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Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the couldn't-blame-canada-then dept.

Music 195

An anonymous reader writes "Michael Geist is reporting that a Canadian parliamentary committee has demanded that the government establish a Canadian DMCA. The demand, which comes in a study on counterfeiting and piracy (PDF) released on Wednesday night, recommends ratification of the WIPO Internet treaties, increasing damage awards for copyright infringement, creating new offenses for selling modification devices, and encouraging prosecutors to seek jail time for piracy violations."

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Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19596775)

Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA?

I demand new Canadian politicians.

- Canadian Voter

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19596863)

On the subject of Canada, I demand that all members of Kittie [wikipedia.org] (especially Trish) suck my cock.

Heh heh heh (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597445)

You're thinking exactly what Michael Liberal Geist wants you to think.

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (5, Insightful)

Synchis (191050) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597515)

As a Canadian voter myself, I second that!

A Canadian version of the DMCA, simply put, will do absolutely NOTHING.

If people are copying software, music and movies now, what makes anybody think that increasing fines, or putting stiffer punishments is going to deter people from doing it in the future?

The plain and simple fact of the matter is just this: Most people who download music, or copy DVD's don't realize that its illegal, or if they do know that its illegal, they simply don't care.

Creating a duplicate law in Canada to mirror the already proven ineffective DMCA in the US is just one step closer to having a more American nation. There are ways to deal with the copying of DVD's or the downloading of music. This is not a good way to deal with it.

Also, for those who didn't RTFA, this "demand" is based on data collected from a study done almost 10 years ago, and even the conductors of the study claimed that the numbers were at best, sketchy. It seems to me that its just more pressure from American corporations to get their laws pushed onto Canadians as well.

Lets see a real study into this... with real numbers. I bet we'll find that:

A: The movie industry is doing just fine! (Spiderman 3 set all time records... I think that says it all.)

B: The piracy problem isn't as bad as they make it out to be. (While they calculate lost profits based on a per file transfer basis, they fail to remove those people that likely wouldn't have bought the movie anyways.)

Off the topic but can (2, Interesting)

JohnnyGTO (102952) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597903)

non-resident Canadians vote? If so how?

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (3, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597955)

A Canadian version of the DMCA, simply put, will do absolutely NOTHING.
...
Creating a duplicate law in Canada to mirror the already proven ineffective DMCA in the US is just one step closer to having a more American nation.
Allow me to be the first to point out the contradiction between those two statements.

It seems to me that its just more pressure from American corporations to get their laws pushed onto Canadians as well.
Ahh, now you're getting it. The, as you call it, "more American nation", will bring with it more American business to Canada. That is why countries join these various trade organizations and ratify treaties.

I'm not saying I think it's good (because I don't) but there are valid reasons for bringing such laws to Canada... unfortunately those reasons have very little to do with benefiting the consumer.

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597641)

tough shit. I demand that people obey the law and start respecting peoples copyright. Sorry, it's a bad day for leeches and thieves, and a good day for honest people.

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (4, Insightful)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597845)

How is it a good day for "honest" people? What happens after this DMCA-like law gets passed and Honest Joe Canada wants to back up the children's DVDs because Honest Joe Canada, Jr enjoys chewing on the discs but can't because he's law-abiding (regardless of the quality of the law) and it's illegal?

Seriously, get the fuck out! Laws like this ONLY hurt the "honest" people. Everyone else is going to continue downloading anyway and this won't slow that down one bit.

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (2, Insightful)

asdfghjklqwertyuiop (649296) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597929)

Sorry, it's a bad day for leeches and thieves, and a good day for honest people.


Since there's no such thing as uncopyable data, the DMCA has no effect on leeches or thieves. They were violating the law before, and the'll be violating the law in the future. The only effect it has is a negative one on honest people. Not a good day for honest people at all.

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598195)

It's a good day for people that want to charge you over and over and over and over for the same content.

