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Microsoft Using .MS TLD

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the step-right-up dept.

Microsoft 308

mqudsi writes "Microsoft is using the .MS top-level domain, assigned to the Caribbean island of Montserrat, for its Web 2.0-flavored Popfly project. You can get your own .MS name if you really want to — there are no restrictions on foreign ownership — at $180 US for 2 years. As of this writing microsoft.ms is available." In an obliquely related note, TechBlorge has up a rumination on the resemblance of the Popfly logo to Tux.

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OMG PONIES (4, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195687)

Tag: SlowNewsDay

Re:OMG PONIES (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195703)

Dear PC users,

It's no secret iTunes turned to shit as soon as Apple had to begin catering to you cavedwellers. It was version 4.1, if memory serves, around the time they let you into the music store. The demand for PC compatibility is the major reason iTunes is still a Carbon app, insiders say, when every other iApp has since been rewritten in Cocoa to behave like a decent Mac application.

Frankly, we think Apple should rescind PC compatibility from the iPod. Only when the last PC user is forced from our platform shall we again enjoy freedom from their tasteless, backwards demands.

Sincerely,
The Mac community

Re:OMG PONIES (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195741)

If Apple were smart, and had balls, they'd make a Cocoa layer for Windows.

Re:OMG PONIES (1)

jamar0303 (896820) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195811)

No, it will only make the OSx86 project stronger (after all, if they've already bought iPods, they know how good it is and will try any method possible to get them working again before going out and buying another).

Re:OMG PONIES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195833)

iTunes (aka SoundJam from Casady and Greene) is carbon because it was written pre OS-X.

Re:OMG PONIES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196025)

Blaming PC users for Apple making crappy programs? "The Mac community" has really fallen apart....

Re:OMG PONIES (1, Offtopic)

Cheezymadman (1083175) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196175)

Dear Mac users,

It's no secret the mouse turned to shit as soon as Microsoft had to begin catering to you cavedwellers. It was version 4.1, if memory serves, around the time they let you dright click. The demand for Mac compatibility is the major reason the mouse is still a legacy periph, insiders say, when every other peripheral has since been rewritten in USB 2.0 to behave like a decent PC peripheral.

Frankly, we think Microsoft should rescind Mac compatibility from the mouse. Only when the last Mac user is forced from our peripherals shall we again enjoy freedom from their tasteless, backwards demands.

Sincerely,
The PC community

Re:OMG PONIES (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195849)

I'm fucking drrunk, so I'm posti ng this random stuff on raandom postrt on slashdot. Really funny huaheauheuhauehae.

An heh... Microsoft sucks... lioke z master scuxert aueuahe oh... xsadhdot eon.. grrrrrrrreatt day for you alll...

cya

ps: I don't tyhink I'll past the capcha test... I'll hope I will... nice day... good day to superstrings... I ownn da vord... all your particles are belong to meeeeeeeeeee

Re:OMG PONIES (2, Interesting)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196021)

If I get this post on metamod.pl, I'll roast the moderator who modded this informative.

Watching drunk people can be funny. Listening to drunk people can get annoying. Reading the ramblings of drunk people is just lame. Grousing about it by posting something in response is just a waste of time.

I guess I'll stop typing now.

Re:OMG PONIES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196151)

'underrated'.

Suck it.

Re:OMG PONIES (2, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195949)

Looks like omg.ponies.ms is free as well. There almost has to be 179 other people willing to chip in a dollar to get this for CmdrTaco.

Re:OMG PONIES (2, Funny)

Rei (128717) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196129)

Too bad www.ms is already taken. I've stumbled into that so many times when I mess up on tab completion when typing "www.msnbc.com".

If they ever open up a ".go" TLD, I am so registering www.go ("www.google.com"). Same with the TLD .goo :)

OMG SILVERLIGHT (1)

llamaxing (895844) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196019)

this is very off-topic, but I wanted to bring it up anyway. for those of you who actually tried getting Popfly, did any of you click the Whack-a-mole link? It leads directly to a web page requiring you to install Silverlight (if you haven't done so already). And to bite MS in the butt, the install page says if you have Firefox or Safari to restart the browser, but if you go to the System Requirements page, only the IE and Firefox browsers are mentioned. way to go, Microsoft. as for the actual topic, why does it matter if Microsoft registered its project's site under a Caribbean island's domain? oops, did I just restate the summary in a bland paraphrase? my bad.

is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (4, Funny)

ip_freely_2000 (577249) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195693)

I want the most active domain in the ms tld.

