Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

World of Warcraft Hits 9 Million Users

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the good-thing-no-one-is-dualboxing dept.

Role Playing (Games) 298

Wowzer writes "Blizzard today announced that their MMORPG World of Warcraft is now played by more than 9 million gamers around the world. From the article: 'That's half a million more than the number of monthly players WoW had back in March five months ago. — It's interesting to note that if the World of Warcraft were a nation, CIA's World Factbook says that out of 236 listed countries it would be the 90th most populated country on Earth above Haiti, but behind Sweden.' Also revealed this week was that DC Comics are creating World of Warcraft Comic Books based on the MMORPG, with the first issue appearing on November 14th. The ongoing monthly series will be written by industry veteran Walter Simonson (Thor, Orion) and feature art by Ludo Lullabi and inker Sandra Hope."

cancel ×

298 comments

Yes... (5, Funny)

feepness (543479) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973673)

...but what did it hit them with.

Re:Yes... (2, Insightful)

mdm-adph (1030332) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973707)

A potentially relationship-ending addiction?

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973777)

Not true. I'm in a family with four of us fighting for the PC to play WoW. Fortunately for me, I (Dad) trump the kids for the PC :).

Jim

Re:Yes... (5, Informative)

thc69 (98798) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974297)

Re:Yes... (1, Informative)

rufus t firefly (35399) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974683)

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that World of Warcraft has every ability to be just as destructive to someones' life as, say, heroin.

I actually have friends who have tried to hit me up for their membership fee when they couldn't afford it, and others who actually spent time and talked to me more when they were on heroin than when they played WoW. It's amazing, but the behavior patterns are the same, in my opinion (although IANA-whatever). I even know someone who lied to their wife about how many accounts he was actively playing ...

Every time I hear about some awful DDoS attack, some small part of me hopes that it's the WoW servers... I imagine millions of dateless wonders and pimply faced teens who have never seen the light of day, jonesing for their digital fix [twitchguru.com] .

Brilliant, Blizzard, brilliant. You managed to create a dangling carrot of a game with no perceivable ending, where millions and millions of people slave away to do ... absolutely nothing. Substance W [wikipedia.org] anyone?

Re:Yes... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974829)

Addiction to things that are not physically addictive is a symptom of depression, not a disease in itself. These "video game" and "Internet" addictions should make that clearer than ever. It's time for us to gain a more nuanced understanding of the addictive process; our current understanding is based on a misguided attempt to eliminate addiction by elimination of chemicals that have been involved in addictions, and this has completely failed.

You will not find me a real WoW addict who is not depressed, and you will not cure anyone of depression simply by removing WoW.

pffft (2, Insightful)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974895)

I recall the same thing said about space invaders. Before that, it was probably tv.
One man's pastime is another's OCD.

Re:Yes... (5, Funny)

shoptroll (544006) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973721)

Knowing blizzard:

Either a nerf bat or a ban hammer.

Re:Yes... (4, Funny)

Himring (646324) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974931)

WoW just follows the rules of mmogs. These rules are:

You always try out-level, and never play with, your friends (no matter what the voiced intentions)

As soon as you finish that quest for that really cool item, a new one comes making it totally worthless

In pvp, if you're in an area where there's a remote possibility you'll get ganked, you will be

In pvp, if you're in an area where there's no way you'll get ganked, you will be

The smallest possible race will always be rolled as a tank, and be better at it than the biggest possible race

1 out of 3, no 2 out of 3 ... no, 3 out of 3 quests will, at some point, make no sense

You will always respec wrong

You will hate the game

You will not stop playing the game

You will wonder why you cannot stop playing the game

You will cancel your account

You will re-open your account

You will cancel your account

[ad infinitum]

The maker will always nerf your class

The maker will always buff your friend's class

You will sell your account for $x amount of money and feel you actually are a good business man (when, truth is, you invested 100x that much)

You will create a new account and character

You will tell yourself that it isn't so bad this time because you're so good at it

You will cancel your account

You will play another mmog and tell yourself and your friends how much better/different it is than the last

You will create a character on a role-playing server and never role-play (nor will anyone else; people who do rarely role-play are made fun of)

K, I'm done, someone take over....

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973757)

A magic hammer, or a bill for $15/month. Same thing really.

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973779)

Nerfs of course.

I'm one of those users ... but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973851)

I haven't payed them in two years....

I wonder how many are inert accounts and alternate accounts.

No, you're not. (1)

ZombieWomble (893157) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974553)

Every time there's a topic like this, people say that, and it's just wrong. Blizzard explicitly state in all of their press releases [blizzard.com] that anyone whose subscription has ended or been canceled is not counted.

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973953)

...perhaps they were hit by the fact that they agreed in the EULA and TOU to let Blizzard search and transmit all content found in their RAM and/or CPU?

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973969)

Um... it was a world, and it was made of warcraft.... Think "The Borg", only bigger and more bristly. Did the Transformers movie show a picture of the mother ship?

