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How Much Caffeine is Really in That Soda?

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the buzz-buzz-buzz dept.

332

The Fun Guy writes "The Institute of Food Technologists summarizes some recent research on food. All things considering, it should settle some arguments among geeks about the caffination of beverages. 'Caffeine is a well-known stimulant added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks, but which drink contains the most, and how can consumers know? A study in the Journal of Food Science used high-performance liquid chromatography to analyze the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store brand carbonated beverages. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The authors found that store-brand beverages generally contained less caffeine, and they also suggest that consumers would benefit from having the actual caffeine content labeled on the beverage.'"

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Jolt? (2, Interesting)

hsdpa (1049926) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784675)

What about Jolt? How much caffeine is it in Jolt?

Re:Jolt? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784689)

nobody drinks jolt anymore idiot.

Re:Jolt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784753)

Blasphemer!

I'm still upset the stuff is nigh impossible to find on a shelf anywhere. If I want some, I have to order it a case at a time, at retail, and cough up shipping to boot. Unpleasant, but still tasty. I still want them to re-release the old re-formulated stuff with twice the caffeine the regular Jolt has. (I'm not the only one that remembers this stuff, am I?)

Re:Jolt? (2, Informative)

blhack (921171) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784927)

To any phoenix based /.ers:

There is a shop just off of scottsdale rd and mcdowell that still sells Jolt (as well as a WHOLE bunch of other really cool drinks).

Its called "Pop The Soda Shop"....its really cool :)

Re:Jolt? (4, Funny)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785033)

Do they have Crystal Pepsi? How much caffeine is in that? Does it age like a fine wine?

Re:Jolt? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785285)

No, but they do sell my semen. Caffeine content per 4 ounce bottle: 69mg.

Re:Jolt? (1)

Nephilium (684559) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785017)

Hells... we have it on the shelf at grocery stores here in Cleveland...

And some gas stations have Bawls...

Nephilium

Re:Jolt? (1)

hsdpa (1049926) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784773)

Hey... We consumed thousands of cans at the store at my (previous) school.. The Jolt-era is NOT dead! :)

Re:Jolt? (5, Informative)

Ledsock (926049) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784713)

Not sure about the accuracy of this page, but it's got almost all of the drinks I've ever seen. http://www.energyfiend.com/the-caffeine-database/ [energyfiend.com]

Re:Jolt? (4, Informative)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784991)

Just picked out a few... Report says:
- 38.9 for Pepsi, database says 38.
- 33.9 for Coke, db says 34.
- 42.6 for Dr Pepper, db says 41.
- 46.3 for Diet Coke, db says 45.
- 55.2 for Diet Mountain Dew, db says 55.

So it looks pretty accurate at least, from a quick glance.

To give some perspective as you're looking at drinks with 40 or 50 mg per 12 oz bottle, note that a regular cup of coffee can have around 60-120 mg per cup, and a Red Bull seem to have around 80 mg per can.

Re:Jolt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784725)

If my math is right it's about the same [wikipedia.org] as Vault.

20mg/100ml (2, Informative)

eddy (18759) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784963)

20mg/100ml (bought in Sweden, bottled in The Netherlands)

Re:20mg/100ml (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785037)

Funny you should pick that country of all. :-)

There's a bit of a story behind the limit in Sweden, because Swedish drinks use to have a limit of max 100 mg caffeine / liter. Åbro, the Swedish producer, has howerver gained permission of using up to 150 mg/l. A US Jolt bottle seem to have 140 mg caffeine, and one in Sweden around 78 mg / 33 cl bottle (or 23 mg/100 ml, about what you say).

Re:20mg/100ml (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785061)

Hmm, looking over those numbers again, it rather seems that the Swedish Jolt has 150 mg/l at their approved cap, while it's the *American* Jolt with around 230 mg/l, the example I gave above, which would amount to around 140 per bottle in US...

The only answer that matters... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784677)

Not enough.

I start EACH day (1)

p51d007 (656414) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784995)

with a Diet Mt. Dew...had to give up the regular kind, but I can't go without the caffine in the morning, or it is HEADACHE city!

Re:I start EACH day (1)

desenz (687520) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785039)

Yeah, but they only last two or three days... Then you're pretty much free of the dependancy. (My experience. YMMV)

Re:I start EACH day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785085)

OMG...can you just be a man and drink a cup of coffee? As it stands now with your Diet Mountain Dew, you're just a little girl with a frilly dress.

Re:I start EACH day (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785255)

Yeah, because your gender is completely determined by what you drink.

Diet Mountain Dew ??!?! (2, Funny)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785133)

Yechh! I'll have the crab juice.

Re:Diet Mountain Dew ??!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785201)

Diet crab juice?

Re:The only answer that matters... (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785273)

As a geek who needs his enormous amounts of caffeine, but is trying to stay away from soda and coffee, I have found that Viso [drinkviso.com] is a delicious beverage. It comes from Portland, Oregon and there are some great flavors. All of them are natural, organic and there is no corn syrup or other fake crap. They have 100% vitamins and minerals and every 20oz bottle has 300mgs of caffeine (at least the two caffeinated versions do).

I drink about four of those a day. Sometimes a half dozen. I guess according to this new study, that's about the same as four six-packs of Coke.

Sounds like... (2, Informative)

Sawopox (18730) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784679)

Vault Zero is going start getting a push in sales for the uber-geek caffeine-riddled crowd. I kinda dig Vault, but it's got so much sugar it can quickly twist your stomach into a knot. The Zero is better with a lower sugar content. Also, it's nice to see that Diet Moutain Dew has a slightly higher caffeine content than it's regular, sugary counterpart.

It's too bad they "Tuned Up the Taste" (1)

Ayanami Rei (621112) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784719)

It tastes alright... the flavor is a bit too much like sunkist or antifreeze but unfortunately every other non-cola diet drink tastes worse. Why does Pepsi insist their diet drinks have the aftertaste of cough syrup?

Re:It's too bad they "Tuned Up the Taste" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785045)

Because women demand it, so they know they're sacrificing for their weight.

Re:Sounds like... (3, Informative)

garcia (6573) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785121)

I've posted about my caffeine free lifestyle on here before but I'm too drunk (it was 97F today) to look it up while I'm mobile.

