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Research Indicates Beijing Is World Virus Capital

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the they-totally-win dept.

Security 119

An anonymous reader writes "The Chinese capital city of Beijing is now a global leader in distributing viruses. According to UK-based managed security services company Network Box, Beijing accounts for 40 percent of all viruses that passed though the company's servers in June, and 5.25 percent of detected spam. This compares with slightly lower percentages for cities in countries noted for having a malware problem. Moscow was second for spam with 5.12 percent, Seoul third with 3.58 percent, Turk in Turkey fourth with 3.4 percent, and London in fifth place at 2.47 percent. 'As more and more users come online in China, there's a good chance those computers are using pirated software without up-to-date security fixes, making them prime targets for hackers who are actually located elsewhere in the world, [Simon] Heron said. Those compromised computers, which are used to send spam and make it more difficult to identify the spammer, are so valuable that hacker gangs have been competing to take over machines. If one gang finds a machine running another gang's Trojan horse program — one that appears harmless to the victim but can be used to control a machine — they'll try to remove the software.'"

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Like street gangs... (4, Funny)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758297)

Hopefully they get so absorbed in rubbing eachother out that the rest of us can just get on with business as usual.

Re:Like street gangs... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758703)

rubbing each other out

I think that's an altogether different Internet phenomenon.

World Computers Vulnerability Capital. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758975)

Washington D.C. is the World Computers Vulnerability Capital.

Does anyone remember the Windows Vista spyies you?
Does anyone remember the Intel Core Duo2?

Why the 95% of the PCs are based in the vulnerables Intel/AMD with Hasefroch Windows?

The vulnerabilities were pre-designed by the DARPA for massive auto-destruction violating all the contracts with NATO's countries.

It's a anti-anti-anti-anti-non-non-non-non-non-non-non-an ti-anti-anti-anti-non-non-non-anti-anti-nondisclos ure.

Re:World Computers Vulnerability Capital. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759487)

Greece is the World Trojans Capital.

The greeks invented the Trojan_Horse [wikipedia.org] .

They evolved its Trojan_horse_(computing) [wikipedia.org] thanks to the Darwinism [wikipedia.org] .

Ohhh, wait! i'm hitting the Creationism's [wikipedia.org] controversy [wikipedia.org] .

OMG (1)

niceone (992278) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758335)

OMG Olympic fuelled avian influenza pandemic here we come!?!

Oh, not that sort of virus.

Re:OMG (2)

IgLou (732042) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758469)

Seriously, when I first started reading the post that's exactly what I was thinking! I feel like I might be a little prejudiced in jumping to that conclusion...

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758525)

Let's look at the list of things China distributes...

Tainted grain made into pet food,
Bad tires that go to shreds,
Now, they are the world leader in distribution of computer viruses.

Maybe it's all part of their plan for world domination.

Kill their pets, wreck their cars, now trash their computers...hooray!!

ya, but.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758733)

..due to glorious globalization and the firm and intellectual resolve of our esteemed business and political leaders, you get all of the above *cheap* and it increases shareholder value! Remember, efficiency is key to increasing the "bottom line", so if you want more cheap counterfeit poisonous junk, exploding batteries, and quality computer viruses, vote the Globalist party (either D or R wing) in 08!

Go a month without China (2, Interesting)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760161)

Try to live here without buying anything from China. It's gonna be tough, especially if you want to buy shoes or electronics without parts or assembly in the PRC. Here's an interesting article about it.http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/1220/p09s01-coop. html [csmonitor.com]

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759565)

Let's look at the list of things China distributes...
You forgot soylent green. And coming soon aboard a produce transit ship bound for America - toilet red.

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758741)

If you've ever seen a chinese hooker you would not be surprised.

No surprise really (4, Insightful)

southpolesammy (150094) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758347)

From a Westerner's perspective, China has the following qualities:
  1. Large population
  2. Growing Internet presence
  3. Restricted access (both physically and logically)
  4. Rampant piracy problem

This seems like a target-rich environment for black hats to "do business" in.

Windows versus Linux (1, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758531)

One might speculate that it's a good thing for linux (and mac) that China runs on Windows. It's an incubator for this kind of activity. It probably does not help that a lot of the windows is pirated and/or never kept patched. Since linux is even harder to keep patched automatically it would not be a better situation (Flame me if you wish but please don't say something moronic as "its' as simple as "apt-get update-all". And even if you believe that linux is more resistant to holes than windows that's not an issue: Remember most of these bots come in as trojans not remote execution exploits, and they don't even need to run as root--so linux is not going to be more secure against trojans people welcome into their user spaces.

