Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Get Ready For the High-tech Beach

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the natures-friends-electricity-and-water dept.

The Almighty Buck 247

coondoggie writes "Ocean City, New Jersey is a nice, family-oriented beach that will apparently soon be the high-tech model for seashore lovers and now perhaps geeks everywhere. The city has on its plate a $3 million plan for myriad public services and Internet access using radio-frequency identification chips (RFID) and Wi-Fi wireless technology. A wireless network will let Ocean City expand economic development and control the cost of local services. Wireless allows the City to save on cell phone usage, T-1 lines, and it adds efficiency. The city is looking to replace its ubiquitous but mostly annoying beach tags — which indicate you paid to get on the beach $5 per day, $10 for a week, or $20 for the whole summer — with wristbands that contain an RFID chip. Yet another cool feature of the high-tech beach will be the ability to track beachgoers — an application that is being touted by parents."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Hmm... (2, Insightful)

EmilyColier (76034) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994733)

The city is looking to replace its ubiquitous but mostly annoying beach tags -- which indicate you paid to get on the beach $5 per day, $10 for a week, or $20 for the whole summer -- with wristbands that contain an RFID chip. Yet another cool feature of the high-tech beach will be the ability to track beachgoers -- an application that is being touted by parents."
Hello big brother.

Re:Hmm... (4, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994767)

I was wondering how long that post would take to appear.

Unfortunately, I have to agree... -sigh- While this would be great to find your children, should they be unruly or kidnapped, nobody else has a use for this. And the kids would rip it off if they didn't want to be tracked (they're unruly) and the kidnapper would rip it off, too. It's no better than the slips of paper, and probably quite a bit more expensive to implement -and- maintain.

So who is it better for? People that want to track you. That's it. You can't very well throw anyone out that managed to break theirs (on purpose or not) as they paid their money and can't be held accountable for the technology failing.

Re:Hmm... (3, Insightful)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994825)

Well the solution is obvious.

Instead of putting the tags on a flimsy wristband, why not inject them into the patron's blood stream. It may also worry some of you that a kidnapper may just take the kid off of the beach thereby eliminating the ability to track and monitor. This is why it is necessary to expand the sensing to a full nationwide, or better yet worldwide scale.

I'm big brother, and I'll keep an eye out for you.

Or better yet, a solution to end KDAWSON! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994947)

Place said RFID tag up KDAWSON's bum so that the government will track him to his death. I hate KDAWSON.

RFID Teeth (1)

mikael (484) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995397)

The register reported on an experiment by Belgian scientists to implant RFID tags in teeth.

Belgian implants RFID chip in tooth [theregister.co.uk]

At least you will know where your dentures are, if you lose them.

Re:Hmm... (2, Insightful)

FractalZone (950570) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995465)

The city is looking to replace its ubiquitous but mostly annoying beach tags -- which indicate you paid to get on the beach $5 per day, $10 for a week, or $20 for the whole summer -- with wristbands that contain an RFID chip. Yet another cool feature of the high-tech beach will be the ability to track beachgoers -- an application that is being touted by parents.

Pardon me for asking, but why are beach tags or RFIDs necessary in the first place? Is the beach in question not a public one? If so, why does anyone need to pay to visit it? Next thing ya know, New Jersey will be implementing a tax on the air people breath and an admission tax to anyone crazy enough to want to enter the state!

What the people of New Jersey should do is impose a stupidity tax on New Jersey legislators...

Re:Hmm... (3, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995593)

I've already answered this elsewhere, but I'll say it again: Clean beaches aren't free.

They get paid for somehow, and if you don't charge admission, you have to charge taxes. Why should people who never go to the beach have to pay for it? I personally hate it (phobia) and never go. When I used to go, nobody ever complained about the admission fee.

I think maybe you've been spoonfed by the government too much if you think everything 'public' should be 'free'. I feel exactly the opposite and people that wish to use a public service should be the ones supporting it. Emergency services/etc are the obvious exception, of course.