;-)

Re:Yes... (1)

Mr. Bad Example (31092) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974873)

> ...but what did it hit them with.

ZERG RUSH KEKEKEKEKE

Damn (3, Funny)

fliptw (560225) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973693)

WOW is fast to hit that many people. I hope the injuries aren't serious.

Inker? (0)

onecheapgeek (964280) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973753)

Ludo Lullabi has talent. HE does he drawing. Sandra Hope just traces. She's a tracer.

Chasing Amy (-1, Offtopic)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973829)

[Banky is strangling the Collector]
Collector: You're mucking with a G, you fuckin' tracer.
Banky: I'll trace a chalk line around your dead fucking body, you fuck!
Holden: [to Security Guards] Will you get him out of here!
Collector: [as he's being dragged away by Security Guard] Hey wait a second! He jumped me, you fucking tracer!
Banky: YOUR MOTHER'S A TRACER!

9 million users or accounts? (3, Insightful)

ArcadeX (866171) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973765)

How many individuals? 9 million accounts, 6 million people?

Re:9 million users or accounts? (1)

lenroc (632180) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974047)

How many individuals? 9 million accounts, 6 million people?

They count paid subscriptions, paid trial subscriptions (30 days free with game count, but not 10-day free passes), and also (and this is huge) any player that has played in a "game house" within the past 30 days.
Apparently this is what really makes the number jump, counting those in Asian countries that haven't really "bought" the game.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (1)

Avatar8 (748465) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974077)

The 9 million might actually be a very accurate number. While there are many individuals with multiple accounts as you suggest, there are likely just as many accounts with multiple individuals. My wife and I own one account each, but our daughters play on each of our accounts, so we're two accounts but four users. We know of several online friends who are siblings or spouses that share an account. I don't personally know of anyone who has multiple accounts.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (2, Interesting)

Alex777 (1113887) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974387)

I would say that the effect you describe is actually much greater than users with multiple accounts. Since your character allotment is vitually limitless, the primary reason someone would want several accounts is for multiboxing. That is, playing two (or more!) characters at once. The only other reason I could think of is if you wanted cross-faction characters on a PvP server.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (2, Informative)

pthor1231 (885423) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974991)

The situation in which you describe is the ONLY way, according to the ToS, that an account can be shared by more than one person. Technically, within the wording of the ToS, your wife is not able to play your account. While I doubt you are entirely unique, I don't think the number of people sharing their account with someone who they are legally responsible for comes close to matching up with people with multiple accounts.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (1)

Adriax (746043) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974173)

9 million accounts. 3 million belong to players, 6 million belong to farmers.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974325)

How many are accounts that are players that were banned on other accounts?

Re:9 million users or accounts? (1)

Alex777 (1113887) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974765)

How many are accounts that are players that were banned on other accounts?

A banned account is no longer active, and so is not counted.

Re:9 million users or accounts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974675)

Considering how addictive the game is, IMHO "user" is an accurate description :)

But like in any economy... (3, Funny)

vigmeister (1112659) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973801)

80% of them are farming gold for the upper 20% :) Gold farmers shouldn't count...

Cheers!

Re:But like in any economy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973833)

I hear the Blizzard Money presses spinning back up.

Class warfare? (5, Insightful)

User 956 (568564) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973855)

80% of them are farming gold for the upper 20% :)

That just proves the realism of the game.

Re:Class warfare? (4, Funny)

Yahweh Doesn't Exist (906833) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973959)

Since it's WORLD of warcraft, not DEVELOPED COUNTRY of warcraft, it should really be more of a 95/5 split

Re:Class warfare? (0, Flamebait)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974607)

In other news, Hugo Chavez bans WoW because it promotes capitolism.

I'm kidding of course, but I'm not laughing. I wouldn't put it past "The Great Emperor" to pass such a law.

MMORPG popularity (4, Insightful)

Longtime_Lurker_Aces (1008565) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973809)

I find it fascinating that all the later, more popular mmorpg's seem to be far inferior to the "original": Ultima Online.

You could own a house, put vendors there to sell stuff, you had trade skills that were fully independent of fighting, you had an economy of "rare" artifacts with no use at all people just wanted them to have them, you could kill other players and take their gear.

And it was so much friendlier to the casual player: you could teleport to where your real-life friends were, you could play with your friends even if they played 40 hours a week and you played 2, you could macro when you were away to keep up with your friends or do things like craft armor to support a guild.

PvP made you actually have REAL friends and REAL enemies, instead of "You're an orc and he's an elf so you hate each other". It also made guilds have value, as you needed protection and could benefit from a guildmate making your armor while you made him potions.

Basically, I just can't stand that WoW is worse than UO in almost every way but has about 8.8 million more subscribers. UO was ahead of its time.

Re:MMORPG popularity (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973933)

Meridian 59 and The Realm preceded UO. Not to mention The Shadow of Yserbius and, of course, MUDs.

