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Student in Court Over Suspension For YouTube Video

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the don't-bite-the-hand-that-grades-you dept.

Education 397

kozmonaut writes "A model student is in court this week over 40-day suspension for posting a mocking in-class video to YouTube of 'Mongzilla', a high school english teacher. The student is arguing he had First Amendment rights to publish the video, though it was filmed without permission in the classroom. 'Kent School District lawyer Charles Lind says the suspension had nothing to do with online criticism of the teacher. Rather, it was punishment for the disruption created by the students secreting a video camera into Joyce Mong's class and dancing in a mocking, disrespectful manner while her back was turned. "It's quite clear that the district is talking about conduct in the classroom and not the videotape," Lind said.'"

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397 comments

First Video! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235347)

I got first video FTW.

Everyone knows that the camera dosn't lie (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235381)

Can the school gaurnantee that there wasn't film trickery to produce the video? What happens if all the students produce a video of this nature? Expell all of them?

Re:Everyone knows that the camera dosn't lie (5, Insightful)

bkr1_2k (237627) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235745)

"What happens if all the students produce a video of this nature? Expell all of them?"

Yes. Disruption of the classroom is a common reason for detention, and in extreme cases, expulsion. As a first offense, it might be a bit much, but if the offenders are continuously causing problems, they deserve the punishments they receive, even harsh ones. Pandering to the crowd of "save the children" and "no child left behind" is a mistake we're beginning to see the results of now. It will only get worse if we keep it up.

Re:Everyone knows that the camera dosn't lie (3, Informative)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235961)

Funny, I was never expelled for 40 days and I remember tossing my text book out the window in complete defiance. This kid posts a video of other kids dancing behind the teachers back, note he didn't record the video, and he gets expelled for 40 days. That's 10% of the school year, for postiing a video on the Internet outside of class.

Re:Everyone knows that the camera dosn't lie (5, Funny)

Raistlin77 (754120) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236073)

...expelled for 40 days. That's 10% of the school year...


Really? A school year is longer than a calendar year?

Re:Everyone knows that the camera dosn't lie (1)

bkr1_2k (237627) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236221)

Agreed, the punishment (after reading the article) is a bit ridiculous, even if the kid did film it and cause the disruption. The article also mentions the teacher wasn't even aware she was filmed, so there couldn't have been too much disruption of the class, as far as she was concerned.

My point was that being punished for doing something wrong shouldn't be considered a bad thing. The saying "don't do the crime if you can't do the time" doesn't seem to hold in our society any more and it's frightening. People should be held accountable for their actions.

Whether or not the kid was actually involved is more important, in my opinion, than the amount of time the punishment was for, or why they set that time frame. From the article it certainly looks as though that fact is debatable.

Your Rights Online? (5, Insightful)

aicrules (819392) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235403)

What online rights is this about? Your right to post videos on the internet without being held accountable for what they contain?

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235485)

Your right to express your dissent with a certain person in an artistic way?

Artistic? (2, Informative)

benhocking (724439) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236023)

You obviously haven't watched the video. It shows him insulting the teacher in class by waving his hand at her as if she smells, holding up fingers behind her head, doing a lewd dance behind her - all in a row. It's a self-incriminating video, giving the school the evidence it needs to suspend him. That said, a 40-day suspension is obviously over the top.

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

dpninerSLASH (969464) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236159)

Your right to express your dissent with a certain person in an artistic way?

Then let the kid picket outside the school on a Saturday (or even during the week, who really cares if such a hump shows up to class?). He has no rights whatsoever to sneak a camera into a classroom. Make an example of this nutjob and keep him away from my kid.

Re:Your Rights Online? (2, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235487)

That's true. Forty days is very excessive, though. I seriously doubt this school district has EVER suspended anyone this long for merely dancing behind a teacher's back or using a videocamera in class. The fact that it was posted on Youtube is clearly the impetus behind such a long suspension. Such a suspension basically puts the student a full semester behind his classmates and will likely lead to either summerschool (which could cost $) or a delayed graduation (which could make college admissions a problem).

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236019)

Exactly, this is a school board that's scared of the intarwebs, rather than leveling discipline.

Re:Your Rights Online? (4, Insightful)

Tekzel (593039) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236141)

Sometimes you just have to make an example of someone, and when you do you go for the harshest penalty you can for effect. Sucks to be them, but they shouldn't have done it. Maybe this will save some other little jackasses some problems. I hope they lose the case and the suspension stays in place. There is little enough order in school these days since educators have no way to enforce rules other than kicking the little shits out. Their parents certainly can't be bothered to teach them the small detail that school is a place to learn and not a social gathering hall.

