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Gigabyte N680SLI-DQ6 - A Mother Of A Motherboard

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the no-flux-capacitor-though dept.

291

MojoKid writes "Motherboards manufacturers seem to get more exotic in their designs, with each new chipset release. HotHardware has an evaluation posted looking at the Gigabyte GA-N680SLI-DQ6; a product that seemingly out does every other current desktop motherboard in a number of key areas. The board features four Gigabit LAN controllers, 10 SATA ports, a 12-phase power array, 100% solid-state capacitors, and a unique wrap-around, passive, cooling apparatus that cools both the top and underside of the chipset and CPU socket area. And because the board is based on NVIDIA's nForce 680i SLI chipset, it also has three full-length PCI Express x16 slots for multi-GPU support. It's a good overclocker and performed well throughout the benchmarks."

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But... (5, Funny)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852551)

...does it go to Eleven?

Re:But... (2, Interesting)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852577)

... does it run linux?

Re:But... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852711)

does it run linux?

Yes. Just wait 4 years and you have a perfectly half-working slow-assed driver. But hey, at least Linsucks is open sores, right?

Re:But... (4, Informative)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852767)

The summary is wrong, as anyone who looked at the front page of the article could tell you.

2 PCI Express x16 slots
1 PCI Express x8 slot
1 PCI Express x1 slot
3 PCI slots

Re:But... (1)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852909)

TFA gets it wrong too: "And did we mention the board is based on NVIDIA's nForce 680i SLI chipset and has three full length, PCI Express x16 slots for multi-GPU action?"

Re:But... (1, Informative)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852935)

Actually, the summary is correct. I thought it was wrong too, though, until I looked at the photograph of the PCB: http://www.hothardware.com/articles/Gigabyte_GAN68 0SLIDQ6/?page=2 [hothardware.com]

Doh! (1)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852941)

Doh! You're right, even though they're the same length, one is 8x. Which begs the question even more, why?

Re:Doh! (1)

kailoran (887304) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852995)

So you can put a 16x card in it - it will work, only get less bandwidth. You can do this with a 'standard' 8x slot too, but you would have to cut off part of the card's connector.

Re:But... (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853129)

No, the summary and article were both correct. It's just that PCIe is more complicated because the "xN" nomenclature can refer to the electrical and physical properties separately.

In other words, the slot in question is physically x16 (i.e., an x16 card will fit) but electrically x8 (i.e., a card in that slot would only get x8 bandwidth).

Re:But... (2, Informative)

CelticWhisper (601755) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852587)

And how much more blue could they make that silicon? The answer is none. None more blue.

Re:But... (2, Funny)

cstdenis (1118589) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852759)

Will it blend?

memerized?? (1)

xtracto (837672) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853113)

Sorry, could someone explain me where does this meme comes from? I think I lost that /. episode...

Re:But... (5, Funny)

sharkey (16670) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853051)

...a 12-phase power array...

It goes PAST eleven.

First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852569)

First POST!

Re:First Post (0, Offtopic)

fattmatt (1042156) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852627)

first post? what is this ... fuckedcompany.com 1999?

oops ... i ate the bait...

Hmmm (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852585)

No referrer in the url. I guess they must organize the kickbacks on the backend somehow.

What is a power array? (3, Interesting)

Shimdaddy2 (1110199) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852593)

I recognize most of that stuff, but what is a 12-phase power array?

Re:What is a power array? (1)

doombringerltx (1109389) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852619)

Imagine a normal power array but instead with 12 phases. DUH!

Re:What is a power array? (1)

Applekid (993327) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852731)

I misread that then. I thought it had a 12 phaser power array to vaporize my enemies.

Re:What is a power array? (5, Informative)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852737)

This refers to the power regulator onboard - i.e. internal to the motherboard itself; it's nothing to do with the 240v PSU.

The onboard power regulator is the part of the motherboard which converts the standard 3.3v to the exact voltages the CPU, RAM, etc require. The theory goes that the more phases, the cooler running, more efficient and more reliable the motherboard will be (but it's mostly about e-penis, rather than any genuine advantage).

