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First Thing IT Managers Do In the Morning?

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the beeline-for-coffee dept.

IT 584

An anonymous reader writes "When I was a wee-little IT Manager, I interviewed for a position at an online CRM provider in San Francisco, a job I certainly was qualified for, at least on paper. One of the interviewer's questions was 'What is the first thing you do when you get to work in the morning?' I thought saying 'Read Slashdot' wouldn't be what he was looking for — so I made up something, I'm sure, equally lame. I didn't get the job. But the question has stuck with me over the years. What do real IT and MIS managers do when they walk in to the office in the morning? What Web sites or tools do they look at or use the first thing? Remember, this is for posterity, so please be honest."

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First (3, Funny)

Sexual Asspussy (453406) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792807)

thing

Coffee machine1st thing I look at (5, Funny)

Evil Al (7496) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792811)

Coffee machine, foo!

Turn off the alarm (5, Funny)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792815)

Otherwise I get a headache real fast!

Shower (5, Funny)

Aliencow (653119) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792817)

I'm sure that would've been the right answer.

Check the sev 1s (4, Informative)

MosesJones (55544) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792821)

The first thing you do every morning is check the sev 1 problems that have occurred when you are out. Next off you look at the 24 hour report to see what is out of whack. Anything odd you follow up on. If everything is fine then you have a cup of strong coffee and wait for the first dumb question of the day.

Deal with the disasters first, after that everything in the day is a lightweight bonus.

Re:Check the sev 1s (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792871)

The first thing you do every morning is check the sev 1 problems that have occurred when you are out. Next off you look at the 24 hour report to see what is out of whack. Anything odd you follow up on. If everything is fine then you have a cup of strong coffee and wait for the first dumb question of the day.

Seriously. If our IT manager makes it from the door to his desk before being accosted, it's a damn good day for him. Poor bastard.

Re:Check the sev 1s (5, Insightful)

Em Ellel (523581) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793049)

The first thing you do every morning is check the sev 1 problems that have occurred when you are out. Next off you look at the 24 hour report to see what is out of whack. Anything odd you follow up on. If everything is fine then you have a cup of strong coffee and wait for the first dumb question of the day.

Deal with the disasters first, after that everything in the day is a lightweight bonus.
Generally speaking if you have to check on them, they are not sev 1. If they are sev 1 you should have been contacted by now via automated(monitoring software) or manual(minions) means.

Of course what is missed in this discussion is that the job is that of an IT manager and NOT SA and as such it is NOT your job to deal with the actual monitoring and fixing of anything (except, as mentioned above, maybe things of highest priority), it is SA's job. Your job to is to support SA's and make sure the emergencies ARE dealt with while also making sure all (including non-emergency) services are taken care of.

This is why sometimes a good SA does not make a good IT manager.

-Em

Re:Check the sev 1s (5, Funny)

edittard (805475) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793217)

Generally speaking if you have to check on them, they are not sev 1. If they are sev 1 you should have been contacted by now via automated(monitoring software)
Perhaps they're a C shop - so they count from zero.

There should be... (1)

Cafe Alpha (891670) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793265)

mod -1, funny :)

Re:Check the sev 1s (2, Insightful)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793289)

Indeed. The first thing you do is chat with the night shift to make sure everything ran smoothly. Then you make sure the day shift are all in.

 

Re:Check the sev 1s (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793315)

> The first thing you do every morning is check the sev 1 problems that have occurred when you are out.

Not bad.

In a non-IT context, I'm about the same:

1) Skim Republican website to see what got blown up last night. They're a pretty panicky bunch, and usually first to report major fires, earthquakes, etc by 15-20 minutes. When a nuke finally goes off in anger somewhere, I'll be selling airlines and buying defense contractors in the few minutes between the flash and the probable temporary closure of the markets due to panic.
2) Skim Democrat website to see what got covered up last night. They're great at digging into scandals; a few years back, their reports on troops without armor gave me a good 24 hours to get into Armor Holdings (NYSE:AH) before the mainstream media forced the government to shovel money into contract awards. Also helped knock Taser off its high horse a few years ago.
3) Skim Slashdot to see what the whackjob partisans in #1 and #2 completely forgot about. Your usual tech stories.
4) Skim financial news websites to see if what I've found in #1, #2, or #3 offer good opportunities to make money.

