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Apple iPhone Dissected

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the better-them-than-you dept.

338

Conch writes "Only hours after the launch, the Apple iPhone has been dissected. The good folks at AnandTech violated one of the first iPhones to still our curiosity about whats inside the aluminum shell. 'Please note that we're doing this so you are not tempted to on your recent $500/$600 expenditure, while it is quite possible to take apart using easy to find tools we'd recommend against it as it will undoubtedly void your warranty and will most likely mar up the beautiful gadget's exterior.'"

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Hooray Apple released a phone! (0, Troll)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698749)

Can they please go back to making computers now?

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (3, Insightful)

Eternauta3k (680157) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698763)

Can they please go back to making computers now?
More profit in making gadgets & iPods?

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (2, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698783)

Can they please go back to making computers now?

No [engadget.com]

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (2, Informative)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699433)

"Why does Apple hate DRM on audio, but not on Software or Video?"

Their OS includes no activation or DRM.

Learn things.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (0)

mmeister (862972) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698965)

Newsflash - the iPhone is a computer. In fact, it's running a trimmed down OS X.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (2, Insightful)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699161)

I love reading peoples opinions all the more when they're given in a sentence that starts with "Newsflash".

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698979)

Technically they have never made a real computer...more like status symbols for smug, self-absorbed wannabe hipsters.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (2, Interesting)

gb506 (738638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699029)

Yeah, status symbols for hipsters. And scientists, graphic artists, video producers, health care imaging professionals, audio engineers, photographers, radio broadcasters, software engineers, web developers, former VPs of the United States of America, etc. I suppose those folks could use your platform of choice to do their jobs, but they probably don't want to *need* people like you around to keep them patched and semi-secure. Nor do they want to associate with you, what with the food stained shirts, bad haircuts, and poor overall disposition due to your invariable inability to secure a sex partner.

STFU and go back to your bag of cheetos.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (1)

Vexorian (959249) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699163)

Wow bro, they washed your brain.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (1)

gb506 (738638) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699183)

Just call it as I see it. Go back to your cheetos and mountain dew.

Re:Hooray Apple released a phone! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699231)

Please do not feed the trolls. Thank you.

More and more detailed pics (5, Informative)

stefanb (21140) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698757)

at ThinkSecret [thinksecret.com] . Plus they didn't destroy the case :-)

Re:More and more detailed pics (3, Informative)

Gwwfps (912993) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698861)

They did destroy some stuff inside though, which didn't happen here [ifixit.com] , from the looks of it.

What's that? (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698759)

That noise - as if millions of fanbois suddenly cried out in shock and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened....

Joke's aside - the thing I really noted from TFA was:

The big yellow thing in the middle is the iPhone battery; you're definitely not replacing this thing on your own
More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

Re:What's that? (3, Interesting)

Svippy (876087) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698781)

More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

You know as well as I, that Apple likes to keep control of their own things. And besides, it is not like there would be any business in a normal mobile store to sell iPhone batteries, whereas selling for instance Nokia batteries could be a good idea, because a lot of phones from Nokia uses the same batteries. I think even across brand names are the same battery used. Not until the iPhone becomes popular enough or Apple makes more phones that uses the same battery (and of course make it easy to exchange battery) will any other store consider selling them, and Apple knows that.

Re:What's that? (1, Flamebait)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698799)

Are you an idiot?

Apple stores & AT&T stores can sell iPhone batteries. In any case, everyone else and their dog will be selling iphone skins/cases/carry bags/random accessories - they'd sell batteries too if they could.

Re:What's that? (1, Informative)

Svippy (876087) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698819)

Uh, duh, of course they can sell the batteries, not what I am saying. Since, well I think at least, the iPhone will even in the USA remain for the few, then if the other stores could sell, they wouldn't, because Apple has made sure the battery is so integrated into the phone. You tell your average Joe to change that battery. I know other stores can adapt those feat, but why bother? When the market is so tiny.

This is also the same reason the iPhone won't work in Europe, where consumers aren't that willing to commit to a single company. At the same time, European consumers (at least Scandinavians) prefer text messages (SMS) over calling at most, and the iPhone's keymap does not live up to that quality. Though, I may be wrong on the keymap, I haven't tried an iPhone, so I wouldn't be entirely sure, though I am thinking it won't be as easy as a usual keymap.

Re:What's that? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699093)

So, it's settled then... You are, in fact, an idiot.

Re:What's that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699459)

Flamebait; Informative ... it's all the same round these parts

Re:What's that? (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699357)

Uh, the keymap is nothing but software...

The battery is not replaceable by design. (4, Insightful)

Cordath (581672) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698827)

Have you ever changed the battery in an iPod? It's possible, but a royal nuisance. Anyone who has done so probably realizes that Apple never really intended it to be possible. With the iPhone they've taken it a step further by soldering the battery directly to the board. I think that says it all. The only question is whether or not the battery will live up to daily use long enough to last out the contracts people are signing themselves into.