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

dpninerSLASH (969464) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236287)

Sometimes you just have to make an example of someone, and when you do you go for the harshest penalty you can for effect.

Couldn't have said it better. Also, this kid was no 'victim of circumstance:' When I went to school there was at least one fist fight a semester in the hallways that was usually the result of funneling too many hormonally-imbalanced adolescents together in a place that they didn't particullarly want to be. Nothing serious ever become of them and I don't recall the punishments being that harsh.

Contrast that to what this idiot did--an overt act meant to humiliate his teacher. He got caught, and now he deserves to pay. The school's correct to start off with the bar high on this one. Set this kid straight before he has a chance to influence any others and distract them from the business of learning.

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235699)

"What online rights is this about? Your right to post videos on the internet without being held accountable for what they contain?"

I'd normally agree, but 40 days?

Re:Your Rights Online? (2, Funny)

hkgroove (791170) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236327)

Seriously. I broke into my school's voice mail system in 8th grade (teachers would leave homework assignments on them - it was called classroom snapshot) and I got 5 days suspension.

It was late May and absolutely gorgeous outside, so I sat at the pool all day and called the voice mail to get my daily assignments.

Re:Your Rights Online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235709)

Yes, that right. The point is that the school is an agent of the state and thus does not have any business interfering with the freedoms enshrined by the 1st amendment.

Re:Your Rights Online? (1)

Higaran (835598) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235715)

This looks like its becomeing a larger problem with society in general, almost like the new generation of tech savy creative kids VS the old instutions such as corporations, schools and the like that frown on creativity. These instutions feel that if you are part of them, like a student or employee, no mater where you are and what time it is, what ever you do reflects on them, so you can not do anything that would make them look bad. What makes a school or company look worse than a goofy youtube video, that alot of people see. I'm not sure maybe it is a generational divide or groups just not wanting bad press, but I dobut this problem will go away soon.

Re:Your Rights Online? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19236137)

Yeah because your right to troll Slashdot is equally as important.

sounds like (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Cowpat (788193) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235407)

the school district is desperately backpeddling to find a good reason why they should be able to sue over a youtube clip. Even IF their given reason for the suspension is legitimate (which it isn't) 40 days is utterly disproportionate. 40 days is 8 school weeks which is over half a term. Even a ONE DAY suspension for getting up and dancing behind the teacher's back is disproportionate.

Re:sounds like (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235475)

Exactly. Lunchtime detention or after school detention would be appropriate. Not expelling. Unfortunately it criticized a teacher so the punishment will be disproportionate.

Re:sounds like (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235863)

Exactly. Lunchtime detention or after school detention would be appropriate. Not expelling. Unfortunately it criticized a teacher so the punishment will be disproportionate.

That a stipulation of the current NEA contracts, isn't it?

No expectation of privacy in a public place (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235489)

The teacher was in a public area and so has no expectation of privacy.

Isn't that what we keep getting told when the government put CCTV cameras up?

Re:sounds like (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235557)

Well, the kid claims that he didn't produce the video, so the only way they would know he was connected is if he is IN the video. If he's IN the video, he's the one making fun of the teacher and dancing around like a dumbass. So yes, he should be punished. 40 days is a bit extreme in my opinion, but it's hardly a free speech issue if my assumptions are correct.

If he's not in the video, and he's just the one that put it on youtube, the school principal needs to be smacked in the face by the judge.

Re:sounds like (2, Insightful)

niconorsk (787297) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235647)

First of all, its the student suing the school to get the suspension lifted. As far as I can tell, the school hasn't even tried to get the video pulled. I mean, its in the article itself, after all. While I agree with you that the punishment doesn't fit the crime, that still doesn't mean that a 1st amendment defense should hold in this case.

Re:sounds like (1)

inviolet (797804) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235771)

Indeed.

"It's quite clear that the district is talking about conduct in the classroom and not the videotape," Lind said.

Remember when obvious liars would get boo'd and pelted with tomatoes?

Yeah, me neither, but it's a pleasant thought. But at least we can hope that karma catches up with this Lind creature some day, in the form of self-hatred or perhaps a falling piano.