Ideally, they will eventually put you into a rental mode where you will pay a fee every time you play the content and then when the storage goes bad or they change the format (again), you'll have to pay for (not buy-- never buy & own content again) the content again.

In other news... (0)

MoxFulder (159829) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597853)

Prostitutes demand sex!!!

Moving along...

Re:In other news... (2, Funny)

JohnnyGTO (102952) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597935)

I've always considered politicians to be prostitutes so are you saying Canadian politicians are also demanding sex? Must be lonely at the top, of what I'm not sure....

RIAA Demands Canadian Politicians to Demand DMCA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19598161)

RIAA Demands Canadian Politicians to Demand DMCA

Re:Canadian Politicians Demand DMCA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19598411)

Fuck them...

And The Point Would Be...? (5, Funny)

CheeseburgerBrown (553703) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596841)

Since users of "Canadian" ISPs [rogers.com] are sent warning letters about their uploading behaviour citing the American DMCA already, what would be the point of having a domestic version? Just so it could be bilingual?

Re:And The Point Would Be...? (1)

Elemenope (905108) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596905)

The Quebecois are fierce; if there isn't a French-also version I imagine they would just burn the warning letters en masse. If there is to be oppression in Quebec at all, it damn well will be in French.

Re:And The Point Would Be...? (1)

Selfbain (624722) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598447)

That's an interesting point when you consider that all provincial laws in Manitoba were once brought down by a speeding ticket that didn't have a French translation on it.

Re:And The Point Would Be...? (1)

Minwee (522556) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598041)

The Canadian version would say 'Please' more often.

Pardon me... (5, Insightful)

Elemenope (905108) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596847)

But who exactly demanded the DMCA-like policies? Politicians pretty much everywhere are ciphers for constituent and special interests, and so it is unusual in the extreme for a legislative idea to come tumbling unbidden from legislators' heads. So, I'm wondering whose doing the demanding such that the legislators are responding.

Re:Pardon me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19596947)

But who exactly demanded the DMCA-like policies?

The Canadian version of the MAFIAA, eh?

Re:Pardon me... (1)

rlp (11898) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597049)

So, I'm wondering whose doing the demanding such that the legislators are responding

Follow the money.

I used my Ouija board.. I'm getting something.. (2, Funny)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597077)

white letters...on a hill? ...somkething about a forest..or woods?

Re:Pardon me... (1)

bdjacobson (1094909) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597229)

This seems to be the workings of the RI/MPAA. Makes perfect sense coinciding with the recent developments [isohunt.com] in the IsoHunt lawsuit.

Re:Pardon me... (3, Informative)

jeevesbond (1066726) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597291)

But who exactly demanded the DMCA-like policies?

Good question, my first instinct was to blame Bev Oda and her unrivalled industry access [michaelgeist.ca] . But she's not even on the committee!

What's also scary here is that, although chaired by a Conservative (from Alberta too), the committee is made up of members from all parties. Have a look at the list [parl.gc.ca] , there're Liberals, NDP and Bloc Québécois in there: I have trouble believing someone from the Bloc would go along with this. Do none of them bother to turn up to committee meetings, does everyone just fall asleep and let the chair do all the work, or is this just a horrible case of group think?!

Either way, our legislature needs some education. Time to get letter writing!

Re:Pardon me... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598077)

Money speaks to all parties.

Re:Pardon me... (4, Insightful)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597527)

I noticed that it didn't say "Canadian citizens demand...".

I can tell you who is not demanding this! (1)

IgLou (732042) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597899)

That would be Joe Public. What pisses me off is that since the media is controlled by the special interests in this that we get a filtered view of the issue. The public has no idea that all this change to copyright (and abuse of patents et al) are eroding things like fair use, innovation and in fact creates barriers to entry. Oh well, aparantly we the public don't know what's best for us. :P

Because we all know (3, Insightful)

Spazntwich (208070) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596853)

that pirates represent such a huge threat to society we should spend tax dollars jailing them.

Give me a fucking break. Can we not come up with a better punishment than jail for non-violent "criminals?"