The war's a crock of shit, but it's a profitable crock of shit.

XPlanner & Team Assessment (3, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792827)

If it's early in the iteration (we have two week cycles for our agile development plan) then I'll log on to XPlanner [xplanner.org] which is a Free Open Source project management tool that allows me to control the user stories and tasks for our project. Early on I look for people that have more hours than others and I try to mitigate that by visiting them and just talking over what they have to do on a high level with them. Since I'm still young and know all the technologies we use, I give them drawings and any sort of information they need to get the job done.

If it's near the end of an iteration or someone is empty, I shuffle tasks and then make a note to talk to both the people one on one when they get in. I also take the time in the morning to talk to people about what they need to work on so they don't spend all day on the wrong task. In the event of something pending that isn't going to get done, I schedule a meeting with my manager and maybe the customer. Haven't had to do that yet though.

Now, keep in mind this is only for a 10 person development team so it might not work on your level. But the first thing I do is assess the day by going over what people checked in and completed the day before in my project management tool, XPlanner. If you haven't used it, I heavily suggest and endorse it--you just need a server to host it on and you're ready. Oh and I'm 25 with little or no management experience prior to this so that could also make this advice completely worthless and naive.

In my opinion, the best thing a team lead can do is listen and, well before it happens, stop people from putting themselves in bad positions where they're in until 3 AM one night before a customer meeting. You take precautions at the beginning of every day and your team should be alright.

Re:XPlanner & Team Assessment (4, Funny)

sunwukong (412560) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793183)

Early on I look for people that have more hours than others and I try to mitigate that by visiting them and just talking over what they have to do on a high level with them.
09:30-1:15 -- mgr walked in to discuss strategic planning and proper time management; gave me a dirty napkin & some URLs; called wife to let her know i'll be late tonight

Re:XPlanner & Team Assessment (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793201)

You sound like a software engineering manager, not an IT manager. Am I missing something?

Re:XPlanner & Team Assessment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793307)

Where do you work? I need to know because I would never want to work there.

Let's see.... (5, Funny)

alexfeig (1030762) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792829)

1) Shmooze around the office cooler for gossip. 2) Make sure my job is still there, and not outsourced. 3) Read Slashdot. 4) Call vendors and complain about service... so I can get free service. 5) Cut my budget even more. 6) Come unglued on a random user. 7) Read Slashdot. 8) Go home.

I fart (2, Funny)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792833)

Seriously, the first thing I do in the morning is fart.

Its a natural event and usually followed by my internal body check (quick overall run over major areas - helpful after waking up with a dislocated leg when I was younger...)

I then open my eyes.

Re:I fart (1)

itwerx (165526) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792965)

the first thing I do in the morning

Anybody else notice how many people completely missed the bit about "walk into the office"?
      Fart jokes aside there's quite a few posts about "waking up" activities, or maybe a lot of people just sleep at the office...?

Re:I fart (2)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793015)

Well I noticed the part about him asking for IT managers walking in the office.
Since I am not a manager I decided to be a bit OT on purpose (I had actually written a full note about my morning schedule but abandoned it in favour of a fart joke).

Re:I fart (3, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793295)

followed by my internal body check (quick overall run over major areas - helpful after waking up with a dislocated leg when I was younger...)
Been there. Entwined with a fat chick, am I right?

Email (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792835)

I'm a programmer, not an IT person. But the very first thing I do in the mornings is check my email. I need to know if anyone had any problems while I was gone, or if there's something urgent that needs taking care of. Basically, I check for emergencies first thing. After that, I read Slashdot, and start planning out my day. (Generally, I'm fairly useless until my brain wakes up. Which happens around noon. But my company insists I work 10-6 anyway, rather than 12-8)

Re:Email (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793087)

But my company insists I work 10-6 anyway, rather than 12-8)

Ten? Hell, you get to sleep in every day. My company insists on 7:30 to 4.