From the pictures on anandtech, it appears that the iPhone uses a Li-poly battery. That's an interesting choice, but a concerning one. Those typically do not last for as many charges as a plain old lithium ion battery. Apple is probably counting on the fact that the people who will lay out the kind of money the iPhone costs are the sort who won't try to nurse a device on for years, but rather, are the sort that will bin said device as soon as the next greatest thing (Hopefully the next generation of iPhone) comes along.

I suppose in this light it's not really planned obsolescence. Apple just built the iPhone to the minimum specs of the fickle trendy gadget crowd.

Re:What's that? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698969)

More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

I've had three mobile phones in my life, each of them for about 4 years. I have never replaced a battery in any of them.

Granted, at the end of the 4 years I might need to charge them every three days instead of every five, but that's not a problem for me. And by the time I get rid of the phone it's usually because it has failed in general - broken clamshell joint or broken charger connection, for example.

Most likely Apple has made the battery non-replacable because they have better uses for the space required for a replacable battery; and because user replacement of batteries is a fairly unusual thing.

Just my $0.02

Re:What's that? (1)

lukas84 (912874) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699037)

These are smartphones - not mobile phones. Both my smartphones (first a Communicator, now a HTC MTeoR) sucked up juice like PDAs.

With UMTS, the MTeoR lasts about 36 hours - so you'll have to charge it every night. Of course this is with Push-Email enabled, and heavy use (both as a cell phone and as a modem).

Re:What's that? (1)

Animaether (411575) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699185)

I charge my smartphone every night, too - I only *have* to do so once in 3 days. Granted, my regular mobile phone can go 2 weeks without a recharge (given the little use it gets right now) - but even that phone I've had plugged in every night. It makes sure that at the start of every day, I have a full battery. I never have to worry whether the 30% charge left in the thing will last me through the day, or whether I should plug it in before taking a shower for another 7% extra just to be on the safe side.

Once you get into the habit of just plugging it in every night, then battery life becomes a moot issue unless.. *unless*.. it won't even last you the day anymore. At that point, the battery is pretty much dead (not empty, just dead), and you *should* be able to get a replacement battery and replace it.. instead of having it 'serviced' for a battery replacement. Not that servicing is bad - it's just that typically they say "come back tomorrow" (if you're lucky!) after taking the phone.

Re:What's that? (1)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699349)

Unusual? None of the phones I've bought (three LG, three Motorolla, one Samsung, one Sanyo, one Kyocera, one Nokia) haven't had a user replaceable battery. And in all the ones I've used personall the battery life - both talk time and idle charge - was severely diminished before two years was out, enough to warrant battery replacement in a couple cases (bad to have a work phone die in the middle of a call or to find your personal phone dead in an emergency).

Esthetics (1)

smurfsurf (892933) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699467)

Most likely Apple has made the battery non-replacable because they have better uses for the space required for a replacable battery
I would rather say iPod and iPhone batteries are non-replacable because they could not do it in a way that still satisfied Steve Jobs' esthetic demands. The Palm V is another device where looks were more important.

Re:What's that? (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699025)

A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

I hope that battery can last 2 years, or the price of iPhones drops before the two years of everyones' contracts.

Re:What's that? (1, Interesting)

rbanffy (584143) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699175)

When was the last time you replaced a smartphone battery?

I had a couple, the current being a Nokia E62 I got for free from the phone company after my faithful Sony Ericsson P-800 died. My SE P-800 was my phone, PDA, camera (for emergencies, because it was a lousy one) and MP3 player for over 3 years and its battery was still strong (a single charge gave it 48 hours) the day it died the bad checksum death.

It's been since the early 90s the last time I saw a phone whose useful life did outlast its battery.

By the time the first iPhone batteries start dying, there will be a better model and you will want to move on to it.

For me, the AT&T tie-in and the ban on installing homebrew software (I need SSH) make the iPhone an unpractical choice. Too bad, because it's really beautiful.

Wow (4, Interesting)

niceone (992278) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698775)

Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

Re:Wow (5, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698789)

Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

You know, I have the feeling people who buy high-tech, flashy gadgetry such as the iPhone aren't likely to invest in it for the long term, with a value-for-money approach to buying and owning the product. The battery will probably last long enough for the owner to have another "oh shiny!" purchasing moment and relegate his iPhone to the bottom of some drawer...

Re:Wow (5, Funny)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698859)

You know, I have the feeling people who buy high-tech, flashy gadgetry such as the iPhone aren't likely to invest in it for the long term, with a value-for-money approach to buying and owning the product.

You'll be surprised. Most Mac people I know are poor, unemployed, and step on toes around their machines. But they were so convinced they should absolutely must get Apple, they would stay away from pot for a month to afford one.

Re:Wow (4, Funny)

FireFury03 (653718) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698895)

Most Mac people I know are poor

They probably weren't poor until they blew all their cash on Apple kit. :)

Re:Wow (2, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699003)

No, they're still using the Mac that their parents bought them when they lived in the basement. The reason that they don't have any money is that they're too busy updating their blogs, and buying emo music, thick-rimmed glasses, and 1970s Tshirts.