Re:is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (5, Funny)

skribe (26534) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195791)

proble.ms

Re:is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (4, Interesting)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195935)

There are a surprising amount of words that end in "ms". /usr/share/dict/american-english contains almost 500. Some are interesting in that the part preceding "ms" is also a word: Ada(ms) Nazis(ms) Si(ms) balsa(ms) boo(ms) char(ms) condo(ms) e(ms) far(ms) fir(ms) for(ms) ha(ms) hare(ms) he(ms) hi(ms) is(ms) la(ms) mini(ms) mode(ms) mu(ms) nor(ms) oh(ms) pal(ms) per(ms) pro(ms) real(ms) rear(ms) sea(ms) see(ms) ski(ms) spas(ms) tea(ms) tee(ms) thru(ms) to(ms) tote(ms) war(ms) ya(ms) and zoo(ms).

Let's start a pool... (5, Funny)

grcumb (781340) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195989)

How long before rectu.ms points to goatse?

Re:is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196023)

or p.ms

Re:is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (0)

Thabenksta (125165) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195955)

Y2K called, it want's it's BSOD joke back!

Re:is bluescreenofdeath.ms available? (1)

welshsocialist (542986) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196263)

Just checked the registrar's [adamsnames.tc] WHOIS. bluescreenofdeath.ms is available!

You mean DUCKS look sorta like PENGUINS?! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195711)

You'd almost think they were both birds or something.

Re:You mean DUCKS look sorta like PENGUINS?! (5, Insightful)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195841)

why is this a troll? I agree, the idea that the duck is a stolen idea from the penguin is stupid. not everything has to become an argument over copyrights and logo stealing just because its microsoft.

Re:You mean DUCKS look sorta like PENGUINS?! (1)

ricree (969643) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195971)

I'm going to second the "why is this a troll". If I hadn't finished off my mod points earlier today, I'd definitely give it a boost.

Another Good One (4, Funny)

tehwebguy (860335) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195715)

Someone get ComicSans.MS

why not? (5, Interesting)

WrongMonkey (1027334) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195727)

Why don't major corporations have their own TLDs as part of the system? It would cut back on a lot of phishing and ICANN doesn't seem to be reluctant to do whatever they can to make a buck.

Re:why not? (2, Insightful)

neoform (551705) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195969)

Mmm.. how about letting anyone have any tdl? honestly, why are we all rushing for .com ? Like, what the hell is "com" for a domain name anyway?

I'd much rather type "apple" or "google" than "apple.com" and "google.com", personally I find it'd make a lot more sense.

Re:why not? (1)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196007)

You mean, like an AOL Keyword?

Re:why not? (1)

beyondkaoru (1008447) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196143)

i'm kind of wondering whether the whole tld thing is even necessary -- let people register domain names to contain whatever letters or dots they want, and rather than have the absurdly excessively busy .com nameservers, have servers do things by hash. this would result in dns getting distributed nicely.

Per Industry TLD's (1)

mechsoph (716782) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196161)

It might make more sense to have per industry TLD's or subdomains of com. in the same way companies in different industries can trademark the same name, ie previously Apple Records vs. Apple Computers becomes apple.mus.com and apple.comp.com or something like that.

Re:Per Industry TLD's (1)

beyondkaoru (1008447) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196249)

they could be applecomputers and applerecords and things would be fine...

Re:why not? (1)

tekaris (967679) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196043)

Suppose some companies do that and others don't. Disasters like this could happen:

We lost your BB&T account data. Please send your username and password to acc0unts.bb
So in this hypothetical world, did BB&T switch over or not? Assume that they have yet to do so - Grandma then unwittingly sends all your inheritance to Barbados!

Re:why not? (4, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196099)

Well, as I understand it, the theory of having the .com domain is that the corporation buys their name and puts in subdomains below it. So, you might have cornflakes.kellogs.com, for example. One corporation, one namespace. Makes things very simple. The problem with moving the corporations to top-level is that they'll do exactly the same thing they did with .com, which is pollute the namespace as much as possible. At which point, the whole system becomes totally unworkable and unusable.

I'd personally prefer it if the .com domain was cleared of all products, individuals, trademarks and other superfluous crap. If you aren't a company, you aren't a .com. If you're an organization, you're an .org, and that's final. In fact, I'd go one further - anything that is directly off a .com, .org, .net or .gov should be international in some respect. If it's more local than that, the name should reflect that. (For example, I would exile the US Government to .gov.us, the same way most other governments do their websites. There should be no exceptions.) When something expands in scope, it can always buy the name for the next scope out.

