear about, because it has been so damn over the top that you can't simply keep it under cover anymore. How much psychological abuse do we never notice? How often do our kids get scarred by teachers who don't have the minuscle idea about motivating and actually encouraging the kids to learn, instead relying on scare and pressure?

Damn, I think I know where those trigger-happy kids come from now!

Meh. (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113421)

I think that in the context of a long series of drills and training, that it would be appropriate for a "surprise" drill of this sort, but having one out of nowhere, especially dealing with kids of that age, is just asking for a massive lawsuit.

I'm personally in favor of a more aggressive approach to school safety...Kids need to be taught to duck and cover when possible (e.g when you're in a secure room), and to mob the gunman when they're not...Hiding under desks is worthless.

Re:Poor judgement (3, Insightful)

jgardner100 (559892) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113193)

How,

Well, I had my head bitten off a few weeks ago by slashdotter's who insisted that children should be exposed to extreme violence as quickly as possible (I had suggested on holding off with getting them to play Halo etc until they were more mature) as apparently bears would eat them if they didn't (you thing I'm kidding, but look through the archives!)

Personally of couse I say hold off with both Sex and violence as long as possible, they have a whole lifetime to follow up on those topics but the innocence of childhood is but once.

Regards
John G

Re:Poor judgement (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113445)

I don't know about you, but I enjoyed my "innocence" much more knowing how to touch Mary-Jane Rotten-Crotch correctly "down there" when playing doctor.

In other news (1)

drgonzo59 (747139) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113205)

Students fake a gunman attack to test how prepared the teachers and the cops are. Results: teachers not prepared, cops freak out and shot half of the kids.


But seriously, good think none of the students decided to jump from the window and died or badly injured themselves.

WTF was the goal?!?! (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113231)

It's not like there is much of anything a student can do in those situation. So the only thing a drill will test is the students fear reaction. Running, cowering, crying, self-defecation, etc... The ONLY outcome this exercise could ever lead to is mentally scaring the youth, and embarrassing them in front of their peers, instructors, and the public. See if these kids ever trust a teacher, or any education employee ever again.

-Rick

Crying "wolf" (5, Insightful)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112985)

Was it really smart to say it was not a drill? It sounds, you know, like crying "wolf"...

Re:Crying "wolf" (1)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113007)

It is more like crying 'Fire' in a crowded theater. I hope they all lose their jobs and face charges if applicable.

Re:Crying "wolf" (2, Interesting)

braintartare (629755) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113103)

Is it just me or are the current crop of teachers and school admins the dumbest sacks of shit ever to hold children's lives in their hands? Remember, these are the geniuses who are raising 'value-free' children. This should not end well.

Re:Crying "wolf" (0)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113219)

They are government employees. What do you expect? Bureaucracy breeds mediocracy.

Re:Crying "wolf" (1, Interesting)

qwijibo (101731) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113439)

If you think the current crop is bad, wait until you get the kids that came from the current crop being the next one. The current thinking is that self esteem is more important than realistic self evaluation of one's capabilities. That leads to people doing things like this instead of realizing that they are not experts in how to deal with dangerous situations. The local police aren't necessarily experts either, but chances are that they would be happy to help the school and certainly are more likely to have a better thought out training plan.

Re:Crying "wolf" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113441)

"But parents of the sixth-grade students were outraged. (Watch student recount incident, mother react )"

LOL, yea, cause we all know parents dont fill kids with falsified information, or perhaps over-react to traumatize them even further (which already happens a lot)

Something telling me this has been all blown out of proportion enough as is.

It would have been quite dangerous for teachers... (5, Interesting)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113447)

Had the students been taught to fight back [washtimes.com] . Since they were not told it was a drill, it could have been quite a sight with 60 little ninjas armed with pens, rulers and flying calculators. Not a pretty sight to say the least...

Learning about authority (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112987)

Well, at least they have started their education in not trusting authority, and learning that those in authority will lie to you. This is one of the lessons that most people don't get, until much later in life.

Re:Learning about authority (4, Interesting)

AlHunt (982887) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113463)

>Well, at least they have started their education in not trusting authority, and learning that those in authority will lie to you.
>This is one of the lessons that most people don't get, until much later in life.

