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190 comments

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563665)

It will be running "Duke Nukem Forever".

Yeah but... (3, Funny)

Aqua_boy17 (962670) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563673)

Can it run Vista?

Re:Yeah but... (5, Funny)

niceone (992278) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563905)

Obviously it can - it is a supercomputer! (as long as you turn the Aero interface off of course).

Re:Yeah but... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563997)

Can it run Vista?


No, Microsoft is trying to get Vista running on Intel hardware first.

Re:Yeah but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564003)

I'm tempted by the fruit of your la-hoins!

Plan 9? (1, Funny)

techstar25 (556988) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563705)

"Plan 9? [imdb.com]
Ah, yes. Plan 9 deals with the resurrection of the dead. Long distance electrodes shot into the pineal and pituitary gland of the recently dead."

Re:Plan 9? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563751)

Resurrection of the dead? It must be something to do with OS/2.

Re:Plan 9? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563823)

Yep, that's what the OS is named after. I think this [worth1000.com] would have been a much cooler mascot though.

Re:Plan 9? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563873)

Well yes they need the power of the Blue Gene to figure out how to harness energy from splitting the photon. Thus causing a chain reaction causing the universe to explode... Cool. I hope they have a small an efficient OS to handle this task.

You see that, your stupid minds! (2, Funny)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564091)

Stupid! Stupid!

When you've got solamanite, you've got nothing!

(Yeah, its one of my fave movies)

Re:Plan 9? (0)

jimicus (737525) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564309)

Why would you want to cause a chain reaction which causes the universe to explode?

Re:Plan 9? (1)

Jaqenn (996058) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564755)

Why would you want to cause a chain reaction which causes the universe to explode?
Cause you don't like the current one.

Re:Plan 9? (3, Informative)

Verte (1053342) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564465)

The full name of the OS is in fact "Plan 9 From Bell Labs". There's also a port of the API to a more popular standard called "Plan 9 From User Space", which is cute.

Pretty cool (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563759)

That's pretty cool to think about since I didn't know if Plan 9 is still used or not beyond research environments. Or even developed for. Also I was beginning to think Slashdot was dying since I hardly come here anymore, but with news like this I feel mistaken.. Pretty cool!

Re:Pretty cool (2, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563923)

Plan 9 if it had a modern web browser like firefox would generally be as useful as any other now. Basiclly now if you can make an OS that Runs a Modern Web Browser (IE, Mozilla offshoot, Safari, or Opera), and a good office Suite (MS Office, Open Office) then basicly it is as good as any other OS. Comon Google lets get your web Office Suite Really working good so we only need a Web Browser for our OS.

Re:Pretty cool (4, Insightful)

0racle (667029) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563955)

Ya, if you're creating a desktop OS. Somehow, booting the thing on Blue Gene, I don't think that's Plan 9's plan.

Re:Pretty cool (1)

pegr (46683) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564463)

The one quote that sums up the difference between IBM and Microsoft...

"Its amazing how really, terminally, completely broken shit can run for a damn long time..."

Re:Pretty cool (3, Informative)

b1ufox (987621) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564199)

Incidentally perhaps you are misunderstanding Plan9. It is not the kind of OS *we* are used to. That said it includes L/unix and family and Windows et all. It serves a different purpose of OS all together, in other terms its a distributed Operating system which incidentally is not designed purposefully to run on your standalone machine.

Feel like running it, you are welcome to the world of wmii, acme and acid. In short Firefox or for that matter any other application comes lower in hierarchy, a lot of things need to be done to make it first Posix complaint, which i guess they are not planing to so soon.

As far as the people who think it is only for research yes it is and this is what Plan9 on Blue Gene is aimed at. As a research project.

My 2 cents :-)

Re:Pretty cool (2, Interesting)

aproposofwhat (1019098) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564317)

IIRC, Lucent Managed Firewalls used to run on Inferno (which is a version of Plan 9)

Don't know if they still do, but the OS is wickedly slim, and ideally suited for network appliances as well as distributed computing.

Re:Pretty cool (5, Funny)

C0y0t3 (807909) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565309)

...Also I was beginning to think Slashdot was dying since I hardly come here anymore...

... but I see your comments ALL OVER Slashdot, Anonymous Coward. In fact you're probably THE most prolific user, certainly the most outspoken.

