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Microsoft Pays Bloggers to Tout MS Slogan

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the we-love-our-sponsor-and-their-product dept.

Microsoft 339

Stony Stevenson writes "In an effort to inject Microsoft's latest slogan, 'People-ready business', into popular usage (and no doubt raise its Google page rank), Microsoft asked a passel of A List Bloggers to write blurbs on what this meaningless phrase means to them. Michael Arrington, Om Malik, Fred Wilson, Richard MacManus and a handful of others happily agreed to churn out some mush for Microsoft, which it later used in banner ads. What it really meant to these guys was income. Redmond paid the bloggers for every user who clicked through to the PRB microsite. That caused other bloggers, lead by Gawker chief Nick Denton, to rightfully question their ethics. A spitball war has been raging ever since."

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Nothing unusual (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19672815)

Any blogger that supports their site through ads is making money through a marketing campaign. You can even pay Google to put other peoples' ads on your site for you. What's wrong with that?

Re:Nothing unusual (5, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672901)

the difference, is this is a cash for comments style scandal. no harm in having banner ads, but your opinions should reflect the truth not you advertising. otherwise why would we bother listening?

Re:Nothing unusual (5, Funny)

br14n420 (1111329) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673513)

I get the feeling, most bloggers would be pretty open about this. "Hey guys, look. Microsoft wants to pay for me to come up with a 30 word comment on how I feel about __________. What an awesome deal! mood: chipper status: lonely music: brittney spears"

Re:Nothing unusual (5, Funny)

misleb (129952) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672919)

Nothing, as long as Adblock catches the ads before I have to see them.

Re:Nothing unusual (4, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673033)

Any blogger that supports their site through ads is making money through a marketing campaign.

This sort of campaign blurs the distinction between comment and advertising.

It diminishes the value of the opinions being blogged and potentially tars all tech bloggers with the same brush.

Re:Nothing unusual (4, Insightful)

CRC'99 (96526) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673311)

This sort of campaign blurs the distinction between comment and advertising.
It diminishes the value of the opinions being blogged and potentially tars all tech bloggers with the same brush.


Isn't this what's been happening in most magazines now for years?

Re:Nothing unusual (4, Interesting)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673493)

Isn't this what's been happening in most magazines now for years?

Yes, that's why bloggers were initially percieved as a breath of fresh air in an arena dominated by shills.

The honeymoon didn't last long, and now many of the journos who used to tout in the magazines have transferred their skills (and bad habits) to blogs.

Re:Nothing unusual (4, Interesting)

pasamio (737659) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673517)

But most magazines have the legal requirement to either mark that its an advertisement (ever seen those full page magazine articles with 'advertisement' placed somewhere on the page) or that they derived some benefit from it (e.g. an article a while back from Angus Kidman with the text "Angus Kidman travelled to Orlando as a guest of Hyperion" (http://developers.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/ 04/27/1224215)).

This doesn't have that sort of marking, there in lies the issue. Its not clearly linked with a company (e.g. blogs.microsoft.com) and it is them being paid off by companies. Cash for comment. Actually illegal in Australia (see John Laws on the same subject).

Thats the issue.

Re:Nothing unusual (4, Informative)

akzeac (862521) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673129)

It's not the same. It's not a case of bloggers putting Microsoft ads in their blogs.

It's a case of getting paid for letting Microsoft quote them saying the "people ready" slogan.

See this link [valleywag.com] .

How is it different from what Google does? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673213)

Google will pay anybody to participate in a Google's "Referrals" program. If an AdSense subscriber chooses to enable "Referrals" Google will pay the blogger (or whoever) everytime a person clicks on the special icon to download the Google toolbar.

Paying somebody to promote you? This is done every single day people. It's called marketing.

People on slashdot forget that there are many developers and companies out there that actually like Microsoft very much. They would and do speak Microsoft's praises even if they weren't paid to. They just like MS. And if MS will give them extra money to say something specific they would enjoy pointing out anyways, why not! My goodness, it's not like a single anti-MS person would even consider taking the money and touting MS. It's only bloggers who already like MS anyways.

Easy Way To Counteract That (5, Insightful)

geordie_loz (624942) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673287)

Might I suggest that we all blog the term People Ready Business [ubuntu.com] , and link it to www.ubuntu.com or our www.apple.com our our favourite decent provider of software, and someone who deserves the publicity. A bit like all the tags for VISTA on amazon marking it as DRM Filled, Buggy, Bad Vista etc..