Re:Wow (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699087)

they would stay away from pot for a month to afford one.

Then after a month with no pot they look at the $500 price tag, two year contract, & wonder WTF they were thinking.

In all fairness though, I met one of the guys who designs lighting layouts at shows for Audio Visual Innovations [aviinc.com], & he uses an Apple laptop to do it. He didn't have to give up pot for a month to get the Mac either, the Mac actually helps him afford good pot.

Re:Wow (1)

starwed (735423) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699137)

I know tons of people with 2 year cingular/AT&T contracts... I doubt that this is that much of a deal-breaker for most.

Re:Wow (1)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699369)

Most Mac people I know aren't poor, and some edge into the wealthy category. On the other hand, a lot of them like to brag about the longevity of their computers. On the other other hand, most of them seem to accept a distinct lack of longevity when it comes to their iPods. I suspect that the price and the lock-in on the iPhone will make for pissed off people if the battery doesn't go the distance, though.

Re:Wow (5, Informative)

Gord (23773) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698901)

Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

Apple will replace it under their service program, when the phone is out-of-warranty. $85.95 including postage.

http://www.apple.com/support/iphone/service/batter y/ [apple.com]

Re:Wow (3, Informative)

djh101010 (656795) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699013)

Apple will replace it under their service program, when the phone is out-of-warranty. $85.95 including postage.

http://www.apple.com/support/iphone/service/batter y/ [apple.com]
Oh come on now, Gord, the bashers were displaying their ignorance for us, and you had to go and spoil the little show by injecting actual facts and everything. What were you thinking?

Another point, is that I've sent 2 iPods back to Apple for battery replacement, and both times they came back as (presumably) the same guts but a new battery, and case. So the cost (60 bucks as I recall) was in effect a refurb. Looked like a brand new unit coming back.

Re:Wow (2, Insightful)

itsdapead (734413) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698925)

Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

Welcome to the scorched Earth.

Lots of people habitually upgrade their phone every time they upgrade their contract - OK that's with free or heavily subsidised phones that don't cost $500 with a contract - but rest assured, those guys who queued all day yesterday are not going to be seen dead using a first-generation iPhone in two year's time. These are the customers that will be paying Steve's mortgage, not the ones still using their 5-year-old handset, so why waste money designing a phone to last more that 2 years?

Plus, it doesn't half make that $70 AppleCare protection plan look attractive.

Having said that, I'm sure Apple service agents will be able to replace the battery (...a purpose designed case-opening tool and a supply of replacement back covers would make it rather easier) - and from Apple's POV a battery hatch, contacts and additional casing will cost a few cents more, might add a millimetre to the thickness and would be something else to break, go wrong or get replaced by a cookie by someone's sprog. Its not like the iPod flopped because of a non-removable battery.

(PS - I'm not saying I like the idea)

Re:Wow (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699279)

Same tired old FUD.
"You can't change an iPod battery"
So what? (never mind that you can, for the moment).
My iPod went THREE YEARS before its battery died.
Three years in consumer electronics is longer than "dog years".
Do you honestly think that everyone buying an iPhone today will find it up-to-speed in three years?
Hell, I can't even buy a $2500 COMPUTER that can keep pace with technology that long.
"What if my battery goes dead while I'm using it. I can't pop in a fresh one".
I have never, ever, in a decade of cell ownership, found myself in a position where I was out of range of a charger for more the 3-4 days needed to recharge my battery.
I have never, ever even owned a second battery.
Guess what? In an informal poll of my co-workers, not a single one of them said that they've ever needed, nor have ever owned, a second battery for their phones, either.
Trust me, there isn't anyone outside of the rabid Anti-Apple crowd that doesn't find this argument to be old and tired, so give it a rest.
(For the record, I'm a field service technician. I work on the road, and exclusively on-site for my company's customers. I am the g-d DEFINITION of a Road Warrior)

Re:Wow (4, Interesting)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699481)

Hell, I can't even buy a $2500 COMPUTER that can keep pace with technology that long.

Some people use their electronics to do things, not "keep pace with technology". My last $600 computer lasted me seven years.

The software (3, Interesting)

yohanes (644299) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698777)

I am more interested in someone hacking the software (is it really OSX?, can you flash it, etc). But this may provide a good start, because they give quite detailed photos of most of the hardware.

Re:The software (0, Troll)

FireFury03 (653718) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699345)

I am more interested in someone hacking the software

Keep an eye out for the Neo1973 [wikipedia.org] later in the year, which will be running OpenMoko and thus be truly hackable (by design). Looks like a better piece of kit than the iPhone (although the screen is a bit small) - I will probably wait until they produce a second generation version with 3G (and hopefully a bigger screen and hard keypad for dialling).

I wouldn't go near the iPhone ATM - it just has too many things wrong with it: Unreplacable battery, can't run 3rd party software, stupidly expensive (around $2000 over 2 years), crap touch-screen (can't be used with a stylus - fat fingers only), doesn't do handwriting recognition, no 3G, no keypad, the list goes on...