Hey! (5, Funny)

Jon.Laslow (809215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852881)

rather than any genuine advantage).

No need to turn this in to a Microsoft flame war! ^.^



Good bye, sweet Karma....

Re:What is a power array? (1)

hobbesmaster (592205) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853049)

That still doesn't explain how you get different phases [wikipedia.org] out of a DC signal.

I'm assuming they mean something else. Or, more likely, its bullshit like audiophile cables designed to minimize the skin effect, cable burn in devices or power factor correction stuff for your house.

Re:What is a power array? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853083)

There is real practical value in breaking it up into phases, not just theoretical.

Note: I've done multi-phase power work, but it has been a while.

Re:What is a power array? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852827)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-phase [wikipedia.org]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_converter [wikipedia.org]

useful for running four AC motors in parallel without having their inductive load mess with each other.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RL_circuit [wikipedia.org]

Given that a motherboard is a DC system, I have no idea what that would be useful for.

Re:What is a power array? (1)

Petrushka (815171) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852905)

Be careful! Even if you're seeing predictable phase arrays, you still might end up with a resonance cascade scenario.

Re:What is a power array? (1)

Control Group (105494) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852975)

Bah. I don't think I'll ever see a resonance cascade--

--you'll have to excuse me. I have to go wait for someone...in the test chamber.

Re:What is a power array? (1, Funny)

Fozzyuw (950608) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852993)

I recognize most of that stuff, but what is a 12-phase power array?

It's next to the deflector dish and is usually the 2nd thing to be re-aligned when trying to solve some complex, physically impossible, life threatening problem.

"In four hours the ship blows up" -- Scotty (The Savage Curtain)

Re:What is a power array? (4, Funny)

Andy_R (114137) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853039)

You are too stupid to understand nature's simultaneous 12-phase powercube! Cubic Creation of 4 corner separate simultaneous 12 phase Days within 1 Earth rotation - transcends and contradicts the 1 Day rotation and all ONEism / Singularity religions - proving them to constitute Evil on Earth for the parallel Opposites. No god equals 4 corner stages of metamorphic rotating humanity - as a baby, child, parent and grandparent evolution of motherboards! I offer you $10,000.00 to disprove math that 1 rotation of 4 Earth quadrants within the 4 quarter Harmonic Time Cube does create 12 simultaneous 24 hr power phases!

Re:What is a power array? (1)

dfsmith (960400) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853153)

Is that regular hours or sidereal hours?

Why? (4, Funny)

danbert8 (1024253) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852597)

Is this really neccesary?
 
(Before someone else replies, I have the most likely response, "Necessary? Is it necessary that I drink my own urine? No, but I do it anyways because it's sterile and I like the taste." -Patches O'Houlihan)

Re:Why? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852765)

haiku

flask of ripe urine
pressed to dead bsd lips
bsd drink up


Fact: *BSD is dying

Re:Why? (1)

asphaltjesus (978804) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852889)

After reading TFA it sounds to me like they probably build another board like it for another brand. This is pretty common behavior.

The feature set sounds like it belongs in a server more than the average desktop.

Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (2, Funny)

CodeShark (17400) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852599)

With all the heat piping in this thing it sounds really great for quietness -- except that the heat still has to be removed from the enclosure so that it doesn't toast lots of other electronic whatzits Of course, if they put a little coffee plate on the top of the enclosure you could prolly use one of things to brew up a pot but otherwise the quiet factor goes away because of the newly required higher capacity enclosure fan.