Re:Pretty cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565541)

Your post is terribly funny. I would give you mod points but I trolled my account into a black hole. :(

Re:Pretty cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565561)

> Also I was beginning to think Slashdot was dying since I hardly come here anymore, but with news like this I feel mistaken..

The party ain't over till netcraft sings!

Am I the only one that thought of this Plan 9? (1)

kabocox (199019) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563765)

Am I the only one that was wondering why Plan 9 Pulishing (http://www.plan9.org/) would need to be run on Blue Gene?

Re:Am I the only one that thought of this Plan 9? (1)

FunkyELF (609131) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563881)

Because it didn't meet the minimum requirements for Vista or Leopard?

Re:Am I the only one that thought of this Plan 9? (1)

monk.e.boy (1077985) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563885)

What the hell are you talking about?!

We'll all be able to resurrect those old Blue Genes we have cluttering up the basement, hell, I've only got two, but now I can use them as a network file store, or run some simple C# or something.

:-P

monk.e.boy

Plan 9 (1)

superskippy (772852) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563783)

Is this a going concern? Do lots of people use this?

Re:Plan 9 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563851)

I'd forgotten all about plan 9, but certainly many or at least some of the main concepts live on

For example:
Distributed systems
System interfaces represented as files
Communication being the central function of the system

Re:Plan 9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565547)

I've seen cable head ends running Plan 9 (can't tell you which). These were pretty experimental boxes though, and I don't know if they ever saw deployment.

Re:Plan 9 (5, Interesting)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565591)

There are about 50 active posters to the 9fans mailing list.
There were about 30 people attending the International Plan9 Symposium in Madrid last year (of which I was one).

Plan9 also has 15 projects in the 2007 Google Summer of Code.

About the plan (4, Funny)

NeoTerra (986979) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563815)

What happened to Plans 1-8? And could you make a module that corrupts the output, and call it Plan B? I think it may be a little too early to grasp exactly what the story is here. Where's my caffeine?

Re:About the plan (5, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564103)

You laugh about such things. But I was the beta tester for Preparation G. Stuff was awful. But boy could I whistle really well after that.

Re:About the plan (4, Interesting)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564211)

They were called 'Unix'. ;)

Seriously, Plan 9 is/was the planned successor to Unix. You can see the benefits of Plan 9's design today: just check out Inferno [vitanuova.com] . You want distributed computing? It's all in there!

Re:About the plan (1, Redundant)

jshriverWVU (810740) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565635)

Noticed that the Inferno environment can even run via a browser plugin. I can envision Google looking into this as an option for a Google OS. Browser plugin that enables a quasi-VM on the system for cross-platform applications.

You remember all those posts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19563883)

...about how I am so l33t and my linux runs on a 386 with 4 meg o RAM? Isn't this the extreme opposite of those posts, using a stupid fast computer to run a tight little OS (probably thinks it's a screensaver)? Well somebody's compensating for something in the hallowed hallways of IBM...

Re:You remember all those posts (1)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564763)

only in the proprietary software world do you need fat software for fat hardware (or vice versa).

Thin software running on burl hardware frees up your resources, gives you room to really flex your muscles. That's what make those 386-linux guys l33t. They get a 2.2 kernel and a copy of busy box, throw it on a 15 year old machine, and when they hit the terminal they still have leg room.

Bah...... (-1, Redundant)

segedunum (883035) | more than 6 years ago | (#19563933)

The real questions of any relevance are:

1. Can it run Linux?
2. Is there going to be a Beowulf cluster?
3. Is this actually a machine you can run Vista on?

Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (-1, Flamebait)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564019)

Well , cutting edge for 1990. If thats the best it can do on a supercomputer it doesn't bode well for your average PC!

I'm sure Plan 9 is an interesting intellectual exercise for the people involved, but other than that , what exactly is its point? The way some people refer to it you'd think it was the 2nd Coming in the world of operating systems. Well if thats the case its the longest coming in history. Has it broken any new ground with any new operating paradigms? (Thats a genuine question , I don't know).
I do wonder why thety bother and don't just try and integrate any new ways of thinking they've come up with into pre-existing systems such as Linux or BSD.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564203)

Are you twenex [osnews.com] in disguise or something? Go read that thread for more reasons why you're an idiot.