Re:Because we all know (1)

CogDissident (951207) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596899)

Um, we do, its called "fines". Where they charge you a crapton of money and ruin your life just as completely.

Re:Because we all know (1)

Spazntwich (208070) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596967)

Tell the Canadian proponents of the DMCA this.

Re:Because we all know (1)

misleb (129952) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597111)

Crapton is nothing! Just wait until they start charging fucktons!

-matthew

How about.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597015)

.....now punishment at all?

Actually, I think that if someone sells a copyrighted work without permission from the copyright holder, that should be punishable.

But profitless publication (aka filesharing) is ok in my book, and should be accepted as a given part of the modern information landscape.

Re:Because we all know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597025)

Would it really be enforced? Hell, it seems you can do 2-3 times the legal speed limit, t-bone a taxi cab, kill the driver and get 12 months of FUCKING HOUSE ARREST here in Canada.

The judge said they didn't intend in killing the driver, so house arrest? Guess reckless disreguard for human life has no meaning to the canadian legal system :P

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNew s/20060125/street_race_060125/20060125 [www.ctv.ca]

http://www.thestar.com/News/GTA/article/219249 [thestar.com]

So I guess we COULD download and use pirated material if we said we didn't intend on breaking the law while doing it?

Re:Because we all know (1)

Kierthos (225954) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597285)

Hey, it's not like the U.S. is that much better. Here, you can have a shitty driving record, be speeding and kill a man, but get 100 days in jail and be immune to being sued, but only if you're Bill Janklow [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Because we all know (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597041)

Take off, eh

The only way to reform pirates and break them of their desire to deprive copyright holders of their God given right to make money from their own creations is to put these pirates into a prison system where they are systematically broken down and raped repeatedly. Something about having a 9 inch cock shoved up your ass against your wishes (i.e., not CmdrTaco) has a rehabilitative effect on the criminally inclined among us.

Re:Because we all know (1)

Travelsonic (870859) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598017)

God given right? Why am I not making money off my work then? (because profit is not, or ever is guarenteed, in case this post is sarcastic and people take it seriously and agree)

Re:Because we all know (0, Troll)

ahodgson (74077) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598217)

Murderers barely get jail time in Canada. No Canadian judge will ever actually put someone in jail for this.

What about the citizens? (5, Insightful)

amigabill (146897) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596893)

What do the Canadian citizens demand?

Re:What about the citizens? (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596989)

The usual, money, sex, booze and smokes. This "legal mumbo jumbo" is out of their pervue as citizens.

Frankly, as a cannuck, I hope it passes for the sole fact that it will contribute to demonstrating how f'ing corrupt people are.

Tom

Re:What about the citizens? (2, Funny)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597363)

The usual, money, sex, booze and smokes. This "legal mumbo jumbo" is out of their pervue as citizens.

No, you're thinking of French people.

Canadians want sex, booze, smokes, and money.

Americans want money, booze, smokes, and to watch sex.

And Mexicans have it all, well, except for the money part.

Re:What about the citizens? (1)

Khisanth Magus (1090101) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597463)

Guess I'm more a canadian than I am an American then!

Re:What about the citizens? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597689)

Well, being a dual citizen is kind of cool. You get to curse out the Pres in Canada using your Canadian rights, and then whine about taxes.

Re:What about the citizens? (4, Insightful)

9mm Censor (705379) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597593)

Beer and hockey

Re:What about the citizens? (1)

Howserx (955320) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598343)

My tax money back. We pay a levy on all blank media. if this goes through I want all my money back.

Re:What about the citizens? (1)

Watson Ladd (955755) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598467)

It doesn't matter what the citizens demand. Citizens are to dumb to decide anything, and should leave power in the hands of the experts who will make the world safe for "democracy" and "free enterprise".

Copyright infringers are the new child molesters (5, Funny)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596907)

Soon you'll have to register as a copyright infringer for life and people will see your house on copyright infringement Google Maps overlays so they can know to keep their little ones and zeros safe from you.