Re:sounds like (3, Insightful)

evil_aar0n (1001515) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235785)

Recently, we had a student who was busted for being drunk at the prom. His punishment, as determined by established policy, was three days suspension. There's no way, even if this Seattle kid was involved in the filming or production, or was dancing stark naked with the teacher in front of the class, that this is worth 40 days.

Another question the kid should ask is: what is the policy? If they have a policy for suspension, what does it say in this case? Is disruption of class typically a 40 day penalty? If so, I wonder how they would've handled a drunk kid at the prom, which seems worse, to me, than a prank in class.

Seems to me a knee-jerk reaction designed to send a message, but, as usual with school boards - I served on one - it's the wrong message. Cue quote from M. Twain...

Re:sounds like (2, Insightful)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235861)

the school district is desperately backpeddling to find a good reason why they should be able to sue over a youtube clip.

If you aren't going to read the article, at least read the summary. He's suing the school for suspending him. They aren't suing him.

Even a ONE DAY suspension for getting up and dancing behind the teacher's back is disproportionate.

This appears to be intentional humiliation of a teacher. That's got serious repercussions; who'd want to go to work where they are routinely humiliated by people they are trying to help? It creates a seriously hostile working environment, something employers have a responsibility to address.

Re:sounds like (1)

CogDissident (951207) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236063)

In the student's defense, would you want to work with someone who only showered once a week? (opening part of the video)

One day is fine. (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235893)

Even a ONE DAY suspension for getting up and dancing behind the teacher's back is disproportionate. I agree one day for THAT would not be appropriate. Filming and the putting it on the net is something else. He planned a disruption and ridicule of his class. I don't care he did it, but getting punished is not a violation of his rights.

Re:sounds like (0, Offtopic)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236093)

How is that complete IMHO "insightful". How are people are getting "insightful" for saying "disproportionate"? Where is the bloody "insight" in this?

Perfectly reasonable (1, Troll)

niconorsk (787297) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235417)

Seems like a perfectly reasonable suspension to me. If someone is stupid enough to post a video on a public forum, he should be ready to accept the consequences of somebody seeing that video. To take the situation to the extreme, if someone posts a video on Youtube of themselves killing somebody else, would you want a 1st amendment defense to hold for them.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (1)

simm1701 (835424) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235499)

Actually I think that defense should hold, atleast as far as the act of posting the video goes (as long as it carried suitable warnings of graphic content and all that stuff)

I also think it should be used as evidence is prosecution of the crime in the video but thats a completely different matter to the act of posting it (or filming it)

Re:Perfectly reasonable (3, Insightful)

Cathoderoytube (1088737) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235847)

You're not even allowed to take pictures in schools without express permission.

The thing that really gets me about this sort of case is this idiot goes and films a bunch of other people without their permission and posts it online then says it's his right to freedom of expression. Somehow that right is violated if the people in the video or in this case the school have an objetion to the video being posted for public display. When you deal with the media or photographers, you have to sign a model release form stating that you give express permission to the person taking the video to use you in whatever they're going to use the video for. The same thing applies if some random jackass with a video camera decides to film you. They have absolutely no right whatsoever to put that video on the internet without your permission. Let alone film you.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (2, Interesting)

bkr1_2k (237627) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236121)

If you are in a public space, and presumably public schools are considered public space, you have no right or expectation of control over media that includes you.

I found a picture of myself in a book last summer, completely uncredited, and certainly unasked. The same truth holds for video or audio as well.

As for the whole "not allowed to take pictures in schools without express permission", that depends upon the school district, and the specific school in question. Most students are not discouraged from taking pictures, however, as long as it's not a disruption of the classroom environment. According to the article though, this kid wasn't even involved in the filming, he simply put it up on youtube and/or myspace. Suspension for disruption of class; fine, but not for 40 days. Suspension for thinking the disruption is funny and telling people about it? Not fine.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (1)

simm1701 (835424) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236339)

I guess it comes down to where it was being filmed and what your local laws are.

As I understand it for the uk, where I am, then you can film or photograph what you like in any place as long as those that are in the picture would not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. So you cant snap someone sunbathing in their enclosed back garden, but you can if they are on their front lawn when there front garden lacks any wall, fence or buses and its a public street.

Its obviously a fairly subjective definition however.

As far as I know it may be against certain school rules that you cannot film here, but I certainly don't think its against any laws.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (1)

spamking (967666) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235529)

Seems like a perfectly reasonable suspension to me.