To summarise, what the GUI looks like is around the absolute bottom of the list of things anyone at IBM could possibly ever give two shits about. Plan9 is a clustering Operating System and Blue Gene is a fucking huge Clustered Computer. Running Plan9 on Blue Gene is an obvious match made in heaven and a very good thing.

So what if you've heard it's "the 2nd Coming in the world of operating systems."? The Plan9 developers don't care if you never run Plan9 on your over-clocked, water cooled, AthlonXP desktop because that's not what it's designed for. It's designed for large clusters of machines that act as compute farms doing Real Work.

I do wonder why thety bother and don't just try and integrate any new ways of thinking they've come up with into pre-existing systems such as Linux or BSD.

There it is! Do yourself a favour: you admit you know nothing about Plan9. As that's clearly the case, please try to keep your tourettes-like thoughts to yourself from this point on and let people who at least have a passing knowledge of Operating Systems to discuss what is a very interesting and clever OS. Perhaps while we're doing that, you could follow some of the links on the article and educate yourself about Plan9?

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564549)

"your tourettes-like thoughts to yourself "

You were the one who swore sonny , though I suspect you don't even know what Tourettes is but you just heard it somewhere and thought it sounded cool.

"Perhaps while we're doing that, you could follow some of the links on the article and educate yourself about Plan9?"

Been there done that. I still don't see its point.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564621)

You were the one who swore sonny , though I suspect you don't even know what Tourettes is but you just heard it somewhere and thought it sounded cool.

Yeah, and I have the sunglasses and leather jacket to go with it.

I bet you think Torettes is just characterised by uncontrollable swearing, don't you?

Been there done that. I still don't see its point.

Oh so you are just a common idiot then? Thanks for clearing that up.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

fitten (521191) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565031)

Perhaps while we're doing that, you could follow some of the links on the article and educate yourself about Plan9?

Been there done that. I still don't see its point.


Plan 9 isn't for everyone. If you aren't into massively parallel machines and some of the other features of Plan 9, you won't see its point. Nor will you likely understand why it is interesting, but that's OK. Your interests just don't lie in that direction, no biggie.

Book. Cover. Judge. Don't. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564323)

Don't judge a book by its cover. The current generation of flashy-looking OS's are excellent for computers with a small number of CPU cores and uniform memory, but they are really poor for machines with many cores and core-local memory. Plan 9 is designed to work as a distributed OS, which is perfect for Blue Gene, and it will probably become more and more relevant to home computing as we move towards PCs with thousands of CPU cores, because we'll need a decent distributed OS to make use of them. The mid-80s "FVWM" look is just because it is a research OS and the researchers have better things to do than port KDE.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

bmgoau (801508) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564347)

With the added power of Bluegene, the Bell Labs team will now be able to add more then on colour to their GUI.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (5, Interesting)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564389)

"Well , cutting edge for 1990. If thats the best it can do on a supercomputer it doesn't bode well for your average PC!"
Super computers don't run GUIs. That is for visualization workstations.
"Has it broken any new ground with any new operating paradigms? (Thats a genuine question , I don't know)."
Yes I suggest you go learn a lot more about it before posting in blatant ignorance.
Plan 9 is a distributed operating system. It uses clusters of servers to act as application servers, storage servers, and IO servers. It is ideal for clustered systems with hundreds or thousands of cores! Guess what Blue Genie is?
Supercomputers usually lack a traditional gui. They depend on workstations to handle any visual interface. They are all about speed and nothing else. Your comment about a less than pretty GUI on a supercomputer is about as useful as complaining about the crappy stereo in a formula one car.
Is Plan 9 important? Well since it looks as if cores are going to start multiplying at a Moore's law like rate then the answer is most likely yes.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564543)

Guess what Blue Genie is?


Blue Gene is a very specialized supercomputer designed with a customized 'OS' (if you can even call it that!) which minimizes any sort of interrupts and other nonsense such as typical OS stuff because when you're scaling out to 65,536 nodes on an MPI-based code which requires lock-step synchronization, you can't afford for some unimportant process on a single node to cause small delays. Plan 9 IS a research oddity on the system in this regard, and not the sort of thing you'll see anyone putting on a BG/L for what it was intended to do.