Re:Copyright infringers are the new child molester (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596977)

and people will see your house on copyright infringement Google Maps overlays


Yeah, just look for the "skull-and-crossbones" flags ... Yarrr!

Re:Copyright infringers are the new child molester (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597053)

Hey, I already patented the list of known copyright infringer's. If you hear of something let me know so they don't infringe on my IP. There will be a reward of 3% of 5% of any money I can collect after expenses and lawyer fees. I would give you the entire 5% but 2% has to goto the patent for awarding rewards electronically.

BTW, Can I copyright the statement you just wrote? I need it to show how the patent infringement is just as serious as copyright infringement. You should have your life ruined for that too. Cause we all know we cannot be free if everyone is free...err violating my...err our IP.

Re:Copyright infringers are the new child molester (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597093)

to keep their little ones and zeros safe from you.
I began by reading that as a "think of the children" comment.

Ahhhh, No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597275)

I understand what your trying to say, but no matter what you do, the stigma isn't the same.

Which list would you rather tell your girlfriend you're on?

Write your MP (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19596951)

My MP is on that list ... considering writing him a letter that strongly suggests he stop sucking American cock if he wants my vote again next election.

Re:Write your MP (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597073)

"My MP is on that list ... considering writing him a letter that strongly suggests he stop sucking American cock if he wants my vote again next election."
I agree. These parliamentarians need to be told by the people what we think. Why are we blindly following US policy?

Are they just stupid or plain dumb? (4, Interesting)

Mr.Fork (633378) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596969)

Ok, I'm a canuck but our current conservative idiots are forgetting one very important piece of legislation that helps protects the privacy of their citizens. PIPEDA protects the privacy of its citizens ~ ISP's can not divulge personally identifying information, especially to the government. so I decide to download 30 movies, there is little they can do about it. What irritates me is that this kind of 1960's thinking is what got RIAA and the Movie Industry into its current mess. Fight the technology, not embrace it. I hope the law gets thrown out like the last one did.

Re:Are they just stupid or plain dumb? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597151)

The Parliamentary Committee responsible for the recommendation is the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology (INDU). http://cmte.parl.gc.ca/cmte/CommitteeList.aspx?Lan g=1&PARLSES=391&JNT=0&SELID=e18_&COM=10476 [parl.gc.ca] It is a multi-party committee comprised of Conservative, Liberal, and Bloc members. The Chair is a Conservative, and the two Vice-Chairs are Liberal and Bloc respectively.

So all parties are culpable, not just the Conservatives.

Re:Are they just stupid or plain dumb? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598231)

Just like in the US.

There is liberal, conservative, hard left, hard right and then there are the corporate issues that they all vote on as a block because they have been bought and paid with lobbiest money and they don't give a damn about what is good for the citizens any more.

You can't even find a good person to vote for any more-- the way the game is structured, unless you have 10 million of corporate bri.. donations, the voters never hear your name and worse, the media (leftist sure- but pro-corporate even more) will destroy any non-corporate backed candidates.

Re:Are they just stupid or plain dumb? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597157)

Sorry, but PIPEDA can be bypassed when doing a criminal investigation. So as long as there is a law, PIPEDA will not protect you.

How does that work exactly? (4, Insightful)

Irvu (248207) | more than 7 years ago | (#19596985)

How can a politician who is by definition a servant of the public demand that a law be crafted according to their interests. In a democracy their job is to serve the interests of the public not the other way around, at least on paper. Or is Canada no longer a democracy?

Re:How does that work exactly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597131)

> Or is Canada no longer a democracy?

Apparently Canada is taking lessons from The United States.

Re:How does that work exactly? (5, Funny)

tourvil (103765) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597371)

Apparently Canada is taking lessons from The United States.

And without paying for those lessons! Can we sue them under the DMCA?

Re:How does that work exactly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597521)

You are forgetting the one key thing: The RIAA and MPAA are advocating on *behalf* of the public for these laws, and as such the politicians feel they are doing what is right.