Re:Easy Way To Counteract That (-1, Troll)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673481)

Might I suggest that we all blog the term People Ready Business [ubuntu.com], and link it to www.ubuntu.com or our www.apple.com our our favourite decent provider of software, and someone who deserves the publicity. A bit like all the tags for VISTA on amazon marking it as DRM Filled, Buggy, Bad Vista etc..

This looks like your latest and greatest ploy to get a girlfriend, and let me tell you: it won't work.

Re:Easy Way To Counteract That (4, Funny)

fbjon (692006) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673579)

Moreover, what does it mean? It seems it has to do with the latest versions of Windows and Office, but what exactly? The Microsoft site tells me that "People are your most important asset. With the right software, they'll push your business forward" (*) or somesuch. Ya sure, all the examples and marketing fluff sound great, but there has to be something concrete somewhere, right? Otherwise, why spend money marketing it, unless the whole thing is a branding campaign for manager types.


(*) $100 dollars have been transferred to your Swiss bank account. Also, it's "drive" not "push".

- Microsoft

Re:Easy Way To Counteract That (1)

halll7 (1009535) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673583)

I like the sentiment, but it has the down-side of associating those decent providers of software with the meaningless corporate-speak. I say steer-clear and leave microsoft and their bloggers to make an ass of themselves.

Integrity demands crying foul immediately (5, Informative)

ttnb (1121411) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673381)

What Microsoft did was an obvious and blatant violation of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association ethics code [womma.org] . The bloggers should have publicly criticized these Microsoft tactics instead of going along with them.

Awesome slogan (5, Funny)

fbjon (692006) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672817)

Good god, it's like a competition on the back of a pack of corn flakes: "Write an essay on how you feel about the word "Crunchy!", and win a trip to Paris!"

In other news (5, Funny)

fferreres (525414) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672925)

Sources report Slashdot was popularized a new term "Money-ready bloggers", a term coined to discredit unetical bloggers who choose topics based on money bounties.

Ethics are easy if your wealthy, but.. (0, Troll)

iHasaFlavour (1118257) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673177)

There is a distinct tendancy to view people on the internet as being the sum of their online work.

This is a big mistake. People, ordinary people, have bills to pay. Real life costs money, and if someone offers you money to do something which, lets face it in this case, is a pretty trivial and short term thing, what's the big deal?

Oh wait, its microsoft, therefore it must be bad. Oh how very sheeplike.

How many celebrities have done adverts for crap and been paid well for it, lots. It's a common event, nothing to be ashamed of, people have to live, and life costs money. And don't tell me that if someone said 'here, have lots of money and all you have to do is write some blog entries', you'd say no. Not if the money were good. I wouldn't.

Re:Ethics are easy if your wealthy, but.. (5, Insightful)

bateleur (814657) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673261)

Real life costs money, and if someone offers you money to do something which, lets face it in this case, is a pretty trivial and short term thing, what's the big deal?
Have you actually read what these bloggers wrote?

Like you say, there are bills to pay. So there's no problem if Microsoft want to pay these people as writers to write pieces for them on a particular topic. The problem starts when those pieces end up as content in a place which is normally home to opinion. The value of opinion pieces all lies in their honesty. If you think you're reading opinion when you're really reading an advert, you're being misled. And that's bad.

Most of the time when celebrities do ads for money there's no conflict with their actual profession. In fact since they're often actors it's just another script to them.

Re:Ethics are easy if your wealthy, but.. (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673479)

And there's a little sentence at the bottom that says something about them being compensated for their time or being a paid spokesperson or something.

Re:Ethics are easy if your wealthy, but.. (0, Troll)

iHasaFlavour (1118257) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673581)

AHA, Now I see the true color of Slashdot. Dare to say microsoft isn't evil and get moderated troll.

Hmm, guess this 'open forum' isn't as open as I thought. Moving on...

Re:In other news (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673369)

Do I get karma points to spread this slogan ?

Re:In other news (2, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673409)

Probably negative ones, yes.

Re:Awesome slogan (-1, Offtopic)

0rionx (915503) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673023)

Much like the recent Penny Arcade comic [penny-arcade.com] on how Doritos wants people to make games about their product.

Re:Awesome slogan (1)

udippel (562132) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673355)

Good god, it's like a competition on the back of a pack of corn flakes: "Write an essay on how you feel about the word "Crunchy!", and win a trip to Paris!"