Now just imagine in the future when phones become general purpose computers, not subject to reprogramming by the phone service provider. That's going to be billions of rooted computers. Yikes.

Re:Windows versus Linux (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758575)

It's as simple as "apt-get update-all"

Thank you, thank you, I'll have another show tonight and two more on Saturday. Refer a friend and get 50% off the price of admission.

Re:Windows versus Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19760899)

Not even that hard. You click on the little orange box that says there's updates, and click "apply updates". Even a brain dead stoned physically dead insane monkey could figure that out.

Just Curious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758743)

Why would you rather be flamed than have someone point out the truth?

Re:Windows versus Linux (4, Insightful)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758749)

One might speculate that it's a good thing for linux (and mac) that China runs on Windows. It's an incubator for this kind of activity.

From what I've seen you have spam, mostly targeting English speaking Americans and Europeans and you have worms targeting anything with a fast connection, for use as a bot. I suspect that even if China was suddenly all using Red Flag Linux, worms and spam from China would still target the US.

Since linux is even harder to keep patched automatically it would not be a better situation (Flame me if you wish but please don't say something moronic as "its' as simple as "apt-get update-all".

What version of Linux on the desktop do you run? My Kubuntu install pops up a nice GUI when updates are available, and that was the default configuration. It also applies to a lot more of the userland software than Windows update does. I find it a lot easier to keep up to date than my Windows install.

And even if you believe that linux is more resistant to holes than windows that's not an issue: Remember most of these bots come in as trojans not remote execution exploits, and they don't even need to run as root--so linux is not going to be more secure against trojans people welcome into their user spaces.

I think you're mistaken here on several points. First, every study I've seen and the non-public data I have from work shows the majority of infections are from worms that do not involve user interaction, not from trojans. There are a lot more types of trojans, but they just don't spread as quickly and widely as fully automated attacks. If you're counting by infection instead of by number of malware variety, trojans are not the biggest threat.

Second, I do think the design choices of the major Linux distros are more secure than Windows for the most part, but that is not the reason why Linux will always have less chance of malware infection than Windows. Innovation, including innovation into security, is driven by market forces. Windows is a monopoly. When a Windows box is compromised, MS does not lose any money and very, very, very rarely lose any customers. Linux, due to its licensing, will never wield monopoly force in the market, thus it will always respond to the wishes of the users, who also happen to be the developers for the most part. If malware attacks against Linux were to increase in frequency enough so that Linux had to face the same level as Windows, Linux would not fare all that much better at first, but it would quickly develop better security features to mitigate the attacks, probably starting with an SELinux type approach combined with human generated white and grey-lists and some sort of an open verification scheme. User space versus root is not the most granular level of security on all Linux boxes today and if trojans became an issue on Linux, that would expand to consumer desktop systems.

Now just imagine in the future when phones become general purpose computers, not subject to reprogramming by the phone service provider. That's going to be billions of rooted computers. Yikes.

That all depends upon how many OS's and providers for phones their are. If there is a monopoly, yep we'll have terrible security and it will be a mess. If we have a healthy market with multiple competing players, I don't think it will be a serious problem.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758931)

I agree that diversity helps resistance. But as phones become computers I think we'll also see all the hand-rolled specialty phone OS disappear and standard OS's, fewer in number, replace them. This almost has to happen for develpers to develop apps. At first this may be web-apps of course so there underlying OS is less important. But long term there's pressure to downselect. Cringely thinks everything will be using Flash as a front end, even toasters. At some point the number of OS's will be small enough that we've lost the advantage of diversity. Or so I speculate.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759335)

But as phones become computers I think we'll also see all the hand-rolled specialty phone OS disappear and standard OS's, fewer in number, replace them.

So long as no one OS wields enough market influence that it can ignore customers needs, it does not matter. You could have 2 OS's each with 50% of the market, or even 1 OS, so long as it is Embedded linux, and because unhappy customers can fork it, you don't have to worry that security will be ignored.

This almost has to happen for develpers to develop apps.