I used to drink up to a case of Coke (in cans) daily during college and once I was done with organized athletics I decided to switch to diet to keep the calories down. I hated the way diet colas tasted so I went with the new diet drink at the time, Diet Cherry Vanilla Dr. Pepper (aka, to my circle of friends, as Liquid Crack).

After several months of drinking it, I as up to at least 4 or 5 20oz bottles and 12+ 12oz cans daily. I wasn't having any sugar guilt so I didn't think anything of the caffeine's effect on my system.

After numerous sleepless nights in terror because of a pounding chest, I went cold turkey. That 7 day migraine sucked more than anything ever before.

Now, over 1.5 years later, I'm much better off. I am convinced that the high caffeine levels of diet soda is to compensate for the lack of sugar and to force addiction over the flavor.

My BP dropped to near normal levels (I was on 150MG+ of two different BP meds prior to the caffeine habit kick) which is likely a combination of the drop in caffeine as well as elevated sodium levels in diet soda and I feel a ton better overall.

Drop the caffeine habit, you'll love yourself for it both health and money wise.

Re:Sounds like... (5, Insightful)

Belgand (14099) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785257)

I think the more important problem is that you were drinking a very, very large amount of it. Most people don't drink nearly that much of any caffeinated beverages and thus, tend not to have serious problems with blood pressure, sleeplessness, or addiction. In short I think that your addiction (and resultant conspiracy theory that the intent is to addict you) is more related to your own usage scenario than to anything to do with the drink itself.

I'M ANGRY PROGRAMMER! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784691)

Don't catch me in the morning without my caffeine! RAWR!

$39?! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784693)

Honestly, $39 for a single article?!!

What's the point of posting a link to an online article in a ridiculously expensive journal?

Charging means reliable (3, Funny)

badriram (699489) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784947)

dont you know that if someone charges for something, it means it is better. The more expensive the product the better its quality automatically gets. that is why free software sucks compared to apple or ms software, dont you read the research they release. /sarcasm

Re:$39?! (5, Funny)

HeLLFiRe1151 (743468) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785001)

Yes, but it's a $59 value.

How much caffiene is in a... (3, Funny)

Bill Wong (583178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784697)

Quad Espresso in an iced venti cup plus ten additional shots of espresso? Yes, that's fourteen shots in total.

I have to repeat that order everytime I order at Starbucks, because it doesn't click the first time they hear it.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

mprindle (198799) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784787)

That must be a $12 drink. If you really want to be wired you have to try Vietnamese coffee. It'll keep ya on a buzz for a couple days.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

Bill Wong (583178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784831)

It's only 55 cents or so for each additional shot, so it's just under $8 bucks or so.
Oh, and I have had Vietnamese coffee before... I get it whenever I order pho.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784813)

that's a silly way of getting coffee. Espresso has about half the caffeine of coffee due to the dark roast. (the lighter the roast, the more caffeine the brew will have). Plus that costs you a lot of money, considering each additional shot is 50 cents, so that's $5 for the basic drink, plus $5 in extra shots.

Since you're obviously not doing this for the flavor (maybe the "shock" value of looking like the biggest ass in line, and tying up the baristas with a ridiculous drink), just get two cups of light roast coffee.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

Bill Wong (583178) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784861)

Actually, yes, that is exactly why I do it.
I also love tying up the bar and seeing the long lines. :)

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (5, Funny)

Sawopox (18730) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784827)

That has got to cause your sphincter to enter into almost immediate shock. I'd be unable to get more than 10-15 feet before this drink emptied me completely.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

joshamania (32599) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784839)

Coffee...it gets you goin in the mornin...

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785149)

A good 8 hours of sleep gets me going in the morning... Coffee? Who drinks that?

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784853)

Spread your dose out throughout the day and you'll find it's much more effective. Caffeine hits a point of diminishing return pretty quickly after the second shot of espresso.

Or just order some 200 mg modafinil tabs from Freedom Pharmacy.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

wrook (134116) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784857)

896 mg assuming each shot is similar to the 1 fl oz reference espresso in the USDA Nutrient database.

I'd be a bit careful. Depending on the speed with which you drink your coffee, you might be getting close to the toxicity level of caffeine. Unfortunately, there is very little information on what that is and how it relates to clinical effects. I found this paper interesting, though.

http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/174_10_210501/ cannon/cannon.html [mja.com.au]

I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on Slashdot.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

AndyCR (1091663) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784873)

It should also be noted that there is not a recorded case of a fatal dose of caffeine being delivered from a beverage, so if you don't drink slowly, you might break ground right before you, err, break ground...

1g! (1)

mapinguari (110030) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784967)

Starbucks' website lists 75mg per shot, so we're talking 1.05g (or 1.025 gi - darn those coffee manfacturers for not using standard binary units like the rest of the computer industry)

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785323)

The LD50 for caffeine in humans is about 150-200mg *per kilogram of body mass*

That means that an 80kg adult male (180 lbs) would have to ingest 12-16 *grams* before he has even a 50% chance of dying. Obviously some people would fall to much less that this, but it seems clear that unless you're trying REALLY REALLY hard, you won't be experiencing any permanant troubles from ingesting caffiene in beverage form.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785325)

Unfortunately, there is very little information on what that is and how it relates to clinical effects.

Caffeine's LD50 is 192mg per kg, so you'd need about 15g, or more than 200 shots, to have a reasonable chance of topping yourself with espresso. The metabolic half-life of caffeine is about 5 hours, so you'd need to be doing the shots fairly quickly too.