Re:Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (1)

morethanapapercert (749527) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852841)

Feel free to correct me if I am wrong, but for most desktop/tower cases the biggest source of sound is the tiny video card and CPU fans spinning at $BIGNUM rpm. The larger and slower case fans make less sound and at far less obtrusive frequencies. This was the logic behind all those fan controllers and BIOS fan speed controls to slow down the smaller fans whenever the heat load was diminished. It also explains some of the more monstrous CPU cooler rigs out there. Using a big chunk of Cu allows you to use a bigger, slower and hence quieter fan. A passively cooled setup that relies on a large (80mm or larger.) case fan to move that hot air out of the box is going to be inherently a lot quieter than the more typical CPU and Video card fan setup. This rig would still be quiet. Not silent, I'll grant you, but still quieter than the average. In my travels across the WWW, the only truly silent (as in 0Db) systems I have read about are custom built boxes based on mini or nano ITX boards, flash based HDD, 12VDC power supplies and so on. Fun little machines no doubt, but not the makings of a high end desktop machine that this mobo seems to be intended for. (I actually RTFA, 8Gb RAM, 10 SATA ports, 4 Gb RJ-45s sounds like a pretty potent unit to me.)

Re:Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (1)

Control Group (105494) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852843)

But you already have a system exhaust fan. Going from a 100 mm fan to a 120 mm fan (running at the same RPM to move more air) won't increase the noise level as much as keeping the 100 mm and also having a whiny little 40 mm fan on the northbridge. And that's assuming that you actually need to increase the total air throughput.

I've certainly built systems where the total air throughput was more than adequate to move all the heat, but it wasn't adequate to cool down a specific hotspot. Which isn't surprising, since this is why we've got heat sinks and fans on CPUs: they don't increase total air flow through the case, they just even out the heat load to take better advantage of that total air flow.

Anyway, my point is that this really should make the system quieter, either because you get to ditch the particularly noisy little fan on the chipset in favor of a size increase on your biggest (and therefore quietest) fan, or because you can just take better advantage of your existing biggest (and therefore quietest) fan.

Re:Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (1)

Low2000 (606536) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852985)

My question is:

Does heat piping work well in a case in which the motherboard is mounted upside down?

I have one of those, and could never find a good answer.

Re:Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853099)

Does heat piping work well in a case in which the motherboard is mounted upside down?

being as heatpipes have been used for cooling in zero gravity, i doubt it would make any differant at all what direction the tubing goes.

Re:Passively cooled sounds good but not quiet. (1)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853133)

No no no! You've got it all wrong! The "heat piping" is what was once called a "radiator" You put it in your house and run it during winter to stay warm - No need for a case; it just adds weight. They are coming out with a summer model in January.

Tech Review Site (4, Funny)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852603)

I intend to launch a tech review site immediately after you give me a copy of that motherboard for review. Just ship it to my house, and I promise you a good review. Mind you I can't really test the board's SLI features unless I have two top-end video cards as well. And I can't really test the overclocking unless you give me a processor, but in the end, you'll get a glowing review. It will be worth it.

Re:Tech Review Site (3, Insightful)

shawn(at)fsu (447153) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852671)

And I would visit your review site provided you don't use those god awful double underlined adds..... Sorry for the rant but those things drive me crazy, they hardly ever are relevant to the context to the way the word is used and they come up just by moving the mouse over them....

Re:Tech Review Site (3, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852743)

And I shouldn't split two pages of content over 12 pages just to generate more ad hits?

Re:Tech Review Site (2, Funny)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852747)

I doubt he would use the double-underlined ads. From a fellow of his standing, I would expect no less than one of those "You're visitor number 1000000. Congratulations, you WON!" with the 10 Hz flashing background that causes epileptic seizures.

Well, two is better than none (1)

vfs (220730) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852605)

I was surprised to read in the blurb that it had three PCI-Express x16 slots, but the hardware summary on the story says it only has two. Still, better than just one.

Re:Well, two is better than none (1)

IceCreamGuy (904648) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852697)

Several boards have come out that have 3 x16 PCI-express slots, two for video and the extra for a physics card. Ah well, a man can dream... a man can dream.

Re:Well, two is better than none (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852753)

I was surprised to read in the blurb that it had three PCI-Express x16 slots, but the hardware summary on the story says it only has two
 
2 of them are for SLI video cards and are x16, the third is for whatever is only x8. In the pictures the orange one is the 8x while the 2 blue ones are for x16 SLI video. The blurb is incorrect - maybe the submitter just looked at the pictures?