Re:Hmm... (1)

CaseyB (1105) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995491)

And the kids would rip it off if they didn't want to be tracked (they're unruly) There's a large window of kids between "slavish automatons standing rigidly at their parents' side" and "juvenile delinquents eager to mug old ladies for heroin money". Little kids don't run off maliciously, they just "go exploring", and will do so on a moment's notice. I think a local tracking system would be handy.

Re:Hmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995715)

You know, you're right on all those points. So why is it so easy to sell a municipality on such over-priced bling? It's like national elections; who says we need results, accurate or otherwise, as quickly as possible? Why is the "instant" availability of poll results so much more important than their accuracy? Do you need time to stop your check to your favorite Congressman if he loses re-election? The President doesn't take office until January, and then we give him/her (Please, dear God, make it a her. Any her), a hundred days to stop celebrating. There's time to get it right. The Constitution provides it.

Why is the promise of rapidity, even pointless rapidity, such heroin for the people of this country? (I know, I know. (Sigh...))

Re:Hmm... (5, Funny)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994861)

Security Monitor Guy into walkie talkie: Hmm... Jim, I'm seeing JANE_2 and SAM_12 at exactly the same location in some shrubbery behind the dunes. Perhaps they're lost.
Security Patrolman: Yea I'm watching them now.
Security Monitor Guy: Why does your voice sound distant?
Security Patrolman: The walkie talkie is on the ground coz my hands are... occupied.

Re:Hmm... (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995029)

Hello big brother.

Big Brother hell!

What happens when the sharks get wind of this? Not only will they have frickin' lasers on their heads, they'll be able to track our every move with their radio direction sensors.

Those chips'll be inside fish in no time, you mark my words...

Re:Hmm... (1)

Andrew Kismet (955764) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995833)

Fish and chips? I'm all for that!

Re:Hmm... (1)

cain (14472) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995853)

Hmmmmmm....fish and chips....gaaaaghh.

Lick my balls, samzenpus! Almost KDAWSON material! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994741)

Lick them clean. Slashdot sucks.

MOD PARENT UP (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994821)

If you don't, you are gay.

HEY KDAWSON! Mod parent up! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995409)

I *know* you modded gp down

I live in the land of the free. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994753)

I live in the land of the free....beaches.*

WTF: you paid to get on the beach $5 per day - Australia may suck big sweaty pendulous donkey balls, but at least we don't have to pay for our beaches.**

* Not so good as the land of the free biatches

** Please return to your scheduled why-noone-needs-wireless-on-the-beach flamefest.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

fl!ptop (902193) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994813)

** Please return to your scheduled why-noone-needs-wireless-on-the-beach flamefest.
why? so you can work while on vacation, of course.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

Don_dumb (927108) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994835)

I couldn't careless about the tech or survellance issues in this story. I am sitting here thinking "You have to pay to use the beach". Then I remember a
Michael Moore's TV Nation where somewhere in the North Eastern US had private (district residents only) beaches, which is even worse. The land of the selfish seems to be a better motto.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (2, Insightful)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995059)

Michael Moore's TV Nation where somewhere in the North Eastern US had private (district residents only) beaches, which is even worse. The land of the selfish seems to be a better motto.
So there are private beaches. There is no reason for every stretch of the coastline to be 100% public access, just as there is no reason for every acre of forest to be 100% public access. Is it that hard to imagine that some people would want to find a quiet little area on the ocean to setup a home. A home that doesn't have a flock of people who have no regard for the residents of the area tramping through their backyards to camp out on that little section of beach. Not every piece of coastline has to be the boardwalk.

I suggest you pause for a moment and consider that these people pay a lot extra for those homes. That extra value in the homes becomes tax revenue that goes to pay for the perks you expect on your vacations.