At least one person has survived ingesting 24g, so while you can kill youself, you'd be more likely to knock yourself unconscious bouncing off the walls...
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/caffeine/caffeine_ faq.shtml#WhatHappens [erowid.org]

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (4, Interesting)

inKubus (199753) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785259)

I've only had dual quads on ice, but I get the feeling the people who work at Starbucks start their days with at least that much. Spread over about 4 hours it maintains your buzz nicely. Since it's iced, you don't have to worry about oxidation and bitterness too much. I like a doppio per day but if you really have a lot to do, quad or dual quad will really keep you going. Plus they are cheap compared to the "lattes": $1.88 for a dopio with tax, 55 cents per shot and if you tip them every day for a while it'll get cheaper ;) After a few weeks I like to detox over a weekend with no caffine, otherwise "caffeinism" can set in:

In large amounts, and especially over extended periods of time, caffeine can lead to a condition known as "caffeinism." Caffeinism usually combines "caffeine dependency" with a wide range of unpleasant physical and mental conditions including nervousness, irritability, anxiety, tremulousness, muscle twitching (hyperreflexia), insomnia, headaches, respiratory alkalosis[51] and heart palpitations.[52] Furthermore, because caffeine increases the production of stomach acid, high usage over time can lead to peptic ulcers, erosive esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.[53] However, since both "regular" and decaffeinated coffees have been shown to stimulate the gastric mucosa and increase stomach acid secretion, caffeine is probably not the sole component of coffee responsible.[54]

There are four caffeine-induced psychiatric disorders recognized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition: caffeine intoxication, caffeine-induced anxiety disorder, caffeine-induced sleep disorder, and caffeine-related disorder not otherwise specified (NOS).

Other side effects of caffeine overuse include: dizziness, tachycardia, blurred vision, drowsiness, dry mouth, flushed dry skin, diuresis, loss of appetite, nausea and stomachaches.[55]
-- From Caffeine Article [wikipedia.org] at Wikipedia..

Yeah, I drank a lot for many years but it's always good to detox once in a while. Since Caffeine has a half-life in your system you can never really get rid of all of it so your base levels go up over time, especially if you have 400+mg a day. Drink tea and take a real asprin on the first day of a 3 day detox and you'll thank yourself.

Oh, and if you're looking to prolong the half-life of coffee, you need a CYP450 [wikipedia.org] inhibitor--such as Bergamottin [wikipedia.org] or Naringin [wikipedia.org] , both of which are found in fresh grapefruit juice, peel and seeds.. It's under debate which one actually affects the CYP450, but it works--trust me. So, do yourself a favor and instead of taking 600mg of caffine, take 200mg with a grapefruit juice and enjoy the better effects.

Re:How much caffiene is in a... (1)

azav (469988) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785287)

That's 14 shots of espresso if I understand you correctly and at 100 mg caffiene per, that would be 1400 shots mg of caffeine.

Enough to down a full grown elephant.

Paid access? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784699)

From the "article"
You can purchase immediate access to this article for 30 days through our secure web site for USD$ 39.00 using a credit card.

You're kidding right?

Re:Paid access? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784835)

Hmm, that sounds crazy. Pay for viewing articles? Wtf (what the frack)?!

Re:Paid access? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784915)

Your first time looking at scientific journal fees, eh? You should see the subscription prices. For many of the smaller journals it is >$1000 per year.

Re:Paid access? (1)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785165)

Some journals are > 10,000 per year.

Re:Paid access? (1)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785265)

Some journals are > 10,000 per year.
And they wonder why the average man knows so little about science. Perhaps scientists should subscribe to some economic journals.

Coffee still rules... (4, Informative)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784707)

Vault Zero has 75mg/12 oz. Starbucks coffee has 200mg/12oz. Various non-soda caffeine amounts here [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Coffee still rules... (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784937)

That doesn't help. I don't think it's something to be happy about, given that long term caffeine use seems to have potentially disturbing consequences. I've been cutting down on my caffeine intake over time, I just don't think the risks are worth it.

Diet Coke More? (1)

natedubbya (645990) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784709)

It's interesting to see that Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz) has so much more caffeine than regular Coke (33.9 mg/12 oz). I can't get to the full text of the article ... is this a typo? Or is there a reason the diet version would have so much more? Pepsi and Diet Pepsi have relatively the same amount.


Re:Diet Coke More? (1)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784751)

I don't know about the full article, they won't let you read the article unless you pay money. In fact, the link is worthless as all the free content is duplicated in the summary.

Diet Coke is so different from regular Coke because they are very different products. The same reason that Coke and Diet Coke taste different and people prefer the taste of one or the other. Diet Coke was formulated to taste like New Coke (sweeter, etc.). Comparing Coke to Coke Zero is a more realistic comparision.

Re:Diet Coke More? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784969)

what about diet coke with splenda? I haven't tried a blind taste test, but the first time I had it, it seemed to taste different (better), though it could just be the splenda/aspartame

Re:Diet Coke More? (1)

Belgand (14099) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785295)

I don't care for Coke, but drinking Pepsi I find that Pepsi One (their version with Splenda) tastes much better than Diet Pepsi. I think part of this is because as with Diet Coke, I believe that Diet Pepsi uses a different forumla to achieve a different flavor profile rather than just adjusting it to make it without sugar (or rather, corn syrup). I think that the newer versions sweetened with Splenda are using something much closer to a modified original formula.

All about the kick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785031)

Someone switching from regular to diet soda may still be expecting the sugar kick, so boosting the caffeine helps lessen that particular withdrawl. This may also explain why Diet Coke drinkers tend to be "addicts" and Diet Pepsi drinkers are just Diet Pepsi drinkers, at least among friends and co-workers.

why they should label it (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784735)

and they also suggest that consumers would benefit from having the actual caffeine content labeled on the beverage.
yeah cuz some ppl like me can have too much and end up in the hospital. I'm super sensitive to it which is made worse from never having it so if I drank a whole monster on an empty stomach, I'd be in big trouble

Pepsi products are listing caffeine content (1)

mprindle (198799) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784761)

I was in the store the other day and picked up a bottle of Pepsi. On the back below the nutrition it listed the amount of caffeine in the drink. It seems most of the Pepsi products had it. I was surprised to see that diet drinks had more than the regular ones.

Re:Pepsi products are listing caffeine content (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784891)

I didn't notice that, but the Pepsi cans that I have handy have it below the standard Nutrition Facts label.

Missing options (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784763)

c'mon, wheres the caffeine rating for Bawls!

Other missing options:
Jolt
I dont drink soda, you insensitive clod
CowboyNealCola

Measuring units? (1, Insightful)

GuldKalle (1065310) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784793)

Sorry to bring this up, but that unit just strikes me as absolutely ridiculous (mg/12 oz).
Why measure per 12oz instead of per oz? Actually, why not skip the oz and go all in on the metric system, instead of that half-assed job?

Can anyone explain this to the people (like me) east of the Atlantic?