Quick Emergency (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793273)

"Hey someone email that guy so he can read it when he gets in !"

you must get some laid back emergencies

First thing in the morning (2, Informative)

yorkrj (658277) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792839)

The first thing I do in the morning is boot up my computer. Then I grab a cup of coffee while it is booting up. If it's still booting, I check in with my coworkers to see what's in store for the day - I try to keep the conversations short. Once the bootup is complete I start up email and work on timesheet/paperwork while my brain is warming up for the day. In short, I first thing in the morning, I multitask and prepare for the day ahead.

Re:First thing in the morning (3, Funny)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792969)

Why do you need to boot your computer? Are you running Windows ME?

Re:First thing in the morning (3, Insightful)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792981)

In other words, your boss could save the company about fifty bucks a day in lost productivity if he made sure you didn't turn off your computer when you went home at night.

Re:First thing in the morning (1)

yorkrj (658277) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793007)

I carry a laptop... and run an intense amount of software over a given day. So for me shutting down nightly just makes sense.

Re:First thing in the morning (1)

mortonda (5175) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793061)

I carry a laptop... and run an intense amount of software over a given day. So for me shutting down nightly just makes sense.

So????

Original question still stands...

I put my MBP through a lot of intense work, and yet leave it on overnight, so the backuppc process can get to it.

Why I cold-boot my computer in the morning (2, Informative)

yorkrj (658277) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793237)

I'm required to carry my laptop home or lock it up; I can't leave it powered over night. I either shutdown or hibernate it at the end of the day. We all would like to believe in this day and age that OS's and applications do not leak memory or become unstable but the fact is that they do. I find that periodically cold-booting my computer keeps things fast and stable. I usually have things to do while waiting for it to boot so it is not really a hardship or loss of productive time. I also find that having to shut down at quitting time forces me to take note of what I was doing over the course of the day and stay organized. Instead of performing daily system maintenance over night, happens durring my lunch hour.

Re:First thing in the morning (1)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793131)

You apparently don't work for a company with a draconian policy that requires you to shutdown your machine every night. That was my company several years ago. Recently they applied a new policy where you had to leave it on, but you must log out (and not just lock your machine). Updates are automatically applied during the evening and your machine may be automatically rebooted, regardless if anyone was still logged on and had something running/not saved. But of course that never happens because everyone logs out every night..right? :(

Re:First thing in the morning (1)

Riquez (917372) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793271)

If everyone leaves their computer on overnight, then how much does that cost in wasted power?

I have my computer scheduled to start up at 8:50am & shutdown at 5:30pm.
Seems pretty obvious.

actual vs interview (3, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792861)

Most probably first get coffee and then read email. A more "interview friendly" answer may be to "visit team members to greet them and see how they are doing both personally and prefessionally".
   

Re:actual vs interview (3, Funny)

mgabrys_sf (951552) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792937)

I find the second response to be more on message but in offices where a more direct response is required: "stick my tongue up middle management's ass and give it a few twirls" also works.

Another friendly tip from your happy labor force - productivity equals happiness. Putting the pro in profits, and the suck in success!

read email (2, Interesting)

OldAndSlow (528779) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792867)

and listen to voice mail.

That's how you find out that while your staff was reading slashdot, a customer reported a major outage that nobody has handled.

Ciggarettes, Coffee, Email... (1)

PoliTech (998983) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792873)

... for the old school.

Or Jolt (Red Bull, Diet Coke, Mountain Due, etc.) and an energy bar, Email

Then of course ... check out /.

4chan (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792875)

Visit this [4chan.org] .

Reading /. should be OK (2, Funny)

tftp (111690) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792883)

You can always say: "I test our Internet access by browsing a few selected Web sites and verifying that their content is correct."

Re:Reading /. should be OK (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793069)

Keeping up to date on a few sites is a good practice, and as long as it didn't interfere with work I would allow it in my office.
I have discovered many important things whilst reading the headlines on my regular rotation.