And one final note, you know that if someone ever drowned in a private section of beach made public-access there would be lawsuits before you could say 'Swim at your own risk'.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (4, Interesting)

hb253 (764272) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995379)

I live in New Jersey and am annoyed to no end that we have to pay to use the beach. Worse yet, there are some wealthier commmunities along the shore where the residents think they own the beach. They make it extremely difficult for day visitors by restricting parking and obscuring or outright hiding the beach access points between the mansions. It's sickening, but it seems that money always wins.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

flanaganid (900938) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995995)

I'm a benny who can afford $2000 to rent a house for a week but not $5 to get on the beach. And I'm jealous of the people who can afford a house with private beach access.
Good points. But the issue with the private beaches is not that you and I can't get on them, but that the people with access won't allow the municipalities to replenish them. The nimby strikes even when he doesn't have a true back yard.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994897)

That was my first thought, too. Who would want to pay $20 to go sit on the beach? Especially considering that once you got there, it would be full of the kind of people who would pay $20 to sit on a beach...

Balmedie ftw.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

mikael (484) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995475)

That's Balmedia up on the NE Coast?

Picture #1 [beachwizard.com]

Picture #2 [belhelvie.org.uk]

you need to understand... it's New Jersey (NT) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994927)

Do a google search...

http://www.jerseysucks.net/ [jerseysucks.net]

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

ivanaponte (82505) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995015)

In my country (Venezuela) beaches are free. And by law no one can own a beach.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995075)

Yep, and it's a lack of that law which has made it necessary to charge people to go to the small strip of beach that is still public.

Not that these are real beaches anyway. It's not quite as bad as an English beach but don't expect Bay Watch.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (2, Informative)

LordBafford (1087463) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995043)

In Ocean City, Maryland the beach is free, people in Jersey are getting ripped off.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

MajinBlayze (942250) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995919)

And unless things have changed in the last 8 years since I've been there, it's nasty as hell too.

Like walking in a giant ash tray.

I would gladly pay a few dollars for them to keep it clean.

Heck, I payed a few thousand to go to a sandals resort for my honeymoon. (of course the beach then comes with a place to stay, and free food and alcohol!!!)

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995083)

As far as I can recall, during season (Memorial Day to Labor Day) - all public NJ beaches charge a fee for beach badges. I believe this was started "way back when" as another way to charge the huge number of New Yorkers that visit.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995425)

On the money, except that there are also hundreds of thousands visiting from Pennsylvania, Ohio, etc. Services are expensive to provide in NJ, and though the state sees indirect revenue via sales tax from tourism, municipalities don't.

Sure, businesses do better, but a lot of the tourism doesn't really improve property values enough (luxury homes do just as well) to make up for the expensive services NJ shore municipalities provide. Emergency services, policing, etc.

It's only just that those who visit a beach, who increase the need for services, contribute to paying them.

Wildwood doesn't charge (2, Informative)

georgeha (43752) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995881)

at least last summer it didn't, the beaches were free. Wildwood does have a reputation as a vulgar blue collar sort of place, which only adds to the charm for me.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995431)

I live in the land of the free....beaches.*

WTF: you paid to get on the beach $5 per day - Australia may suck big sweaty pendulous donkey balls, but at least we don't have to pay for our beaches.**


I lived in Florida for 5 years, most beaches in the US are free. There were none I knew of there where you had to pay. You have to remember, this is New Jersey they're talking about, the place New Yorkers call "the armpit of America", and nearly everyone I ever met from New York City was an asshole (there have been exceptions).

The US is the third largest country in the world in terms of land mass (source) [wikipedia.org] , over 3.7 million square miles (9.6 million km). Thhere's an ocean on each side of it. That's a hell of a lot of beach. Sun of a beach!

* Not so good as the land of the free biatches

They cost $20 here. Just find the skinniest woman in the sleaziest bar in town. Be sure to have a condom! If it weren't for crack whores, American nerds would never get laid! [slashdot.org]

** Please return to your scheduled why-noone-needs-wireless-on-the-beach flamefest.

Nobody is flaming about the wireles, we're flaming about Big Brother AKA "The Stalker". Funny, if I stalk you it's a felony, but the government can stalk anyone they want. So much for our vaunted Constitution [kuro5hin.org] , where the people are supposed to have power over government, rather than the other way around as it is today.

-mcgrew

Re:I live in the land of the free. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995943)

The US is the third largest country in the world in terms of land mass (source), over 3.7 million square miles (9.6 million km). There's an ocean on each side of it. That's a hell of a lot of beach. Sun of a beach!
And he spoke of Australia which has more coastline as you can see here [wikipedia.org] . It should be noted a lot of coastline does not mean a lot of beaches. There are several places in the US where it is sheer cliff meeting water, not really a beach.