I wonder what if one of the students had brought a gun that day? Maybe shot the hooded teacher who rattled the door?

hmph ...

At least a Disturbing the Peace Charge (5, Interesting)

Mephistophocles (930357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112989)

Assume everyone is aware of this [chicagotribune.com] unfortunate story from a couple weeks ago. My suggestion is that these teachers and the principle do a little time of their own. In fact their sentence should probably be much harsher than the one given to the Chicago teenager. I think most parents would agree that we do halfway expect the teachers and administrators of that school to act more or less like responsible adults.

Re:At least a Disturbing the Peace Charge (4, Interesting)

SubtleNuance (184325) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113233)

Seeing this story makes me think of Aqua Teen Hunger Force LED-pranksters and the Boston Police. The ATHF-pranksters are being held to task because of the over-reation of the Boston authorities. The same hysteria that brings the Boston Authorities to react in the way they did has informed these Tennessee teachers.

They (thought) it was a correct behaviour in this "post 9/11 world" (whatver that is), and were made to look extremely foolish. But now we have an ACTUAL case of terrorism. In this case, these teachers *actually* terrorized these students. There motivation matters not. They have *actually* done to these children what the Boston Authorities (B.A.) did to Boston (but, then, pinned the blame on the ATHF, who had no reason to think anyone could react in the ridiculous manner of the B.A.

These teachers should be drawn and quartered for their ACTUAL act of abuse of these children.

how about terrorism charges? (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113281)

Assume everyone is aware of this [chicagotribune.com] unfortunate story from a couple weeks ago. My suggestion is that these teachers and the principle do a little time of their own.

I'm not aware, no- and your link is registration-only.

I think we agree, though: why aren't they in jail and the local DA mulling over terrorism charges? They terrified a couple dozen students...

Re:how about terrorism charges? (1)

Mephistophocles (930357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113321)

I'm not aware, no- and your link is registration-only.

Ah, my mistake - see Bugmenot.com [bugmenot.com] for a usable password.

What Maroons! (4, Insightful)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112993)

How can they be so stupid? These kids won't trust teachers ever again ... and they'll probably have trouble with authority figures for the rest of their lives.

I say we take the asshats responsible for this and lock them in the school's auditorium with all the angry parents and let the asshats see how it feels to fear for their lives.

Re:What Maroons! (5, Insightful)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113079)

Take care to remember that when you hear a news item that makes you think any of these words:

  • crazy
  • insane
  • evil
  • outrageous
  • inexplicable

...then you have almost certainly been given only half the story.

These kids won't trust teachers ever again ... and they'll probably have trouble with authority figures for the rest of their lives.

You say that like it's a bad thing.

Re:What Maroons! (5, Insightful)

VirusEqualsVeryYes (981719) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113367)

Take care to remember that when you hear a news item that makes you think any of these words:
  • crazy
  • insane
  • evil
  • outrageous
  • inexplicable
...then you have almost certainly been given only half the story.
Either that, or you're reading about US politics.

Re:What Maroons! (4, Funny)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113469)

...then you have almost certainly been given only half the story.
Either that, or you're reading about US politics.

That's what I said!

Indeed, we are in danger of a stack overflow here. When you read about US politics, you are begin given half the story about the giving of half the story.

Re:What Maroons! (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113279)

they'll probably have trouble with authority figures for the rest of their lives.

You say that like it's something negative that they will use their own mind to judge a situation instead of turning to someone to tell them what to think and how to act.

Darwin awards (0, Flamebait)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112995)

We need to submit this to the Darwin awards and then wait for the children to grow up and sue the fuck out of these teachers.

There is just a line where stupidity goes from a mistake to outright malice. This crossed the line, turned round and started to pee on it while singing "it's raining men" and tap dancing.

Re:Darwin awards (1)

Skidge (316075) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113047)

We need to submit this to the Darwin awards and then wait for the children to grow up and sue the fuck out of these teachers.


We probably don't have to wait until they grow up; I bet lawsuits are already in the works.

Re:Darwin awards (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113105)

No see, point 1 will be lawsuits now. Parents will go nuts.