I haven't yet worked out whether the iPhone will be a big success or a massive flop. What I do know though is that it will only be bought by people who buy based on hype rather than featureset. So the equation comes down to how many Apple fanboys are there with buckets of cash who will buy something purely because Apple tells them to. :)

What did slashot do (0, Redundant)

JamesRose (1062530) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698801)

Before it became a pure iPhone advertising tool, i honestly can't remember, and I can only imagine how empty it must have been...

Re:What did slashot do (3, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698995)

The unwashed masses have Paris Hilton, we geeks have the iPhone...

Still, I'd like one of the editors here to take the attitude toward the iPhone that Mika Brzezinski [youtube.com] has towards Paris. This video is quite funny, she was really mad!

Back to Slashdot - you realize you made the problem worse by clicking on and replying to this story? If the editors are looking at what types of stories lead to more clicks, you've just "voted"! :)

What did slashot do-stories that BURN! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699125)

"Back to Slashdot - you realize you made the problem worse by clicking on and replying to this story? If the editors are looking at what types of stories lead to more clicks, you've just "voted"! :)"

Then we'd have more creation vs evolution stories. Anything having to do with religion pushes a hot button and generates the most comments ever.

Re:What did slashot do (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699393)

The unwashed masses have Paris Hilton, we geeks have the iPhone...

I'm willing to bet a lot of slashdotters will have both... in the virtual sense that is.

Kleenex!

Snuff movie (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698813)

It's like some kind of warped geek snuff movie

Re:Snuff movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699241)

Indeed, with the victim hacked apart by a clueless butcher. It would work better if they copied the style of one of those 1940's German snuff movies with a trained surgeon doing the job.

SIM (2, Insightful)

wikinerd (809585) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698815)

Here in Europe in most cases we can change the SIM easily. Why not in the US?

Re:SIM (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698865)

You can also change the SIM easily in most US GSM phones. (not CDMA, of course) The iPhone is special.

Re:SIM (4, Informative)

lexarius (560925) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698929)

You can change the SIM in the iPhone too (there are pictures of the software demanding that the SIM be inserted). However, like many US phones, it is vendor locked and can only be used with SIMs from a particular provider. If Apple drops the exclusive deal with AT&T (which they can do in two years), they'll probably send out unlock codes via Software Update. Maybe.

Re:SIM (2, Informative)

abdulla (523920) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699329)

I think it's actually 5 years. They must have one hell of a deal.

Re:SIM (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698933)

Uh, it's quite easy to change the SIM card in the iPhone. There's a tray at the top that works like the battery tray in the Apple Remote.

Re:SIM (0)

v(*_*)vvvv (233078) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698875)

I think that is why it is not being released yet in Europe or in Japan... It lacks some vital features these markets are used to. Well, apart from replacing batteries.

Re:SIM (1)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698989)

Here in Europe in most cases we can change the SIM easily. Why not in the US?

I'm "here in Europe", and this is differing from country to country, and service provider to service provider. Sometimes even the same provider would offer locked and unlocked phones at the same time.

So don't oversimplify things so much.

As about disassembling the iPhone: bleh. I wanna see actual reviews and sales numbers.

It's not susprise if you open it you'll see chips, batteries and TFT screen.

Re:SIM (0, Troll)

FireFury03 (653718) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699363)

Sometimes even the same provider would offer locked and unlocked phones at the same time.

I was quite surprised to hear that the Carphone Warehouse sell unlocked phones these days because it's much cheaper for them to not have to stock the same phone branded and locked to each telco.

Re:SIM (1)

Egdiroh (1086111) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699019)

How many times does this perception have to be fixed. You can change the physical sim. The thing that is restricted is using another carrier, which is common on US phones. In the end of the day the reason for this is our messed up publicly traded stock system. Rather then just being used for long term investment, there are now many people who try to skim money off our economy by taking advantage of short term fluctuations of relative stock value. This has resulted in a more volatile market, where companies are valued, not on their real value, but on their rate of growth and sometimes even the rate of their rate of growth. This can result in a successful company ending up vastly undervalued, and often when this happens they get bought out to the detriment of the company. And in this world being able to make long term profit estimates is very important, and as a consequence of greed and the corporate corruption that stemmed from that greed, we have fairly strict laws about what profit you can say that you expect. And cell phone contracts come out of that, ATT gets to declare more expected earnings from me if they have a 2 year contract with them, then if I am just month to month. Of course this has meant that once the market adjusted to the 1 year contracts they had to go to 18 month and now 2 year. I would be surprised if we made it to the end of the decade without the standard contract being 2.5 years.

US$600 well spent on... (2, Funny)

sankyuu (847178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698833)

1. Unraveling the mystery of the multi-touch screen by peeling it like an onion!
2. Figuring out if the iPhone has vestiges of unimplemented features (like how they found unused slots on the Mac Mini).
3. Seeing exactly which parts are from China, Taiwan and Korea.
4. And most importantly... iPorn! (is what you get when you cause your iPhone to do an iGoatse.)

But, does it blend? (0, Redundant)

bitserf (756357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698839)

Re:But, does it blend? (1)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698849)

That is one of the most retarded videos I've seen on YouTube.