Anyway, if you like UO so much, then stop referring to it in the past tense and go play it - it's still around, and the client was just overhauled.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974757)

Anyway, if you like UO so much, then stop referring to it in the past tense and go play it - it's still around, and the client was just overhauled.
Ultima Online was destroyed by the developers many years ago. Unsurprisingly, UO today bears little resemblance to the UO of 7-10 years ago.

Re:MMORPG popularity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974805)

Meridian 59 and The Realm preceded UO. Not to mention The Shadow of Yserbius and, of course, MUDs.


Shadow of Yserbius wasn't online in the sense that it was Internet-connected (it was on TSN, Sierra's Compuserve-like game BBS), and wasn't massively multiplayer (4 people per "instance").

And if SoY counts, how can you neglect the original Neverwinter Nights, an older game which was superior in most aspects? (the cost not being one of them...)

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

flitty (981864) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974989)

PvP made you actually have REAL friends and REAL enemies, instead of "You're an orc and he's an elf so you hate each other". It also made guilds have value, as you needed protection and could benefit from a guildmate making your armor while you made him potions.

Actually, the backstory (having played the warcrafts before WOW) was one of the things i liked about WoW. I also have REAL friends and REAL enemies, along with Horde vs. Alliance. You sound like one of those "get off my Text-based rpg!" old men. Not that WoW didn't 'dumb-down" MMO's, but you get my wife to play UO as much as she plays WoW, and i'll give you a dollar.

Re:MMORPG popularity (2, Interesting)

cHiphead (17854) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975461)

Let us not forget the most kickass-ist of ALL, the original Neverwinter Nights, exclusively available to AOL customers. I spend many a dollars of my parents going past that $9.95/10 hour limit on AOL cuz I was cracked on NWN.

Sure, LoTR and U-something-that-had-whores-and-was-cooler (Usurper?) on dialup BBSes were hellafun, but NwN actually integrated graphics and made it all sexy. for the time.

Ever since I spent a month on UO and Everquest (I'm sorry, but if you were addicted to EQ you should be face stabbed, it SUCKED, even with a kick ass high speed connection) years ago I havent been able to really get into these newfangled bullshit ripoff MMORPGs. I'd much rather devote my time to an open, networked sort of world, but Second Life's interface is total crap, so back to CS and biding my time.

Look at that, brought out the kid in me, I'm talking like an angry 14 year old fan boy now.

Cheers.

It exists (3, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974045)

You could own a house, put vendors there to sell stuff, you had trade skills that were fully independent of fighting, you had an economy of "rare" artifacts with no use at all people just wanted them to have them, you could kill other players and take their gear.

EQ2 has everything but 'taking their gear'. EQ PVP servers have everything but 'owning a house'. Non-PVP EQ didn't have the gear stealing.
And it was so much friendlier to the casual player: you could teleport to where your real-life friends were, you could play with your friends even if they played 40 hours a week and you played 2, you could macro when you were away to keep up with your friends or do things like craft armor to support a guild. EQ has a cool system called shrouding, where a high-level player can 'shroud' into a different form and descend to a lower level; and change classes even. Its nice to play with friends leveling alts or, as you say, friends that aren't as hardcore.

Never played UO, I got sucked into EQ, just wanted to agree with you that WoW really is a dumbing down of the oldschool MMO's but that EQ offers basically everything UO offered, and is still alive and kicking (new expansion in a few months, baby! I think its #14 now ...)

Re:It exists (1)

Broken scope (973885) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974175)

EvE sorta has what he is describing, though I would say its a bit more ruthless.

Re:It exists (1)

Lord of Hyphens (975895) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975201)

A bit? EVE-Online is built around PVP, whether it involves blowing people up or fiddling with the market. It's cutthroat and downright insane at the higher levels (by higher, I mean in terms of organization, not character qualities), teeming with paranoia. EVE invites the players to stake their own claims and fight for their homes, by the Great Bird. Such struggles amongst the "superpowers" breed intrigue, unconsider gambits.

Space is quite unforgiving, a quality EVE-Online tends to share.

(22 million skillpoints and counting)

Re:It exists (1)

Zekasu (1059298) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974337)

I'll disagree with you on EQ2 having a better housing system than UO.

UO's housing system actualyl implemented houses that could be real (physical in elation tot he wrold) houses, instead of Inns like EQ2.

Having played both, I'd still say UO was by far sueprior to EQ2 in terms of "woah, I can do this, this, and this." UO had a craft leveling system like EQ2's, except EQ2's has you running around various places, looking for scattered (to a point) resources. UO typically made you go to the mine to mine ore.

However, that being said, if you want an MMORPG where you can do "anything", I'd suggest looking into one called "Wyrm Online".

Although, be careful what you wish for.

Re:It exists (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974561)

I'll disagree with you on EQ2 having a better housing system than UO.