Whether it be battening down the hatches for an internet storm or updating software we use its invaluable for at least some team-members to keep their ear to the ground.

Re:Reading /. should be OK (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793263)

I've never met anyone who considers the goatse man important...

In order of priorities.... (1)

aarggh (806617) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792901)

1 - hook up and power on laptop 2 - get breakfast and coffee 3 - go through security and domain logins for laptop 4 - start eating breakfast 5 - login to servers and slashdot 6 - glance at emails for anything important 7 - COFFEE!

Check my office email then plan my day. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792907)

Title says it all. I read slashdot and other industry materials at home- which I can pull off by having a ton of RSS readers on my dashboard.

Then again I work in a client driven work situation, so YMMV.

For what it's worth I'm usually consuming caffeine during this important time of the day. A couple (diet) Dew or Vault generally do it for me.

The first thing I do. (1)

E-Sabbath (42104) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792909)

The first thing I do is crack my diet soda, and take a long pull.
The second thing I do is check the backup tapes.

After that, I see if the phone system is functional.

Finally, I check the emergency log.

Then, slashdot, groklaw.

i pee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792911)

of course

Re:i pee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793117)

I'd hate to be the guy who washes your sheets...

Check the logs (1, Insightful)

Southpaw018 (793465) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792915)

Anything on my network that sends emails - any kind, alert/notification/log, including stuff from SNMP - goes to one address. First thing, I check that address, make sure nothing needs immediate handling, and then grab some coffee.

Check Logs, Check in on Groklaw... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792921)

Easy to just check some logs, and read Groklaw for the real news.
Oh - Slashdot too.

First Thing In The Morning (1)

rux (307826) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792923)

  1. Make my coffee and cereal (otherwise, I won't have the time once I open my mailbox)
  2. Check my mail
  3. Put out fire
  4. Put out some more fire
  5. Chew delegated tasks from higher management
  6. Delegate tasks to team members
  7. Compose reports, answer queries from team members, entertain annoying ones
  8. Put out fires made by team members
  9. Submit reports to higher management

First thing? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19792925)

Masturbate. It's important you let them know you do this before you get to work. Sticky keys are nobody's friend.

Re:First thing? (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793195)

Finally, someone being honest. As it's IT related, make sure you tell em what site you get the pr0n from.

Re:First thing? (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793309)

sdticvkly kleysd asre nmo ghoodf./

Talk... (1)

darken9999 (460645) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792929)

I finish my coffee while I look over anything interesting on Google News and Slashdot. If I look in the morning, I don't think about it the rest of the day, so I don't get distracted. Then I make sure nothing important appeared in my email overnight, and I look over my plans for the day. So I guess the "good" answer is, I do a quick plan for eight hours of work.

Simple (4, Insightful)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792939)

You answer it like so:

"Every evening before going home, I write down my objectives for the following day. This helps me to stay focused the following day on what needs done. Sure, sometimes there are fires to put out, and not everything gets done. But by having a written down list, I find I am more productive. What I do first in the morning depends on what needs to get done that day"/

Very first thing... (5, Insightful)

ushering05401 (1086795) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792943)

After I put the kettle on is scan the news sites. It takes me all of two minutes to identify any news item that might somehow impact me and my little slice of the IT world.

I do this not so much for security or first-alert type response but for a more simple reason... I start conversations using the info I gleaned from the news. The people I work with each have different areas of technical interest, specialties, etc... managing a team means more than riding people about deadlines. I always start the day with a little chatter, and feel good when one of my team members gets to share some of their 'personal interest' knowledge because of a conversation I started.

Starting conversations in this manner provides all sorts of little 'contact points' that provide info about your employee's mood, attitude, satisfaction, etc... and way too many managers I have known fail horribly at replicating these contact points through more formal methods.

Anyhow, after that it is review e-mail, prioritize the day, and only begin coordinating with others once they have had time to do the same.

Regards.