You mean, a trip to Century Regional Detention Facility in Lynwood, California ? Isn't that a tad late ?
Or a trip with Paris ? Isn't that a tad dangerous ?

Oh, I agree, a tad lame this is. Still ...

Re:Awesome slogan (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673519)

People-ready business... Two things come to mind. The first is "prostitution", as I can't think of another business that deals directly in people who are made ready. The second is:

(1) Say "People-ready business"
(2) ...
(3) Profit!!!

Ok, you had to know that was coming...

Makes you think... (5, Interesting)

oskay (932940) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672853)

I wonder how much of this thing goes on that we *don't* hear about.

Re:Makes you think... (3, Insightful)

vivaoporto (1064484) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672977)

In my case, at least, everything of that goes, and I never hear about. The same goes for the rest of mankind, except for the tiny percentage of the population that read these blogs, tiny even if only tech savvy people is considered. Who are those bloggers and why are they considered important to deserve front page on Slashdot?

Another poster put it better a couple of posts above, this is no different from a corn flakes company creating a contest in the lines of "write an essay with the word 'crunchy' and win such and such prize'", and getting 10 years old children to publish their essays. They will do for the prize, even if they hate that particular brand of flakes.

The joke is on whoever blindly believes in anything written by those bloggers, or by any other blogger, or anything written on the Internet, for all that matters. But bloggers, blah, a bunch of self-important people that touts their own (and each other) horns and manage to convince some gullible people that their opinion is any better than the guy next seat on the bus.

Well, I'm astonished. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673527)

Somebody who posted something uncomplimentary about blogs and bloggers on Slashdot, yet not only did they not get modded Off-topic, Troll or Flamebait, but actually made it to +4 Insightful!

Even more surprising considering the things they said were mostly true and factual, which is usually cause for bitter Slashdot bloggers with mod points to send such posts off into negative integer oblivion.

Oh and it's true: not even your Moms read your blogs. They just say they do. Sorry.

Re:Makes you think... (1)

OeLeWaPpErKe (412765) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673491)

I do wonder what's wrong with it. Obviously people will be tempted by money to do this type of things (and much, much worse).

You should trust a blogger not to do these things, and immediately remove the ones you know that did do it.

The solution is NOT to try and take away the temptation of the money. The solution is to ASK them to reject it, and if possible use your own 2c of reading eyes to prevent them from doing it.

Looks like it worked. (3, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672855)

Looks like it worked - allready mentioned on slashdot!

Re:Looks like it worked. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673047)

True, and how much did YOU get?
I am an AC, for me PRB means... oh, nevermind.

Re:Looks like it worked. (1)

nEoN nOoDlE (27594) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673077)

Yeah, I didn't know about this new "Microsoft" company, but from the sound of it, they're an upstanding people-ready business.

Re:Looks like it worked. (4, Funny)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673233)

Looks like it worked - allready mentioned on slashdot!

Oh yea, it worked. I can totally imagine thousands of Slashdotters storming Microsoft with "damn, get me some of that people-ready business software!".

Truth is Microsoft marketing sucked for nearly 12 years now. They're totally clueless about how to advertise even their good products (such as Office 2007, which is a great piece of software*).

*Microsoft paid me $100 to post this.

Re:Looks like it worked. (2, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673301)

If the intent was to get PageRank up, and get word of mouth out, then getting an article on Slashdot did work.

Now I've heard the slogan, and no doubt this will increase hits to their site, people linking to them, PageRank, etc.

However I completely disagree that their marketing is horrible.

Marketing is arguably more important than making a quality product. Marketing isn't just the ads you see on TV. It the deals you strike with vendors and the like, and whether ethical or not, their marketing has been EXTREMELY successful.

Re:Looks like it worked. (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673509)

That's not marketing. That's SALES. When they go to [bignameoem] and say "you have to buy a copy of windows for every machine that you sell (thus all but ensuring that you install it on every machine that you sell) or you have to pay retail price" is an unethical SALES tactic. It isn't marketing.

Sorry, I need money for trip to Europe (1)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673415)

People ready business, People ready business, People ready business, People ready business. There we go, $15.30

Re:Looks like it worked. (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673429)

With thousands of people sitting there now, like me, pondering hard how to dissect and make fun of the slogan "people ready business".

Yay, blogosphere news! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19672857)

Ah, blog news! The kind where no matter how things are settled, nobody will care.