I don't believe I said it was better, I just said, they had a housing system. Personally, my poison of choice is Everquest (the original). I had hopes for Vanguard (which had an awesome crafting system) but it looks like it will descend into mediocrity, sadly.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

razorh (853659) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974059)

It's funny, I've said mostly the same thing about Meridian 59, when talking about EQ. Guild halls, guild member rankings, multiple chat channels, PvP that was done well (an no, I've never been a big PvP'er myself but it deffinately has it's place if done right)... and that was all before UO. Seems the easier a game is to play, the more people line up to pay for it.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

seebs (15766) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974111)

I would never play UO, because I do not have any interest in a game where other people can kill me and take my stuff.

That's the thing; WoW has allowed me to play the game I want to play. No one else had it on offer, least of all had it on offer for Mac too so I could play with my spouse.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974521)

I would never play UO, because I do not have any interest in a game where other people can kill me and take my stuff.
The thing about UO was that there wasn't any awesome uber-gear that you had to invest massive amounts of time to get. Even dying with a full set of plate armor and a large bag of reagents wouldn't set you back more than a few thousand gold, which was trivial to get. I've heard that UO has changed since then to something more Diablo-like, but the truth is that in UO's heyday, death was rarely a massive loss. But it mattered, and it added a very real sense of danger and camaraderie, as the GP mentioned. It's something that no MMOG since has come close to recapturing.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

Avatar8 (748465) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975059)

Wrong on two counts:

- losing a full suit of armor could set you back quite a bit if you had a full set of valorite armor or any of the other colored, skill specific armors. Not to mention if you had rare, magical weapons that were found in dungeons.
- A few thousand gold trivial? Hardly. Only those who exploited, sold numerous rares or had been there since the server first powered up considered that trivial. To any player of a few months, that was equivalent to several days of killing and gathering.

Re:MMORPG popularity (3, Insightful)

Avatar8 (748465) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975117)

I totally agree. PKers almost drove me away from UO completely when it first began. I tried to get my wife interested, but she hated how vulnerable we were and how pointless PvP was in general. (you call friends, they call friends, everybody dies and loses gear and it just wastes your time instead of allowing you to play the game)

I showed her WoW during beta and she was curious. When I purchased it, she started a character and was hooked within a few hours. She went on a trip and came back home to find her own account waiting for her. We still play side by side to this day and show no signs of slowing.

Key point to WoW's popularity: it appeals to EVERY play style in some form or fashion.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

SquareVoid (973740) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974139)

You could own a house, put vendors there to sell stuff, you had trade skills that were fully independent of fighting, you had an economy of "rare" artifacts with no use at all people just wanted them to have them, you could kill other players and take their gear.

Owning a house thing seems like fun, except that it would be limited to actual realestate. Newer players would not enjoy this wonderful feature. Seperate trade skills, Ultima Online was first, but there are many MMOs that have this. And if you want an item of no use just cause you wanted it, that is called loot-whoring. Killing players and taking there gear is bad. Nothing stops higher level players from griefing lower level players. WoW wouldn't be as big as it is now if their new players were constantly harassed.

It also made guilds have value, as you needed protection and could benefit from a guildmate making your armor while you made him potions.

I have seen this in many MMOs.

UO might be better for you, the hardcore gamer. But WoW is easier on those without much time. It has 9 million people b/c many of the drawbacks of PvP were taken out. I personally don't like WoW though. Tried, it... I hate quest grinding. And I am not fond of a game that breaks old content every 3 months.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974665)

Owning a house thing seems like fun, except that it would be limited to actual realestate. Newer players would not enjoy this wonderful feature.
UO solved this later on by adding more land mass.

Seperate trade skills, Ultima Online was first, but there are many MMOs that have this.
Which other MMOG allows me to be *just* a master blacksmith/miner, without fighting endless monsters to level up? That's what UO let me do.

And if you want an item of no use just cause you wanted it, that is called loot-whoring.
Uh...no. Plainly, you never played UO. GP is talking about rare decorative items that were scattered around the world, and could be collected by eager players shortly after a new shard was created. Not to mention the Christmas gifts, etc that you could decorate your house with.

Killing players and taking there gear is bad.
Killing playeres and taking their equipment was *fun*. It was part of the game, and added immensely to the thrill of going to a dungeon when you knew that someone else could be there waiting to attack you.

Nothing stops higher level players from griefing lower level players.
There were no levels in UO. Lesser players could advance quickly by staying around towns, and venturing out with their friends. Personally, I played a pure blacksmith for more than a year and had a blast.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

SquareVoid (973740) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975413)

There were no levels in UO. Lesser players could advance quickly by staying around towns, and venturing out with their friends.
That is not what I hear from veteran players. They pretty much told me it was about who had the most "friends" You would get killed and come back with your posse to kill them. Then they come back with a larger army of friends. And so on and so forth. Doesn't seem fun to me to have a response that lasts 2-3 hours that diverged you from whatever you were doing when you got killed. Some players seem to like the aspect of killing other players (and much more if they can take their stuff). But from experience, games that allow this always devolve to a mass griefing mess. Always. I fail to see how UO was an exception.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

Longtime_Lurker_Aces (1008565) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975421)

I played a pure blacksmith for more than a year and had a blast.