But... (5, Funny)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852609)

Will it blend?

That is the question :)

Re:But... (1)

HolyCrapSCOsux (700114) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852877)

Ye, But you'll need to break it up a bit first. That's cheating.

editors..... (4, Informative)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852611)

From TFS:

it also has three full-length PCI Express x16 slots for multi-GPU support.


From TFA:

2 PCI Express x16 slots
1 PCI Express x8 slot

Re:editors..... (1)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852849)

You weren't seriously expecting the editors to proof-read and verify the submission, were you?

That's like asking them to spell-check everything. That will never happen.

Re:editors..... (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853085)

The x8 slot is the same physical size as the x16 slots, so x16 cards will fit in it. Same as putting an 8xAGP card in a 4x slot.

Why? (5, Insightful)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852617)

Why stick so many ports (4x LAN, 10x SATA) on the motherboard? Is there a performance benefit to putting those ports there, instead of providing lots of PCI slots so you can create your own optimal mix of ports?

Re:Why? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852703)

They should replacs the 2 of the lan ports with usb ports or more fire wire ports as they give you 0 usb / firewire back plans.

Re:Why? (1)

asphaltjesus (978804) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852755)

4x LAN?
If they were deployed right, it would be very nice teaming and redundancy. What are the chances of that on retail hardware?

10x SATA
I need a new file server. Nothing like an LVM using 10 drives. Pretty cheap. But hot.

Is there a performance benefit to putting those ports there?
If you did the same thing with PCI slots the power and heat requirements might be higher.

No doubt this will be an expensive board few will pay for.

Re:Why? (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852863)

4x LAN?
If they were deployed right, it would be very nice teaming and redundancy. What are the chances of that on retail hardware?


From the fine article:

controller, two of the GigE LAN ports are powered by the nForce chipset, the other two by a pair of Marvell PCI Express controller,


My first thought was that if I needed 4 GigE NICs, they'd all be Intel, so maybe this isn't so much a feature.

Re:Why? (1)

ZwJGR (1014973) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852813)

Ack, all those LAN and SATA ports, and *one* IDE port.
One!
So your machine can serve as an ultra-über-mega-server-games-machine being connected to 4 LANs and having 10 SATA hard drives, with two graphics cards (4 screens?), and up to 10 USB ports, but you can only have max 2 PATA IDE devices :?
They deemed necessary to sully it's presence with floppy, serial and PS/2 ports, so why not another IDE or two...

No good for me, with one SATA hard drive, one PATA IDE one, and two PATA IDE optical drives...

Re:Why? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852897)

Also, they should have some 8 bit slots! I got a 300 baud modem to run!

Sheesh, get with the times.

10 USB posts isn't a lot. I have iPod, Shuffle, Camera, printer, head set and external drive.
Considering most people also have a USB mouse and keyboard and speakers.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

compro01 (777531) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853171)

Sheesh, get with the times.

tell that to the optical drive manufacturers. it is still problematic to find SATA optical drives at reasonable cost.

Re:Why? (1)

saider (177166) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852987)


Add another $25US to the cost for the SATA to PATA bridge.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

magarity (164372) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852819)

Two reasons: Slots cost more during manufacturing than headers. And modern video cards with hugemongous heatsinks overlap at least one of the spare slots (mine has a passive heatsink and takes up 2 other slots plus the one its plugged into) so slots are really less useful than having ports built in elsewhere.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852847)

That's exactly the problem with these modern motherboards. You get 3x PCI-E slots, and plenty of LAN and SATA ports but you get 1x IDE and after seating 2 high-end videocards you're left with 0-1 PCI slots. It's ridiculous that they'd cripple expandability the way they do for that third GPU.

Nice cooling system (1)

InvisblePinkUnicorn (1126837) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852653)

The wrap-around design looks like an improvement over the standard system without going overboard like the ASUS Striker Extreme [pcstats.com] . How do these two cooling systems compare?

No Thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852661)

almost $300 for a lot of crap that I will never use

solid-state capacitors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852669)

100% solid-state capacitors
Is there another option? I've never heard of a vacuum tube capacitor.