Wait a minute... (3, Informative)

Macthorpe (960048) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672859)

So Microsoft paid bloggers per click to advertise for them?

Where's the scandal here? There's no mention of Microsoft forcing these guys to say that they weren't being paid, and doing something like this is up to the personal ethics of the individual blogger, surely?

Re:Wait a minute... (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673179)

The "scandal" (it isn't really) is that bloggers are supposedly posting their own personal thoughts on various issues, unsullied by commercial pressures, unlike the press (for example, it's well known in the computing press, many magazines won't give a bad review to a product that's heavily advertised in said mag).

This is just showing that bloggers really are no different to the traditional press - they are just as easily bought.

Re:Wait a minute... (1)

BuR4N (512430) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673181)

"Where's the scandal here?"

That its posted on this site as news....

Re:Wait a minute... (3, Insightful)

interiot (50685) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673331)

Surely you realize there's a difference between organizations who pass advertisements off as their own opinion, versus organizations who clearly indicate which content is advertising and which part is editorial. Maintaining a wall between editorial and advertising has long been recognized as a part of journalism ethics, and while that wall is breached from time to time [wikipedia.org] , it's something that's important enough that there can sometimes be legal repercussions [bloomberg.com] to breaching it.

Re:Wait a minute... (1)

Macthorpe (960048) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673379)

Well, yes, which is precisely why I said it's "up to the personal ethics of the individual blogger". I agree that I personally would state explicitly that I was being paid to advertise something (if I kept anything more than a public journal). If somebody doesn't and you don't agree with that, you stop trusting their opinion.

Nobody is forcing you to believe everything you read on the internet, after all :)

Re:Wait a minute... (1)

chiui (1120973) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673533)

> Where's the scandal here?
I don't know in US, but here in Italy it must be clearly obvious what is an advertising and what is not. For example if something is promoted during television shows you see a label somewhere on the screen which let you know you are watching some promotional content.
Maybe it's not law there, but for sure it's a scandal.

In other news... (5, Insightful)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672861)

A whore will fake an orgasm for you, if you pay for it.

Oh, and astroturf isn't real grass.

Re:In other news... (2, Insightful)

lendude (620139) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673091)

Get your hand off it mods - parent is a troll?: whilst using a slightly colourful metaphor, this comment is on the money.

Re:In other news... (1)

Macthorpe (960048) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673273)

No, it's not. From Wiki:

the term astroturfing pejoratively describes formal public relations projects which deliberately seek to engineer the impression of spontaneous public reactions to a politician or political grouping, product, service, event, etc. by many diverse and distributed individuals acting of their own volition, when in fact the efforts are centrally coordinated.
Microsoft didn't even try and keep this secret. It was fully public and the bloggers had every opportunity to state that they were acting on Microsoft's behalf.

parent is not a troll...mods wake up (2, Funny)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673165)

the parent comment is right on the money...

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673313)

A whore will fake an orgasm for you, if you pay for it.
A wife or girlfriend will too but studies have shown the whore is cheaper.

Oh, and astroturf isn't real grass.
If your doing her on astroturf she is obviously faking enjoyment, unless she is really into S-N-M.

Nothing wrong with writing advertisement (5, Insightful)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672863)

There's a whole profession of people writing text for advertisement.
What IS moraly wrong is presenting it as a personal opinion; that's verbal prostitution. Publishing it on the web would be indecent exposure.

Re:Nothing wrong with writing advertisement (1)

monk.e.boy (1077985) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673105)

There's a whole profession of people writing text for advertisement. What IS moraly wrong is presenting it as a personal opinion;

Everyone has their price. Say I asked you to put a link on your blog to my site and offered you $1,000,000. You'd do it. Then we start haggling.

Most companies have a price they will pay for good links to their site (non reciprocal and none of that rel="nofollow" shit) a lot of them say $100-$150 for a link.... how much do you think Microsoft is willing to pay for an entire article?

They are the richest company in the world.

I'd sell them my blog and let them carry on using my name. Then I'd retire to Hawaii and go surfing :)

monk.e.boy

Re:Nothing wrong with writing advertisement (1)

spasticfraggle (670632) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673187)

What IS moraly wrong is presenting it as a personal opinion; that's lying. Publishing it on the web would be dishonest.

There, fixed it for you.

Aha! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19672867)

So how much did Slashdot get paid?