Wouldn't this impinge on privacy, freedom, etc? Not really. Whilst governments should be honest about location (I can dream - they're rarely honest about anything else), the only constraint I'm suggesting is that the type of name should reflect the type of scope. If you're running a website for a metropolitan area, I'd say you should have a metropolitan-level domain name. Doesn't have to be the same metro, the same country or (when NASA gets round to it) even the same planet. This gives people plenty of room for satirical/joke names, etc. It just adds a few more dots to it. Big deal.

It'd be almost trivial to make the DNS hierarchy deeper. Most users would be unaffected as most people outside of the US already add country codes to the names and as far as US users are concerned, Slashdot is an international forum. Everything else you get to through links.

This really would help for domain spoofing, because when unicode domain names start to come online, it will be possible to generate visually identical domain names that are physically different. That's been the claimed problem all along, although since browsers have a language attribute, I don't see why the browser can't just recode names for your language anyway. However, apparently that is a no-no. Given that, I can't see why you can't validate that the string uses a consistent character set AND a character set that the user has pre-approved for use with the country-code that I'm arguing should be there in most cases. In such a system, spoofing names should be impossible.

Re:why not? (1)

beyondkaoru (1008447) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196219)

something that's a little weird to me: as far as i know, and i don't know too much about this topic, all the .com domains are sold by some company, and all .org domains by some other, and .net by another... it seems like they're not well designed for companies/organizations/...net's? do you know anything on this topic?

Hmm, that was fast (4, Informative)

AsmCoder8088 (745645) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195729)

I just checked on whois.net and it appears microsoft.ms is now registered....

[whois.adamsnames.tc]
Yes
microsoft.ms is registered.

Domain Name: microsoft.ms

Registrant
Domain Registrant
id domain privacy network (iddp.net), 588 sutter st. #129, 94102-1102 san francisco, ca
United States
E-mail: tlds@rrpproxy.net
Phone: +1.4154408001
Fax: +1.4154408001

Registered 22 Dec 2005 (3, Informative)

ensignyu (417022) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195739)

Whoever wrote the linked blog apparently doesn't know how to do whois lookups.

Re:Registered 22 Dec 2005 (2)

ensignyu (417022) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195751)

Correction: whoever submitted the Slashdot article doesn't know how to do a whois lookup. That makes more sense.

Microsoft.ms is obviously *not* available (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195731)

Just because it doesn't have a webserver up and running, doesn't mean it isn't registered [adamsnames.tc] .

That'll make you cringe (3, Insightful)

robot_lords_of_tokyo (911299) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195749)

We're a hip crazy cool start up [popfly.ms]
it's bad enough when people mean it when they write it... it's so much better when it's forced by some guy upstairs.

Re:That'll make you cringe (3, Funny)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195809)

Hey, did you laugh at the pictures like I did?

One was the obligatory girl. She probably did design work. Not that she couldn't code circles around the guys and all, but you know, gotta keep up appearances.

There were three guys on there, I swear, I saw them on NBC's To Catch A Predator getting arrested. It's good microsoft hires ex-cons. Keeps em off the streets.

Sloth from Goonies evidently works there now. Good for him. I'll bet he eats a LOT of Baby Ruths.

There were plenty of forgettable, dorky white guys who, together, probably own every D&D and Warhammer piece ever made.

Finally, the project lead was surely the guy on top (of the pyramid, you perverts!). I guess I have worked on enough projects to know.

*Sigh*

Well, what do you know? popfly.ms IS good for something! It amused me for ten minutes.

Re:That'll make you cringe (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195879)

dorky white guys? fuck, half their team is h1b status.

Re:That'll make you cringe (0, Troll)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195867)

looks more like a middle aged diversity bowling league than a startup. I wonder if token girl and striped shirt homo share blowjob tips.

Re:That'll make you cringe (1)

etnu (957152) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196087)

They have more program manager than they have developers. That speaks volumes. Microsoft wouldn't know how to form a web startup if a $50 billion market depended on it. Because it does.

Re:That'll make you cringe (2, Interesting)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196127)

So is it supposed to be the new way to create a myspace page or something? Is this MS admitting that their "LIVE" campaign is failing?

White on white (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196153)

Great cross-platform browser support, guys... I'm seeing mostly-grey-on-white ranging to totally-white-on-white, using Konqueror.

Anyone else seeing strange things on non-IE browsers?

how about (5, Funny)

AresTheImpaler (570208) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195753)

http://i.hate.ms/ [i.hate.ms]

That way it really looks Web 2.0!! yay..

resemblance? (4, Funny)

crossmr (957846) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195761)

They're cute birds... wow..anyone who has a cute bird as a logo is ripping off linux?