(This doesn't mean you won't see it eventually if someone has way, way too much money to burn - after all, the PS3 is designed for games, but some people are experimenting with them for computation - but let's not get carried away. The point is, BG/L is not the sort of system that Plan 9 would be targeted at.)

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (2, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564947)

But BG/L is exactly the type of hardware that Plan 9 is designed for.
Plan 9 could allow Blue Gene to be used for different problems than it is currently being used for. Yes it is currently are research project but it is far from a waste of time.
I disagree that BG/L isn't the type of system that Plan 9 is targeted at. The current problem set that BG/L is being used for isn't one that Plan 9 is a good tool for. The hardware probably isn't ideal but it is close enough for useful research.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0, Troll)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564599)

"Plan 9 is a distributed operating system. It uses clusters of servers to act as application servers, storage servers, and IO servers. It is ideal for clustered systems with hundreds or thousands of cores!"

Yeah , distributed OS. Nice buzzphrase but means bugger all. An OS is by definition the software than runs the hardware its executing on via the CPU and controls access to resources by application programs to that CPU. Therefor a "distributed" OS is nothing more than a whole load of seperate OSes heavily linked by RPC style calls. I'm sure it sounds cool in powerpoint presentations however.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564963)

Therefor a "distributed" OS is nothing more than a whole load of seperate OSes heavily linked by RPC style calls.

Yes, that's right. However, some OSs are better at that type of call than others. In some "non-distributed" OSs, for example, there is a higher overhead for RPC calls due to a large number of transitions between system and user space. With sufficient hacking, any OS could work on Blue Gene, but it makes sense to go for a OS that is already optimised for Blue Gene-like platforms.

I see your point that it's a buzzword, but generally speaking, most technology can be described as a special case of a previous technology. An OS is nothing more than an application that provides a virtual machine. A virtual machine is nothing more than a software-controlled representation of an actual CPU. A CPU is nothing more than an adding machine connected to a finite state machine. A finite state machine is nothing more than a special type of logic circuit. We assign new labels, like "CPU" and "OS", because the special case has a new property that is useful to us.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564985)

Oh sorry Professor, I don't think any of us realised it was you! Now I feel silly. Well, thanks for clearing that up!

P.S: When is your next peer-reviewed Computer Science paper due to be published? I'm eager to read more of your insight, as always! Will you be presenting at any conferences this year? I bet Ken Thompson and Rob Pike won't be able to look you in the eye now you've so devastatingly destroyed their "research"!

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565001)

I don't know about Plan9, but QNX does in fact use RPC style calls to implement its distributed functionality. What makes QNX "distributed" compared to non-distributed operating system with RPC grafted on top is that for the programmer, there is no difference between using a local resource or a resource on a different machine in the distributed system - both use the exact same APIs. This is seriously cool if you intend to run on a cluster of machines (like a modern supercomputer, for example), because you don't need middleware layers like MPI or PVM.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

s4m7 (519684) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565083)

Nice buzzphrase but means bugger all.
Normally the way the "buzzphrase" is used, I would agree. But seriously, Plan9 is a really unique and specialized architecture built by some real luminaries in the field of computer science. Try it out and read up on it before you dismiss it so quickly: if you have the hardware and the types of tasks that this OS is suited for, it's a remarkable thing.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (5, Informative)

mls (97121) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564419)

"Has it broken any new ground with any new operating paradigms? (Thats a genuine question , I don't know). I do wonder why thety bother and don't just try and integrate any new ways of thinking they've come up with into pre-existing systems such as Linux or BSD."

Well, yes. Read the overview [bell-labs.com]

Slowly, ideas from Plan 9 are being adopted by other systems. Plan 9 was the first operating system with complete support for the UTF-8 Unicode character set encoding. The dump file system has been mimicked in Athena's OldFiles directories or Network Appliance's .snapshot directories. The flexible rfork(2) system call, the basis of lightweight threads, was adopted as is by the various BSD derivatives and reincarnated on Linux as clone(2). The simple file protocol 9P has been implemented on early versions of FreeBSD and current versions of Linux.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (4, Insightful)

wealthychef (584778) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564479)

I'm sure Plan 9 is an interesting intellectual exercise for the people involved, but other than that , what exactly is its point?

The WHOLE POINT of Blue Gene is to do intellectual exercises. It's a RESEARCH computer.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564569)

"It's a RESEARCH computer"

Its for researching problems using a computer. Its not generally for research computing issues themselves.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (1)

BytePusher (209961) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564911)

Its for researching problems using a computer. Its not generally for research computing issues themselves.