Re:Very first thing... (0, Troll)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793297)

You are the most cold calculating bastard I have ever heard of. I'm sure it rubs off with your employees: "no no, he wasn't really interested in what I had to say, he just wanted to make a little 'contact point'.

What I do in the morning? (1)

saberman3000 (908378) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792949)

[1] Check my email [2] Get some coffee [3] Check my email [4] Read Slashdot [5] Check my email [6] Pretend I am working [7] Check my email

first thing (1)

zakeria (1031430) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792953)

I goto bed! turn of cell phone so the boss doesn't bother me, fight insomnia by counting Microsoft software flaws and bugs while removing the caffeine drip from my arm and neck.

Remember, this is for posterity so be honest... (3, Insightful)

Houdini91 (588691) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792955)

Ah, you gotta love those obscure The Princess Bride quotes. =)

Isn't It Obvious? (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792987)

The serious answer:

Check my phone messages, e-mail, and run logs, for any problems from the previous night's processing.

Why, sir.... (5, Funny)

digitalamish (449285) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792989)

The first thing I do is come up with an action plan to provide a best of breed solution that will benefit both our customers and our stockholders. After I take a wag at my daily task list, I begin working on new strategies to augment and improve the current paradigm. Once I have liaised with my support staff to determine the readiness of our infrastructure, I take off my jacket and put my briefcase away. Sir.

Re:Why, sir.... (1)

sash (107931) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793159)

Alice, welcome to Dilbertland, come see how deep the rabbit hole is...

Really, who would actually work for a company that hires you after having said something like this?

Re:Why, sir.... (1)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793275)

Anybody with a sense of humor.

status board (1)

Spazmania (174582) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792993)

My network monitoring system gives me a status board. The first thing I do is glance at the board to see if anything is red.

The second thing I do is ask the early guy if there is anything going on that I need to know about. I also ask about anything I noticed back when I checked my email before breakfast.

The third thing I do is plug in and boot my laptop.

Say hi to your colleagues...? (1)

emm-tee (23371) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792997)

It's got to be "say hi to your colleagues"... hasn't it?

Isn't that the most important thing?

The obvious (5, Funny)

Mike1024 (184871) | more than 7 years ago | (#19792999)

1. Park my bike, shower etc.
2. Turn on computer.
3. While it starts, get a coffee.
4. Log in, drink coffee, check e-mail/calendar.
5. Get to work.

I've got to say, that sounds like the sort of interview question that would get some pretty boring responses. Like mine, above. So I usually jazz it up a bit in interview:

1. Park my unicycle, change out of my superhero unitard.
2. Get a new guitar from the IT guys because I smashed mine at the end of my last performance.
3. Check in with each of the 10,000 people who work under my command, all of whom I know by name.
4. Have my executive assistant relay my e-mails to me, one character at a time, by throwing lettered frisbees back and forth between my company's two tower blocks.
5. Take my second breath of the day.

So far I haven't had any job offers, but I figure the market is pretty competitive at the moment - it's only a matter of time!

Re:The obvious (3, Funny)

arielCo (995647) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793213)

  1. Park my unicycle, change out of my superhero unitard.
  2. Get a new guitar from the IT guys because I smashed mine at the end of my last performance.
  3. Check in with each of the 10,000 people who work under my command, all of whom I know by name.
  4. Have my executive assistant relay my e-mails to me, one character at a time, by throwing lettered frisbees back and forth between my company's two tower blocks.
  5. Take my second breath of the day.
So, you applied at Google and can't wait for that first interview :)

make sure nothing is on fire (1)

ArbitraryConstant (763964) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793001)

I typically check my mail, touch base with the support guys, etc. Nagios would be lighting up my phone if it was something big, but it's good to be seen tackling the issue before everyone starts noticing.

First thing (1)

dwywit (1109409) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793013)

Say hello to co-workers?

First thing in the morning... (1)

EchoD (1031614) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793017)

I'm not really an IT Manager, but I'll bite...