First of all, they obviously look similar
really? huh.. you know you're right. If someone hadn't pointed out it was the popfly website, I would have swore I was at a linux site.
The resemblance is damn near perfect. I like the way the pink really brings out the black and white....
this is beyond slow news day.

Adium (2, Informative)

SpeedyDX (1014595) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196111)

Adium [adiumx.com] has a cute duck logo. If anything, Popfly's logo, being a duck, should be compared to Adium's.

But uh ... yeah, all of that resemblence thing is just flaimbait.

Re:Adium (2, Funny)

coolGuyZak (844482) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196207)

Ah, but now we stumble upon the true way that Microsoft is ripping off of open source. Obviously they combined both logos as a way to drive linux and Adium off of the market. And you know what's also a bird? Pidgins. Could it really be such a coincidence that Tux is a bird, a duck is a bird (twice, once for MS, once for Adium), and that a pidgin is a bird? OH, LORD. WHAT IS THE WORLD COMING TO.

But uh ... yeah, all of that resemblence thing is just flaimbait

I wouldn't even call it flamebait. I would, however, call the blogger an idiot.

ZOMFG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195765)

Look at all this content derived from tux i found on google [google.com] . Quick, get the torches and pitchforks!

or... (5, Funny)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195767)

linuxsavedmefrom.ms

Could this be... (5, Informative)

tiffany98121 (1094419) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195773)

... the absolute lamest Slashdot article ever posted?

Re:Could this be... (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195825)

Well the tech.blorge link is certainly one of the lamest attempts I have seen to have a dig at MS. I mean seriously with all the ammunition they provide the best this loser can come up with is 'conceptual similarities' between a fucking dayglo pink duck and a penguin.

Re:Could this be... (1)

figleaf (672550) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195883)

The neosmart guy just cares about getting hits to his site. So he posts his microsoft -ve blogs to slashdot.
He also posts on http://neowin.net/ [neowin.net] but nobody gives a damn on that site.

Re:Could this be... (1)

HeroreV (869368) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196065)

I would vote yes in a poll.

tux? no... (3, Insightful)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195775)

but if they changed the font it would look like something from Apple.

Popfly? (4, Insightful)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195783)

Anyone check out the popfly site?

I get a kick out of when a large corporation tries to make itself look all independent and hip and stuff with a so-called irreverent site.

Did you look at the About Us page? "the team hustles for resources every day and is innovative, scrappy, and fun" Good night, does anyone really believe that within Microsoft there are real innovative ideas that don't simply involve entrenching the Microsoft brand? Not that there aren't smart people there, it's just that I have not seen many good ideas coming from there as of late (IE7, Vista, Zune, Media Player, Silverlight...need I go on?) And if this team does exist, then surely their ideas are too innovative and rogue for stodgy old Microsoft and outside of some pseudo-web2.0 site won't see the light of day.

Case in point, the only way to log into the site is with a Microsoft passport. Therefore, I don't know what else is there, but from the looks of things, not much. And isn't "web 2.0" supposed to be made with valid markup? Grumble grumble...

Re:Popfly? (0, Flamebait)

MSFTVet (1039178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195803)

I'm not on the Popfly team but I can assure you that they're super small, "lightly funded" by any standard and definately outside of the bounds of the traditional MSFT brand. Maybe once you have the chance to use the site you'll have a more informed opinion on whether the app is cool or not, huh?

Re:Popfly? (2, Insightful)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195863)

"Maybe once you have the chance to use the site you'll have a more informed opinion on whether the app is cool or not, huh?"

Maybe. One of the few Microsoft products I like is Visual Studio, so they do seem to get IDEs right.

Or not.

From the looks of thing, based on what I see on the Overview page, its the next-gen frontpage all gussied up for the web2.0 (which would have been trendy -- two years ago).

I write loads of web code using jEdit and Firefox. Works great for me. I can write better code than a program, anyhow, at least when it comes web markup, javascript, css, ajax calls, etc. It probably writes code that locks in IE anyhow.

On the positive, the site itself worked with Firefox. On the downside it did not work with Opera. If a company is selling you a tool that lets you write web code, and their site doesn't adhere to web standards (because it would work with Opera if it did), then that's not a great ad for their product.

That in itself created a bad impression. Not trying to be negative, just being honest.