But when little Timmy hits 25 and can't work because he's terrified of gun men and won't leave the house, well little Timmy can go point his finger at them and go "You ruined my life, you pay up NOW!"

Re:Darwin awards (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113119)

This crossed the line, turned round and started to pee on it while singing "it's raining men" and tap dancing.
Dude, have you ever tried to pee while you're tap dancing (or tap dance while you're peeing)? You ruin your shoes long before you get to the big finish.

Justice (-1, Redundant)

Yoda Jedi Master (1101773) | more than 7 years ago | (#19112997)

Throw you out of school, a game level will.
Then, throw you out of USA, this should.

It is part of the " no child left unterrorized" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19112999)

program.

I love the internet ... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113009)

If you feel so inclined, go ahead and let the school know what you think about this ...

http://www.cityschools.net/schoolsites/se/index.ht ml [cityschools.net]
Scales Elementary Telephone (615) 895-5279

Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (1, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113013)

Considering how (relatively) common school shootings have become, I'm not against the idea of drilling kids on what to do in such a situation. If a set of procedures have been devised to combat the situation or at least keep it under control, then teaching it to the kids would probably be a positive thing. However, it does need to be taught to them.

You can't just spring a "real emergency" drill on them without first performing announced drills and properly training them. The result would be similar to the pandemonium that would result if it was announced that the school was really burning down every time there was a fire drill. That's no way to teach proper handling of the situation. You want everyone as calm and collected as can be.

The article is light on details, but I do hope some good comes of this. These teachers sound far too junior to be implementing this plan on their own. (Their first major mistake.) If schools take notice, however, perhaps more appropriate training and procedures can be put in place.

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (2, Insightful)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113071)

Please tell me how I plan for a mad man with fire arms. I would really like to know how you plan your exits while you have a guy in an unknown position heading towards unknown locations. Do you play Russian roullete and let 1 class get massacred so the others can escape, or do you all move to 1 location and get shot when he realizes you're all going to parking lot B?

If you've ever played any sort of FPS game you know full well people react in odd ways and you can't predict which way they will come at you from, let alone make a formal plan for such a situation. Putting this into real world setting you're plan revolves on 99% luck and 1% skill.

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (1)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113271)

Do you play Russian roullete and let 1 class get massacred so the others can escape, or do you all move to 1 location and get shot when he realizes you're all going to parking lot B?

So THIS is how the Kobayashi Maru got started.

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (1)

EchoD (1031614) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113101)

My thoughts exactly when I first read about this. It may not have been handled in the best possible way, but it's certainly not a bad idea. My biggest issue is the age of the children -- wait a few more years. Involve the school board, the police, etc... get things cleared and approved quietly and have a few police come in as the "attackers". I'd say even go so far as to have them firing blanks when there's nobody around. You don't want people to think they've actually been shot at, just have them think somebody is being shot at.

Drill the students, and teach them that sitting under their desks waiting to be slaughtered isn't the best way to go about things. A few people with level heads during a crisis like that could potentially help the situation.

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (1)

RockoTDF (1042780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113387)

Still a bad, bad, idea. Even if the kids know it is a drill, the idea of carrying out a fire exercise in a high school is almost as retarded as the initial article.

Why not breed even more fear? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113459)

You could have a plan for every high profile type disaster that could possibly happen somewhere -

1) Asteroid avoidance plan
2) Volcano escape procedure
3) Mustard gas attack escape plan
4) Aeroplane plummitting from the sky escape plan (you could even drop a real-size cardboard plane out of the sky to create the right atmosphere)
5) Alien invasion fighting back plan
6) Super-AIDS avoidance plan (don't sit on the toilet seat)
7) Cameron Diaz offering everyone a blowjob plan

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (2, Insightful)

rlp (11898) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113141)

Considering how (relatively) common school shootings have become

They're not - when they happen they get amplified by extensive coverage on the 24-hour cable news programs.

Too true (3, Insightful)

spike2131 (468840) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113309)

And the accompanying fear-mongering only enhances the probability of such attacks in the future.

Still, in terms of number of lives saved, the resources would be better spent on educating kids about things like basic traffic safety, good nutritional habits, and not sniffing paint.