Re:How does that work exactly? (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597803)

Or is Canada no longer a democracy? - when was it a democracy?

Same Story, Different People (1)

SnowNinja (1051628) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597001)

This is ridiculous. The PC Party seems incapable of coming up with it's own ideas. All they can do is look towards the US and emulate their behaviour trying to privatize health care and adding draconian copyright legislation.

Apparently it's not enough that we're assumed guilty and pay a levy on blank media in order to cover copyright infringement, next it will be to take away fair use.

Now, don't get me wrong.. If the money actually went to the artists I'd have no problem with it, but recording companies squeezing every bit they can out of their customers is something I have no patience for.

Re:Same Story, Different People (2, Informative)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597045)

The levy was added during liberal time. It's nice how people forget that. Oh the big bad PC crowd they caused the 12 YEARS OF STUPIDITY that the liberals caused.

Not that I care much for the PC either. I despite most politicians. Though I'd still rank PC above liberals, liberals above NDP, and the bloc can blow me.

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

SnowNinja (1051628) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597109)

Meh, Politicians are politicians. No matter who gets voted into power, the people are miserable and demand change. I'd still rather pay the levy than get charged with copyright infringement.

Re:Same Story, Different People (2)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597119)

The levy is precisely what kept Hollywood off our backs for the past 12 years(they still pressed a bit, mind you, but nothing special. They knew the Liberals weren't going to cave in any further). Nobody should be complaining about it lest they reveal their complete lack of knowledge on this topic. The current government being Conservative is the sole reason behind this sudden push for draconian copyright legislation.

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

dadragon (177695) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597155)

They were pushing under Martin, too.

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597403)

Shhh, don't you recall, life was perfect under the Liberals guidance [*]. I love how easy it is for Dion to get up there and badmouth the PC for problems that the liberals either started or equally failed to resolve.

[*] Again, not claiming the PC are perfect. Just saying life wasn't perfect during their period either. And frankly, I hate how they MUST disagree on everything. It's so juvenile and a huge waste of time. We should just forgo paying MPs between resolved acts. That way they only get paid for getting shit done and not just bickering back and forth.

Tom

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597543)

Shhh, don't you recall, life was perfect under the Liberals guidance

I think you meant to say the NDP.

That's ok, I changed it for you.

At least it wasn't a BQ idea.

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

Tridus (79566) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597601)

These are the same people who watched how effective the US No-Fly List is, and decided that we needed our own to keep pesky libera... I mean terrorists off planes.

I do have one beef with your post - this isn't the PC party. The PC party is dead, killed by one of Peter Mackay's many lies. This is the CPC, although as far as I can tell they're basically the Liberals who wear blue instead of red.

Re:Same Story, Different People (1)

Happy Lemming (918671) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598271)

That's Conservative Reform Alliance Party.

Re:Same Story, Different People (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597681)

This is not a party-specific issue. I wish it was that simple, but it isn't. The previous liberal government had tabled revised copyright legislation. It died when the government did (thank goodness). The committee in question has wide representation from all parties.

According to the links at this house of commons web page [parl.gc.ca] , the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology consists of:

CHAIR
James Rajotte (Conservative MP for Edmonton-Leduc, Alberta)
VICE-CHAIRS
Paule Brunelle (Bloc Québéois MP for Trois-Rievières, Quebec)

Dan McTeague (Liberal MP for Pickering-Scarborough East)
MEMBERS
André Arthur (Independent MP for Portneuf-Jacques-Cartier, Quebec)
Maurizio Bevilacqua (Liberal MP for Vaughan, Ontario)
Scott Brison (Liberal MP for Kings-Hants, Nova Scotia)
Gerry Byrne (Liberal MP for Humber-St.Barbe-Baie Verte, Newfoundland & Labrador)
Colin Carrie (Conservative MP for Oshawa, Ontario)
Brian Masse (NDP MP for Windsor West, Ontario)
Bev Shipley (Conservative MP for Lambton-Kent-Middlesex, Ontario)
Dave Van Kesteren (Conservative MP for Chatham-Kent-Essex, Ontario)
Robert Vincent (Bloc Québéois MP for Shefford, Quebec)

And then there are a huge number of associate members (looks like most of the House of commons). The above page has all the contact information for the relevant MPs.