What is the difference? Is computer science not "science?"

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (4, Insightful)

nomadic (141991) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564619)

I do wonder why thety bother and don't just try and integrate any new ways of thinking they've come up with into pre-existing systems such as Linux or BSD.

Why would they put a 16 year old consumer-oriented, x86-based, single processor-optimized operating system on a distributed supercomputer? I dunno, maybe they're just a little dim.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565293)

No more makin fun o' Dim. It's part of the new way.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (3, Informative)

Dopeskills (636230) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564697)

The whole purpose of the project is to research new ideas which make their way into production operating systems. "Slowly, ideas from Plan 9 are being adopted by other systems. Plan 9 was the first operating system with complete support for the UTF-8 Unicode character set encoding. The dump file system has been mimicked in Athena's OldFiles directories or Network Appliance's .snapshot directories. The flexible rfork(2) system call, the basis of lightweight threads, was adopted as is by the various BSD derivatives and reincarnated on Linux as clone(2). The simple file protocol 9P has been implemented on early versions of FreeBSD and current versions of Linux."

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564703)

You should read this: http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Overview/ind ex.html [bell-labs.com]

Plan 9 presents a consistent and easy to use interface. Once you've settled in, there are very few surprises here. After I switched to Linux from Windows 3.1, I noticed all manner of inconsistent behavior in Windows 3.1 that Linux did not have. Switching to Plan 9 from Linux highlighted just as much in Linux.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (2, Insightful)

nanosquid (1074949) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564773)

I'm sure Plan 9 is an interesting intellectual exercise for the people involved, but other than that , what exactly is its point?

The point is to make distributed computation a whole lot simpler than it is right now.

I do wonder why thety bother and don't just try and integrate any new ways of thinking they've come up with into pre-existing systems such as Linux or BSD.

They do try, and they have succeeded to some degree.

But that's fraught with its own problems; for example, few if any Linux programs will know anything about 9P or naming or any of that.

Re:Check out those cutting edge GUI graphics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564887)

if thats the case its the longest coming in history

"that's", "case, then", "it's". (And if you think that it's the longest coming in history, then you don't watch enough porn.)

Puzzled (0, Flamebait)

bytesex (112972) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564059)

Plan 9 looks to me like the perennial contender for something which is never to be released; much like the HURD (although I think the HURD is more like a search in the wrong direction altogether; I mean, if you're going to do it all afresh - why use UNIX ?). I imagine a bunch of Wozniaks tinkering about all day without any impatient Jobses looking over their shoulder scheming to make a buck. Then I read their website again, and I knew for sure they must be out of their minds at bit: THEY BROUGHT ALONG 'ED' [bell-labs.com] !!

Re:Puzzled (1)

nanosquid (1074949) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564927)

Plan 9 looks to me like the perennial contender for something which is never to be released; much like the HURD

Plan 9 has been released, and it's working.

Is it going to catch on? Who knows. It took 20-30 years for UNIX to catch on after it had matured reasonably well, so that would put Plan 9 taking over the world at somewhere between 2010 and 2020.

ED IS THE STANDARD EDITOR, HERETIC (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565141)

When I log into my Xenix system with my 110 baud teletype, both vi and Emacs are just too damn slow. They print useless messages like, 'C-h for help' and '"foo" File is read only'. So I use the editor that doesn't waste my VALUABLE time. Ed, man!

!man ed

ED(1) UNIX Programmer's Manual ED(1)

NAME
          ed - text editor
SYNOPSIS
          ed { - } { -x } { name }
DESCRIPTION
          Ed is the standard text editor.

Computer Scientists love ed, not just because it comes first alphabetically, but because it's the standard. Everyone else loves ed because it's ED!

"Ed is the standard text editor."

And ed doesn't waste space on my Timex Sinclair. Just look:

-rwxr-xr-x 1 root 24 Oct 29 1929 /bin/ed
-rwxr-xr-t 4 root 1310720 Jan 1 1970 /usr/ucb/vi
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root 5.89824e37 Oct 22 1990 /usr/bin/emacs

Of course, on the system I administrate, vi is symlinked to ed. Emacs has been replaced by a shell script which:

      1. Generates a syslog message at level LOG_EMERG;
      2. reduces the user's disk quota by 100K; and
      3. RUNS ED!!!!!!