What do all those parts actually cost? (2, Interesting)

fedxone-v86 (1080801) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698857)

Mod me flamebait but I'm always interested in comparing the estimated manufacturing costs to the price tags Apple puts on its gadgets.

Re:What do all those parts actually cost? (1)

contrapunctus (907549) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698893)

What about the cost of product development?

Re:What do all those parts actually cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699431)

huh? Thinking costs money? No wonder I'm poor AND dumb.

This is just the beginning... (1, Funny)

GFree (853379) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698869)

Apple iPhone Dissected
Given the way things are going, who knows, the children of the future might end up dissecting iPhones instead of dead rats

Re:This is just the beginning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699301)

In Soviet Russia, iPhone dissects children of future!

Almost good enough for me. (0, Redundant)

StonedRat (837378) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698873)

If this had 3G, GPS and was open to third party development then I would certainly buy one. Maybe version 2 will have those features.

Re:Almost good enough for me. (3, Informative)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699005)

Or you can go with an unlocked phone [nokiausa.com] with all that and more. No touchscreen, no lock-in, no lack of 3G, no closed door to third party apps. Gambling for version 2 might not be a good idea.

NEO1973 (4, Informative)

Tony (765) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699145)

Sounds like you want a FIC NEO1973 [openmoko.org] . According to Sean Moss-Pultz in his most recent announcement [openmoko.org] , the consumer model due in Q4 this year will include wifi.

It's almost fully open. As in, everything is open except the AGPS daemon, which you don't need for GPS, just AGPS.

And it'll only be $450, for the phone itself. No contracts required.

Re:NEO1973 (0, Troll)

FireFury03 (653718) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699397)

Sounds like you want a FIC NEO1973.

I'm planning to buy an OpenMoko phone in the future, but the Neo1973 is missing some important features - 3G (releasing a smartphone without 3G is crazy), a hard keypad (dialling with no tactile feedback isn't great) and the screen is rather small. So I'm holding out for a revision of the Neo in the hope that they add some of these features. Something a similar form-factor to the iPhone but with a keypad (maybe a flip-down thing like the SE P900/P910 or a slide out keypad) would be great.

As for the price tag, the $450 is for the "basic" version - the "advanced" one is going to be $600, although I've not actually been able to find a description of the differences between these versions (but whichever you get, it's still a much better price than the iPhone since it's not on a contract).

Re:NEO1973 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699493)

(but whichever you get, it's still a much better price than the iPhone since it's not on a contract)

Uh, you don't have to get a contract with the iPhone. In fact, you can't -- you just buy it at the store and take it home, no contract involved.

The only catch is that it's locked with Cingular, which means that if you don't already have a plan with them, you'll have to buy one. If you do, though, you can switch right over; I know at least one guy who did so.

Why is everyone addicted to GPS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699377)

I see this always listed as a mark against the iPhone, but I haven't once seen an explanation for it. The only purpose I see for GPS is turn-by-turn driving directions. Here are a few reasons why I don't think this is useful in the iPhone:

* only used in car, iPhone is a device for portable use, dedicated in-car GPS is more appropriate
* Google MAPs can supply directions, just not turn-by-turn
* extra hardware/cost/power required

And honestly, I think Steve's argument against 3G is a solid one. He claims it's a power hog compared to 2.5G. This means you get longer battery life/smaller device footprint for battery. I'd much rather have a longer battery life or smaller device than 3G speeds. In any case, this issue seems to be more with the 3G chipset manufacturers than Apple, but could be a legitimate reason to wait.

Third party software definitely needs to be addressed better, though.

-Huck

Re:Why is everyone addicted to GPS? (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699411)

The GPS functionality is used to augment location by cell tower in case of 911 calls.

i(nferior)Phone !!! (0, Troll)

JagsLive (1106379) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698899)

guess that 'i' stands for inferior 'coz it lacks so many things that even non-smartphones carry these days...

i'm not sure if steve jobs has ever heard of 'high speed internet' that at&t is offering for almost a year...obviously he hasn't heard of A2DP (stereo bluetooth) either...

the only thing I find great about iPhone is all hype jobs was able to create...

even after paying $535 you can't set your own mp3 as ringtone

no copy/edit/paste commands(as per early engadget reviews)

no video recording

no 3rd party software? so I guess you can't play xVid/DivX/mms (live streming/video feeds)etc...

guess if you can create a huge hype you can sell anything...even an inferior phone and that too in 2007

Why not just one chip? (2, Interesting)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698905)

I wonder if some EE guru could answer me what might be a stupid question: what's the point of using a PCB these days instead of just putting everything on the same chip? I highly doubt that anyone would try to repair an iPhone by substituting some component. Hell, we don't even fix TVs any more. There might be some advantage to using a generic component, but once you are making a custom chip, it would seem to be no harder to merge all the others into it. With the architecture being mostly virtual, I doubt there would be any physical design revisions that could be corrected by revising the layout. So why the PCB?