Re:Measuring units? (3, Informative)

ViX44 (893232) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784817)

Because in the US, soda is sold most commonly by 12 ounce cans. Vending machines usually go by 16 or 20 ounce if they use bottles instead of cans. One litre is availiable, but usually litre is reserved for 2- and 3-litre large bottles. Glass is 8 ounce or 12 ounce, if you can find glass.

Re:Measuring units? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784825)

The standard serving is 12 ounces -- one standard can of soft drink.

Re:Measuring units? (1)

RpiMatty (834853) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784847)

12 oz is usually 1 serving size. Cans of pop (soda) are 12 oz, so measuring the caffeine per serving saves people the complicated math.

Re:Measuring units? (1)

saxoholic (992773) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784913)

12 ozs is the size of a can of soda in the usa. So basically they're telling us how much caffeine per can of beverage. I'm sure the only measures they have of caffeine is in mg and it wouldn't make sense to convert it to metric. They're catering to those of us in the states.

Re:Measuring units? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785005)

"I'm sure the only measures they have of caffeine is in mg and it wouldn't make sense to convert it to metric."

I always have trouble converting mg to metric as well. I can never remember if it's add 0 then divide by 1. Or multiply by 1 then subtract 0.

Because furlong per fortnight (2, Funny)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785003)

is a measure of speed and would not work in this case and a hogshead is more than most people can drink, they had to use gram per fluid ounce...

Re:Measuring units? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785023)

That's the standard sized soft drink can.

Yes, it doesn't allow for ready comparisons with coffee etc... which come in different sized servings, but that wasn't the point of the article.

Cheers

Re:Measuring units? (2, Informative)

NeilTheStupidHead (963719) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785117)

A 12floz can down south is the same as a 355ml can here in Canada (and presumably overseas) so a can with 50mg/ 12floz becomes a more sensable measurement of about 1.7mg/ml.
As an aside, my favourite energy drink is Rockstar Juiced, in part because the can is labelled as containing "70% Juice"

Re:Measuring units? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785207)

Actually, why not skip the oz and go all in on the metric system, instead of that half-assed job?

Can anyone explain this to the people (like me) east of the Atlantic?

Because it would be a ripoff. Over on your side of the ocean they start with the soft drink serving size that God Himself intended, a full 12 US fluid ounces, then they round it waaaay down to some tiny multiple of 10 ml, then they charge *more* than a full 12-oz can costs here. Even the authors of this outrageously priced journal article don't want to blow money like that.

some drinks already list the caffeine content. (1)

yincrash (854885) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784809)

the can of Barq's I was just drinking listed 22mg/12oz.

I'm not sure how that compares to what the study says though, because I can't read it because I don't have a subscription to their journal.

How you know you had too much coke (1)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784833)

The "wasted on Coke" phase:

The feeling can be described as feeling little bubbles grow in your brain and blow up, your eyes kinda wanna get as far away as possible from the bubbles.

There are also bubbles in your throat, and sometimes your feet.

Wait.. there must've been something else in that Coke :P damn it.

Units (0, Flamebait)

dsanfte (443781) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784849)

Milligrams per 12 ounces.

You know, a half-assed conversion to metric is worse than none at all. That's two conversions required to work with any system, be it American or SI.

Please stop retarding the world with your garbage non-standard unit system.

Re:Units (3, Interesting)

golob (69902) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784879)

Awww. I work as a scientist, and I have a fond spot in my heart for imperial measurements.

You might have ten fingers, but both 12 and 16 have many more factors. One system plays nicer with decimal math, but the other is much more practical in the real world.

Re:Units (3, Informative)

GizmoToy (450886) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784899)

Well, I'd imagine the reason they used 12 ounces is because that's how much is in the typical can of soda.

Re:Units (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784959)

I don't really like it either, but that's one serving size for most sodas that I've seen, I wish the summary said mg/serving. If it helps, it's equal to 355ml.

ummm (2, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785009)

Please stop retarding the world with your garbage non-standard unit system.
In other news, high amounts of caffeine seem to correlate with aggression and a tendency to lash out against others...

Re:Units (1)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785099)

You know, a half-assed conversion to metric

It's not a conversion. For certain items, usually chemicals, the US has adopted the metric system. (The others are usually utilitarian items.)

Please stop retarding the world with your garbage non-standard unit system.
The only reason the Metric system became standard was the lack of any other unified standard in Europe. Here in America, we just steamrolled over any competing system with our semi-British units, and there's no real reason to change it.

Anyone who uses the metric system will have to do a number-dance to get to a rational quantity, anyway. It's the nature of the system.

Re:Units (2, Informative)

jbengt (874751) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785293)

Actually, in a round-a-bout way, the US DOES use the metric system.
Since around the 1890's, US units have been officially defined in terms of metric units.

Re:Units (0, Flamebait)

humankind (704050) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785135)

Thanks for pointing this out. While we're at it, let's also make it known that Gerald R. Ford signed the Metric Conversion Act of 1975, giving the United States ten years to fully convert over to the metric system. So why aren't we using it now? Two words: RONALD REAGAN.

The Great Communicator. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785317)

And that, my friend, is why Ronald Reagan was the best president ever.

He knew well the dangers of the metric system, that the metric system is, in fact, the tool of the devil.

Full Article Text (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19784887)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Caffeine is a well-known stimulant that is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Due to its stimulatory and other physiological effects, individuals desire to know the exact amount of caffeine consumed from these beverages. This study analyzed the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store-brand carbonated beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study with their caffeine contents were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The Wal-Mart store-brand beverages with their caffeine contents were Sam's Cola (12.7 mg/12 oz), Sam's Diet Cola (13.3 mg/12 oz), Dr Thunder (30.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Thunder (29.9 mg/12 oz), and Mountain Lightning (46.5 mg/12 oz). Beverages from 14 other stores were also analyzed. Most store-brand carbonated beverages were found to contain less caffeine than their national-brand counterparts. The wide range of caffeine contents in carbonated beverages indicates that consumers would benefit from the placement of caffeine values on food labels.
Introduction

Caffeine, 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine, is an odorless, slightly bitter substance found in numerous plant species (Tarka and Hurst 1998). Extracts derived from these plants, such as coffee and tea beverages, naturally contain caffeine and other methylxanthines. Caffeine is intentionally added as an ingredient to many carbonated soft drinks, including colas, pepper-type beverages, and citrus beverages. Although soda manufacturers may explain that caffeine contributes to the flavor of soft drinks, only 8% of adults were able to differentiate between caffeinated and caffeine-free colas at the concentration of caffeine contained in most cola beverages (Griffiths and Vernotica 2000). These beverages appeal to many consumers because of the stimulatory effect caffeine provides.