"Ed is the standard text editor."

Let's look at a typical novice's session with the mighty ed:

golem$ ed
?
help
?
?
?
quit
?
exit
?
bye
?
hello?
?
eat flaming death
?
^C
?
^C
?
^D
?
    ---
    Note the consistent user interface and error reportage. Ed is generous enough to flag errors, yet prudent enough not to overwhelm the novice with verbosity.

    "Ed is the standard text editor."

    Ed, the greatest WYGIWYG editor of all.

    ED IS THE TRUE PATH TO NIRVANA! ED HAS BEEN THE CHOICE OF EDUCATED AND IGNORANT ALIKE FOR CENTURIES! ED WILL NOT CORRUPT YOUR PRECIOUS BODILY FLUIDS!! ED IS THE STANDARD TEXT EDITOR! ED MAKES THE SUN SHINE AND THE BIRDS SING AND THE GRASS GREEN!!

    When I use an editor, I don't want eight extra KILOBYTES of worthless help screens and cursor positioning code! I just want an EDitor!! Not a "viitor". Not a "emacsitor". Those aren't even WORDS!!!! ED! ED! ED IS THE STANDARD!!!

    TEXT EDITOR.

    When IBM, in its ever-present omnipotence, needed to base their "edlin" on a UNIX standard, did they mimic vi? No. Emacs? Surely you jest. They chose the most karmic editor of all. The standard.

    Ed is for those who can *remember* what they are working on. If you are an idiot, you should use Emacs. If you are an Emacs, you should not be vi. If you use ED, you are on THE PATH TO REDEMPTION. THE SO-CALLED "VISUAL" EDITORS HAVE BEEN PLACED HERE BY ED TO TEMPT THE FAITHLESS. DO NOT GIVE IN!!! THE MIGHTY ED HAS SPOKEN!!!

    ?

Implications (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564111)

Sorry but it's not really clear what it all implies. Could someone explain?

Re:Implications (2, Informative)

spatialguy (951355) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564595)

The Blue Gene is a supercomputer designed by IBM, based on their research towards the chess computer Deep Blue that beated Kasparov at his own game. It is not a beowulff cluster (that would by definition consist of consumer hardware). I don't have time to look it all up again, but a few years ago I was involved in negotiations for the purchase of such a system...

So, from memory:
Each processor (powerpc/cell technology, I think also used in the PS3, but maybe another expert can enlighten me on that one) is a dual core and has six (or was it four?) high speed network connections to its neighbors. 64 processors are mounted on a "motherboard".
In a rack 16 of these boards are installed. The network connections of the processors on the side of the boards are connected to the neighbors on the boards above and below.
Per rack this amounts to 2048 cores. Each rack is connected back to back to another rack, giving a total of 4096 cores in a kind of network matrix.
These dual racks can again be cascaded to make a very large system. (The slant of the racks, see picture, has to do with the cooling of the system). One of the first computers to use such a matrix setup was the transputer in the 80s.

As said, the processors have high speed connections to their direct neighbors, connections to others are slower.
So this machine is very fast at for example signal processing or, more general, any pipeline where the output of one processor can be sent to the next in line for further processing.
Other applications are for example spatial simulations, climate and such, where each processor gets a part of the atmosphere, assuming that effects to other parts will be more local.
A third is biochemical simulations, hence the "Gene" in its name. And when you turn its coolers temporarily of, you might be able to get water hot enough for coffee.

Plan 9 I have no real knowledge on, but it seems to be an operating system that is tailored to enormous amounts of jobs on massive parallel computers.

reatards (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564121)

I can't believe people in slashdot is so absolutely reatard. Of course, plan9 people don't read slashdot any more, so you won't have what you deserve (I would like to see what uriel would tell you...), but if you read a little, you will see that plan9 is one of the pieces of software which sucks less. Its source code is ART, what you can do with it is awesome, and it would be the standard if people wasn't so stupid (probably due to all those lights and colors in your screens...)

Long live to glenda!!!!

Is this a well disguised troll? (4, Funny)

Critical Facilities (850111) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564149)

From TFA

The graphical programs displayed are: the mail announcer faces(1), the system statistics watcher stats(8), the text editor acme(1), the sky catalog scat(1), the image viewer

I'm not sure I'm ready to check out any "graphical" items called scat.