Re:Popfly? (1)

MSFTVet (1039178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195897)

Fair enough. To be clear, the site is not for Pro devs although some may go up and create what they call "application blocks" - essentially little components that others (non developers) can hook together to create mash-ups. I think their target is more non-developers who want to create little apps/mash-ups/gadgets and share them with friends. Imagine the users of MySpace or FaceBook who might want to use this kind of thing to trick out their sites. People like that "borrow" code all the time and make small modifications and re-use it. I think the "vision" is pretty cool - shouldn't anyone be able to build applications by dragging and dropping components onto a surface and hooking them together in ways that they find interseting? It's the future of software development in the long term... You'll always need the hardcore coders to write the core code but most apps will just be made up of pre-existing code put together in ways that users want.

Re:Popfly? (1)

karmaflux (148909) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195981)

Imagine the users of MySpace or FaceBook who might want to use this kind of thing to trick out their sites.
The fact that you don't find this idea terrifying is evidence that you're not qualified to make judgments on these matters. Also, people have been talking about this "the user as the application developer" crap since BASIC came out, and it's just not going to happen, even if you use the word "mashup." Regardless, even this specific idea has already been done -- and in open source, no less. From http://sprog.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] :

Sprog is a graphical tool that anyone can use to build programs by plugging parts together. In Sprog jargon, the parts are known as 'gears' and they are assembled to make a 'machine'. Gears are selected from a palette and dragged onto the Sprog workbench, where they can be connected together. Options can be set using a properties dialog on each gear. When assembly is complete, the machine can be run, reconfigured, or re-run.
Or are you going to try to tell me it's COMPLETELY DIFFERENT because Popfly calls them "blocks" instead of "gears" and it's on the web? Face it: Popfly is a mildly interesting idea, but it won't take off for two reasons. The first reason: nobody wants it. The second reason: Silverlight is ActiveX for Web 2.0, and nobody sure as hell wants that, either.

Re:Popfly? (1)

notaprguy (906128) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196009)

Silverlight ActiveX for Web 2.0? Uhh...no. Silverlight runs on Mac (Firefox and Safari) and Windows. No activex. Nobody wants it? No again. Developers who actually want to write applications instead of only making annoying Flash-y animations will like Silverlight. Wait for a year and see.

Re:Popfly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196041)

Silverlight runs on Mac (Firefox and Safari) and Windows. No activex.
I think it was a metaphor, genius.

Developers who actually want to write applications instead of only making annoying Flash-y animations will like Silverlight. People said the same shit about ActiveX. THIS IS GOING TO REVOLUTIONIZE WEB-ENABLED COMPUTING! What did we get out of it? ASF video files. Great. Eagerly awaiting the quickly-obsolesced niche garbage that Silverlight latches on it.

Re:Popfly? (0, Flamebait)

notaprguy (906128) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196061)

Nah, I don't think it was a metaphor. I was either just ignorance, annoying flame-bait or possibly wishful thinking.

Re:Popfly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196135)

Do you really not see the conceptual similarities between Java (in the form of applets), Flash, ActiveX, and Silverlight?

Talk about ignorance.

Re:Popfly? (5, Interesting)

Oswald (235719) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196049)

Props for having the stones to use a name like MSFTVet on /. but come on:

The team is a small band of folks with a passion for democratizing development, housed within Microsoft's Developer Division based in Redmond, Washington. Like most startup ventures, the team hustles for resources every day and is innovative, scrappy, and fun. Oh, and we also dream big.

That's just sad. Women, men, motorcycles, music, sports, dogs, horses, science fiction (back when it was worth a shit), Smalltalk, dancing...these are just a few of the things people can be passionate about. Democratizing development, whateverthefuckthatmeans, is not on the list. Smells like marketing to me.

White boys should not try to talk like they grew up in the hood, lesbians should not piss standing up, and corporations with US$50 thousand million in the bank should not try to act "scrappy". All of these acts display a combination of confusion, dishonesty, and poor taste. It's no sin to be bigger than God; just don't try to act like you're too cool to suffer the ill effects.

This is not a criticism of the people on the team because I can't possibly know anything about the people on the team (well, I know that Aaron Brethorst turned his last name into a verb, which is pretty creepy, but we'll let that slide). I'm criticizing Microsoft management for thinking they can pull this off. They're off to a great start, with 9 managers and 6 developers.

It doesn't matter if Popfly [isn't a popfly usually an out in baseball, btw?]is a cool app or not, because it will go away. If it's cool now, then it will be exploited by MS in some off-putting way as soon as it gets remotely popular, and if it's not cool then having a rich daddy won't help it.

On a positive note, the website makes pretty nice use of color.