Caffeine has drawn more attention in the past decades due to its widespread consumption and physiological effects beyond that of its stimulatory effect (James 1991; Bernstein and others 2002; Mandel 2002). Caffeine is quickly absorbed by the body. The human salivary caffeine level, which indicates the extent of absorption, peaks around 40 min after caffeine consumption (Liguori and others 1997). Various physiological effects on the central nervous, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and renal systems have been reported (Nehlig and others 1992; Spiller 1998; Hartley and others 2004; Savoca and others 2005). For example, Hartley and others (2004) reported that caffeine causes a mild elevation in blood pressure. In addition, caffeine's diuretic effect is widely known (Spiller 1998).

Various governmental bodies have specified the maximum level of caffeine allowed in carbonated beverages. The U.S. Food and Drug Admin. limits the amount of caffeine in carbonated beverages to a maximum of 0.02% (FDA 2006). Therefore, the highest legal amount of caffeine allowed in a 355 mL (12 oz) can of soft drink is about 72 mg. Likewise, Canada limits caffeine to cola-type beverages at a level of 200 ppm or about 71 mg/12 oz (Dept. of Justice 2007). In Australia, the maximum caffeine level in cola-type beverages must not exceed 145 mg/kg or about 51 mg/12 oz while in New Zealand, the caffeine level is limited to 200 mg/kg or about 71 mg/12 oz (FSANZ 2000).

The amount of caffeine contained in various foods and beverages has been analyzed, including coffee (Bell and others 1996), tea (Hicks and others 1996; Friedman and others 2005; Pena and others 2005; Yao and others 2006), carbonated beverages (Bunker and McWilliams 1979; Strohl 1985; Grand and Bell 1997; Pena and others 2005), and chocolate products (Caudle and others 2001; Tokusoglu and Ünal 2002). The last large-scale study involving the caffeine contents of carbonated beverages was conducted 10 y ago where the caffeine contents of 24 fountain, 20 prepackaged national-brand, and 16 prepackaged private-label store-brand carbonated beverages were determined; the store-brand beverages were limited to products from 4 stores (Grand and Bell 1997). The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Natl. Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 19, provides broad classifications of carbonated beverages and includes average caffeine contents for 8 types of carbonated beverages (USDA 2006). Caffeine data for some national-brand beverages are also reported on manufacturer websites (A&W 2006; Coca-Cola 2006; Pepsi-Cola 2005; Dr Pepper 2006a, 2006b, 2006c; Sundrop 2006). Caffeine data for private-label store-brand beverages are not available.

New flavors, formulas, and brands of carbonated beverages continue to be introduced into the market. Manufacturers may gradually lower caffeine contents due to health concerns of some consumers or increase it to correspond to the demand for greater stimulatory effect by other consumers. Without caffeine values placed on the label, consumers are left relatively uninformed regarding the amount of caffeine contained in these beverages. In addition, comprehensive databases on the caffeine contents of specific carbonated beverages are lacking. Therefore, the specific objective of this research project was to measure the caffeine contents of national and private-label store-brand carbonated beverages so that current data will be available to the scientific community and public.
Materials and Methods

Chemicals and reagents

Anhydrous caffeine used for preparing the standard solutions was purchased from Sigma Chemical Co. (St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.). Sodium phosphate monobasic, phosphoric acid, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) grade acetonitrile were obtained from Fisher Scientific (Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A.). Deionized water was obtained from a water purification system (18 Mcm-1 quality).
Samples and sample preparation

Fifty-six varieties of national-brand prepackaged (cans and bottles) carbonated beverages were collected across the southeastern United States; these are listed in Table 1 along with their manufacturers. Seventy-five types of private-label store-brand beverages were acquired from 10 grocery stores, 2 pharmacies, 2 general merchandise stores, and 1 mini-market. Names of these stores, along with the beverage names, are provided in Table 2. Carbonated colas, pepper-type beverages (that is, like Dr Pepper), and citrus beverages (that is, like Mountain Dew), as well as their diet varieties, were analyzed in this study. Average caffeine contents of each carbonated beverage were determined from a minimum of 2 different lots. The beverages analyzed in this study were purchased between June 2005 and July 2006. The unopened beverages were stored at room temperature until analysis.

Each sample was degassed via sonication and diluted 3-fold with deionized water (1 mL sample + 2 mL water). Duplicate dilutions were made for all samples. An aliquot of each diluted sample was injected into the HPLC system to quantify the caffeine concentration.
Apparatus

The caffeine content was determined by isocratic reverse-phase HPLC equipped with a UV/visible detector, adapted from that used by Grand and Bell (1997). The chromatographic separation occurred on a Prodigy (150 × 4.6 mm) C-18 column (Phenomenex, Torrance, Calif., U.S.A.) in series with a Novapak (150 × 3.9 mm) C-18 column (Waters, Eatontown, N.J., U.S.A.). The mobile phase consisted of 20% (v/v) acetonitrile mixed with 80% (v/v) 0.1% aqueous sodium phosphate monobasic, acidified to pH 3 with phosphoric acid. The combination of these 2 analytical columns eliminated interference caused by other components in some samples, such as colors, artificial sweeteners, flavors, and preservatives. The wavelength of detection was set at 254 nm, and flow rate was set at 1 mL/min. Separation was performed at room temperature. Caffeine eluted around 4.1 min. Data were recorded by a Hewlett Packard HP3395 integrator (Palo Alto, Calif., U.S.A.). From spiking Caffeine-Free Diet Coke (Coca-Cola, Atlanta, Ga., U.S.A.) with known amounts of caffeine, the percentage recovery for this method was determined to be 96.7% to 100.8% with a coefficient of variation of 0.6%. These values were similar to those reported by Grand and Bell (1997). A sample chromatogram for the analysis of a pepper-type beverage is shown in Figure 1.
Data analysis