Read the committee report and write informed letters NOW to the chair of the committee and to your local MP, especially if your local MP happens to be on the committee. The party they are in is irrelevant. They're all in the pockets of the media interests trying to lobby these changes through. It is time to remind MPs of who elected them, and that they can't neglect the implications for the wider public. It's a minority government. They might actually listen.

Tabled for the break by a minority government (1)

davecb (6526) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597091)

One tables reports before the summer break so the people adversely affected will forget about them by fall. A common trick by weak or minority governments to try to defuse controversies that would threaten them in the very next question period (;-)) --dave

As a Canadian Citizen with registered copyrights (4, Informative)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597099)

on file in Ottawa, I think this is the dumbest thing I have ever heard.

The DCMA won't help Canadians, only multi-nationals that suck the lifeblood of Canadian writers, artists, game designers, and musicians dry.

But, hey, what do I know, I've only flown across Canada for literary and game conventions on Canada Council grants ...

In Summary: Bad Idea. Very Bad.

Re:As a Canadian Citizen with registered copyright (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597273)

oops, DMCA I always type too fast, where's the edit function when you need it.

Les larmes des anges sont dans mes oreilles.

This makes no sense (2, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597121)

First off, I'm sorry for all you Canadians whose politics are getting fucked up by stupid companies.

Second, it made some small amount of sense when the DMCA was put in place in the US because it hadn't been tried before. There were no examples of the DMCA in another large, first world country failing spectacularly. I still think that Orrin Hatch is an idiot at best, but at least they had some justification for it.

But these politicians have no such defense. The DMCA was a failure by anyones metric, online piracy is out of control and pirated materials are sold without much problem. How could anyone in their right mind think that more of the same will help anything? How could anyone think that this is in Canada's best interest? This makes no sense.

p.s. This isn't meant to say anything about canada in general or to endorse piracy.

Bryan Adams Conspiracy (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597123)

Must be a lot more popular than I thought! Continued theft of his work by legions of adoring but thrifty fans is depriving this important artist of his livelihood. Obviously, Ottawa has to get involved at once.

Re:Bryan Adams Conspiracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597567)

Especially, since Brian Adams lives/works in England for tax purposes.

It's funny, how tax payers pick up all the tabs.

Straight out of Lynnwood (-1, Flamebait)

fishthegeek (943099) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597197)

Courtesty of Weird Al

Don't wanna be a Canadian Idiot
Don't wanna be some beer-swillin' hockey nut
And do I look like some frost-bitten hose head?
I never learned my alphabet from A to Zed

They all live on donuts and moose meat
And they all leave the house without packin' heat
Never even bring their guns to the mall
And you know what else is too funny?
Their stupid monopoly money
Can't take 'em seriously at all

Well, maple syrup and snow's what they export
They treat curling just like it's a real sport
They think their silly accent is so cute
Can't understand a thing they're talking a-boot

Sure, they got their national health care
Cheaper meds for prime rates and clean air
Then again, well they got Celine Dion
Eat their weight in Kraft macaroni
And dream of driving a Zamboni
All over Saskatchewan

Don't wanna be a Canadian idiot
Won't figure out the temperature in Celcius
See the map, they're hoverin' right over us
Tell you the truth, it makes me kinda nervous

Always hear the same kind of story
Break your nose and they'll just say "Sorry"
Tell me what kind of freaks are that polite
It's gotta be they're all up to something
So, quick, before they see it coming
Time for a preemptive strike

Re:Straight out of Lynnwood (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597421)

your sign of "I'm from the government and I'm here to help you" probably sounds funny to Americans.

But Canadians have to trust the government is there to help them.