Ditilled news. (1)

iknownuttin (1099999) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113461)

They're not - when they happen they get amplified by extensive coverage on the 24-hour cable news programs.

Even the regular broadcast news does this.

I once actually paid attention to the locations of these "news" items one time. They were from all over the World. What's happening with the news it's being distilled. So a very rare incident looks like it happens more often than it really does for any given area. Now, the public who doesn't pay attention to the locations of these incidents or even if it's a new one and not a rehash of something happened weeks ago, perceive this incident as happening much more ofter than it does. Look at Meth labs. Because it's big news whenever one gets busted - and they are rare - folks think there's some major crisis with Meth and the easy availability of Psuedophredrine. So, the politicians get involved, and now to get cold medicine that actually works requires filling out a form with your name, address, phone number, and driver's license number - all for 10 pills that have other compounds in addition to the psuedophedrine.

And then this incident, all it's doing is perpetuating the culture of fear in the US.

I got to stop..Im starting a rant.

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (5, Insightful)

digitig (1056110) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113251)

Considering how (relatively) common school shootings have become, I'm not against the idea of drilling kids on what to do in such a situation.
Er, just how common have school shootings become? Relative to what? I thought they were very very rare, and the chance of your or my kids being involved in one was tiny. Isn't that why they still shock?

Re:Right Idea, Wrong Implementation (1)

riker1384 (735780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113283)

School shootings aren't common. One happens what, every few years? Car accidents are very common. Sports accidents are common. Fires are common, school shootings are not common.

The new "Stop, drop and roll" for the '00's? (5, Interesting)

screeble (664005) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113015)

While I read this article and think "Well, that was fucking stupid." I have to wonder if there needs to be a school-sanctioned version of this concept in place.

I grew up in US/USSR Cold War times and spent a few schoolday hours a year huddled in the fallout shelter basement during drills. We also had tornado, flood and fire drills. What fun.

Seems to me that as shootings get more prevalent it might be a good idea to have drills to limit deaths from mass panic.

Re:The new "Stop, drop and roll" for the '00's? (4, Insightful)

wass (72082) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113135)

In how many of those drills were you told it wasn't a drill and that the Soviets really were on their way to bomb the school? Or how many fire drills have you had where the teachers yelled that it's not a normal fire drill, the school really is burning down and you might burn to death?

What these teachers did was equivalent of yelling "Fire" in a crowded theater.

Re:The new "Stop, drop and roll" for the '00's? (2)

RockoTDF (1042780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113429)

....Once when I was a kid I remember we were going for a fire drill and we turn to our usual route out of the school and the principal is standing there with her walkie talkie in front of some cardboard flames and we had to use our backup way out. It was so cheesey. Then I remember one kid was missing because he was on the crapper, and was asked by the headmistress "well wouldn't you have felt silly burning on the toliet?" or something like that and I can't get the stupid image of this terrified little kid sitting on the crapper in the middle of a massive inferno.

Re:The new "Stop, drop and roll" for the '00's? (1)

aadvancedGIR (959466) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113217)

Sure, I'm waiting to see what will be the mad scholl shooter version of "duck and cover".

Joke aside, with young children, the only practical way of dealing with this is to teach them to stay with the teacher and quietly evacuate, not to traumatize them. If they ever get within 5m of a real shooter, they can only rely on luck anyway, but there is no reason to rape their childhood for such a tiny statistical risk.

Re:The new "Stop, drop and roll" for the '00's? (1)

powerpants (1030280) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113361)

Seems to me that as shootings get more prevalent it might be a good idea to have drills to limit deaths from mass panic.

Except they aren't becoming more prevalent. Worldwide, there have been around 5 shootings per year [infoplease.com] , and the number appears to be holding steady, at least for the last decade. I know that's not a very long record to plot a trend, but it's better than nothing.

Gruesome group deaths, when perpetrated by a person, have a huge psychological impact on the general public. The level of fear is vastly disproportionate to the actual threat. 24-hour news outlets intensify this fear by exaggerating the threat. I'm not saying that preparation is a bad thing, but there's no reason to scare people in the process.