Every type of beverage underwent duplicate measurements per lot; these were averaged to give the mean caffeine content for that lot. Data from these duplicate dilutions were typically found to vary by less than 2%. The caffeine contents for the various lots were then averaged to give the mean caffeine contents of the beverages along with the standard deviation. Because these beverages are so commonly distributed and consumed in 12-ounce cans, the caffeine values are reported in terms of milligrams per 12 oz.
Results and Discussion

National-brand colas

The caffeine contents of 31 national-brand colas are listed in Table 3 along with available manufacturer data. The caffeine contents of this group ranged from 10.3 to 57.1 mg/12 oz. The highest value (57.1 mg/12 oz) was found in Pepsi One. Except for the lower caffeine contents of Ritz Cola and Red Rock Cola and the higher caffeine content of Pepsi One, the remaining samples contained 33.3 to 48.1 mg caffeine/12 oz. The caffeine values of some national-brand colas (Coke, Diet Coke, Pepsi, and Diet Pepsi) were 13% to 20% higher than determined 10 y ago (Grand and Bell 1997). Caffeine values for Tab, RC Cola, and Shasta Cola were similar to those reported previously (Grand and Bell 1997). The caffeine values determined in this study were consistent with the available manufacturer data. However, the USDA nutrient database gave an average caffeine content of 29 mg/12 oz beverage for regular cola products (USDA 2006), which was lower than most of the values determined in the present study. For diet cola products, the USDA gave an average caffeine content of 43 mg/12 oz, which also does not adequately represent the range of caffeine values.
National-brand pepper-type beverages

The caffeine contents of 10 national-brand pepper-type beverages are reported in Table 4. All samples in this group contained similar caffeine contents, with values ranging from 39.4 to 44.1 mg/12 oz. These caffeine values were similar to those of national-brand pepper-type beverages determined previously (Grand and Bell 1997), as well as data on the available manufacturer websites. The USDA nutrient database gave an average caffeine content of 43 mg/12 oz for diet pepper-type beverages (USDA 2006), which is consistent with the current data. On the other hand, the database gave an average caffeine content of 37 mg/12 oz for regular pepper products (USDA 2006), which is slightly lower than the values determined in this study.
National-brand citrus beverages

The caffeine contents of 10 national-brand citrus beverages are also reported in Table 4. The caffeine contents of this group ranged from 19.7 to 74.0 mg/12 oz. The greatest caffeine content (74.0 mg/12 oz) was found in Vault Zero. Except for the lowest caffeine content of Faygo Moon Mist (19.7 mg/12 oz), the other beverages contained more than 49 mg caffeine per 12 oz. These data were consistent with the available caffeine data from manufacturer websites. The caffeine contents of regular and diet Mountain Dew and Mello Yello from the present study and those from Grand and Bell (1997) were also similar. The USDA nutrient database gave an average caffeine content of 55 mg/12 oz beverage for regular caffeinated lemon-lime beverages (USDA 2006). For the purpose of this study, it is assumed that the lemon-lime caffeinated beverage classification by USDA refers to regular citrus products because there is no other carbonated citrus beverage category. Another USDA classification (carbonated beverage, low calorie, other than cola or pepper, with aspartame, contains caffeine) could include diet citrus beverages; this beverage category had an average caffeine level of 53 mg/12 oz (USDA 2006). Five out of 10 national-brand citrus products were found to be similar to the data from USDA. The other 5 citrus products were quite different from that in the USDA database. The caffeine contents of regular and diet SunDrop as well as Vault Citrus and Vault Zero were 17% to 34% greater than the values listed by USDA. For the citrus beverages, it was challenging to determine which USDA category was appropriate to use. Clearer descriptions of database categories would reduce this ambiguity.
Miscellaneous national-brand beverages

The caffeine contents of 5 miscellaneous national-brand beverages are also reported in Table 4. The caffeine content of Big Red (34.0 mg/12 oz) was similar to the majority of national-brand cola beverages. The USDA nutrient database gave no caffeine content for carbonated orange products (USDA 2006), but the regular and diet Sunkist beverages were found to contain 40.6 and 41.5 mg caffeine per 12 oz, respectively. These values were comparable to caffeine values reported previously (Grand and Bell 1997). In addition, the USDA nutrient database gave no caffeine content for root beer or cream soda products (USDA 2006). However, caffeine contents of 22.4 and 28.6 mg/12 oz were found in Barq's Root Beer and A & W Cream Soda, respectively. The USDA caffeine values for these beverage categories are inaccurate based on both current and previous data. Because these products may or may not contain caffeine, careful evaluation of the product's ingredient list is advised.
Private-label store-brand colas

The caffeine contents of 41 private-label store-brand regular and diet colas are reported in Table 5. The caffeine contents of regular colas ranged from 4.9 mg (IGA Cola) to 46.4 mg (Rite Aid's Big Fizz Cola) caffeine per 12 oz. The caffeine contents of diet colas ranged from 10.3 mg (IGA Diet Cola) to 61.9 mg (Rite Aid's Big Fizz Diet Cola) caffeine per 12 oz. The range of caffeine contents of this group was unlike the spread of national-brand colas, being much wider. Big Fizz Diet Cola contained more caffeine than any cola product, national or store brand; many other store brands contained less than 20 mg caffeine per 12 oz. Because of the large caffeine content range of these products, it is difficult to generalize the amount of caffeine being consumed from such products.

The caffeine values of Winn-Dixie's Chek Diet Cola, Kroger's Big K Diet Cola, Wal-Mart's Sam's Cola, and Sam's Diet Cola were comparable to those determined previously (Grand and Bell 1997). Big K Cola was found to contain 38.8 mg caffeine/12 oz, which is over 600% higher than the value of 5.2 mg caffeine/12 oz, reported 10 y ago by Grand and Bell (1997). Similarly, Chek Cola contained 29% more caffeine in this study (34.7 mg/12 oz) than that reported previously (27.0 mg/12 oz) by Grand and Bell (1997). These products have clearly been reformulated over the past decade. The USDA nutrient database gave average caffeine contents of 29 and 43 mg/12 oz beverage for regular and diet cola products, respectively (USDA 2006). However, the USDA database is impractical to use due to the wide range of caffeine values in private-label store-brand colas (4.9 to 61.9 mg/12 oz).
Private-label store-brand pepper-type beverages