Re:Is this a well disguised troll? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564953)

Faeces? Acne? Scat?

Their website says it all (1)

bytesex (112972) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564191)

That is, if you look at the source. Man, for such a simple page [bell-labs.com] they sure use an enormous amount of tage. If this is what the future looks like, I want the past back !

Re:Their website says it all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565651)

That is, if you look at the source. Man, for such a simple page [bell-labs.com] they sure use an enormous amount of tage.
I was wondering what happened to all the tage. My spice cupboard was practically cleaned out with all their tage use.
 

"non-viral" license (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564195)

From the plan9 page: "... it does not require source code to be distributed with derived works; it is non-viral."

Do people really need to say "non-viral"? Does this add information, or is it an attack on the GPL?

licences are not alive.

Or is the copyright on Microsoft code "viral" as well? Derivations are restricted the same as the original.

Re:"non-viral" license (2, Interesting)

Goaway (82658) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564975)

Do people really need to say "non-viral"?

Yes. It is a genuine concern for many people.

Re:"non-viral" license (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564981)

Christ, will you shut up already?

No, it's not an attack on the GPL. I wish it was, if only to annoy whiny bastards like you. "viral" is an appropriate term for the GPL, in that it infects any code it's mixed with. Which is a good thing in many ways, though unfortunately it does seem to arouse the zealots as a side effect. "non-viral" is a clear and concise way to describe a license which does not exhibit that behavior. That's all there is to it. Give it a rest, tinfoil boy.

Re:"non-viral" license (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19565709)

> "viral" is an appropriate term for the GPL, in that it infects any code it's mixed with.

I think you have shown exactly why "viral" is an inappropriate term.
"viral" is associated with "infect[ion]".
(which you used, but did not define)
The definition of "infect" has something to do spreading disease.

If you really think GPL code is a disease, that's fine. I hope you do not use any. Better put on your tinfoil shorts to avoid catching it.

But if you call GPL a disease when talking to a Linux audience, you will loose much credibility.

Saying "the derived code must be published and retain license" is descriptive and not political like "the code uses a license that spreads like a virus".

Re:"non-viral" license (2, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565575)

To some of us yes, its important and does factor into decisions as it can cause long term ramifications.

If licensing restrictions didn't matter to people, we wouldn't even have the concept of BSD license to discuss ( or GPL ), would we?

Yawn, wake me when it can run NetBSD... (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564277)

Considering some of the low power hardware that NetBSD has been ported to, I am sure that a top of the line IBM super computer should have no trouble handling it :)

functional languages in plan 9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19564373)

I was wondering if Plan 9 integrates all peripherals through the file system, wouldn't it be easier to do system calls in pure functional languages, without the need for side effects? I guess it would be possible to program a complete program of any sort in a purely functional language such as Haskell. Does anyone know something about this? My interest is purely academic though, as i don't have any plans for plan 9.

So, you take a SuperComputer and... (1, Funny)

WED Fan (911325) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564561)

...turn it into a Sinclair ZX81 to prove that it can be done?

What's next? ReactOS on a Cray?

Plan 9 - a radical OS (4, Informative)

andrewzx1 (832134) | more than 6 years ago | (#19564723)

Plan 9 is a radically distributed OS. It was written from conception as a distributed kernel, and all aspects of the OS are distributed in ways that Linux/Unix/Windows are not. It may be older, but it embraces many distributed paradigms that few OS's in production can handle. Because it is so distributed, the many common utils are simply not compatible with the kernel without a ground-up rewrite. Emacs Emacs, X, KDE, Gnome are not ported and probably won't be. Here's a naive review: http://www.osnews.com/story.php/15235/Investigatin g-the-Plan-9-Operating-System [osnews.com]

Re:Plan 9 - a radical OS (1)

rvqbl (906692) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565397)

Thanks for the link, I found it very informative. After reading the article, I wondered if it would be possible to install this in a large office building, everyone sharing each other's hardware. Just a thought.

Pictures of Space Glenda (3, Funny)

nacturation (646836) | more than 6 years ago | (#19565359)

Okay, with a name like that I definitely clicked on the link... and I feel *so* cheated.
 
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