Though it has been years since we played, my friends and I occasionally reminisce about the crazy things we did starting out in UO before we even knew about macroing. Our first house was a 1-room that we paid for by spending HOURS and HOURS mining iron ore by hand and selling the ingots in town. Buying that first house was quite possibly the most fun thing I've done in a video game.

But see you are wrong (5, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974375)

I get amused by the people that claim WoW is "inferior" because of its friendly environment and no-penalty PvP. Well it's not, that is actually what makes it superior to most people, and is the reason they have 9 million players. Most people aren't hardcore, they don't want a game that punishes them for failure, they don't want to have to deal with keeping up with those who make a game in to a life and so on.

If you want games like that, they are available. I'm made to understand EVE is such a game. Extremely hardcore, real loss, etc, etc. That's great if that's what you like, but don't pretend like it is "superior". One of the reasons WoW is so great is it treats things more like a single player game. When I die in a SP game I don't lose anything but time, I am set back to whatever my last save point was and must replay from there. The nearest MMORPG experience, since you can't reload, is to just have you have to wait a bit as you head back to your body. No loss of anything but time.

That's what has kept me interested in WoW. It is the 5th MMORPG I've tried (EverQuest, Dark Age of Camelot, EVE, Starwars Galaxies) and the only one that has lasted more than 6-9 months or so. All the rest got boring fast for various reasons. For example in EQ the problem was it felt like they hated you. The game was setup to punish you severely for failure, and to be very unhelpful.

WoW gets it right for me, and for many others because it is extremely easy to get in to (I've never seen a more friendly start than WoW's newbie quests), doesn't punish you, and has lots to do for whatever it is you like doing. I realise that's not for everyone, but you need to realise that if a more hardcore experience is your preference that is a different preference, not a superior one. There is nothing wrong with wanting an easier, more friendly experience. After all, the whole point of games is to be entertaining. They are not for proving or accomplishing something, they are there to make you happy and let you have fun. Whatever it is that does that, that's what you should play. For 9 million of us (and counting) WoW is that kind of game.

Re:But see you are wrong (5, Insightful)

theantipop (803016) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974605)

These are very good points. Along with this, I will point out one area where WoW really has been revolutionary: the UI. If WoW got one thing gloriously right, it was their very moddable and customizable user interface via a LUA scripting system. I hope this catches on in future game's of a variety of genres, not just MMO's, because it really allows you remove the largest barrier in enjoying button-heavy and information spamming games.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

goldspider (445116) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974745)

Summary:

UO is better because -I- like it! And it makes me real mad that so many stupid people disagree with me!! WAAAAAAAAHH!!

Seriously, what happened to different people having different tastes? And how does this childish rant get modded up?

Re:MMORPG popularity (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974755)

I played muds for years. I played EQ1. I've played EQ2. I've played UO and I've played WOW.

I really hated UO. It was very, very boring for me. There was nothing to do and every moment of every day you were getting killed or robbed. It seemed completely pointless. There are a great many people who enjoyed UO. That's great. I just found it most definitely was not for me and I'd never have suggested it to friends.

I played EQ2 when both WOW and EQ2 was out. I stuck by EQ2 for two years. Any game(WOW) that that many people liked had to suck bad (yes, my flawed logic)

For various reasons I gave up on EQ2 for a short while and I tried WOW. I had to admit, grudgingly, that WOW is a superior game to most MMORPGS. They've gotten a tremendous amount of things right. I realised that it actually most closely matched Everquest 1. It's hard to explain exactly why, but the feeling is there.

Is WOW better than UO... really a matter of choice but I would never suggest someone go play UO. And I would recommend WOW to just about anyone who wants to play an MMORPG.

Yeah, Ultima Online was Better... (2, Interesting)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974819)

Except in its interface, which always sucked...

And its crafting system, which required a ton of grinding out the same crap over and over again for a .1 skill gain (I GMed blacksmithing, bowcrafting and tailoring on several characters over there.) And you still couldn't create an item that was as good as various world drops you could find.

And the constant griefing, from the flock of pickpockets at the bank before the Trammel split to the flock of PKers who kept a stranglehold on the dungeons on the PvP side where the best items dropped.

And the game balance, which was fine right up until EA threw it out the window with the new loot system and artifacts.

Other than that Ultima Online was a pretty good game though.

Re:MMORPG popularity (5, Insightful)

Avatar8 (748465) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974911)

Being a 7.5 year UO vet, I think I can address this.


Many aspects of UO were ahead of its time. It could have been a fantastic MMORPG that would have reached millions of players, but too many factors prevented that from occurring.