Distrust of government workers is a very American attitude.

Re:Straight out of Lynnwood (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597865)

It's not distrust of government workers, it a distrust of government in general. And it dates back all the way to the founding of the Republic.

Read the Federalist Papers, for more details.

Re:Straight out of Lynnwood (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598151)

You must be either an American or an Albertan.

Real Canadians basically trust government. I know this is hard for you to grok, but it's true.

Re:Straight out of Lynnwood (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598287)

Yep, I'm a US-ian. The bit on the Federalist should have clued you in.

Not so bad. (1)

mightybaldking (907279) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597305)

Actually, this isn't too bad, although I'm not familiar with the WIPO part. It clearly says "distributing pirate or counterfeit works" If I buy Iron Maiden's "A Matter of Life and Death", it's not piracy. If I copy it to the hard drive, it's not piracy. If I share it, it's not a pirate work until the downloader receives it. - There's nothing in there about this situation. It's certainly not counterfeit as I'm not asserting anything about it. So it seems that I can only get in trouble if I were to download "A Matter of Life and Death" and then re-distribute it. Most of what they're talking about seems to be aimed at commercial distributors. It even allows free (as in beer) software circumvention measures. DeCSS is still safe as long as it's not sold for profit. What I have a problem with (Look at the PDF for full recommendations). 1)Enact legislation to make cam-cording in a theatre a criminal offence. This should be a tresspass offence. Kick them out, ban them and take away the camera. 2)Enact criminal legislation clearly defining offences for criminal circumvention activities... Document doesnt' specify what would be defined as such. Maybe DeCSS isn't safe. What I do like: Remove the Copyright Act from the list of indictable offences excluded from Proceeds of Crime legislation. This means we can now seize assets from commercial rings.

Re:Not so bad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19598027)

DOES IT SAY FOR PROFIT???? Don't lend your mama any movies.

Re:Not so bad. (1)

mightybaldking (907279) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598137)

Actually, it does say for Commercial purposes. So lending it to my mama wouldn't be commercial. Lending it to your mama, in exchange for her professional services, might be considered commercial.

If it is wrong, it has to be punished... (1)

mi (197448) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597375)

Just trying to set the debate straight here. If it is wrong, and if the current countermeasures aren't sufficiently deterrent, than stricter measures must be introduced.

Is it wrong to copy somebody else's work despite the owner's objections? Stick to this point...

Re:If it is wrong, it has to be punished... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19598107)

It's not wrong when you're already assumed to be copying the work and paying a levy on all blank media for over 10 years, time during which the levies collected weren't monitored and ended up being over-collected by the private sector company responsible for it, even if the media you buy is used for purposes that have nothing to do with copyright enfringement.

I've payed for the right to copy copyrighted material and I will damn well use that which I have paid for.

Re:If it is wrong, it has to be punished... (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598167)



Just trying to set the debate straight here. If it is wrong, and if the current countermeasures aren't sufficiently deterrent, than stricter measures must be introduced.

Is it wrong to copy somebody else's work despite the owner's objections? Stick to this point...


The point, which you have missed, is not about copying and whether it is right or wrong. The point is - how does Canada benefit from a law designed to protect American business interests?

None of the movies are good enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597379)

Frankly, I have yet to see any movie to be good enough that's worth the tax payers money for policing, legal fees and the cost of keeping anyone in jail.

Has anyone made any feasibility calculations on this?

Sending people into jail for copying movies could be completely ridiculed if all citizens would come forward to claim that they did it.

Who would pay for the courts, police and jails to enforce such laws if all taxpayers would be sitting there?

corrected headline .. (1)

rs232 (849320) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597417)

Canadian Politicians get funds from RIAA

Government at it best.... (1)

lexsco (594799) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597437)

Do you see how many members are in that committee? It amazes me that anything gets accomplished with this many people on it.

If you live in a country run by committee, be on the committee.