Seriously?

A day or two maybe, but 40? That's freakin' harsh.

Perfectly UNreasonable (2, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235553)

If you hold them to their stated reason (or rather, excuse) for the punishment, it's for "disrupting the class." 40 days is several orders of magnitude too extreme. It's like executing somebody for spitting out their gum on the sidewalk.

No, they're punishing him for embarrassing the teacher (and exercising his rights), and now they're just trying to cover their asses.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (1)

Constantine XVI (880691) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235577)

Actually, their First Amendment rights would still hold. Trick is, all they protect is the video itself. They still don't keep you from being convicted of murder. In fact, those same rights you invoked putting the video up more or less do the convicting for the court.

Re:Perfectly reasonable (1)

Samdroid (1001824) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235579)

Killing somebody and dancing behind somebody are very different things, especially in the eyes of the law. It isn't illegal to dance behind a person.

only a lawyer (3, Insightful)

skeletor935 (790212) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235457)

would consider a less than B average in high school as "model student" material. from tfa [quote] Cohen said her client has "no disciplinary record at school, and he is the model student" with a 2.97 grade-point average. [/quote]

Re:only a lawyer (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235629)

would consider a less than B average in high school as "model student" material. from tfa [quote] Cohen said her client has "no disciplinary record at school, and he is the model student" with a 2.97 grade-point average.

You should see the curve in law school, it's brutal. A 2.97 in most law schools is actually good.

Re:only a lawyer (1)

Donniedarkness (895066) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235923)

Who really cares about his high school GPA? Just because it isn't very high (it's not much lower than mine was when I graduated, though) doesn't mean that he isn't a good student.

When I graduated high school (a year ago), I had a 3.0 GPA. I was the only student in the entire school who took every advanced course. I also had a 33 ACT score (took it twice... my ACT score from my sophomore year was a 31). So yeah, my GPA was a 3.0... but I don't think anyone there considered me a bad student. I just didn't like "busywork", as I thought writing definitions 5 times each was studid. I used to tell the teachers "If you want me to learn the words, ask me to learn the words and then test me on them like you're going to anyways.... just don't make me waste time writing them."

This kid might be the same way.

I'd like to note that my college GPA is currently MUCH better, and I'm about a semester ahead or so because of all the AP classes I had and such.

Lord of the Flies (1, Insightful)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235479)

This is what happens when you socialize young people in a setting where adult presence and guidance is nearly non-existent. You can't blame the students because their elders created an environment that is a more civilized version of Lord of the Flies.

The teacher may have something to say. (5, Informative)

iknownuttin (1099999) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235481)

The teacher was in frame and the video was published on the internet. Where's the model's release? This isn't a news item so it's arguably warranted.

Try getting a man on the street photo published sometime, you'll see.

Re:The teacher may have something to say. (2, Interesting)

pla (258480) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236123)

The teacher was in frame and the video was published on the internet. Where's the model's release?

Considering the noncommercial nature of this, what would the "model" sue for? Even if you spun this into some sort of defamation issue, the student, not the teacher, makes a fool of himself.

Re:The teacher may have something to say. (2, Interesting)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236145)

Where's the model's release?

The last time I checked, aren't releases required for commercial purposes? For personal, non-commercial uses, there is no release required. Newspapers get releases because they are a business; however, many times in an event, a release can't be obtained and may not be neccessary. Did the person who taped the Rodney King beating get Mr. King's and the officers' releases? Did the news outlets who obtained the video do the same? No.

The Video in question (5, Informative)

baboonlogic (989195) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235497)

Mongzilla [youtube.com] is still up on Youtube.

Re:The Video in question (1)

Skylinux (942824) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236225)

Thanks for posting.
Now that I have seen the video, 40 days is not enough. It is one thing to document "bad" teacher behavior but it is another to act like an undisciplined high school kid. Teachers must be held accountable for their behavior but students must be held responsible as well.

Right... (3, Insightful)

Adam Zweimiller (710977) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235525)

This is totally different than the students who videotaped their teacher being a complete asshole in class and posted it. They were punished for embarrassing the teacher and no other reason. If they were acting like the asshats (in class) that the article describes, then they deserved to be smacked. That said, 40 days is DAMN ridiculous. Students do not need to be bringing cameras to school in order to record themselves acting the fool, but suspending them for 8 weeks is nonsense. Stop with the knee-jerk reactions because kids are being kids. Suspend them for a day or two and hope they learn. Sheesh.