- Garriott's vision of a dynamic online world never reached fruition. The ecology system never really worked (animals preying upon other animals to keep the spawn rate down). It does work in WoW, and it's fascinating to watch monsters fight each other.
- Garriott (and Raph's) vision was too dependent upon players "playing nice" and wanting to be a moral, socially upright group. What they didn't count on was how some people feel they have the right to be complete and total a-holes because they're hidden behind the anonymity of a game character.
- The economy was ruined... by players. Greed, immorality and the desire to simply ruin the experience for others drove exploiters to imbalance the money system. Granted WoW has its share of gold exploits and problems with people selling their gold farming "services," but it's not nearly as skewed as UO was after the first two years.
- The PvP system was ruined... by players. Instead of a fair playing field where everyone has an equal chance, it turned into a predator/prey system where crafters gathered resources and fighters took it away. I despise PvP, but WoW is so well balanced and has such few penalties I'm considering participating. If it's attractive to a pacifist like myself, I imagine it's remarkable to those that enjoy PvP. If someone kills another player for gear, they're playing and killing for the wrong reason, IMO.
- The classless system was unique and allowed some flexibility, but still you ended up in a niche of "warrior, caster or crafter." I knew of numerous players who started out going one direction only to discover they had wasted their time and needed to go a different direction. I lost count of how many times I "respecced" my main character. Having grown up playing D&D, I prefer the class style.
- EA prevented UO from reaching it's potential numerous times. 1)Pushed Garriott out. When you get rid of the person with the vision, how do you know where you're going? 2)Lost the "Ultima" in "Ultima Online." I'm sure you probably played the series, too. Didn't you want to see more correlation with the series stories? There were two major attempts to bring that content to UO, but EA killed them. Then they brought in Todd McFarlane to add his touch. Another major mistake there. 3)There were also multiple attempts to overhaul the game entirely, but EA wouldn't hear it because it might endanger their constant cash flow if some players decided to jump ship if they had to start over. I would have stayed because there was nothing better than UO for several years (tried DAoC, AC, AO. EQ sucked from the outset, so I never needed to try it.)

To your points:
- Crafting skills in WoW are just as separated from fighting as they were in UO. In order to gather resources, you must be able to face the wilds and at least fight enough to defend yourself from roving monsters. Otherwise a crafter can stay in town safe from harm.
- WoW also has a few rares, but they are not exchangeable which I prefer. My pets from my Collector's Editions make my account fairly valuable. Since I cannot foresee my future of not playing WoW, I have no intention of cashing in.
- I do hope WoW implements housing, but I hope they do it correctly. I despised how UO just allowed players to ruin the landscape and affect the monster and resource spawns. I had even sent the designers several suggestions of having housing servers with teleporters to keep the land pristine. If WoW does add housing, I'm sure it will be a separate server that would not affect the current world.
- I liked having my vendors sell my wares while I was away, but I did not like having to keep them stocked and paid whether they sold anything or not. I much prefer the Auction House in WoW.
- WoW has a very similar, and I think more robust, social aspect than UO ever did. Multiple people can "speak" and be heard instead of their words blotting each other out. You don't have to gather in one place, but it's more fun when we do. The rest system and the ability for a higher level to help a lower level allow the casual and hardcore players to play together regardless. No, my friend's lvl 10 druid cannot come do the instances my 70 paladin can.. yet, but I can take my lower level character (or roll another one) to go play with his chars. I enjoy crafting just for the reason you mentioned: helping others. I fully support my guild, and they know it. I can make rare armors that few can. When someone in my guild needs it, I'm there to help. Macroing/botting is illegal in any game and it ruins the gaming experience all around.
- PvP, grouping and raiding has the same affect in WoW. Yes, the younger crowd have the knew jerk reaction of "kill the horde," but from talking with friends who do PvP, there's a great many grudges held against people, not characters. Guilds do have value. Like I said, I'm one of the more experienced armor crafters, and I look to alchemists to provide my potion needs.

I played UO from October '97 to March 2005. I was basically just "maintaining" my account for months because there was nothing better to play. When WoW came out, I signed off UO permanently shortly thereafter and sold my account to an acquaintance for a pittance of what it was worth a few years before. I have no regrets whatsoever. I could tell from beta that WoW had such a slick, easy to learn interface, a great back story, numerous, fun systems (questing, crafting) and the quality of Blizzard ("won't ship until it's done") behind it, I was sure it would be successful. I had no idea it would be THIS successful. I wish I'd purchased Blizzard/Vivendi stock. :-)

WoW is to MMORPGs like RPGs were to paper D&D: it made things easier, simpler and in general better. While I still reminisce about playing a D&D session with some friends, WoW gives me the same sensation without all the difficulties, conflicts and spilled soda. I completely understand how WoW has reached this milestone, and I'd wager they have not peaked yet. I know I'll be playing for several more years. I like LotRO, too, but I don't play it as often as I do WoW. It's a very different game, but still better than predecessors.

Re:MMORPG popularity (1)

brkello (642429) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975337)

Yes, losing all your stuff is much more friendly to casuals. Huh? I think you are looking UO through rose colored lenses. Back in the day...everything was better!

Is played or has been played? (1)

bigtangringo (800328) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973811)

I haven't given Blizzard a dime in several months now. I'd imagine they're still counting the folks who used to play, but no longer do.