Re:solid-state capacitors (3, Informative)

Ashtead (654610) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852757)

Vacuum capacitors actually do exist, but their capacitance is way too small for the decoupling jobs that the capacitors on a PC motherboard do. Not a likely option as they tend to find use in high-power, high-frequency radio or radar equipment, with price tags to match.

The opposite of "solid-state" capacitors is in this case the aluminium electrolytic capacitors. Presumably they just use tantalum or some other kind instead on this board. Now, these are also polarized and technically also "electrolytic" (besides, they can still fail) but their failure mode does not include emitting nasty goop onto the board.

Re:solid-state capacitors (1)

PoliTech (998983) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852803)

From TFA: "As we continue our tour around the GA-N680SLI-DQ6, you may notice that this board is equipped with nothing but solid-state capacitors; no electrolytic caps are to be found. This should help with the board's longevity as there no chance of a leaky cap.

Re:solid-state capacitors (1)

mmontour (2208) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853033)

Is there another option? I've never heard of a vacuum tube capacitor.
Vacuum Capacitors [omnicor.com] exist, although you're not likely to find them on a PC motherboard.

I WANT TO FUCK IT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852695)

right in the socket

Re:I WANT TO FUCK IT (1)

AC-x (735297) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853135)

You must be thinking of those new iMacs [bbspot.com]

(Ok not so new anymore but you get the idea)

Re:I WANT TO FUCK IT (1)

jamieswith (682838) | more than 7 years ago | (#19853147)

How, exactly is this informative?

Besides telling us what kind of mental help it is that you nead?

solid-core vs solid-state (3, Informative)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852719)

The correct term is 'solid-core', not 'solid-state', FYI.

Three PCI Express 16X Slots? (1)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852729)

Three PCI Express 16X Slots? I'm not quite sure I get that one. Why? To run SLI on one pair, and have another single graphics card? Most cards today come with two outputs anyway, and if you're crazy enough to need SLI on two monitors, why wouldn't you need it on your third/fourth? Four slots would've made more sense to me.

I guess they must be aiming at the booming five- and six-monitor market...?

Re:Three PCI Express 16X Slots? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852789)

I believe "SLI" is supposed to be generalized over the next generation of cards, so you can run in configurations with more than two.

Re:Three PCI Express 16X Slots? (1)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852871)

I believe "SLI" is supposed to be generalized over the next generation of cards, so you can run in configurations with more than two.

I hadn't thought of that; I guess I still have my old 3dfx Voodoo2s in mind. Still, the Wikipedia article only details dual- and quad-slot setups, and has only this to say about three-slot motherboards:

In response to ATI offering a discrete physics calculation solution in a tri-GPU system, NVIDIA announced a partnership with physics middleware company Havok to incorporate a similar system using a similar approach. Although this would eventually become the Quantum Effects technology, many motherboard companies began producing boards with three PCI-Express x16 slots in anticipation of this implementation being used.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Link_Interfa ce#Quad_SLI [wikipedia.org]

Re:Three PCI Express 16X Slots? (1)

danbert8 (1024253) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852811)

You forget the physics card that you really need if you are going to show off your billion dollar machine. Of course pretty soon they'll have dual physics cards that run in parallel to compliment your dual-core processor, dual-channel memory, SLI graphics, and RAID array.

And the next step from there... (1)

Jon.Laslow (809215) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852931)

...is to have dual computers.







Wait....

Two actually (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852947)

It's 2 16s and an 8

however, to answer your bigger wuestion: There are cards other then video cards that use 16 PCI-eXpress.

What's really cool about the GA-965P-DQ6 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852741)

The PnP 1.0a, DMI 2.0, SM BIOS 2.3, ACPI 1.0b supports the T.I. TSB43AB23 1394 chip and Dual Channel DDR2 800/667/533 ram. The LGA775 is paired nicely with 1333/1066/800/533 MHz FSB. Another cool thing is how the TMP and LPT connectors complement the S/PDIF out port which includes the ALC888 DD audio codec, Q-Flash and @BIOS. For internet connectivity, the 88E8052/88E8056 chip superheats the 88E1116 phy (10/100/1000 Mbit) nic. Also you can plug in some DDR2 667/533/400 DIMM or ECC type DRAM (what ever floats your boat!). Anyway, good motherboard, a little expensive but all in all worth it.