I disagree. It is just as likely that development environments will evolve to target multiple OS's. We already have that on PC's with Java and Flash and several other environments, and that is where there is little motivation because of the Windows monopoly.

But long term there's pressure to downselect.

I don't really see it. There is pressure to move to fewer OS's or to more platform agnostic development tools. Assuming there is no one party with a lot of influence pushing for the former, the latter is more within the power of developers, and they're the ones feeling the pain.

At some point the number of OS's will be small enough that we've lost the advantage of diversity. Or so I speculate.

I think you're mistaking my assertion. I don't assert that having a number of OS's is any better than having one (well it is, but that is not the big reason for the security difference). If 30% of all computers ran MS Windows, 30% ran MSClosedBSD, and 30% of computers ran MSNewCode3-OS, security would be almost as bad as it is today. MS would still have no motivation to fix security, because regardless of what OS a person picked, MS would still get paid. In fact, by decreasing security they could motivate people to try something else and thus increase sales.

It is not that MS is incapable of making Windows secure, it is that they have no reason to do so. It costs significant money and MS will get paid whether they do it or not. Monopolies lead to inferior products and stifle innovation. If the market is not dominated by a monopoly, then there will always be insecure offerings, but they will lose as customers move to something better and security will keep up with malware.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

grcumb (781340) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760393)

At some point the number of OS's will be small enough that we've lost the advantage of diversity. Or so I speculate.

I think you're confusing interoperability and consistency with sameness. The latter is neither necessary nor desirable.

Who mod'ed that "interesting"? (4, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758911)

Since linux is even harder to keep patched automatically it would not be a better situation (Flame me if you wish but please don't say something moronic as "its' as simple as "apt-get update-all".

Well, it seems that the moderators are as uninformed as you are. Imagine that.

Most current distributions AUTOMATICALLY check for updates.

And they do NOT require "Windows Genuine Advantage" or any such crap (unless you're running Novell). Ubuntu does this flawlessly.

And even if you believe that linux is more resistant to holes than windows that's not an issue: Remember most of these bots come in as trojans not remote execution exploits, and they don't even need to run as root--so linux is not going to be more secure against trojans people welcome into their user spaces.

Actually, at the moment it appears that the majority of NEW infections are coming from holes in IE.

Zombies send out spam telling you that you have a greeting card at site 123.321.123.321 and when you go there, IE is cracked.

So, running Linux WOULD prevent that.

And regarding trojans, Linux makes it FAR more difficult to run software WITHOUT specifically intending to do so than on Windows. So Linux is more resistant to trojans.

Go ahead and claim that just because it is possible for a sysadmin to fuck up his system despite all the precautions otherwise ... well, you know what you're going to attempt to claim.

The fact is that Linux is far more resistant to viruses, trojans and worms.

And that is sufficient because it appears to drop the infection rate below the disinfecting rate. So the threats die because they're cleaned faster than they can spread.

But we've gone over this before and we'll go over this again.

Re:Who mod'ed that "interesting"? (1)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759209)

WHAT was that? I couldn't HEAR you. Please speak UP.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

babyrat (314371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759195)

Hmmm - saying it it's as simple as apt-get update-all would almost be as moronic as stating that linux is even harder to keep patched automatically. Seems pretty much the same to me - click the automatically check for updates/automatically install security updates boxes.

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/ubuntu/configure-ho w-often-ubuntu-checks-for-automatic-updates/ [howtogeek.com]

One of the nicest features of Ubuntu Linux is the automatic update feature, which helps you keep your computer updated with the latest software and security updates. There's also a nice GUI tool that helps you configure how often updates are checked, and can even automatically download the new updates.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759637)

And even if you believe that linux is more resistant to holes than windows that's not an issue: Remember most of these bots come in as trojans not remote execution exploits, and they don't even need to run as root--so linux is not going to be more secure against trojans people welcome into their user spaces.

And how many Linux users install programs outside their distro's repositories?

Under Windows, you can lure users to download your cursors, smiley collections and screensavers, because downloading from wherever and running setup.exe has been the preferred method since forever. Under Linux, programs are installed through repositories, and users can see the difference immediately.