MS sits back and watches (5, Insightful)

c3ph45 (911279) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672879)

Could this have been a part of Microsoft's plan. Seems to me that this controversy will help them much more than the original paid-for blogs.

Unfair accusation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19672883)

These ads mentioned are not anything out of the ordinary. They are standard ads with copy by microsoft that happen to use the name of the site in the ad text.

The key point is that the ads contain text written by microsoft and are not product endorsements on the part of the site.

People making these accusations of bribery and selling out are either speaking out in ignorance or deliberately distorting the facts to stir up controversy (I'm looking at you, Nick Denton).

This whole mess is another example of Snape and Hermione die in the final Harry Potter book.

PRB = Public Relations Bullsh*t (1)

SloWave (52801) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672895)

Can't wait for someone to register the domain

Re:PRB = Public Relations Bullsh*t (3, Funny)

TechnoLuddite (854235) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672997)

Actually (and tell me this isn't amusing), PRB is Microsoft Knowledge Base's acronym for Problem. Or, to put it in non-spin, "Yes, it's a bug ... but we're not fixing it."

Maybe that's the People-Related Business they're talking about.

People-ready business (4, Interesting)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672903)

To me, 'People-ready business' represents a new low in catch-phrase marketing. We all know 'can you hear me now', a stoned man saying 'dude we're getting a Dell', 'works out of the box' and the Vegemite song sucked. But new levels are being reached, requiring of extending the "int catchphrase_rating" to "long int catchphrase_rating". These levels are being reached by the one and only, Microsoft.

For a while now, Microsoft has been looking for a way to make money. Their business has been dying down not due to competition, but due to sheer lack of anything to sell. So comes Vista. With it's color-coded file explorer, OSX ripoff interface and Vista-only-for-no-real-reason DX10, they were sure they were saved.

This was not the case.

The hotcake Vista was predicted to be turned out more to be a segway, and (while ducking from flying chairs) the marketing department had to come up with a way to sell this new steaming turd. Enter 'people-ready business'.

I am not personally sure what this is intended to mean. Are they attempting to sell a business that is ready for people to use? Doesn't Mcdonalds fall into this category? Or is it an attempt to make people ready for a business? If so, what business? Microsoft?

Has Microsoft finally admitted to being the Borg? Is the next tag line, "lower your shields and prepare to be boarded"?

Who knows. This blogger is unsure.

/Waits patently for check

Re:People-ready business (1)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673169)

Their business has been dying down not due to competition, but due to sheer lack of anything to sell.
Take a look at MSFT stock price, business isn't dying down. They also have Office and Windows, the most profitable software products on the planet; how can you say they have nothing to sell?

Why can I practically hear the Apple "switch" background music chimes when I read Slashdot these days?

Re:People-ready business (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673207)

Their business is dying down? Seriously - what are you smoking and can I have some? Microsoft just had its most succesful year in its entire history - highest revenues, highest profits. Vista *is* selling like hotcakes - almost every new PC has it pre-installed (all the negativity about Vista is just a repeat performance of all the negativity about XP five years ago).

You're in denial if you think Microsoft is dying.

Re:People-ready business (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673473)

MS is the corporation equivalent of an oil tanker. Even with the engine off, the momentum keeps them moving for a long, long time. They needn't even sell anything actively to make some money. Computers get sold with their systems preinstalled, that's what's selling Vista.

I know a fair number of system integrators (i.e. hardware vendors that also offer you complete sets). They get some "gentle" pressure into their backs from MS to push Vista instead of XP, and the policy of MS that you may use an older version of Windows with a compatible license of a newer system helps a lot, too. So I can well see people buy Vista (because, well, it doesn't cost more than XP with a new system) and use XP instead.

And so far, the number of people buying Vista to upgrade from XP has been rather small.

So I wouldn't call it selling like "hotcakes". If anything is an indicator, it's the price of ram chips currently.

Re:People-ready business (1)

supersnail (106701) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673341)

Shouldnt that be :
" signed long long int catchpahrase_rating;"

afterall we would need a very large negative number to rate "money^H^H^H^H^Hpeople ready busines"

Re:People-ready business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673347)

void main( void ) { printf( "%d %d", sizeof( int ), sizeof( long int ) ); }

computer say: "4 4"

O_o

Re:People-ready business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673399)

/Waits patently for check
You patented waiting for the check? I am sure there is prior art to that.