Re:Is played or has been played? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973863)

or you could read the article and see their definition of an subscriber is a current paying one....

Re:Is played or has been played? (0, Redundant)

bigtangringo (800328) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973917)

Perhaps you could quote the part of the article which defines that for me.

Re:Is played or has been played? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19973995)

World of Warcraft's Subscriber Definition
World of Warcraft subscribers include individuals who have paid a subscription fee or have an active prepaid card to play World of Warcraft, as well as those who have purchased the game and are within their free month of access. Internet Game Room players who have accessed the game over the last thirty days are also counted as subscribers. The above definition excludes all players under free promotional subscriptions, expired or cancelled subscriptions, and expired prepaid cards. Subscribers in licensees' territories are defined along the same rules.


Taken from http://www.blizzard.com/press/070724.shtml [blizzard.com]

Re:Is played or has been played? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974839)

So there are actually MORE active players as they exclude people on the free 10day trial. I have given out 5 in the last week (and am maxed out until those guys pay, or let the 10days run out). Oh and I forgot the needed ZING! For telling some one to RTFA, then after they claim to, pointing out they still didn't.

Re:Is played or has been played? (2, Informative)

CaseCrash (1120869) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974041)

That's half a million more than the number of monthly players WoW had back in March five months ago
It's even in the summary. So, currently paying customers.

Re:Is played or has been played? (5, Informative)

Mascot (120795) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974109)

Perhaps you could quote the part of the article which defines that for me.
I'll do the honors.

World of Warcraft's Subscriber Definition
World of Warcraft subscribers include individuals who have paid a subscription fee or have an active prepaid card to play World of Warcraft, as well as those who have purchased the game and are within their free month of access. Internet Game Room players who have accessed the game over the last thirty days are also counted as subscribers. The above definition excludes all players under free promotional subscriptions, expired or cancelled subscriptions, and expired prepaid cards. Subscribers in licensees' territories are defined along the same rules.
Source: http://www.blizzard.com/press/070724.shtml [blizzard.com]

Apologies on behaf of the poster you replied to. He shouldn't expect anybody to actually click through to the Blizzard press release. This is Slashdot, after all.

Re:Is played or has been played? (1)

Usekh (557680) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973965)

They only count active accounts, defined as ones that are still financial. Of course if you bought a 6 month subscription and stopped playing about 3 months you would still count, at least until it expired.

Re:Is played or has been played? (2, Informative)

alexgieg (948359) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974017)

Nope. Non-paying accounts, such as inactive accounts (in countries where it's charged per month), accounts not played in the last 30 days (in countries where it's charged per hour), and trial accounts, aren't included in the total. This 9,000,000 number is really for active, paying accounts only.

Numbers game? (0, Redundant)

faloi (738831) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973859)

Is that nine million current active paid subscriptions? Nine million unique accounts (including trial accounts and accounts that aren't being played right now)? Still a darn good number, I'm sure there are lots of other gaming companies that would like the headache of supporting that many players.

9 million paying accounts (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974481)

They mean they have 9 million accounts that are either active subscriptions (for countries that pay monthly like the US) or accounts that have paid to play recently (for countries that pay for play time like China). Translated in to dollars that's somewhere in the 1-1.5 billion dollars in terms of revenues (the precise amount depends on the breakdown of accounts since they don't all cost the same).

Wow (0)

coren2000 (788204) | more than 6 years ago | (#19973885)

Wow.

Definition of "Subscriber" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974055)

Since the article doesn't seem to have it (from the actual blizzard press release, http://www.blizzard.com/press/070724.shtml [blizzard.com] ):

World of Warcraft's Subscriber Definition:
World of Warcraft subscribers include individuals who have paid a subscription fee or have an active prepaid card to play World of Warcraft, as well as those who have purchased the game and are within their free month of access. Internet Game Room players who have accessed the game over the last thirty days are also counted as subscribers. The above definition excludes all players under free promotional subscriptions, expired or cancelled subscriptions, and expired prepaid cards. Subscribers in licensees' territories are defined along the same rules.

ONE OF US (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974075)

ONE OF US ONE OF US

Accounts, not Users (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974099)

That's 9 millions accounts, mind you, including suspended/terminated accounts.

Funny how they ban cheaters and still classify them as "users," as if they were still using the game.

Comic endeavor (5, Funny)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974107)

Each issue of the WoW comic's gripping storyline will be interrupted by the characters running around shouting misspelled racist and homophobic epithets at the reader for two solid pages.

Re:Comic endeavor (1)

theantipop (803016) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974437)

More likely, it will feature numerous Chuck Norris jokes intermixed with linking [Foror's Compendium of Dragonslaying].

I Know Nothing of WoW, but... (4, Interesting)

rhartness (993048) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974271)

I knew WoW was a HUGE MMORPG and that's about it but if my calculations are correct 9M Active Accounts * $10/monthly subscription fees(that's my guess, I don't know the actual figure) * 12 Months = $1.08 Billion a year! Holy Cow, that's insane!