You can explain "if it's not in the repository, it's dangerous". You cannot explain "well, if it's from this website, it's OK, this one is good, this one is fine, go here if you want a crack, but be careful, and don't download fancy stuff". Besides, the amount of software in the repository can keep even the manic installers of everything "just to see how it works" interested and busy for months

All in all, I think this method of installing programs adds quite a bit to Linux security, though I'm certain there will be user-friendly ways to circumvent that... But not in such a great extent - the philosophy is different enough.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

grcumb (781340) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760295)

One might speculate that it's a good thing for linux (and mac) that China runs on Windows.

The government of China has at least two officially supported Linux distributions that I'm aware of. They fund their development and promote them internally as well as internationally. It would be accurate to say that they've got some idea of the relative level of security that Windows and Linux provide, and have made their strategic choice.

Since linux is even harder to keep patched automatically it would not be a better situation (Flame me if you wish but please don't say something moronic as "its' as simple as "apt-get update-all".

Wouldn't dream of it. Because in Linux automatic updates are simpler than Windows, better controlled and more comprehensive. Try the latest Ubuntu and tell me again how inferior it is. No command line, no muss, no fuss, no Genuine Advantage, no worry.

And even if you believe that linux is more resistant to holes than windows that's not an issue: Remember most of these bots come in as trojans not remote execution exploits, and they don't even need to run as root--so linux is not going to be more secure against trojans people welcome into their user spaces.

You might want to read up a little more on the relative health of monoculture and heterogeneous systems. It's true that only a fool would say that Linux is immune to trojans. But it is a good deal more resistant, by virtue of the fact that:

  • Escalation is somewhat more difficult;
  • There are more variables at play, which makes it harder to write a 'one-size fits all' trojan.

These factors can slow down the propagation of a given trojan and limit damage even when it succeeds, reducing its overall effectiveness and requiring greater effort for smaller reward.

None of these items represents a complete solution, but security is not a zero-sum game that's won or lost in a single stroke. Linux is not The Answer; it's a useful component of a larger response to the threats posed by malware of all kinds.

Re:Windows versus Linux (1)

sybesis (1095871) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760747)

Wow, we could start a movie...Shell hell and the editor of the beast....VI VI VI People would probably go home with a different perspective on how to use their computers. cmd line are faster to do most of the thing i need. And to continue, to protect you computer against malware. you need to watch... The return of the daemon. then killall Or even Cron Jobs log my home

Re:No surprise really (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758757)

You forgot the most important:
5. An extremely corrupt anything-goes-as-long-as-you-have-cash political infrastructure. And I don't mean people from wealthy family tend to be the ones who run for office (in the USA this refers to both parties). I mean if you don't give the policeman enough of a bribe that he bothers to arrest you for jaywalking/software piracy/industrial accidents/mass murder you can give something to the judge and still get out of it.

research indicates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758357)

that the strictness of windows update is to blame....

duck and cover

In Before... (4, Funny)

susano_otter (123650) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758361)

..."I blame George Bush".

Re:In Before... (1)

uglydog (944971) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758409)

I agree. The US falls behind once again.

Re:In Before... (2, Interesting)

Zonekeeper (458060) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758515)

This would be funny, if it wasn't for the fact a large portion of Slashdot's community didn't believe exactly that in some incredibly screwed up set of dreamed-up circumstances.

Re:In Before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758791)

Perhaps George Bush could parse that sentence. I certainly can't.

Re:In Before... (1)

dotfile (536191) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759997)

Then obviously you're just not as smart. I had no trouble parsing it, you just have to read all the words.

Re:In Before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19760173)

I'm a Democrat so you'll need to spot me a few IQ points.

Thanks.

Re:In Before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758837)

what drooling retard gave this troll mod points for being "funny"?

Re:In Before... (1)

mikael (484) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759963)

..."The Intertubes are blocked again"...

Re:In Before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19760135)

Yeah, I think Bush's Law is destined to be a weak corollary to Godwin's Law. :-)

May You Live In Interesting Times. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758377)

Blah

here we go again (0, Redundant)

hoto0301 (811128) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758401)

In communist China, virus distributes you

Hmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758415)

I would have guessed Redmond.

Strange. (2, Funny)

Mockylock (1087585) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758425)

That's funny, I thought Africa was?

Follow the money ... (0, Troll)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758491)

and 99% leads to America. Not only that, virtually every piece of spam, everywhere, requires payment via an American owned credit card. If the US government made half the effort to restrict use of credit card payements for spam advertised goods that they did for on-line gambling, there would be no spam.