Re:Why not just one chip? (3, Informative)

jamesh (87723) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698949)

I'm not an EE guru, and I know next to nothing about the iPhone, but very standard chips exist for lots of things like 802.11abg, GSM, CDMA, 3G, USB, Bluetooth, LCD/TFT displays, audio, battery charging and monitoring etc. Also, some of these components might be region specific. It makes some sense to keep them separate rather than try and stick everything on the same die, unless you are really pushed for space. Once the thing leaves the factory it may not be repaired, but at the assembly level they may well swap out a bad Bluetooth chip and replace it if required...

It also allows for (eg) 802.11n ability to be added at a later date if a pin compatible 802.11abgn chip comes on the market, or for them to change display vendors (maybe requiring a different driver chip) if they need to.

Re:Why not just one chip? (2, Informative)

dsanfte (443781) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698959)

The more stuff on a chip, the lower the yields due to failures of individual components, and the more need for a heat spreader. Secondly, putting all the stuff on a chip means it has to be manufactured by a single company, so less cost-savings is to be found than from shopping around for off-the-shelves from China.

I would also hazard a guess that some of the components on the PCB would simply not fit into an IC.

That being said, if you really wanted to make an all-in-one-chip iPhone, it's probably possible, minus a few bulky components, but probably not economical. I'm pretty sure they've put the phone together in close to the cheapest way possible given their circumstances.

Re:Why not just one chip? (3, Insightful)

Thumper_SVX (239525) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698977)

I'm not an EE guru, but it seems to me the reason for discreet chips in a lot of these devices actually serves several purposes.

Firstly, data speeds between chips might not match; something that's a lot easier to engineer into discreet chips than a single chip with everything on board.

Secondly, it gives the manufacturer the freedom to switch out components at will. If you dismantle anything from a large embedded device manufacturer, you might find that a single "generation" of a product might go through several iterations of chips simply because the manufacturer was able to source chips from different chip manufacturers for better prices.

Hell, I know I've seen a number of devices of supposedly the same generation that have had four or five iterations of motherboard and probably more of the chips themselves. Don't kid yourself; manufacturers of these devices are all about maximizing profits, and they do that by keeping their product lines "nimble"

Third, and as an aside to the second point; fabbing a custom chip is expensive, in time, resources and cost. Most manufacturers will use off the shelf components where possible so that they can keep the costs down. Custom chips tend to be fabbed only where off the shelf solutions don't exist or fail to meet some other engineering goal. The custom chips shown in the iPhone are a prime example of this. Although we don't know for sure what's inside that ARM package (the part numbers seem incongruous), we can guess that they did combine multiple discreet components into that chip package. In the case of the iPhone this was probably done to meet the packaging requirements of the entire device; i.e. Apple wanted a slim and compact device and discreet chips may have taken more space than the engineering team wanted.

However, the fact that there are several off the shelf chips on the board as well tells me that they were balancing cost and engineering requirements... this almost certainly took a lot of time and it's a nicely engineered solution. I look forward to version 2... which is when I might consider buying one (sorry, tethering and 3G are a big deal for me as I use them daily).

Re:Why not just one chip? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698981)

Because it means you have to create everything yourself--you can't license/buy/borrow already existing parts from other companies. Ask yourself this--why don't programmers write everything themselves? Wouldn't it be more efficient to have it all come from the same place? Possibly, but it's far more difficult, and the gains would often be very negligible.

Re:Why not just one chip? (1)

the_doctor_23 (945852) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699129)

Yes you can and it has been done so for years.
You can license synthesizeable blocks (called IP cores [wikipedia.org] ) written in some kind of HDL and combine then to build your ASIC or FPGA just fine.

Re:Why not just one chip? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699027)

A) the larger your chip is on die, the more chances of there being a defect in your chip (decreasing yeilds) and the fewer chips you get per wafer (decreasing yeilds)

B) Generic chips are incredibly cheap to manufacture. In the dollars to tens of dollars for most simple circuits (because they are simple, they are small, meaning they get high yeilds per wafer, which means that they are dirt cheap).

C) Pcb's are very easy to mass produce. You get your board, etch, insert components and wave solder.

Re:Why not just one chip? (2, Interesting)

catwh0re (540371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699091)

Many reasons for keeping away from a giant mother chip vs chip division by their function:

1. Lots of proprietary chips from lots of vendors.
2. You lose greater economies of scale when engineering custom silicon. Instead of buying existing chips.
3. It's often easier to contain clock speeds and single-ended capacitance within the boundaries of a chip. Extra electronics is required to buffer the effects of clock/capacitance etc from other components. (I.E. Interference.)
4. If all the chips are together, then you can't upgrade anything in the next model.
5. Similar to point 4, if there is a fault, you can't flunk or swap out a chip on the assembly.
6. Various stability, heat and power savings by using a different chip for each function, e.g. h264 decoding will be on a different chip than the GSM functions.

Re:Why not just one chip? (4, Informative)

Bender_ (179208) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699457)


Ignore all other replies, they are only half truth.