Re:I live in the land of the free. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995687)

It has been pointed out (as it should be) that not all beaches in the US charge money. First, anyone going to a beach in Jersey should really re-consider their beach options. Second, there are free beaches up and down the east coast from Florida and on up to at least Maryland. I am not sure I would choose my beach vacation much further north anyway. There are also "private" beaches in some of these areas (and some along the gulf coast as well). Most of the "private" beaches I am aware of are owned by hotels and resorts that are located along the coast lines. It is a way to ensure that their patrons have the best access to the beach and also helps to prevent some level of over crowding in this way.

Personally, I am not a huge beach person for a few reasons, probably the biggest is some of the over-crowding that does occur. I really do not enjoy being run over by kids whose parents are incapable of monitoring the child and ensuring they are behaving. Does anyone know any good adults only beaches in the eastern US? Now, I would pay money for that.

Pay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994757)

Pay?? To go on beaches in your own country, that you paid taxes to? That sounds odd to me...

Re:Pay? (1)

untaken_name (660789) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994847)

Here in America, our national government is ostensibly seperate from local municipalities. I don't know how it works in your country.

Ok, paid to local then... still dumb... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994895)

It boils down to this "fee" thing, again.

If everything has a "fee" attached to it, what exactly does your (local then) taxes pay for?

I don't know; do you? Can you keep track of it all?

Attaching "fees" simply obfuscates how much you really are taxed.

Back to the beach thing; if you have a lovely beach, that attracts people; said people pay for things like food, gas, and shelter, as well as raise property values. Adding a "beach" fee is simply a money-grubbing way to obfuscate a hidden tax.

Is this article meant to be flamebait? (4, Insightful)

Glowing Fish (155236) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994771)

Since there is a big crowd of Slashdotters who are reasonable luddite-like, and who rightfully decry the unnecessary adding of technology to everything, I am guessing that an article suggesting that what the majestic natural experience of ocean and land needs is RFID tags was perhaps posted knowing that it would cause scorn and derision.

Which doesn't mean I am not going to fall for the bait.

Man, is this a stupid idea OR WHAT?

Re:Is this article meant to be flamebait? (1)

egyptiankarim (765774) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994883)

While I like to hope I am one of those "luddite-like" /.ers that you mention, and totally agree that this seems like a worthless provision to have installed at a beach, and also that paying to get on a beach is rather crazy... More over than anything else, I can't help but point out the lunacy of anyone who may consider OC, NJ a "majestic natural experience of ocean and land." :P

Re:Is this article meant to be flamebait? (1)

andy1307 (656570) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994913)

Absolutely right. And Wi-Fi internet was Hi-Tech maybe 6 years ago.

Re:Is this article meant to be flamebait? (1)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994973)

majestic natural experience of ocean and land
Er... We're talking Ocean City here. This is beach as playground, not beach as majestic natural experience of ocean and land

You're still right, it's technology for technology's sake.

Re:Is this article meant to be flamebait? (1)

robably (1044462) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995617)

there is a big crowd of Slashdotters who are reasonable luddite-like
A technophile and a technophobe can come to the same conclusion that one aspect of technology is invasive or unnessecary, but that does not mean the technophile is now a technophobe, or that they both used the same logic to get to that conclusion. On the contrary - an understanding of technology makes you more acutely aware of its disadvantages.

Calling someone who is concerned with how technology affects people's privacy rights a Luddite is disingenuous.

Is this a joke? (3, Insightful)

Chineseyes (691744) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994795)

Why on earth would you need wi-fi and rfid at the beach? Maybe its just me but when I go to the beach I don't bring anything that would allow someone to contact me except an old cellphone which is usually OFF. Why an old cellphone? Theft is a huge problem at beaches these days leave your average device that is wi-fi enabled and you'll probably find it gone by the time you are out of the water.