Conclusion: ... G Bush is 100% responsible for failing to stamp out spam.

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758547)

Yeah, look how well it worked for online gambling...

Re:Follow the money ... (0)

eln (21727) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758671)

Conclusion: ... G Bush is 100% responsible for failing to stamp out spam.
You just aren't in on the President's brilliant spam-fighting strategy. Once the dollar devalues even more and the economy collapses under the weight of crushing debt, the average American will be too poor to be able to afford C1AL15, even at a discount. At that point, the spammers will stop targeting Americans, and send all of the spam to Europe instead, and Presto! America's spam problem is solved.

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759087)

Actually, I am a European. My spam problem is entirely composed of people advertising products I dont want, cant pay for, and dont believe I would get if I ordered them.

Notwithstanding the above, ALL credit cards, everywhere, are run by American companies. Bush could stop the whole lot in HOURS.

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759353)

Bush could stop the whole lot in HOURS


Ahh...another clueless European that doesn't know jack about American government. Do yourself a favor and read about the Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Branches. You'll quickly find out that the president doesn't have the kind of power you THINK he has.

But as long as we're bashing Bush, who cares right?

Re:Follow the money ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759463)

Grandparent is a lesbian communist moslem fucker. And probably french to boot.

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

drpimp (900837) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758885)

"restrict use of credit card payments for spam advertised goods"

How do you expect them to do that? Disallow legitimate CC purchases or Viagra, Male Enhancements, stocks, and Spyware protection? Would CC companies fail approval for statements that contain those keywords? I would imagine your reciept does not say "Viagra", it's possible it would say "V14Gr4" before it said the prior. New sites pop up daily, it's not like they can track domains or IP's either. Sounds like yet another step back restricting our freedoms as Americans. I DO NOT want to be restricted by my government to things which I can and can't buy legally online (those items that are legal at least). Not to mention if someone is purchasing from some no name site, then the site might as well pass their CC info on to the next person willing to accept it I mean the fact that they are spamming to get sales should say something as it is.

Point is, if spam gets to the inbox, it's too late!!!! Spam has gotten so bad in general, people just need to be educated that everything in their inbox should be considered spam, unless it is from a trusted source. PPK validation, (try and teach that to grandma or your mother). Too bad educating people and/or PPK is not a realistic solution either for most people, there are just too many people that lack computer ethics/skills.

Re:Follow the money ... (2, Interesting)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759247)

How do you expect them to do that?

The creid card companies mantain a tight reign on what there licencees can buy and sell. If you fall out of line, your access is cut off io hours. New sites may pop up daily, but its not that easy to get a merchant account. You have to provide an insane amount of documentation - typically directors of the company to have to hand over passports, marriage licences, firstborn sons, etc. If evidence of promotion via spam was grounds for cancelling merchant accounts, and the credit card companies were required to enforce this, then it would stop because it would be pointless. Currently the credit card companies make millions from spam, and will not act against it unless forced to by the government, because they are required by law to act in their shareholders best interests.

I sure as hell want your freedom to have your fellow countrymen send me several thousand spams a day promoting illegal, fake goods curtailed. You are free to provide me your e-mail address so I can forward all my spam to you if you like.

I assure you that educating people, while worth trying, fails on the PT Barnum test - "there's one born every minute".

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

drpimp (900837) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759727)

While I failed to mention that "following the money" wasn't entirely a bad idea (just to note that), and after hearing your arguments I would say you sound educated on CC companies, but after working with an e-commerce company for 2 years prior to now I can say getting a merchant account to process transactions is not as difficult as you suggest, but you're right they are strict on consequences and items of sale. Secondly, if CC companies are spamming, isn't that the pot calling the kettle black? If that is true as you state, then yes get the government should get involved with auditing these companies. Regardless of the facts about CC companies. This will definitely not eliminate spam entirely, in fact it would only put a dent. But it would be a step in the fight. There are plenty of other spam vectors (as the original article was based one viruses) not related to sale of items. Some spam also does nothing, no sale of items, no hot stock, nothing, some gibberish story and that's it. Christ what a waste of bandwidth. Hell I already receive enough spam on my domains, I don't need your forwarded spam as I am sure I already have a copy of those ;-)

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

Ornedan (1093745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760351)

The point of the nonsense spam is to mess with adaptive spam filters. The idea is to train the filters so that the relative weight of whether the message looks like gibberish or not is high compared to other factors. Then you make the spam messages you want to actually reach the recipient look like legitimate messages. Of course, I could be wrong about that, since that's just conjecture based on what I remember from my information theory courses.