The truth is: Different manufacturing processes are required depending on the function of the chips. There are many different types of integrated circuits in a cellphone: Logic (processor), analog parts (Silicon and exotic III-V semiconductors), Memory (NAND flash, NOR flash, DRAM), Sensors (think MEMS). Each of these require a different process flow. Combining those is often extremely expensive to impossible.

The way it is usually done is to use different circuit techniques to achieve the same functionality in a silicon logic process. However in many situations this is not possible or economical, yet.

This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0, Troll)

v(*_*)vvvv (233078) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698909)

Q. I was wondering why there haven't been any touch screen phones until now. It seems simple enough, and Apple makes it look like it is the future of phones.

A. YOU CANNOT USE THE IPHONE WITH ONE HAND!!! Because you need to be able to "point" and "move your finger" to send commands to the device, it is much harder to one-hand it than any other phone which pretty much are one hand devices. Many phones have a full keyboard, and they require 2 hands also, but most of them also have a 1 hand mode.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19698961)

Doesn't matter... at least if you don't want to use it while driving or for watching porn.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (1)

v(*_*)vvvv (233078) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699179)

When driving in LA sometimes it feels like 99 out of 100 people have a cell phone in one hand. So i guess the iPhone won't catch on in LA... strike that. It will catch on and so will more accidents.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (1)

16K Ram Pack (690082) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699011)

I am ignoring every review at this point. Even "we had the phone for 2 weeks" reviews.

I want to know how it performs in the real world when it really matters. When you need to look up some information in a big hurry for your job. When you need to discretely text someone. When you need to find a place on maps. When you realise that you've been listening to music for too long and your phone is dying.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699021)

I'll wager that you live in the US. There have been plenty of touchscreen phones up until now. The Sony Ericsson P800, for example, was released back in 2002.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (1)

v(*_*)vvvv (233078) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699131)

no no... i mean touch screen ONLY phones. Even sony recognized the importance of a keypad on this one.

The iphone boils down to being a great touch screen OS for phones. I expect the iPhone2 to be more like this:
http://www.casio.co.jp/release/2006/images/w41ca/t heme_S.jpg [casio.co.jp]
(opens and folds)

I have this phone for when I go back to Japan. It is not a touch screen (don't need it to be), but if it had the iPhone interface as a UI mode, that would be a true advancement. But if I had to turn in the keypad to get it, forget it.

I am still disappointed at how WOWed people get by features that have been standard in most other markets for years. Like wireless broadband. Which in japan is faster than most DSL and cable connections in the states.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (4, Informative)

catwh0re (540371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699119)

All phone functions can be carried out with one hand. (similar to how you handle an ipod with one hand.)

More advanced functions such as web browsing and browsing email are far easier with two hands (but if you can be bothered stretching your thumb around, then again you can do it one handed.)

It's silly to suggest that the iPhone is the only phone that benefits from two hands. (E.g. any phone that uses a stylus requires two hands on the go.) Since many phones do already require two hands to operate them, having a multi-touch display represents better efficiency of the hands (that is, it should speed you along a little bit, touch typing and gesture short cuts are good examples of this.)

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699189)

TWO HANDS? That sort of limits the market for iPhone porn.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (1)

Weaps (642924) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699205)

Good, that'll keep down the number of people using it while driving. Or at least darwinize out people who would try to use it while driving.

(Oooh, a picture! I'll just pinch it down and OH SHIT A TELEPHONE PO-[*static*])

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699289)

Gotta love the people that consider themselves typists because they can use two thumbs.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (3, Insightful)

filterban (916724) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699335)

Q: Name one smartphone that can effectively be used with one hand.

A: You can't. They all have this same characteristic - whether it's a stylus (Treo) or a Crackberry, they all require two hands for effective operation.

Re:This phone is a 2 HAND device vs 1 HAND device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19699379)

I have an iPhone. I can do pinching with my middle and index finger of the same hand while holding. A lot of the interface can be used with single finger tapping. It isn't like using a single finger on a woman... oh wait... you wouldn't get what I am talking about.

Uses an ARM Jazelle processor (2, Informative)

Sam Haine '95 (918696) | more than 7 years ago | (#19698915)

I see the iPhone uses a 667 MHz ARM processor that's able to execute Java bitecode directly. I wonder what Java performance is like on this thing?

Re:Uses an ARM Jazelle processor (1)

wootest (694923) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699139)

Nonexistant, since it's not supported.

I'm hoping Apple will open up the iPhone to third parties sooner or later, but being able to run existing Java midlets is low on their list, and probably for good reason. That's a 160dpi display. You want to aim for a 9-pixels-high checkbox using your finger on that sort of screen? It's not like Java's well-positioned for resolution independence either.

Java apps would stick out like a sore thumb, would work entirely differently and wouldn't actually be able to take advantage of the features people are buying iPhones for. My guess is that they're working on a native SDK for later on.

Also just hours after launch ... (4, Funny)

jc42 (318812) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699053)

I got my first "Congratulations, you have won new iPhone" phishing message, complete with link (to http://203.121.78.200/... [203.121.78.200] ) to click on and give them all my personal contact info.