Solid state capacitors? (0, Offtopic)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852761)

As opposed to the ones that have moving parts?

Re:Solid state capacitors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19853057)

As opposed to ones that use liquid.

captcha: ohmmeter

Sigh. This is news? (0, Troll)

sloth jr (88200) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852769)

Another motherboard. No real performance standouts. Usual mix of ports and "more" crap. Marketing nonsense like 12-phase power array. Another review spread in 6 or more pages.

Wake me when something really interesting happens.

sloth jr

Re:Sigh. This is news? (1)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852865)

Did you hear? It can run Linux too.

Re:Sigh. This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19853073)

Enjoy this preview [notebookreview.com] of the linux-based mini-laptop ASUS Eee.

Personally I'd really like to see 1GiB memory instead of 512MiB, especially with DDR2 as low is it is. Yes, even if it draws a bit more energy. I believe being able to cache and collate flash-writes would be worth it.

Man, I hope the powertop the fuck out of the bundled apps.

AMD !!! (0, Redundant)

n0084ever (1042786) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852771)

just a personal preference, but I'll wait for a comparable AMD board, thank you very much.

Re:AMD !!! (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852917)

we understand not everyone deems quality important, good luck with that.

Capacitors (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852777)

All the hardware faults I've had in the past few years are due to bad caps. I hope other manufacturers take the hint and ditch using electrolytics for their mobos. The only place I want to see electrolytics are in the power supply.

Re:Capacitors (1)

Keith_Beef (166050) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852845)

A few years ago an electrolytic capacitor in my PSU literally exploded, frying the mobo, both CPUs, keyboard and mouse...

Beef.

Re:Capacitors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852879)

Yes but that's rare and using solid core caps to smooth the ripple current is prohibitively expensive.

slashvertisement tag ? (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852787)

Anyone? I'm not sure why its news ...

Re:slashvertisement tag ? (1)

Lord Apathy (584315) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852923)

Two words. They paid cmd taco off. Okay 5 words...

N680SLI-DQ6 (4, Funny)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852829)

That's a mother of a product name too.

Re:N680SLI-DQ6 (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852929)

You see this cat is a bad mother...
(SHUT YO MOUTH)
But I'm talkin' about N680SLI-DQ6
(Then we can dig it)

iSCSI SAN (3, Interesting)

doseyg (1127317) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852839)

With 4 Gigabit ports and 10 sata slots this could make a nice cost-effective iSCSI SAN...

FRY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19852895)

Oh good, another board so idiot overclockers can prematurely destroy their hardware by burning it to cinders!

Bought one -- DOA (1)

FreeKnight (669019) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852967)

Always had good luck with Gigabyte...bought one these and had to return it because it wouldn't POST. Too bad, looked like a nice unit. Bought an EVGA instead, which worked okay, BIOS updates a must though

Query (1)

dj_tla (1048764) | more than 7 years ago | (#19852981)

I have a question, maybe a somewhat simple one, but I'll ask it nevertheless. What's the point of multiple PCI Express slots? I'm not aware of any devices other than video cards using PCI Express (though I could very easily be wrong). It's not possible to use two video cards at the same time, correct? Is this just looking towards the future when more devices will need to throughput offered by PCI Express?

Sweet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19853123)

Now I can make a blazing fast ricer PC to match my souped up 2005 Handa Civic.

Seriously, I wouldn't have expected /. to showcase a piece of hardware that only really appeals to Gamers who want to win this upgrade pissing contest every six months or so.

Who is this guy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19853137)

So this guy from HotHardware is now Zonks new blow job buddy, eh? Just amazing how many stries he PIMPS to Slashdot.
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