Before I get out of bed, the first thing I do is turn off my alarm. Does that really need to be said?
Once I'm up, I either check my personal email or jump right in the shower. This really just depends on my mood.
Once I get to the office, I check my work email if it doesn't look like people are already in a panic. Otherwise, I deal with the problems at hand. Anything from a software bug to a HDD that's failed with priceless data on it and no backup (Friday was fun).

Re:First thing in the morning... (1)

zakeria (1031430) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793057)

you don't put your cloths on?

check backups (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793023)

check backups! Then, I recheck the backups. After that, I usually check the backups before getting to work. Seriously, nothing makes me sleep better than good, consistent backups.

VM, Email, Checklist (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793029)

I check Voicemail, while the machine is booting. Then check email for any hot items. If nothing's on "fire", I print off and check my list for my boxes.. backups ran, servers up, operator messages... Then on to my Change manangement system tracked issues to work on for the day...

Email - the alerts come in that way (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793041)

I check my email. With nagios, logwatch and to a lesser extent swatch that lets me know if something unusual has occured. Usually the subject line gives me the information I want. In the corner of the screen gkrellm with the multiping plugin lets me know if hosts are up or down.

slashdot (0, Redundant)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793051)

Read Slashdot.

TPS Reports (3, Funny)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793053)

while reading the e-mail and memos from my 7 bosses

A good answer (5, Funny)

blhack (921171) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793055)

When i come in, i immediately remove the backup tapes from last night and replace them with the ones for the night to follow. After that i sit down at my workstation and check the server logs to make sure that the backup completed successfully. Next comes email. There are a few automated emails that get sent to me when cron jobs are completed detailing what was done and how efficiently. If there aren't any problems that need to be dealt with, I start scheduling out my day in my notebook. After that i usually make my rounds around the office checking back in with users who had problems that required attention yesterday, to make sure that the solution worked for them and that everything is running smoothly. Once that is done, i log into the servers to check their state, make sure there aren't any runaway tasks, and basically ensure that everything is running smoothly. If there still haven't been any users with problems that need attention at this point, i will usually start looking through the firewall logs from last night to make sure nothing fishy was going on while i was away.

At this point, printers usually start exploding.

Hmmm (1)

torqer (538711) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793059)

From personal experience....

Depending on age, either they spike their hair or work on their comb-over.

Come on! (2)

technos (73414) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793067)

The first thing you do is walk into the john and empty the first four cups of coffee from your bladder in preparation for the next three you'll imbibe while trying to look thoughtful and ignoring your email..

At least that's what I did.

You assume too much. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793083)

I've not got up in the morning for months.

Well (1)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793099)

1. check for disasters that happened while you were away

2. coffee

3. plan the day

Everyone has missed the vital answer (1)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793109)

This question has to be answered with more context -- as an IT manager, one should have put in place automated monitoring and backup processes. One should answer the question by discussing these first -- at least at a very high level.

Then, the first thing one does on arrival is to check the results of the automated monitoring. However, the key point to get over to the interviewer is the proactive setup of the automated monitoring.

Of course for many people, they will already have checked the results of the automated systems from home, so then, the first thing one can do as a manager is to talk to the team -- get updates, opinions, ideas, or just bonding.

Office Space (4, Funny)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793119)

Peter Gibbons: Well, I generally come in at least fifteen minutes late, ah, I use the side door - that way Lumbergh can't see me, heh - after that I sorta space out for an hour.
Bob Porter: Da-uh? Space out?
Peter Gibbons: Yeah, I just stare at my desk, but it looks like I'm working. I do that for probably another hour after lunch too, I'd say in a given week I probably only do about fifteen minutes of real, actual, work.

He got promoted to manager off this.

Check slashdot (2, Funny)

unfunk (804468) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793121)

No, really.

I'm lying in bed right now, typing this on my mobile phone. The first thing I did when I woke up was to roll over, pick up the phone and check Slashdot.

It's warm in bed, and my computer is on the other side of a very cold room..

Bugger this, I'm going back to sleep.