No it won't (4, Insightful)

Visaris (553352) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113031)

It'll be interesting to see what happens to these teachers after the charges brought against students in recent months.

No it won't. Not much will happen to them. Unlike the student who was arrested a while ago for completing his essay assignment as sked, these teachers will not be arrested. At best they may be fired after a couple months of looking in to it. They will probably only get a slap on the wrist. Don't forget that America in not interested in protecting children. This is a perfect example. By pulling this stunt, the teachers were able to scare the kids and permanantly brand the image of terrorists into the Children's minds. It doesn't matter that the thing turned up to be a hoax, the less educated/experienced of the kids will live with fear for quite a while, perhaps their whole lives. The teachers are acting much as the rest of America acts. It more important to mold children into the "American Cog" than to treat them fairly, or to give them an education. I mean, after all, what about the terrorists?

Re:No it won't (1)

dswensen (252552) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113127)

Wish I had mod points. This is exactly what I was going to say.

modern life in the US (4, Insightful)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113041)

Gotta start teaching them to be scared at an early age, y'know...

Eh (1)

shagymoe (261297) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113049)

Just make them personally responsible for the mental health bills for all these children and that should be punishment enough. They'll never have another cent to their name.

Bleah. (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113053)

Dunno who to feel sorry for in all of this, save the kids themselves, and even then just a little. The teachers are going to get fired + sued into oblivion, while the idiots responsible for initiating such a dumb plan will likely remain unscathed (or will stan if it goes like I think it does up an appropriate scapegoat). The parents are going to look at this situation and not likely think "time to explain to the sprogs that sometimes people do dumb things - they'll be okay otherwise"... many of them are instead going to think "JACKPOT!" and milk victimhood for all its worth while putting some lawyer onto their speed-dial.

Screw the mod points: A pox on all their damned houses, if it goes like I think it does.

/P

no excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113059)

hope the parents have the balls to sue the school AND proceed with criminal charges against these morons.

"There is just no excuse for this type of abuse."

yes Johnnie Cochran you may use that one.

Re:no excuse (1)

RockoTDF (1042780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113471)

I think Johnnie is dead?

Like fire in a crowded theater house? (1)

SpzToid (869795) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113063)

I mean seriously, what were these 'adults' trying to teach these kids? How to shit in your pants? About having a miracle moment? Sometimes it would help to consider the message towards the audience, entrusted. These adults won't be entrusted in the future as in the past, and that's probably enough. Let's all move forward, if only we can. Being a kid certinly sucks though.

Who cares? (-1, Troll)

CyZooNiC (656901) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113065)

How does this classify as Slashdot news?

Re:Who cares? (5, Funny)

uberjoe (726765) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113169)

How does this classify as Slashdot news?

Because in about five seconds Jack Thompson will emerge from his hole and say that the teachers in question trained for this fake attack by playing Doom and Counter Strike.

Zero tolerance (3, Informative)

faloi (738831) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113089)

If all those pesky zero tolerance rules get used, there should be a lot of fired teachers. Even without the zero tolerance rules, there should be a lot of fired teachers. I'm old enough to remember the nuclear "hide under the desk" drills, but they were always clear it was a drill.

Wolf-crier? (1)

caffiend2049 (984834) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113093)

It drives me nuts that people reason that this is more reprehensible "in light of recent incidents."
If not for the fact that these things do happen, this un-drill would NEVER have taken place.
And honestly, this exercise could provide useful information to the faculty about what to expect if such an event occured and what preparedness training would prove most beneficial. Think of it as a pre-test, as it were.

Unfortunately, the children probably learned a lot as well - like sometimes adults will tell you lies and intentionally scare the shit out of you "for your own good."
ah learning....isn't that what school is all about?

Did these teachers ride the short bus? (4, Insightful)

qwijibo (101731) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113111)

Doing a drill where students are taught what to do and try to react in a controlled environment might be reasonable. Whether or not the underlying idea has merit, training has to be right to have value. Executing a drill for the purpose of finding out how kids will respond is just sick amusement.

Telling the kids that it wasn't a drill and they had to fear for their lives was counter productive at best. The teachers and administration that were involved in this should all be locked up. The purpose of this act was to terrorize the children. At a minimum, each person involved should be charged with one count of child abuse for each child affected by this incredibly retarded action. The closest any of them should be to a child for the rest of their lives is asking "do you want fries with that?"