The caffeine contents of 18 private-label store-brand pepper-type beverages are reported in Table 6. The caffeine contents of this group ranged from 18.2 to 59.8 mg/12 oz. The lowest and highest caffeine concentrations were found in Ingle's Diet Dr Lynn and Dr IGA, respectively. The caffeine contents of the samples were distributed evenly within this range. The distribution of this group was different from national pepper-type beverages, all of which contained around 40 mg caffeine per 12 oz. Dr IGA was found to contain more caffeine than any pepper-type beverage, national or store-brand, while several store-brand beverages contained less than half the caffeine of the national-brand products. The caffeine contents of Kroger's regular and diet Dr K were much higher (> 150%) than those analyzed by Grand and Bell (1997), indicating that the products have been reformulated. Similarly, the caffeine content of Winn-Dixie's Dr Chek analyzed in the present study was 33% higher than that reported previously (Grand and Bell 1997). The USDA nutrient database gave average caffeine contents of 37 and 43 mg/12 oz for regular and diet pepper-type drinks, respectively, which again does not adequately represent the wide distribution of the current results.
Private-label store-brand citrus beverages

The caffeine contents of 16 private-label store-brand citrus beverages are also reported in Table 6. The caffeine contents of this group ranged from 25.1 to 55.1 mg/12 oz. The lowest and highest caffeine concentrations were found in Kroger's Big K Diet Citrus Drop and Winn-Dixie's Chek Kountry Mist, respectively. Ten beverages within this group contained over 50 mg caffeine per 12 oz. The USDA nutrient database gave an average caffeine content of 55 mg/12 oz for lemon-lime (citrus) products (USDA 2006). Most of this group's results were similar to the value from USDA. Kroger's Big K products contained approximately half the caffeine of the value listed by USDA. The amounts of caffeine existing in Chek Kountry Mist, Sam's Mountain Lightning (from Wal-Mart), Big K Citrus Drop, and Big K Diet Citrus Drop were similar to the values reported by Grand and Bell (1997).
Quality control of store-brand beverages

Based upon the standard deviations listed in Table 3 to 6, the quality control of national-brand beverages appeared generally better than that for the store-brand beverages. Additional lots were obtained and analyzed for some beverages whose duplicate lots had quite different caffeine values. Products displaying large variations between lots included Rite Aid's Big Fizz Cola, Walgreens Cola, Walgreens Diet Cola, Dollar General's CloverValley Cola, CloverValley Diet Cola, Save-a-Lot's Dr Pop, Winn-Dixie's Chek Diet Kountry Mist, and Ingle's Laura Lynn Mountain Moon Drop. In addition, 1 lot of Food Lion's Mountain Lion was found to contain no caffeine (this sample was not included in the data analysis). Thus, there appears to be less stringent quality control with store-brand products than with the national-brand products.
Mean caffeine contents in different beverage types

The average amounts of caffeine existing in each beverage classification are tabulated in Table 7. The average caffeine values for national-brand cola and pepper-type beverages were similar. The national-brand citrus beverages contained more caffeine than cola and pepper-type beverages. National-brand diet colas contained, on average, more caffeine than the regular colas. One may suggest that this result is due to caffeine being diluted by the bulk from added sugar. However, the 9% to 11% sugar added to regular colas causes the solution volume to increase by less than 7% (Weast 1972). Therefore, adding 11% sugar to a beverage containing 42 mg caffeine/12 oz would only dilute the caffeine content to 39 mg/12 oz. Furthermore, the data in Table 1 do not show a pattern with regard to the differences between caffeine levels in regular and diet colas. Thus, specific formulation changes, not simply dilution from the sugar, account for the different caffeine levels. With respect to store-brand beverages, their caffeine contents were, on average, lower than the national-brand counterparts. In addition, the variation between store brands was generally greater than between national brands.

The USDA data in Table 7 represent the average caffeine values for a given beverage type. Interestingly, the overall caffeine averages for the regular colas, regular pepper-type beverages, and diet citrus beverages were close to the USDA values. Contrary to this result, the average caffeine contents of the diet colas, diet pepper-type beverages, and regular citrus beverages were lower than listed by USDA. When the beverages were categorized into national and store brands, additional discrepancies appeared. For the diet cola, diet pepper, and regular citrus beverage categories, the mean national-brand data were similar to the USDA values. However, for the national-brand regular cola, regular pepper-type, and diet citrus beverages, the average caffeine values were greater than those reported in the USDA database. The average caffeine data from store-brand beverages were all lower than those listed by USDA. The USDA classifications of caffeinated carbonated beverages should be broadened to differentiate between national-brand and store-brand categories, recognizing there remains a wide distribution within each beverage type.
Conclusion

The caffeine data collected in the present study suggest that consumers concerned about limiting daily caffeine ingestion from carbonated beverages may select the lower caffeine-containing store-brand beverages; however, a limited number of these beverages actually contain substantially more caffeine than national-brand products. In addition, although the store-brand beverages are less expensive, their caffeine levels tend to vary more between brands, and in some cases between different lots of the same brand, than the national-brand beverages. Consumers desiring caffeine may likewise select from higher caffeine-containing beverages. Because of the wide range of caffeine values (5 to 74 mg/12 oz.), broad generalizations about the caffeine contents of national and store-brand carbonated beverages are difficult to make. Our data may be used to update and expand the USDA nutrient database so that consumers have more current and accurate information. However, the best way for universal access to caffeine data is to place values on food labels so all consumers can be better informed about the amount of caffeine they are ingesting. Consistent with this recommendation, the Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo announced in February 2007 their intent to place caffeine contents on the labels of various carbonated beverages (IFT 2007). If all manufacturers placed caffeine contents on food labels, consumers would have the ability to instantly compare products, enabling them to make more informed purchasing decisions.
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Bernstein GA, Carroll ME, Thuras PD, Cosgrove KP, Roth ME. 2002. Caffeine dependence in teenagers. Drug Alc Depend 66:1-6.

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Caudle AG, Gu Y, Bell LN. 2001. Improved analysis of theobromine and caffeine in chocolate food products formulated with cocoa powder. Food Res Int 34:599-603.

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Dept. of Justice. 2007. Food and drug regulations. Canada Department of Justice. Available from: http://lois.justice.gc.ca/en/showdoc/cr/C.R.C.-c.8 70/bo-ga:1_B-gb:1_16//en [justice.gc.ca] . Accessed March 26, 2007.