Re:Right... (1)

delt0r (999393) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236269)

Yea, and to all the other kids in the room who can't learn because of a few asshats. Well to bad for them eh.

School should be rasing kids (Young adults). They are there to teach. If the student doesn't want to learn he/she has no right to stay and be disruptive.

however 40 days does seem like a long time. I bet there is more to the story. From both sides.

40 days? (1)

Morinaga (857587) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235527)

A 40 day suspension for making fun of a teacher? Christ almighty. Am I totally out of touch with current school policies? In my day kids got one week suspensions for smoking pot and getting in to fights.

Re:40 days? (5, Funny)

DrivingBear (931124) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235781)

In my day kids got one week suspensions for smoking pot and getting in to fights.

But pot and fights never hurt anybody. He gave her bunny ears. There's no recovering from that kind of humiliation.

School board is over reacting (1)

alman (86957) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235531)

40 days for a classroom disruption?
What the hell are they thinking? Back when I was in high school, we just got yelled at by the teacher, at worst sent to the principal. Maybe in the most extreme situation you'd get a week, but 40 days?

Re:School board is over reacting (1)

thousandinone (918319) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235979)

Not even this long ago, my senior year in high school, early 2001, I used a homosexual slur on a teacher who turned out to in fact be a homosexual- I was suspended for 1 week for sexual harassment of all things. 1 week. And 40 days for this?

And again... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235539)

...if they just called him into the dean's room and gave him a quite "personal" lecture, he would maybe simply have removed it and nobody would've ever heard of that video, safe a few of his friends who already saw it.

Now, the whole world will watch it and, to add injury to insult, think the school is trying to throttle free speech.

Link to the video (-1, Redundant)

Nick Fury (624480) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235545)

Here is the video:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=aHIJMWr1Zy0 [youtube.com]

Re:Link to the video (1)

sith (15384) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235841)

I think this kid should have been paying more attention to the content of this English class, and less attention to making fun of the teacher.

"Your about to see"

"Imagine the worse smell"

Grammer and spelling kids, grammer and spelling.

Re:Link to the video (1)

The tECHIDNA (677584) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236097)

Grammer and spelling kids, grammer and spelling.

...which once again supports my theory that ~95% of posts discussing a person's spelling or grammar on /. must have at least one grammatical or spelling error, usually in a hilariously ironic location or position relative to the content of the post.

(Yes, I know this would include more than likely my own post as well, even though I checked for spelling. I can make a spelling error if you want. Really, I can. Please?)

Re:Link to the video (4, Interesting)

heatdeath (217147) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235843)

After watching the video, I have to say, that's pretty worth a lengthy suspension. It wasn't just a stupid prank, it was premeditated and fairly vulgar. If I were a teacher, and the whole school had watched the video, I'd be pretty embarassed. From a legal sense, sure, he has a 1st amendment right to 'say' what he did...but they also have the right suspend him for however long they want. It's too bad they don't have the legal right to backhand him for it too.

Student work ethics? (1)

DollyTheSheep (576243) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235551)

Students have to study and learn and to show respect for their teachers. Any disrespectful behavior should be punished. A 40-day suspension however, is way to harsh.

Re:Student work ethics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235659)

No wonder you go by the moniker sheep...Teachers have to earn respect just like everyone else.

Re:Student work ethics? (1)

DollyTheSheep (576243) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235763)

School is not kindergarten anymore. Do you really think, you do students any good, if you allow them to behave like this? And no, teachers, when they are not complete morons, have a right be treated respectfully and not to be mocked.

Re:Student work ethics? (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236143)

No wonder you go by the moniker sheep...Teachers have to earn respect just like everyone else.

Please, high school kids are lousy judges of character and have no clue when it comes to judging whether someone is deserving of respect or not.

Re:Student work ethics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235741)

Very few teachers I had growing up deserved any respect. Teachers need to earn the students respect just like everyone else. If they can't earn the students respect, then they shouldn't be teachers. This idea that teachers deserve some kind of respect is a large part of what's wrong with our public schools.

Re:Student work ethics? (1)

mcpkaaos (449561) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235747)

Students have to study and learn and to show respect for their teachers.

Teachers must earn the respect of students. It is not (and never will be) automatic.

Any disrespectful behavior should be punished

Why, so the punished have even more motivation to mock you while your back is turned?