Last I checked... (3, Insightful)

jessiej (1019654) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672917)

I'm not a huge fan of Microsoft, but last I checked they weren't having a problem with their Google page rank, so I do doubt that that was part of their "People-ready business" blog campaign.

Surely the Salshdot crowd has some ideas (5, Funny)

clickety6 (141178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672923)

Surely the Slashdot crowd has some ideas of their own as to what "people-ready business" might mean?

Business ready to fleece the people?

If we're talking Vista, maybe it means business with some people-sized holes where the customers should havebeen inserted?

Re:Surely the Salshdot crowd has some ideas (2, Funny)

c3ph45 (911279) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673051)

Well I'm guessing it means that Microsoft isn't a Robotic-Overlord-Ready Business.

MS Warden Confirmation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673161)

Business ready to fleece the people?
Pete Boden wants people at Microsoft to think like criminals. [com.com] *

Pete Boden = Microsoft Senior Security Director

*hidden out of context quote disclaimer.

Re:Surely the Salshdot crowd has some ideas (1)

feepness (543479) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673427)

Surely the Slashdot crowd has some ideas of their own as to what "people-ready business" might mean?

Business ready to fleece the people?

Is this another opportunity to mention vivoleum [youtube.com] ?

Re:Surely the Salshdot crowd has some ideas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673501)

Surely the Slashdot crowd has some ideas of their own as to what "people-ready business" might mean?

VISTA PREMIUM IS PEOPLE! It's made from PEOPLE!

I'm Secretary of State, (1, Funny)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672931)

brought to you by Carl's Jr.

People-driven business means: (5, Funny)

smurfsurf (892933) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672943)

A people-driven business leverages collective synergy with a quality-driven approach that focuses on delivering key objectives. It is quite obvious, actually.

(The BS bingo blurb is courtesy of the DailyWTF)

What if... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19672955)

What would happen if all Slashdotters started linking People-ready bussiness [wikipedia.org] to Linux' Wikipedia page?

Re:What if... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673221)

All the googlers who can't spell will be sent to the Wikipedia page

Support by trashing? (1)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672971)

So, these A listers say the slogan when tearing it apart. I'm sure this still benefits Microsoft to some degree, at least where Google ranking is concerned.

People Ready??? (1)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 7 years ago | (#19672985)

you mean it wasn't before??? or are they trying to say anything that's not Microsoft isn't

Bloggers != Journalists (5, Insightful)

supersnail (106701) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673001)

Next time some blogger makes a fuss about not being treated like "real" journalists just point them to the Cringley/McKraken articles.

They will be treated like journalists when they can demonstratte some ethical and professional resposibility.

Not that all journalists are perfect but they do lose thier jobs when they get caught red handed.

Anyway all the best blogs are deeply personal, opinionated, and, do not pretend to be journalism.

A List ? (1)

niceone (992278) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673009)

So that's what Paris was screaming about as they dragged he off to jail!

They manage it on slashdot as well... (1)

Idaho (12907) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673089)

Look at this article [slashdot.org] , posted yesterday, for example. Especially the last sentence:

I was shocked that Apple was even on the list as I believed all those Mac commercials!


This part has "PR shill" written all over it. No tech would write this.

The slashdot editors might want to pay a little more attention to the stories they accept. I'll admit that this one is hardly the worst, but it's less visible than normal, which makes the story almost believable (instead of the guerilla marketing campaign it in fact is)

Re:They manage it on slashdot as well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673557)

This part has "PR shill" written all over it. No tech would write this.
Yes, nobody submitting to Slashdot would ever write a sarcastic comment implying that Apple users are sheep. Never. Because nobody on Slashdot has strong opinions about Apple.

Dude, you're barking up the wrong tree. The article in question was written by a guy that works at Microsoft [csoonline.com] , in which Vista came out on top. I'm not saying he's biased, but your theory that an Apple shill submitted the story is a little weak, all things considered.

Collective noun (5, Funny)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673137)

> passel of A List Bloggers

I thought the collective noun was "a crock of bloggers".

PRB (4, Insightful)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673153)

I'd be happy to clarify what "people-ready business [wikipedia.org] " means to me.

People Ready Business = DRM shop (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673155)

Try Pretty Ridiculous Business.

Ready to restrict people with hideous DRM and milk them for every cent they'll spend. Ready to take on slogans from the people at large because their own ad execs can no longer stomach the BS long enough to produce a slogan.

Corporate Bullshit Generator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673163)

It wouldn't have surprised me if they used the Corporate Bullshit Generator [aol.com] to come up with this crazy slogan!