Re:Follow the money ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758941)

Blaming Bush for each individual problem relate to America is as naive as blaming Bill Gates personally for each individual bug in Windows.

Re:Follow the money ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758953)

Actually, if you are going to follow the money, then you will find it going to China. China has their money fixed to the dollar and it is designed to make all imports to America dirt cheap, and pretty much keeps out our imports to them. With 1.5 Trillion dollars sitting the banks (and will have 2 Trillion before the end of this year), and yet, they are not spending any of it here. Sadly, you are right about the problem being Bush, but about spam. If bush were to push for the unfixing of the chinese to American money, then it would fix the piracy and spam issues. Piracy would stop because DVDs and CDs would be about 1/100 of their current costs.

Re:Follow the money ... (1)

ThousandStars (556222) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758971)

Sorry, you're too late [slashdot.org] .

This is what you get... (3, Insightful)

E. Edward Grey (815075) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758507)

...When you won't allow people to update invalid copies of your software with security fixes. Quite honestly, Microsoft has to bear its share of blame in this. If they would simply make ALL security fixes available to all users no matter whether their copy is legal or not, we might be able to mitigate this problem to some extent.

I'm perfectly willing to admit, however, that you can't make people patch their OS if they don't want to do it.

Re:This is what you get... (1)

matazar (1104563) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758687)

you can't fix stupid. The biggest bug in Windows is between the chair and keyboard. The item in question is gullable, has admin privilages, and can run widely dispensed Windows specific code.

I still blame Microsoft. (2, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758967)

you can't fix stupid. The biggest bug in Windows is between the chair and keyboard. The item in question is gullable, has admin privilages, and can run widely dispensed Windows specific code.

Now look at Ubuntu.

By default, you are a less privileged user. You have to do RESEARCH on how to log in as the root account. And the people who are most likely to be a problem are the least likely to do the research. This limits the trojan and virus threat.

By default, there are no open ports. This limits the worm threat.

People can STILL manage to get their Ubuntu machines infected. But it takes a LOT of work on their part and it's very easy to clean them.

Once the infection rate falls below the disinfection rate, the "threat" dies.

Microsoft is TRYING to get around to doing this. But they're still learning. Maybe Vista +1 will follow Ubuntu's lead.

Re:I still blame Microsoft. (1)

tknd (979052) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759733)

Vista is pretty close if setup correctly.

When Vista first boots, it asks you to create a user account (and optionally password). What it's not clear about, is that this first account is actually the admin account. If you put a password on the admin account and create a regular user account and login with the regular user account, every UAC prompt will require the admin password before continuing. The admin account name/icon will already be selected/shown in the uac prompt and all you have to do is start typing the password. Most people initially think that the first account is actually the user account and therefore have admin privileges but still get the UAC 'cancel/allow' buttons.

When setup and used in the admin/regular user manner, it's very similar to a *nix environment. The regular user account can't delete/overwrite other important areas like the system directory and applications folders and anytime they try they either get an access denied message or a uac prompt requiring the admin account password. So as long as they're not doing something fishy (like install software or mess with the system areas) they never see it.

Re:This is what you get... (1)

manifoldronin (827401) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759521)

What share of blame is there for a company not to service a user who didn't pay?


Microsoft definitely deserves the blame for having the security holes in their products, but your angle is really just high horse riding.

I for one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758509)

I for one wercome our new vilus spleading overrords.

Re:I for one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758571)

owh lee-leee?

Windows Genuine Advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758513)

Thank you, WGA.

Re:Windows Genuine Advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758601)

WGA does not apply to security patches. Anyone may download them freely.

Turk in Turkey? (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758595)

What is "Turk in Turkey"? Some guy named Turk in Istanbul?

Re:Turk in Turkey? (1)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759277)

No; it's what ExampleCorp Farms puts into every pound of mouthwatering sandwich meat.

Re:Turk in Turkey? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759515)

Not Constantinople.

Re:Turk in Turkey? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759875)

Sounds like it could be a slogan for Louis Rich: "We put the Turk in Turkey!" [amazon.com]

Linus is right (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758597)

I am with Linus on this one.

Blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758627)

Maybe the people who wrote these viruses are to blame?

Zombies can be tricky (2, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758637)

What if somebody is simply zombying Beijing servers and/or desktops? It just may mean they have the most zombies, not that the actual perpetrator is there. It would still be considered lax security either way. Unless perhaps some big virus shop chose Beijing as their frame target because of China's already poor reputation in this area such that nobody would look elsehwere once traced there.

Re:Zombies can be tricky (1)

x3nos (773066) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758707)

Not even from TFA, but in the summary:

'As more and more users come online in China, there's a good chance those computers are using pirated software without up-to-date security fixes, making them prime targets for hackers who are actually located elsewhere in the world, [Simon] Heron said. Those compromised computers, which are used to send spam and make it more difficult to identify the spammer, are so valuable that hacker gangs have been competing to take over machines
Apparently not only are Zombies tricky, but so is reading an article summary.

And... (3, Insightful)

rajinikanth (235707) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758663)

and let me guess, the "UK-based managed security services company Network Box" is trying to get into the Chinese market?

and here i was.. (0, Flamebait)

rubberbandball (1076739) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758667)

thinking that this had something to do with the report on CNN this morning that 60% of all toys recalled this year so far were "Made in China."

still, does this really come as a suprise to many people? with corporate outsourcing (and an exponentially higher amount of bitter employees, i'm sure) and a large population such as theirs i am by no means shocked. although i would expect more from india in this department.

Consciousness Indicates The (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758723)


White House AND CONGRESS [whitehouse.org] constitute the world's corruption capital.

Cheers,
K.

What about Bangkok? (4, Funny)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758761)

I caught some serious viruses last time I was theer

I Am (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758771)

I defeat SPAM and I will defeat you.

Re:I Am (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759771)

No one defeats SPAM. SPAM will absorb you into it's conscience meat globule like all other the animals contained within the cube.

Resistance is futile. Comply!

\\//_

I believe it. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758777)

I been monitoring spam, brute-force attacks and other junk that is coming to my network and most of it comes from China recently. It is hard to discern if these are 2nd or 3rd party bot attacks but in the last month I had and still under spam attacks from China, Korea and other locations and China is still number one for me.
China is still "under-development" and I think most systems in China are half-baked that are ripe for botnet attacks so my thinking that the junk is botnets. Don't think I'm against the Chinese since I'm Chinese also and seen the fair amount of bad configurations, software and hardware that Chinese have and they have a headache beyond any system administrator's nightmare. But who is controlling the botnet I would like to know since there is so much junk other there I barely have anytime to defend against it.

Re:I believe it. (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759559)

How do you define a spam attack? For me, being under spam attacks is the normal status of my email server and I would tend to beleive it is also the case for most email servers ;-)

I drop connections from hosts listed in spamcop and once I do accept a message, I scan it for spam and viruses and drop it/archive it depending on the results of the scan.

Spamcop or similar rbl are pretty good at listing well known spamming IPs so I did not notice any considerable amount of spam from china recently in the portion of the spam that makes it to my scanner.

Dropping connections from well know IPs (RBL like spamcop) can save you quite a bit of bandwidth and it can make the difference and keep your server up when some stupid bots try to establish a connection with your mail server to send you crap.

What would happen ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758787)

if the monitoring was inside china, rather than outside of it? Just because something appears to come from another country does not mean that it does.

i just hope they're giving out the aids (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758795)

i hope all the fags are getting aids so we have less fags.

This news story itself is spam? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19758897)

There is no city called Turk in Turkey...

Wrong wrong localization!!! Wrong!!! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759959)

Turk is not in Turkey country.
Turk is in Uzbekistan country.

The exact localization of the HaXoR is in the UnDeRgRoUnD of this garden [google.com] inside of an anonymous farm.

Virii in my china? It's more likely then you think (0, Troll)

SG_Fry (1124357) | more than 7 years ago | (#19758965)

Not only does this country have an insane problem with computer security, it also brought us SARS and the soon to come bird flu. WAY TO GO CHINA!!!!

I have the solution. (2, Funny)

glasn0st (564873) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759109)

To guard their citizens against these virus threats, the Chinese government should create a giant firewall and put all their machines behind it!

Oh wait...

uh oh.... (1)

BlaKnail (545030) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759167)

Somebody better let Paris Hilton know that Beijing took her title while she was in prison.

or more likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759243)

vilus capital...I keed, I keed.