Ah, an "Industry Committee" (4, Insightful)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597443)

Just as parliamentarians voted to break for the summer, the Industry Committee issued its report on counterfeiting and piracy, unambiguously titled Counterfeiting and Piracy are Theft.

Ok, two things.

First off, "Industry Committee". A group that, by it's name alone admits that it does not represent the people. It represents business interests.

Secondly, "Counterfeiting and Piracy are Theft". No, they're not. Otherwise you wouldn't need laws against counterfeiting and copyright violation, now would you? Theft was already on the books as a bad thing.

What they are trying to do is to make things that aren't theft equal to theft to support their agenda. Which represents no person - only business interests.

What is the problem.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597459)

I am a filmmaker. Even with the best efforts of an active community, DMCA like laws and regulations would be imposed in many countries. DMCA like regulations discourage/limit "freedom" to make copies of content you own.

I release my films with no content protection and region encoding and I include a note "we trust your judgment to copy/not copy this film". EBAY and Amazon restrict sales of DVDs without region encoding so I need to include region encoding only for those retailers.

I am "small enough" not to get noticed by pirates/file sharers, and I have no desire to become "large enough" to be noticed. I have seen that the best films I like and I want to make do not require huge budgets. Take a Director like Spielberg - I don't think he has made interesting films like "Duel" or "Jaws" once he grew into a "power-player". The same goes for Soderberg or other American filmmakers. (Most of the Slashdot readers are American, so I am giving examples of American filmmakers.)

What I have found is that the problem still exists in a few cartels controlling the Distribution where entry is damn difficult. Whether you are making mainstream or non-mainstream films, to get the film to theaters or television where you recoup your investment to go to the next project, you need their blessing - and thats very difficult.

Expected, and probably inevitable (4, Insightful)

debest (471937) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597569)

As a Canadian whose been watching this since the late 90's, frankly I thought that we'd have reached this stage earlier. The media companies have been pushing the government non-stop: obviously, they are finding that Bev Oda and her Tory friends are more receptive to their message than Shiela Copps was in the Liberal days.

As the Americans have discovered, it is difficult to get rid of crappy laws. The lobbyists know this: they just have to have patience and find the right stooges in power to do their bidding, then they're set.

Do what I want (1)

HalAtWork (926717) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597797)

I'm Canadian and I don't want a DMCA, nobody I know does. Fuck you politicians for not doing what we want.

and do they demand to return the surcharge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19597825)

Canada puts a surcharge on all recordable media, supposedly because of "piracy" which goes to the big media companies.... even if you are backing up your word docs onto CD you pay this RIAA tax.

How much you wanna bet these politicians are not "demanding" this to be abolished?

no, they're demanding loonies ($CDN) (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 7 years ago | (#19597895)

and to get 'em, they have to take the DMCA.

Write your MP (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19598015)

While I do appreciate the comments on these forums as they are usually informative and funny, in this case the forums are not the place for your comments.

I know, all systems are flawed and MPs are corrupt, blah blah blah; BUT, we have MPs for the purpose of representing us in Parliament. Use them.

Write your MP. Tell them that you do not support this, and that your vote will be based on who represents you best, and not what colour they wear on their party logo. Maybe, just maybe, if we get enough support we can start to direct our government in a direction chosen by it's citizens instead of corporations.

I wrote mine.. wappel.t@parl.gc.ca

Bush + Harper sitting in a tree... (1)

e-scetic (1003976) | more than 7 years ago | (#19598255)

The current Canadian government (Conservative) is well known for emulating the Bush administration in style and method and also wanting to pander to American interests merely because they are American interests, regardless of the merit or demerit of anything. The usual argument is that "the Americans are our largest trading partner, we must not anger them". I remember when this was cited, by conservative MP's during parliament, as the whole fucking reason Canadians should support the US invasion of Iraq, no more no less. This shows you just how moronic these people are, that they would follow Americans into hell just because of some perceived friendly alliance or loyalty that is not reciprocal.

I'm sure the same thing is going on here. Canuckistan became more like Bush Amerika the day the Conservatives won the election.

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