A 40-day suspension however, is way to harsh.

On this, we agree. :)

Re:Student work ethics? (1)

DollyTheSheep (576243) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236109)

Teachers must earn the respect of students. It is not (and never will be) automatic.

You seem to imply that the teacher-student relationship is symmetrical, when it's not. Unless a teacher is a totally incompetent or bullish, students should pay respect to those, who enable them to go through life with a half-decent job.

It's okay... (5, Insightful)

Thrace (1096621) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235561)

All kids involved in the video taping the teacher are morons. I remember when it was common sense not to do something so blatantly stupid and self-incriminating while in school. What ever happened to being able to sit for 45 minutes without acting like a jackass?

Re:It's okay... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235999)

What ever happened to being able to sit for 45 minutes without acting like a jackass?

We live in a post-Sept 11 world!! Where is your patriotism??? Maybe you hate America???

Re:It's okay... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19236173)

What ever happened to being able to sit for 45 minutes without acting like a jackass?

It became obsolete with the invention of myspace and youtube.

Do "model" students have more rights? (3, Insightful)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235563)

Why is the summary making it a point to say that that student was a model student? Do these model students have more rights than nerdy students, ugly students, non-bulumic students and fluncking students?

No, but... (2, Insightful)

raehl (609729) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235735)

We're talking about a 40-day suspension. If the student had previous 10, 20 and 30 day suspensions for selling drugs to kindergarten students or something, then maybe a 40 day suspension would be more reasonable.

But if a student has never been disciplined before, jumping straight to a 40-day suspension for a first offense that is neither illegal nor dangerous seems a tad unreasonable.

So no, model students don't have more rights than non-model students, but model students probably deserve lighter punishment for the same offense than students who are constant sources of problems and have been disciplined several times before.

Bring back corporal punishment. (4, Insightful)

PHAEDRU5 (213667) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235567)

Kid insults teacher, teacher whacks kid. End of discussion. You know. Like in the non-medication solution to ADD [tv.com] on South Park.

Dr. Shay: (on video) Hello, I'm Dr. Richard Shay, here to tell you about my exciting new drug-free treatment for children with Attention Deficit Disorder. (Several hyper and rambling children) This treatment is fast and effective and it doesn't use harmful drugs. Watch closely as I apply treatment to the first child. (SMACK) SIT DOWN AND STUDY! If you would like more information on my bold new treatments, please send away for this free brochure entitled: 'You can either calm down, or I can pop you in the mouth again.'
But then, what would all the lawyers do?

Huh (2, Interesting)

mekane8 (729358) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235569)

According to the article, all the kid did was post links to the video. I can understand suspending the kids who were causing trouble in the room, but also suspending people for just posting links (for the same amount of time, anyway) seems a little over the top.

Of course, as a teacher, if you're so oblivious of what's going on in your classroom that a kid can walk around behind you and give you bunny ears and make rude gestures, then this kind of thing is no surprise. I say that as a high school teacher, by the way. Bad classroom management creates way more problems than bad students.

I also thought it was funny that the video that was making fun of their english teacher had several spelling/grammar mistakes.

ridiculous? (1)

Enf0rcer (1099319) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235879)

I'm still in high school and when a infraction such as this occurs we just get a talking to by the Net Admin here and maybe are parents are informed, I could understand a 3 day suspension but 40 day? That is just ridiculous. The dean should just sit him down have a talk and have the kid remove the video with respect.

Re:Huh (2, Interesting)

Kantara (246758) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236027)

The students who were posting links would probably come under continued harrassment.

40 days??? (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235611)

OK I can accept that they are just use the video as evidence of the wrong doing. I would like to see them justify 40 days suspension or even suspension since they did not seem to even notice until it was posted. One day in school tops, 40 days is outrageous. If the school cant deal with an upset student population then they do not know how to teach.

FYI my wife is a teacher I have worked around school systems for the last 10 years, no I'm not a school administrator.

Re:40 days??? (1)

Mephistophocles (930357) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235739)

I'm guessing the 40 day suspension wasn't just for this. There was probably a history and/or other events may have been taken into consideration. If that is the case, then the little bastard got what he deserved and need to quit whining about it, particularly in court. If not, well, 40 days probably is a little extreme - but IMHO the term of suspension probably should be left to the discretion of the administration, not the courts.