Re:Popfly? (2, Interesting)

notaprguy (906128) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196133)

I agree with most of what you said. It's like trying to be cool when you're not or, even if you are cool, you can't say you are or...you're not cool. What I don't really agree with is the criticism of them saying they want to democratize development. Maybe "democratize" wasn't the best choice of words but I think there's something cool about trying to make computing and development more accessible. I think one of the reasons the uber eggheads have such a hard time with Microsoft (beyond some bad behavior a few years back) is that they feel threatened by them. MSFT created VB because they wanted to make it easier to write apps for Windows than using C. Sure, C is a more elegante' and powerful way to write apps but VB was easy enough that anybody would put together a decent Windows app. Despite what some may think, Microsoft has generally forced prices of computing down, making it more accessible to everyone. Sure, today you can get good software for nothing but overall Microsoft software is and has always been cheaper than most commercial alternatives. But I digress. Popfly seems to be about making it easy for anyone to make simple little Web apps. It's a step in the right direction as far as I'm concerned. Even if it does make nervous the people who like to feel superior to everyone else b/c they have more technical knowledge.

Re:Popfly? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195819)

Yeah, they must have only been skimming "Web 2.0 for Dummies" and missed the warning box on page 2:

[!] If your logo is a pink rubber duckie, YOU ARE TRYING TOO HARD.

Re:Popfly? (1)

MSFTVet (1039178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195855)

It's not the logo. It's just a silly picture of ducks. You're taking this way too seriously.

Re:Popfly? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195893)

Whatever. It's stupid either way.

Re:Popfly? (-1, Flamebait)

MSFTVet (1039178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195907)

Hmm...well, that's a well thought out and constructive comment. Or, maybe just stupid.

Re:Popfly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195927)

You're the one replying to every single critical post on this story. Who's taking this too seriously?

Popfly is nothing more than a masturbatory web-2.0 buzzword festival and it will be gone by the end of the year.

Re:Popfly? (0, Flamebait)

notaprguy (906128) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195957)

Can't resist. And why is it that you're uniquely qualified to identify popfly as a "masturbatory web-2.0 buzzword festival..."? You've used the site?

Re:Popfly? (5, Insightful)

karmaflux (148909) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195873)

Also from the About Us page:

From left to right: John Montgomery (Group Program Manager), Andy Sterland (Program Manager), Alpesh Gaglani (Developer), Tim Rice (Developer), Suzanne Hansen (Program Manager), Steven Wilssens (Program Manager), Vinay Deo (Engineering Manager), Michael Leonard (Test Developer), Jianchun Xu (Developer), Dan Fernandez (Product Manager), Adam Nathan (Developer), Wes Hutchins (Program Manager), Aaron Brethorst (Program Manager), Paramesh Vaidyanathan (Product Unit Manager), and Murali Potluri (Developer).
That's nine managers and six developers. No wonder the team "hustles for resources." They're probably going broke paying management wages to sixty percent of the staff. It says three more people aren't pictured -- we can bet that two of them are more managers.

This team sounds like a developer's nightmare.

Re:Popfly? (2, Interesting)

mr_man (141914) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195943)

At Microsoft, Program Managers are not "Managers" in the traditional sense. Instead these people spec out the different features a product will have.

In Microspeak they are individual contributors and not managment, they don't have reports.

Having a strong team of program managers is a good thing for a developer. You get to spend more time focusing on the techncial implementation.

Re:Popfly? (2, Informative)

Osty (16825) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195951)

That's nine managers and six developers. No wonder the team "hustles for resources." They're probably going broke paying management wages to sixty percent of the staff. It says three more people aren't pictured -- we can bet that two of them are more managers.

You're obviously not familiar with Microsoft position nomenclature. Of the names listed, there are three real managers -- the GPM, the PUM, and the Engineering Manager. You're confusing "Program Manager" and "Product Manager" as actual managers. They aren't.

Program managers [microsoft.com] "manage the program", not people -- they write specs, interface with customers, etc.

Product managers [microsoft.com] "manage the product", and are purely marketing. Again, they don't necessarily manage people.

Program managers and product managers are roughly on par with developers and test developers. They don't make the same big bucks as GPMs or PUMS.

Re:Popfly? (2, Informative)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196005)

Hehehe.. you've been in corporate land too long. Go visit a startup. There, they have: developers (the guys who write code), sales (the guys who find customers) and managers (the guys who do everything else). These dudes are managers. Perhaps "suits" would be a better term.

Re:Popfly? (5, Funny)

bmo (77928) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196167)

"That's nine managers and six developers. No wonder the team "hustles for resources." They're probably going broke paying management wages to sixty percent of the staff. It says three more people aren't pictured -- we can bet that two of them are more managers."

Three lions escape from the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle.