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Mod parent up (0, Troll)

turtlexit (720052) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785015)

Mod parent up

Regional variations? (3, Interesting)

identity0 (77976) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784895)

I know Coke/Pepsi use different sweetners for its drinks based on local price and taste variations, so is there a possibility the caffine levels could vary as well? Also, what do they put in Coke that caffinates it? Do they just pour an amount of pure caffine in, or what?

Source of caffeine in Coke (4, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#19784985)

Also, what do they put in Coke that caffinates it? Do they just pour an amount of pure caffine in, or what?

The "Cola" in Coca-Cola stands for kola nut extract, which used to provide the bulk of caffeine. But after several reformulations of Coca-Cola, less actual kola is in the formula, and most of the caffeine is now pure caffeine. Caffeine is a base, and Coke has phosphoric acid to disguise the bitterness.

Personally, I like the taste of Coca-Cola Zero [wikipedia.org] a lot better than that of Diet Coke. I can tolerate Diet Coke only in a fountain mix that emulates C2 [wikipedia.org] (50% Coca-Cola, 50% Diet Coke). But will Coke follow the example of Diet Pepsi Max in introducing a new higher-caffeine formulation? And will it be called Crack-a-Cola?

How much? Well, this is Slashdot, so: (5, Funny)

Kohath (38547) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785065)

It's an ALARMINGLY small/medium/large amount. Be alarmed.
It's a CONSPIRATORIALLY large/medium/small amount. They're out to get you.
It's a nasty CORPORATE amount. You should be randomly angry that your soda isn't made in some guy's garage by 11-year-old soda hackers.
It's an ANTI-CONSUMER amount. Consumers deserve more/less at a lower price (free if there was any justice, man).
It's an UNSCIENTIFIC amount. Those Christians wouldn't let stem cells evolve into the right amount -- we hate them.
It's an amount that VIOLATES YOUR RIGHTS. Online.
GEORGE BUSH hates your soda and makes the caffeine the wrong amount. Cheney hates the can.

The amount is most unfair to women and minorities and we could get it fixed if they'd stop outsourcing all the soda engineering jobs to Bangalore.

Re:How much? Well, this is Slashdot, so: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785077)

Why is it when I don't have mod points, every idiot troll on the planet appears?

Re:How much? Well, this is Slashdot, so: (1)

Kohath (38547) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785109)

Why is it when I don't have mod points, every idiot troll on the planet appears?

Submit it as an Ask Slashdot question. (The answer is hire a lawyer.)

Re:How much? Well, this is Slashdot, so: (1)

azav (469988) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785319)

You sir, are indeed awesome.

So? (1)

morari (1080535) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785071)

After a tiny, initial burst (if that) you don't really receive much of any stimulation. I never quite understood that "cool factor" in drinking highly caffeinated beverages anyway.

I'll take coffee, thankyouverymuch (2, Interesting)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785079)

Sorry, pop doesn't cut it for me any more. I suppose if I have a paper due the next day and I have to work on it late at night I can (and do) settle for Mountain Due to help me out for an hour or so thanks to its combination of caffeine and sugar. But overall, I'll take my coffee. In addition to having n times more caffeine, it is also healthier because of less sugar and has been correlated to a decrease in risk in diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, which I am afraid of getting since one of my grandfathers had Parkinson's and my other grandfather had Alzheimer's. Plus, coffee smells better

Re:I'll take coffee, thankyouverymuch (1)

residieu (577863) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785229)

The problem with coffee is you have to drink it as soon as you pour it. With Coke, you can leave it sitting around taking sips as you work and it'll be ok for hours. If you don't finish your coffee within 10 minutes or so it gets cold, and there is little that is nastier than a cold cup of coffee.

Mountain Dew in Canada (1)

Nyktos (198946) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785089)

Last time I checked, Mountain Dew in Canada is caffine free. I remember someone telling me that in Canada you can not put caffine in a pop (soda) unless it is dark coloured.

Caffeine-free Coca-Cola (2, Insightful)

Yaztromo (655250) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785091)

I've been drinking Caffeine-free (NOT DIET!) Coca-Cola ice it came out on the market a few years ago, after consuming who-knows-how-much caffeine over the course of my lifetime previous to its release. It has all the sugar and calories of regular Coke, but zero caffeine, and tastes virtually the same (although perhaps a tiny bit sweeter, as it lacks the bitterness of the caffeine). I bring a case to the office every week or two for my own consumption. People always ask me about it, as it comes in a shiny, golden coloured can, as if it were Coke for the super-rich or something.

Unfortunately, it's brutally difficult to find. I went through a three-month stretch a year or so ago where I simply couldn't buy it at all. So now I keep a small stock-pile. I know of one store in the area that carries it (I used to know at least four, three of which have stopped carrying it), and they often get 3 or 4 cases every week or so. Recently, however, they suddenly had more than a dozen cases on their shelf, and I've been slowly buying it up.

Anyhow, if you're looking to get your body out of the caffeine-consumption cycle, but don't want to give up that sweet, sweet nectar, look around for it. It's good stuff. Maybe if I can convince more people to drink it, it will become possible to find it in more places and more sizes (I've only ever seen it in 12-can cases and 2 litre bottles, and never in a vending machine, and only very rarely in a convenience store as single cans).

Yaz.

Other references already exist though... (1)

azav (469988) | more than 7 years ago | (#19785119)

like this one:
http://wilstar.com/caffeine.htm [wilstar.com]

and this:
http://www.napa.ufl.edu/2003news/caffeinecontent.h tm [ufl.edu]
Starbucks regular drip coffees contain an average of 200 milligrams of caffeine per 8-ounce serving; their decaffeinated drip coffees contain an average of 5 milligrams to 11 milligrams of caffeine per 8-ounce serving, according to the statement. ...
The study's second phase used 16-ounce cups of Starbucks' Breakfast Blend, a mix of Latin American coffees, purchased on six consecutive days from a single Gainesville store and analyzed by the same method. Results for the six days were, in order: 564 milligrams, 498 milligrams, 259 milligrams, 303 milligrams, 300 milligrams and 307 milligrams.

back pain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19785237)

i notice that drinking a lot of coffee seems to cause back pain for me. i let it go for a long time until i got a job that required hard physical labor. working your back + too much caffeine = waking up with loads of pain. that's my experience anyway.
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