Don't Television producers have to get permission (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235627)

to put someone on TV?(unless the filming was incidental, ie you were part of a crowd they were filming). At the very least, can't someone force a television station to not air a piece of footage if they do not sign a waiver? Does this also apply to youtube?

A lesson I learned at a young age.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235667)

If you're going to do something illegal/stupid, don't film/photograph it. It may be cool, but eventually it will bite you in the ass.

Aww jeez. (1)

u-bend (1095729) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235675)

This type of teacher-mockery should stay in the classroom (and occasionally in the principal's office) where it belongs. In my day there was no YouTube. I remember having to write an apology for my disruptive conduct. I wrote it out in a scroll, and unfurled it on bended knee to the offended teacher while my friend, as my squire, made tooting "hear ye" noises with her hands. I wanted the scroll back, but the teacher was amused enough that he wanted to keep it.

RTFA, damn it! (5, Interesting)

Lurker2288 (995635) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235723)

If you read the article, it isn't even clear at this point that the kid who's being suspended was involved in producing the video, either by acting up in the classroom or by assisting in filming it. It sounds like all he did was post a link to it on his Myspace page, and the school is busting him because they want him to rat out the people who DID make it.

Excessive punishment (1)

RedneckJack (934223) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235755)

40 days suspension is excessive ! One or two days might get the message through of not showing disrespect but 40 is harsh. Leave it to zero tolerance policy....

Three things come to mind instantly.... ok, five (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#19235791)

1) Quick, get JT, this behavior was causes by that candy bar advertisement
2) People are still using MySpace???? WTF
3) If someone posts links to a video that you don't like, find out who made the film and posted it to the public forums.
4) if you want to suspend all people who post links to it, I suggest that the entire population of that school start posting links now. Let them suspend the entire school population for 40 days.

5) Have you seen that video... OMG, they have a right to complain IMO. There is enough evidence to support making fun of the teacher. Hell, late night comedians could make fun of this situation just looking at the video and take a no child left behind theme... wow.

I've learned an important lesson. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235837)

Before making a video criticizing your English teacher, proofread your titles.

Or, if you prefer,

before makeing a video critisizing you're english teacher, proof read you're titles.

He got what he deserved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235939)

40 days of suspension sounds about right. The video was not funny. I hope he gets sued for libel and emotional distress.

Kent, huh? This kid's lucky to get a suspension; (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19235957)

they might just have SHOT [wikipedia.org] him instead.

I do not think it means... (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236033)

... what you think it means

"A model student... secreting a video camera into Joyce Mong's class and dancing in a mocking, disrespectful manner while her back was turned."

Recording someone without their knowledge or consent while also disrupting their teaching efforts in order to mock them isn't what I would call "model behavior." Usually that term is awarded based solely on GPA; it seems like it's more a matter of "smart enough not to get caught (until now)" rather than "acts in a respectable manner."

A two-faced honor student. Gee, never seen that before...

Did he post the video or just link to it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19236087)

According to comments on youtube, Gregory Requa did not post the video. He just added a link to it from his myspace page.

If I where the teacher (1)

hrieke (126185) | more than 6 years ago | (#19236147)

I think I would have assigned a 50 page single space typed essay to the entire class, to be submitted in 3 week's time on the values of a good education or something along the lines of the course's subject.[1]

But really, students poking fun of a teacher has been around since day one. Teachers doling out the punishment to fit the crime has been around since day two- which brings me to the 2nd point- 40 days really is too long. A week, perhaps, but not 40 days.

[1] Before everyone gets their underwear in a knot, when I was in high school, my English teacher made her class read the entire collection of Shakespeare in 3 weeks with a 3 page report on each play and collection of sonnets.

RTFA, it's worse than the summary (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 5 years ago | (#19236217)

Hmm. They suspended a student for 40 days for disrupting class, in an incident that wasn't even noticed by anyone in authority until it was posted on YouTube and later reported on the news. But that's not all. The kicker? The suspended student wasn't even there!

Suspension? Detention? Expulsion? Yeah, maybe for the administrators involved. For the student? Nada.

The judge, of course, accepted the school district's sophistry and let the suspension stand.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/316793_kentrid ge23.html [nwsource.com]

Similar case already heard at SCOTUS this session. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#19236233)

It's the "Bong Hits 4 Jesus" [wikipedia.org] case. While the current case differs in that the video was taken on school property a favorable return for Frederick might go a long way in assisting the plaintiff win his case.
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