They decide to split up, to improve the chances that they won't all be caught all at once, and agree to meet three months later to compare notes.

So three months pass by and they all meet. Two of the lions are all skin and bone. One is shaking, he says "I ate one kid at a school and they chased me into the woods. I had to live on voles, shrews, and the occasional mountain biker...stringy, they are." The second lion, also skinny, said "I ate a cop, and they chased me 'round the city and I wound up having to climb up Mt. Ranier and all I could find to eat was squirrels."

So the two look at the third lion and ask why he's so fat and happy:

"I hid in the bushes next to Microsoft's main entrance. I ate a manager a day and nobody noticed."

--
BMO

(joke shamelessly stolen and adapted from IBM to Microsoft)

Re:Popfly? (1)

Daltorak (122403) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196191)

Actually, no, it's not a nightmare -- it's a good thing for developers. The problem is that Microsoft has a naming issue... (you don't say!)

In Microsoft parlance, a "Program Manager" isn't a person who works in the "management" sense of the business or people. They have other people for that. Program Managers are responsible for writing technical specifications, co-ordinating development activities (e.g. who works on what piece), and making sure the developers are clear of distractions to get their job done. They're the ones that have to deal with finding out what the business requirements are and translating that into development activity.

Let's take a step back from the Microsoft thing for a bit, and think about how you would approach building a team of, say, eight people to develop a piece of software. Would you want eight developers and nothing else? Of course not... you'd want at least one person in there who will run interference between the developers and the people who want the job done, be it the people bankrolling the development, or the customers you're writing the software for. Right? You'd probably want another person focused on writing test cases and documentation, the code that the developers are pushing out is of high quality. You'd probably want one person who takes responsibility for architecture, including researching into options that are available for libraries, database backends, and that sort of thing. They could then distill and filter things down so that the people writing the code don't have to do all that research and architecture work themselves. They could write code, but maybe it'd only be prototypes. Maybe you have one person whose sole responsibility is getting graphical assets and localization together so you can produce the product in ten languages. One person might be tasked full-time to user interface development (e.g. the person who writes all the HTML and CSS).

See how this works yet?

Our team of eight people is already down to three developers. But the cool part is that those three developers will be able to do what they are best at: writing code. They won't be constantly distracted from this to deal with boring ancilliary issues like whether the Spanish translation is accurate, or whether the business requirements are being met.

Sounds like a developer's dream job, doesn't it?

Re:Popfly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196237)

You have no freaking idea who a PM (program manager) is... so stop throwing bullshit around..

PM is a person who is as technical and in almost the same level as a developer. She just gets to be more creative and writing out features and specs.

Oh wait, this is Slashdot isn't it. why the fuck am I even trying?

Re:Popfly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19196059)

It seems to work for Apple, why not...

Re:Popfly? (2, Funny)

MikeMLP (1085367) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196155)

http://popfly.ms/Overview/ [popfly.ms] - click on "watch the popfly screencast"
If you want, watch the video. I have to admit the concept is kinda cool. The way you can edit block code and share it... It seems to me that MS is trying to leverage a community which openly shares code modifications. The problem is that it is all based on a closed-source platform, and I'm sure the best hackers would rather work on an open platform, instead of one which could change or become obsolete without notice.

The funniest part is if you skip to 9:50 when there is a demonstration of a digg reader. The first listed article mentions the exclusive MS / Lenovo deal, but, even better, the second is "Hackers use Windows Update to download..."

Despite Silverlight looking quite polished in the demo, MS still cannot avoid bad press on a free-information internet, and thus, still cannot be cool.

Paranoid much? (2, Informative)

MSFTVet (1039178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195793)

I can assure you that not only is the duck imagery NOT the logo for Popfly but that any resemblance to "Tux" is completely coincidental. Me thinks the Tux fans are a bit paranoid. The duck image is just a photo that the team thought was a fun way to illustrate how people can express themselves by doing whatever they want with Popfly...get it? The one duck has a style unique among the others? It's just a ducky picture! Me thinks the Tux fans are perhaps a bit paranoid.

Re:Paranoid much? (2, Funny)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195903)

You must be new here...wait, you ARE new here!

For the first time ever, the "you must be new here" meme has been used against...someone new!

Of course Tux fans are paranoid. And don't try to change that, you!, with all your common sense and all. I run a tinfoil haberdashery and make quite a good living at it.