The Building could be on fire for all i care. (3, Funny)

scenestar (828656) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793127)

But the first thing I need is to get my first hit of the day

Some Coffee, a cigarette followed by a few tabs of dexedrine and Effexor.

Honest to god, i couldn't give a fuck less about anything untill I have satisfied my cravings.

So what If i'm addicted.

Checklist (1)

daeg (828071) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793135)

I'm the first one into the office. I get in around 7:00. Our office opens at 8:30, our earliest clinic (medical offices) opens at 9:00. This gives me 2 hour window of few interruptions to not only fix problems, but get a lot of work done. I make more progress on major projects in those 2 hours than any other time during the day. Much of the rest of the day is fielding phone calls and working with coworkers to determine the direction/features of the products I'm working on.

The first 5-10 minutes entails checking the local servers, ensuring Exchange, Windows, etc are running OK. Then I check that our local failover web server is running fine. Then I check our remote web and database servers. I check the backup logs to make sure all offsite backups are up to date and that storage usage is OK across the board. I have small Python scripts that monitor most of the stuff for me and generate an XML report piped through PrinceXML into PDF. The scripts gather usage, load levels, etc of all remote servers as well as database growth (mostly row counts) over the past day, week, month, and quarter. They are PDFs because they are (a) easy to read and (b) look good when potential clients come in -- I can present a book of extremely detailed statistics on our uptime, downtime, server locations, average latencies, etc.

The reports also contain the volume of e-mail handled, bounced, rejected, and sent for all servers.

I then check all webmaster, abuse, and postmaster accounts for our domains, which are generally empty, thankfully. This also entails checking to see if any security alerts have come through Secunia. I have Outlook filters set up to flag incoming alerts for the products and operating systems we use, so I don't have to read all 300 message subjects each day. If there are any alerts, I still have almost 2 hours to handle them if needed, or at the least draft a memo to alert of downtime that evening or weekend.

All in all, it takes about 10-15 minutes of my time to check all of that. Follow that up with a nice glass of water, tending my plants and tending to my schedule for the day, and I still have an hour and a half before the office starts getting busy.

We're mostly Mac at my company (5, Funny)

spirit_fingers (777604) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793145)

So the first thing I do in the morning is play Unreal Tournament deathmatch online with the Maytag Repairmen. They suck. Naturally, I pwn their asses. After that, it's time for my mid-morning nap. Then it's off to lunch! Two hours later, I'm back, and it's siesta time, followed by a bathroom break where I peruse the the NY Times. Then, back at my desk, I jiggle the hula doll on top of my Mac Pro and check my email. Yawn. Nothing happening there. Then around 3:00 pm, my supervisor usually calls and asks me to show him for the 300th time how to import his Van Morrison CDs into iTunes. By then it's happy hour in the employee lounge. A couple of brewskies, followed by a fevered round of pinball, and it quittin' time! Yay! I've earned my pay for the day.

Backups (1)

jobin (836958) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793151)

CHECK THE BACKUPS. Seriously -- before coffee, anything. Make sure that any overnight backups went through okay and make sure all the data is safe and secure. That way, come hell or high water during the day, you're not going to lose more than one day people's work. Because losing people's data is the worst thing that can possibly happen.

What I Do Every Morning (usually..) (1)

Joel Rowbottom (89350) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793153)

1. Get into office. Assume coffee is there.
2. Check Nagios.
3. Quick look up the screens to check the usual jobs are running.
4. If all's cool, continue day as normal.

The important bit 'check Nagios' can be phrased as 'make sure everything's running'.

Email, before getting out of bed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793173)

No problems equals a lie-in followed by a leisurely coffee. Problems can mean not getting dressed properly until mid-morning.

(thankfully I work from home)

People first. (2, Interesting)

Masque (20587) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793181)

First thing? I say hello to my team. Because even though "IT" comes before "Manager" in the title, it comes a distant second in terms of priority.

Better Luck Next Time (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793193)

...saying 'Read Slashdot' wouldn't be what he was looking for

I'm sorry. The correct answer was indeed 'Reading Slashdot', yes 'Reading Slashdot.