Why is this a huge deal? (-1, Troll)

fireboy1919 (257783) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113117)

From TFA:
night was intended as a learning experience and lasted five minutes during the weeklong trip to a state park

Five minutes. Kids can't handle five minutes of fear in a weekend of great experiences? And we're not even talking about seeing something horrible. They were told there was a gunman, and that they didn't know where he was. This is something that brings events like the Virginia shootings into reality. It's not just something that they saw on TV. Now they know how it felt for five minutes. They can imagine how bad it would be for hours. Maybe they can even relate to kids who go to schools that are bad enough that they know that in going they are risking their lives.

A measure of empathy will do more good than harm, I think.

Re:Why is this a huge deal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113337)

Is it ok if I rape your wife for a few minutes? I mean, it's only five minutes in a lifetime of good experiences. I won't even leave any lasting damage. You can even tell her that I'm coming, if you'd like.

What'll Happen. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113143)

1. Some students really scared. Parents cope.
2. Some Students really scared. Parents see dollar signs, hire lawyers.
3. Some students, this doesn't bother.

4. Lawyers sue, get settlement. Parents get small check, lawyers buy another couple of BMW's.
5. Pricipal gets talked to.
6. Teachers get fired, humiliated, and blackballed.

Poor Judgment (5, Interesting)

devnullkac (223246) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113145)

When an adult does it, it's "poor judgment;" when a student does it, it's "a potential threat that must be dealt with seriously."

For once they learn something real. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113155)

I think they did the best thing they ever could have for these kids. The kids learn to deal with panic scenarios for later in life. Slightly lacking in taste. Sure!! But a good lesson none the less. For once these kids deal with reality in thier sheltered lives.

Seriously... (5, Funny)

TheRon6 (929989) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113189)

Did anyone *ACTUALLY* think of the children before they decided this was a good idea?!?

Dependency (2, Informative)

sam the lurker (209655) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113223)

This event is no big deal, just teaching the fifth lesson [newciv.org] .

And? (1)

darkstock (1101387) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113225)

Poor judgement perhaps, but I would stop it there. I wouldn't even go so far as to say that "drill" was inappropriate. When I was in sixth grade, we would pull pranks like this on each other all the time. In fact, at our school camp in elementary school I nearly pissed myself when our counsellors (teachers and high school students) decided it would be funny to tell us that a mad man with a gun was running around. We were all scared as hell, but it makes for a good jaugh now. I still do not understand what the huge deal is, but maybe that's because I'm still in a pre-columbine mindset. All I know is that they did this type of thing to us a few times, we didn't know they were joking at the time, and I'm not fucked up, nor are any of my former class mates (at least, not because of that).

Re:And? (1)

Himring (646324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113285)

When I was in sixth grade, we would pull pranks like this on each other

"I remember sixth grade. That was the best three years of my life." --Redd Fox

Aw get over it already (1, Interesting)

ozzee (612196) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113263)

Yep the teachers were total jobs, OK.

Kids got to learn the hard way about themselves. - almost always a good thing.

No-one got hurt, no I don't care if someone got stressed for 5 minutes. Getting stressed is an unfortunate part of life, get over it and learn to deal with it. If you don't push the human brain to go beyond it's comfort zone, it may never get out of being a whining spoiled brat that most of us are. This is probably the biggest favor some of these kids will ever have done to them.

Tomorrow most will forget.

Yep the teachers were total jobs.

Let the punishment fit the crime (4, Interesting)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113265)

Arrange for some convincing actors armed with high-quality toy weapons to threaten the idiot teachers who did this, in some time and place where they aren't expecting it. See how "educational" they find it.

You know, some decades ago... before Columbine, before the year 2000 incident when what's his name shot coworkers at Edgewater Technology, and I believe before incidents in post offices made the phrase "going postal" part of the language... on one Halloween I thought it would be funny to wear a Halloween mask at work. It was a corpse-like mask that fit over my head. Apart from the mask, I was wearing my ordinary work clothes. I sort of scrooged down behind my computer monitor. I waited for a couple of coworkers to walk buy, then slowly stood up, saying nothing.