They should move to Bermuda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195799)

microsoft.bm
dotnetlock-in.bm
15yearsofdoslock-inwhilemac-amiga-sun-cheated.bm
cutoffmy-msdn-o2.bm
thinkevil.bm
curing-disease-in-africa-wont-save-your-soul.bm
what-jerk-would-waste-life-rewriting-windows-gui-a nd-call-it-kde.bm

was too spooked to login (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19195801)

I was going to try that popfly service this morning and when the passport login showed it was going to route to a weird .ms ccTLD, I thought, no way, this has to be some kind of scam, someone has hacked passport to send them passwords...

who cares about microsoft.ms? (1)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195805)

>As of this writing microsoft.ms is available

I'm more curious if fucking.ms and the likes are already taken.

A modest request when using a wierd country code (2, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195845)

When you use some country domain that's not really the country you're in, put the real country name after the postal mailing addresses on your web site. Wrong country domains screw up systems that are trying to locate your business for local search purposes. If your domain is under ".WS" (Western Samoa) or ".TO" (Tonga), you may be mapped into the middle of the Pacific Ocean. (There are Tongan web sites [www.tcc.to] in ".TO". Admittedly, ".TV" is unlikely to lead to a real web site in Tuvalu, and does tend to be handled as a special case.)

Misread (1)

Ariastis (797888) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195861)

Thought it was a .ms STD

I'm calling dibs on.. (3, Funny)

katterjohn (726348) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195869)

nudewebca.ms

Kind of shows the pointlessness (4, Insightful)

nebaz (453974) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195919)

of 2 Letter country code TLD's, if major corporations get them, and the US doesn't use the .us domain. Too bad it's too late for a whole TLD overhaul.

Re:Kind of shows the pointlessness (1)

evilviper (135110) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196197)

Kind of shows the pointlessness of 2 Letter country code TLD's, if major corporations get them, and the US doesn't use the .us domain.

Tiny countries get money out of it. Large corporations get "clever" and unique new domain names to use. What's the problem? .us is certainly a strange case, that hasn't entirely been worked out... Other countries put universities, government, etc. basically everything under their country TLD, but the US has .edu .mil and really, .com as well. It's only non-federal government sites, non-university schools, etc. that use it. So, it actually has quite a bit of use, but it's very localized, and not to many globally-significant high-traffic sites. It's not as widely used as other large country TLDs, and they only fairly recently allowed free-form, commercial registration of them.

I'll jump that bandwagon (2, Funny)

xrayspx (13127) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195925)

IONLYUSEWINDOWSINV.MS

Only $180? Bah (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195941)

Micro$oft has enough petty cash to buy the whole country. Maybe King Bill can crack down on the phone-scammers.

oh, great, another rub duck (1)

sectionboy (930605) | more than 7 years ago | (#19195977)

Is this a subtle compliment to sony's Super Rub-a-Dub? [ign.com] , which, btw, has a score of 2.9/10.

There are now somewhat effective treatments for MS (1)

stox (131684) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196013)

Maybe soon. there will be a cure.

We can only hope.

no doubt ms will claim (0, Offtopic)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196063)

everything under MS is misleading the consumer into beliveing it's associated with microsfot al la lindows

Obvious a Tux ripoff! (1)

Lavene (1025400) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196119)

But it's not only Microsoft doing it. Take a look HERE [seaworld.org] , HERE [k12.in.us] and HERE! [penguin.net.nz]
It's an epidemic! Someone need to sue someone... now!

M$ TLD (1)

istewart (463887) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196137)

When will this much more important TLD be open for registrations?

Hmmm... (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 7 years ago | (#19196261)

A lot of chatting around i.hate.ms and so on, but will Montserrat get any money back from the use of the domain .ms? Considering that they have had a hard time with their volcano [www.mvo.ms] they should get something at least to support the community. The effect of the volcano they have had could be considered as bad as if 40 to 50% of the US had to be evacuated.

But on the other hand - the volcano may be good for tourism - and now they have a modern airport too.

Anyway, this volcano has caused some devastation and a few deaths. On the positive side - the deaths has been very few, but there are other volcanos that are known to behave in the same way that are more likely to be the cause of a higher death toll. One such volcano is Vesuvius in Italy. It has been dormant since the 1940's and considering that it has had regular outbreaks about every 70 years it is not unlikely that it will have an outbreak during our lifetime. The question is - will there be any warning before the eruption, or will it be an explosive eruption with short notice? Pompeii and Herculaneum are two rather important warning signs. Pyroclastic flows are about the worst things that can occur from a volcano since they are unpredictable and very fast. Flying rocks are fast and dangerous too, but they aren't having the same blanketing effect as the pyroclastic flows. Lava, which most of us associate with volcanos is bad, but it's liquid and often rather slow, so it's predictable and can be avoided but it will destroy anything in it's path.

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