I had a thought, then it passed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759453)

I know it would be a small percentage, but with IP spoofing, and other options, how many spams are being mislabeled because china ip's are easy to copy and hard to verify? I've done research into China based IP's for spam and brute force attacks and can never get much info on it, seems to me like if I were to spoof an IP, that would be great cause it's harder to prove it is / isn't legit.

P.S. Dye gramar nazi dye.

Turk in Turkey? (5, Informative)

fincan (989293) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759459)

"This compares with slightly lower percentages for cities in countries noted for having a malware problem. Moscow was second for spam with 5.12 percent, Seoul third with 3.58 percent, Turk in Turkey fourth with 3.4 percent, and London in fifth place on 2.47 percent."

As a Turkish guy I would like to state that we don't have any city/town/place called Turk in Turkey. But we have around 65 million Turks living in Turkey. I am really sorry that we don't have a place like the author said but I'll contact the authorities immediately to build a new city named Turk and place all spammers/virus writer in there so you don't have to change your post. We're benevolent people.

Re:Turk in Turkey? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19761455)

"Turk in Turkey fourth" = "Turkey in fourth"

I think this is an obvious error. He was on the phone with his girlfriend while trying to type. Stupid girl..I mean stupid cell...I mean stupid keybo...I mean fingers, stupid fingers! FREAKIN STUPID ASS DIGITS, I'M GONNA CUT EM ALL OFF!!!!!!

Signed,

The Cowardly Lion

What about the great firewall of china? (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759501)

Couldn't it be diverted from it's propaganda goals to also filter for malicious traffic?

Censorship != Propaganda (2, Insightful)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759701)

Couldn't it be diverted from it's propaganda goals to also filter for malicious traffic?

You mean censorship? Propaganda is what you read on sites like Slashdot. Both are bad, but they are not to be confused with each other.

Bag it, and get on with it! (1)

turgid (580780) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759697)

As a friend of mine always said, bag [durex.com] it and get on with it.

The Great Firewall of China (2, Interesting)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759753)

How is it that the Chinese are so good about keeping out what they don't want their culture to learn about the rest of the freedom loving world, and so incredibly lousy about keeping in what they shouldn't be spreading to anyone else?

funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19759817)

It's funny how the Chinese government can filter anything they want to, yet they allow this crap through. Hmmm, I think the key point is WANT TO. More than likely half of it is state sponsored.

this is not surprising. (0, Troll)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 7 years ago | (#19759965)

china has fired the first volley:

poisoned food.
computer virii. (or viruses for the humans)
email spam.

We will retaliate by opening more chinese armories. (otherwise known as WalMart)

you dont know how big virus issue is in Turkey (0)

unity100 (970058) | more than 7 years ago | (#19760017)

most of the turkish internet users use internet for limited purposes - using MSN messenger to chat (generally during work), chain mailing each other and 20-30 lot lists various forwarded email messages that are "funny", "interesting" or "cool", (most of them are powerpoint slideshows, which are widely used to spread viruses), and idiotically clicking on links in chain forwarded emails that are supposedly sent by their "friends" - which takes them to trojan, keylogger, virus anything malicious sites.

this is something actually present in all countries, but its more serious in turkey. people generally do not work in any job that remotely in their interest area in turkey, due to unemployment, tough economic conditions, and social pressure that forces people to "immediately find a job, marry and make a baby, thereby creating a family". this results in people being more interested in anything other than work during work hours - in this, internet jumps in, and surfing, chain forwarded jokes, "funny site links", and emails go rampant. result is virus mayhem.

Re:you dont know how big virus issue is in Turkey (1)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 7 years ago | (#19761901)

Isn't it amazing how Microsoft seem hell-bent on continuing to make their products just ideal for sending virusses.

It seems powerpoint and word are both designed to just blindly execute whatever is embedded in their document formats. Talk about a ridiculous strategy. Why have a program execute documents in the first place?

modX down (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19760227)

Lenovo and Thinkpad (1)

Robowally (649265) | more than 7 years ago | (#19761715)

Should I trust Lenovo with my trusty Thinkpad laptop? Or could the dodgy Chinese be installing scanware each time I upgrade my drivers? I don't have good feelings about my data being in the hands of corrupt commies.
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