Michael Arrington got confused. (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673201)

TechCrunch wasn't much fun in the very early days. We were mostly talking to ourselves because readers were scarce. But as the site grew and more readers came along, things got exciting. The discussion in the comments to each blog post was as or more compelling than the actual news we were reporting.

It looks like Michael Arrington got confused. He's written his MS assignment about Slashdot instead of his site!

Surely I'm not the first to think this... (1)

Shipwack (684009) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673265)

Soylent Green is 'People-ready business'!

Slashdot (1)

Safiire Arrowny (596720) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673323)

Seeing as how Slashdot is Taco's blog, and it has a multitude of advertisements with Microsoft slogans all over it, I fail to see a huge difference.

Taco is putting MS slogans and advertising material all over his site for money, the only thing different is that I wouldn't consider it astroturfing, while I do think blogging about "What MS bullshit means to me personally", is.

Reverse Slashdot effect (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673325)

This is what I challenge everyone. Let's make some copy (text) about what 'people-ready business' means to us, and by that I mean slam Microsoft rightfully so for putting small companies out of business, etc.

Then post an exact copy of that text on every blog, forum and community we can find. Link to it everywhere. Have that be the #1 hit in every search engine. When people search for Microsoft and "People-Ready Business" let them find exactly Microsoft represents.

Re:Reverse Slashdot effect (1)

RichardDeVries (961583) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673471)

Who is going to search for Microsoft and "People-Ready Business"?

Re:Reverse Slashdot effect (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673495)

Isn't that the point of this blogging campaign though? If Microsoft is trying to get a variety of positive posts via blogging, then let it backfire. Let's blog on what the slogan means to us.

More and more people seem to invest a huge interest into blogs. They accept it as sincere opinion. We dismiss an ad because it is paid for and biased. When we see blogs that are paid for, we assume the opinions are sincere, when really they are deceptively biased.

I'm not sure the average user will Google for "People-Ready Business" but I'm sure Microsoft is, to see how quickly it is skyrocketing in PageRank.

I would absolutely love for the Microsoft PR firms and execs to Google for "People-Ready Business" and instead be inundated with our sincere opinions with how Microsoft fails to actually cater to the people who are forced to use their products.

Re:Reverse Slashdot effect (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673537)

So what would the text be? This idea could get me entertained for the rest of the weekdays. Currently the M$ site holds the #1 in Google rankings.

People-ready business (1)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673363)

Things I have learned about making my business people-ready:

- Running around naked is not good.
- Shades are very important.
- I can not kill or lethally wound people for no good reason.
- If a human will not believe, peel off hand.
- I can't say "negative" and "affirmative". I gotta say "no problemo" or "hasta la vista" or "chill out". Or randomly permutated combinations.

The Terminator

low (1)

DavoMan (759653) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673373)

Microsoft paying people to say they like its stuff? A new low, even for Bill.

Once again.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19673383)

Slashdot is 3 days late with a story. Stunning.... zzzz......

It means crap to me (1)

Wiseman1024 (993899) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673475)

To me, "people-ready business" means your standard enterprise advertisement crap, whose success seems to be measured in the number of times the word "business" is mentioned.

Slashdot, too. Let's take a day off... (4, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673541)

We're seeing too much of that on Slashdot these days, not just the astroturfers posting their messages, but endless bombardment of MS-oriented slashvertisements in place of real articles. Sometimes it's several content-free articles per day apparently posted just to keep MS in the headlines. How about easing up on that and getting back to technology?

None of the negative coverage is getting through, such as a 30% return rate [itwire.com.au] for the Palladium testbed, so that suggests that Slashdot is a participant (willing or unwilling) in spreading that movement's marketing churn.

A moratorium on MS churn, whether slashvertisements or otherwise, even one day a week or one week a month would do wonders to improve Slashdot. Let's leave political parties like MS on the sideline and re-focus on technology.

Prior art! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673571)

To me, it sounds like MS is getting ready to milk its customers in ways unprecedented. And not only its customers, but the people. I thought that's the state's prerogative?

I'd sue.

Cue in "soviet russia" (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#19673589)

And of course, in Soviet Russia it would be "business ready people". Umm... wait a minute, that sounds more like the "in the free world" part of the joke... But that would mean that the original buzzphrase is for the "in Soviet Russia" part...

Oh my God! MS is turning communist!
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