Re:I Know Nothing of WoW, but... (2, Informative)

theantipop (803016) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974517)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_of_warcraft#Pri cing [wikipedia.org] As you can see the pricing structure, especially in Asia, is very fluid. They're pulling in a lot of cash, but not nearly as much as you calculated.

Re:I Know Nothing of WoW, but... (2, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974599)

$15.00ish a month for US subscribers, not sure about EU. But the chinese, etc. do not pay nearly that much... they pay about $0.04 an hour. And the Chinese account for an excess of 5M subscribers. source [gigaom.com]

Re:I Know Nothing of WoW, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974647)

At minimum, you are going to be paying 12.99 (purchase six months at a time from regular online billing) and at maximum 14.99 (gamecard and short-term online billing). If we assume all players use the cheapest method to pay we are looking at 1,402.29 million dollars. Of course, the actual money coming in will be higher.

And I can only imagine how much it costs for maintenance.

Re:I Know Nothing of WoW, but... (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975135)

* is a huge MMO

How and how much you are charged for WoW depends on your region. While those numbers are normal for US and EU accounts (~$15/mo or less for US, depending on how large of blocks of time you buy), WoW players in Asia have very different pricing structures (and account for a huge number of accounts).

What's the metric? (1)

warmgun (669556) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974321)

How did they measure this number? Is this number of accounts created or number of current active accounts? I'm guessing its the former, where someone like myself (who hasn't played in months) would be included.

Re:What's the metric? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19975171)

Are you fucking retarded or just illiterate? I'm guessing the former.

9 Million Served and counting (1)

obergfellja (947995) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974395)

...on McDonalds or WoW? ;)

all the while... (1)

dahwang (973539) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974397)

... and mankind has hit a new low.

Yet Somehow... (5, Funny)

SQLz (564901) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974473)

There are only 9 million players but 11 million night elf hunters. Go figure.

Re:Yet Somehow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19975261)

Night Elf hunters in the lead, followed closely by Draenei shaman, Blood Elf paladins, and Undead rogues

If these numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19974641)

are any indication, I think PC will soon be pulling ahead of the Wii and 360 and PS3!

What is World of Warcraft (3, Funny)

zussal (1058116) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974735)

Am I out of touch, what is this World of Warcraft thing?

Re:What is World of Warcraft (1)

MooseMuffin (799896) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975141)

"Butters go buy World of Warcraft, install it on your computer, and join the online sensation before we all murder you."

Does that include trial users? (0, Troll)

syousef (465911) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974807)

Does that include every user created using those $2 trial disks that in reality you can get for free? ...Because if so I've got 9 million bridges to sell you.

If they reported the true numbers (0, Flamebait)

evaprototype00 (878901) | more than 6 years ago | (#19974811)

I'd say it is more like 3 Million actual people either playing casually or full-time to play the game then 6 Million Asian gold farmers, power levelers and bots.

9 million people are gone from life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19975243)

The humanity just lost 9 million people who could help improve the life on real Earth, vote for Net Neutrality, fight MAFIAA, invent new gadgets, fight diseases...

Now those people are lost in the virtual world, bringing money to the super-rich game industry. What a shame!

Count me in too...

Highly Inflated (3, Interesting)

Zanthor (12084) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975275)

I would wager that this number is highly inflated...

Personally, I own and maintain 3 accounts and my girlfriend has her own as well, so 2 players, 4 accounts... If you take a look at my guild of 50+ active members you will find an impressive roster of well over 200 characters many of which are on seperate accounts. I know I have at least 15 players with more than one account, and our biggest account holder is sitting around 8.

Take a look at Dual Boxing [dual-boxing.com] and evaluate how many multi-account users there are out there... Many claim (and have video proof) of 5 [dual-boxing.com] , 10 [dual-boxing.com] , and even 50 [gameslah.com] boxes running at a time... with one of the contributors to the community boasting over 200 wow accounts [dual-boxing.com] on one server...

I figure that without even counting farmers, we have made a significant notch in the 9 million number...

Re:Highly Inflated (2, Insightful)

mikeabbott420 (744514) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975473)

I expect there are also single accounts shared by multiple people.

yeah but... (4, Funny)

to_kallon (778547) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975299)

It's interesting to note that if the World of Warcraft were a nation, CIA's World Factbook says that out of 236 listed countries it would be the 90th most populated country on Earth above Haiti, but behind Sweden. i pasted this to a friend who pointed out that while the taxes are much lower the death rate is significantly higher...

I hate stupid comparisons... (0, Offtopic)

Arathon (1002016) | more than 6 years ago | (#19975367)

...like that one. "If it were a country...it would be the ____ biggest country...."

If those 9 million people formed a country, there would be 9 million less people out there to be part of those other countries. So not only is the comparison ridiculous/pointless/ludicrous/silly, it's also very possibly simply wrong.

Incorrect Stats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19975431)

It's not 9 Million players.... it 1 Million players with 9 accounts each...
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...