This is indeed an opportunity for all kinds of modern enterpreneurs.

ifixit has a much better takeapart... (5, Informative)

dreemkill (170748) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699165)

http://stream.ifixit.com/ [ifixit.com]

they did it some time yesterday, about an hour after it came out i think.

and by the looks of it, they didn't destroy it.

50 reasons the iPhone sucks (1, Funny)

kuactet (1017816) | more than 7 years ago | (#19699353)

1. In keeping with Apple's design philosophy, the iPhone has only one button built into its chassis. The rest are virtual.

2. That button is the number 6.

3. It comes with an on-screen keyboard that is too small for all but children to operate.

4. Steve Jobs has been happily married to Bill Gates for the last ten years. The supposed rivalry between their companies is a marketing ploy.

5. It offers only 8GB of memory; the average Internet user's hard disk contains almost twice that in celebrity porn.

6. The built-in battery is non-rechargeable and non-removable. Once dead, it will have to be sent back to Apple to be replaced.

7. The average battery life (idle): 17 hours.

8. The average battery life (running iTunes): 68 minutes.

9. It will only run Apple's OS X, which science has proven to be the worst operating system ever.

10. The built-in web browser supports neither Flash nor Java.

11. The built-in spellcheck and auto-complete only understands American English.

12. The user cannot add new ringtones. Rather, he must select from a list of Steve Jobs quotes.

13. The cellular internet connection runs at a paltry 16kbps. At that speed, it's faster to write your own Internet.

14. To make it 'secure,' Apple is not allowing third-party developers to create programs for the iPhone. No, you will take what Apple gives you, and <i>you will like it</i>. I guess Apple learned its design strategies from <b>Joseph Stalin</b>.

15. Stephen Hawking will not be buying one.

16. Unless you also buy a two-year contract with AT&T, you have just bought a very expensive paperweight.

17. In fact, it is impossible to make the iPhone run on any network but AT&T's.

18. Some reviewers have commented that the iPhone is a sexy machine. Clearly, they have never felt a woman.

19. It is assembled in Taiwanese sweatshops while Apple pockets a 50% markup.

20. Did I mention that Apple is evil?

21. Apple has cut numerous features in order to make the release, including the ability to <i>make phone calls</i>.

22. Also crippled is the virtual keyboard, which lacks both punctuation and capitalization. good job apple way to spread decoherence in the english language lol

23. Early voice recognition was bugged to the point of being unusable: it would misdial all numbers as 1-900-SEXCHAT. The capability has been removed entirely, presumably following complaints.

24. Apple has announced that additional features may be added after release. Thank you, guys, for selling us a product that even you admit isn't finished. Thank you straight to Hell.

25. Besides, how are we supposed to get these updates without an <b>internet connection</b>?

26. Following the Apple pattern, the iPhone is incompatible with <b>Linux</b>.

27. Following the Apple pattern, the iPhone has no games. At all.

28. The screen is 320x480 pixels, a resolution beaten by the Apple II in the <b>1970's</b>.

29. To battle what they perceive as amorality, Apple has removed the 'vibrate' capability.

30. The iPhone costs <b>$600</b>. For that amount, you could save over 200 African families from malaria.

31. You could also buy a separate PDA and dedicated cell phone.

32. Or, if you <i>have to</i> have OS X, an older Apple laptop. And a dedicated cell phone.

33. Let me just say it again: 200 families.

34. It is a well-known fact that hand size is correlated with penile length. Keep this in mind when you want to buy a 3.5 inch phone.

35. All of the promotional videos (including the vaunted feature walkthrough) are <b>computer generated</b>.

36. Chris Tucker was originally set to play the Mac in Apple's TV ads. He was only replaced when Steve Jobs insisted on somebody "whiter."

37. Apple's design once again relies heavily on white with blue and gold trim, a color scheme first made popular by <b>Hitler</b>.

38. The screen is touch-sensitive, but rejects stylus input. Rather, it relies on something skin-like (e.g. a finger). I guess we won't be buying any of these used.

39. And how is a customer with prosthetic hands supposed to use this? With his <i>nose</i>? I get the picture: the disabled <i>just aren't cool enough</i>.

40. OS X's 'Spotlight' was stolen from <b>Windows Search</b>.

41. OS X's 'Dashboard' was stolen from <b>Windows Sidebar</b>.

42. OS X's codebase was stolen from <b>BSD</b>.

43. OS X's 'Aqua' interface was stolen from <b>Windows Vista</b>.

44. Apple's idea of a product being buggy for the first year after release was stolen from <b>Microsoft</b>.

45. Apple's ubiquitous 'i' was stolen from <b>George Orwell</b>.

46. Its built-in portable music player was stolen from the <b>iPod</b>.

47. The finger as an input device was stolen from <b>prostitution</b>.

48. In a misguided attempt to battle piracy, Apple has made it impossible to copy and paste.

49. Did I mention you could operate it with your dick?

50. But I can't, because of the built-in proximity sensor that turns off the touch-screen when it approaches anything that's <i>too large</i>.
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