Let me tell you, I was completely taken aback by the intensity of the moment of terror that evoked in my coworkers. The unspoken thought was that people don't wear masks unless they're robbing a bank, or something. I immediately took of the mask, apologized profusely, never did it again. I wasn't fired, lectured, or disciplined, but those coworkers were cool toward me for some time. I realized I'd made a serious goof.

They were adults. It was Halloween. I did not have any weapons. I didn't jump out. I didn't say anything: not "Boo!", not "stick 'em up," or anything suggesing violence.

And for a fraction of a second--my colleagues were in fear for their lives. Only a fraction of a second, but that's the effect of doing something like that.

I can't begin to imagine the effects of a staged mock attack by adults on eleven-year-old-kids lasting for five minutes. That's not a short period of time to be in fear for one's life.

Re:Let the punishment fit the crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113355)

You, sir, are an asshole.

You were an adult. Hallowe'en is for children.

Those who can't, teach... (1)

PHAEDRU5 (213667) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113293)

Here in Atlanta, one of our local radio talk show hosts regularly sounds off about how those who go into schools of education are usually the least-capable of any given college.

I never gave him much credence, until now. This was a shocking display of poor judgment.

What if.... (1)

iknownuttin (1099999) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113303)

The mock attack Thursday night was intended as a learning experience and lasted five minutes during the weeklong trip to a state park, said Scales Elementary School Assistant Principal Don Bartch, who led the trip.

It would be nice to see these folks do the drill during a High School Rugby trip.

Teacher/Coach: "There's a gunman loose!"

Rugby team: "Yes! Let's kick his ass now!"

Teacher/Coach: "Wait! It's only a dri......."

Staff member gets his ass royally kicked. High school students' parents then sue school because their kids were terrorized.

OK, I'm dreaming again.

Re:What if.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113401)

It would be especially funny if a group of elementary school students took down the staff member.

Stupid (1)

normuser (1079315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113319)

During the last night of the trip, staff members convinced the 69 students that there was a gunman on the loose. They were told to lie on the floor or hide underneath tables and stay quiet. A teacher, disguised in a hooded sweat shirt, even pulled on a locked door.

So they were telling the kids to lie on the floor like good little targets, WTF? They should be collectively attacking the ass-clown, not cowering on the ground waiting to be shot.

I'm surprised no one killed the teacher that was playing the attacker.

how exactly is this news for nerds? (1)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113329)

Really.... no mention of anything using electricity, or fancy mechanics, or anything like that.

Re:how exactly is this news for nerds? (1)

chemicaloli (1026172) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113363)

Nerds start off in school, they may have just destroyed a whole generation of nerds!

disagree (1)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113399)

Einstein did horribly in school... I'd argue that 'school' is just to raise the general populace - the truly gifted will find it to be more of a hindrance than a help. Nerds tend to be self-taught from what I have seen.

Who? (1)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113339)

Who, in their right mind, could possibly think that terrorizing SIXTH graders is a good idea? This sort of stunt would be a poor choice with teenagers but with children? Are you joking?

I hope, at the very least, that some of the teachers involved with this stunt lose their jobs, let alone face criminal charges.

did they train them first? (2, Interesting)

phrostie (121428) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113359)

did they train them what to do first or were they just thrown into panic with no guidence?

did they coordinate with local law inforcement and emergency services so they knew it was only a drill and participate in the drill?

if something like this was done right it could be a good thing, this shows none the signs of having been done right.

wonder what would have happened if someone had been seriously injured or killed in the panic?

This must be a sick joke, it's too crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113393)

If this shit really happened I think those involved should do some time behind the bars.

This kind of shit leaves people mentally scarred for live. Just like raping someone.

What can I say, only in Amerika...

OMG! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19113433)

"I was like, 'Oh My God,' " she said. "At first I thought I was going to die. We flipped out."

OMG, like this is the student quote they totally decided to use in the article? Cool!

We all have to make sacrifices... (1)

Dude McDude (938516) | more than 7 years ago | (#19113453)

...in this War on Terror.
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