Now destitute and unemployed, Anon reader falls to his knees, choking on the fecal stench of his own loserdom.
"Dear God! How has it come to this?"

First (1)

wlvdc (842653) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793203)

Check my honor tab in WoW.
Oh wait, you said IT Manager?

My routine (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793211)

1) Verbally check to see what is "on fire" with my underlings.
2) Go into office, scan through my email until I get sleepy again.
3) Close office door.
4) Go back to sleep, preferably in a position where it looks like I'm doing something if someone opens the door without knocking.

That's covered the first half hour or so of my day. Here's the rest:

Wake up (noon to 1300)
Heat up lunch, go back to office, eat.
Read slashdot or whatever while eating, and until I get sleepy again.
Sleep until 1600.
Wake up, do whatever I really need to get done.
Leave late, after collecting at least 1 hour of overtime, at least 15 minutes of which must be spent bitching about how I never get to leave on time, damnit.

Go home and read/play games/watch movies/hang out until 4-5 AM.

5 AM: Go to sleep.

If you make it to the desk, its a good morning (4, Funny)

ritchim (1097289) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793215)

Walk in the door, counter sarky comment from reception with "Yo mama" jibe. Walk past HR bitch, try not to catch eyes in case she steals my soul whilst i'm not looking. Pass 2-3 people having a conversation about shit not working, try to ignore it, if that proves impossible say "It's probably normal" or "Fucking goldmine/microsoft/Vendor-X" and walk off looking like your about to go fix something. Walk past engineers, stop to have a look at the latest batch of pornography they are trying to pass off as work related e-mail. Make it to the desk, throw down keys locate cup and head for a cup of tea. Return to desk and kill time until eyes finish opening and last nights hangover subsides. Each week is a relentless collage of grey interspersed with trips to the lav.

From a technical management point of view... (2, Informative)

QuasiEvil (74356) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793225)

I'm not a personnel manager, but a technical lead, and as such do have a bunch of technical types that I manage. So if you want to include me...

Seriously, bring up a browser, start the usual stuff loading (/., Ars, CNN, etc.) and then pop over to email while it all loads up. Generally go through my email, delete the crap, answer the easy stuff, read the hard stuff. Go get coffee while pondering the harder emails, come back, answer the ones I've thought about, read morning websites, answer the rest.

Generally then I get sucked down into the seventh level of he.. er, rather, an meeting about something I don't give a sh^H^H^H care deeply about.

Ob (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793235)

Well the one thing they don't do is stare out of the window. Otherwise the afternoon would be really empty...

What I do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793243)

1. Login (dang it takes forever)
2. Check group calendar (see who is in and out)
3. Check the help desk ticket queue
4. Check my Inbox (see what's urgent, medium, etc)
5. Take tactical actions only.

While reading Slashdot is fun, it's not something you should do first thing. Keeping the pulse of technology is strategic, not tactical. First thing in the morning, you do tactical. Later in the day when it slows down, then you can go strategic.

First Think Management Does in the morning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793247)

Jack off

pee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793257)

pee

fifteen minutes late. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19793261)

Well, I generally come in at least fifteen minutes late. I use the side door, that way Lumbergh can't see me. Uh, and after that, I just sorta space out for about an hour. Yeah. I just stare at my desk but it looks like I'm working. I do that for probably another hour after lunch too. I'd probably, say, in a given week, I probably do about fifteen minutes of real, actual work.

What I do in the Morning (2, Interesting)

riffzifnab (449869) | more than 7 years ago | (#19793283)

Whole lot of funny comments modded to +5, need more signal to noise I guess.

Heres what I do when I get in:
- Change backup tapes
- Do other things that have to be done (move tapes to off-site safe, make sure AC drip pan isn't full, etc)
- Check Nagios to make sure nothing is totaly f'ed up
- Tea

What I should do:
- Review my to do list and try and create some kind of schedule.

Good reading if your feeling a bit disorganized:Time Management for System Administrators [oreilly.com]
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