Re:Is this a joke? (3, Insightful)

dkf (304284) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994845)

Theft is a huge problem at beaches these days
I'd have thought that sand would also be a problem; I can't imagine that it would be very good for keyboards and cooling fans...

Wristbands? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994815)

Wristbands? That idea will never float on nude beaches, so Slashdotters need worry not, there's one way to retain privacy...

... What do you mean, most Slashdotters wouldn't be caught dead on a nude beach?!

RFID people tracking (3, Funny)

ArcadeX (866171) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994833)

If we take these rfid tags and throw them in the water, will a lifegaurd come save it? Technology vs. the undertow, and all i want is pam anderson to save me

Re:RFID people tracking (1)

k8to (9046) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994891)

Oh no David Hasslehoff.

Wrong Spin (3, Insightful)

detain (687995) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994855)

Great idea, but they're not focusing on the good parts of it. This shouldnt be about wireless on the beach but more wireless within the city. This is a great technological advancement and something I hope more cities start to do as well.

As far as wifi on the beach little people will use it, but most people will be using it in the city where the wifi also is.

RFID tags: great for your kids, wonderful idea.. but not everyone will want these, should be optional.

Re:Wrong Spin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994969)

As far as wifi on the beach little people will use it, but most people will be using it in the city where the wifi also is.


Finally, we've found a way to keep children and dwarves busy while the rest of us normies have fun!

Re:Wrong Spin (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994997)

I couldn't see bringing a laptop, or any other wireless device to the beach. First, when you want to go in the water, what do you do with it? Trek all the way back to your car and leave it to roast in there? Second, even if you don't plan on going in the water (why are you at the beach), the sand would still be a major problem.

Re:Wrong Spin (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995139)

I disagree. I live in area with some of the best beaches in the world, the Tampa Bay Area in Florida. Let me tell you, having wifi on the beach would be awesome. Most of you are thinking things like "why I would I want to get sand in my laptop?" but there are lots of areas on the municipal beaches here, like for example Clearwater Beach [clearwaterbeach.com] , where wifi is absolutely apropos. Check out the photo gallery [clearwaterbeach.com] if you don't live in a beach community and have no idea what I'm talking about.

Re:Wrong Spin (1)

zig007 (1097227) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995481)

Wonderful? Electronically tracking children like they're potential criminals?

What happened to the responsibility of the parents for the children's upbringing?
Don't they even care that much anymore?

Now the children will learn that they are not even trusted a little bit. Not given a inch of leeway. Always watched.

It sure is a great way to create a responsible generation that thinks for itself.
This way you don't even have to learn them common sense, cause they won't need it.
The fucking beeps tell them when they are doing something wrong.

By all means, don't rectify the problem, when it is easier(though way more costly) to just dampen the symptoms.

Maybe I am overreacting here.. But I think the acceptance that has been building up regarding stuff like this is awful.

She sells... (2, Funny)

Digitus1337 (671442) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994887)

C shells by the sea shore.

Re:She sells... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19994939)

Ah the Unix saleswoman's retirement plan

Pay to go to the beach (0, Redundant)

mgblst (80109) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994893)

I must have misread this, surely you don't have to pay to go the beach. The article has an interview with someone, who finds it disgraceful that people would try to sneak onto the beach for free?? This is a joke surely. Coming from Australia, where the beaches are bountiful, beautiful and free, this is the biggest disgrace I have ever heard off.

Even with wifi!

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

ArcadeX (866171) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994953)

From what I've heard from a friend from NJ, you do have to pay to go to the beach. Space is very limited, too many people, too little parking, and the local government wanted extra income. I've seen other parks you had to pay for, guess this isn't any different. Glad it's not the case in most of the rest of the country.

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995019)

However, like you said, Australia has bountiful beaches. Tons of them. And not a whole lot of people either. At least no relative to the states. I imagine their ocean side property is at quite a premium. It's completely understandable that beaches would be something you have to pay for. Then again, I'm from a town of 12,000 with 2 beaches, with the town built around a lake. Most of the time we didn't even go to the beach but to some other swimming hole where there wasn't so many people. Anyway, I guess times have changed.

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

pla (258480) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995081)

I must have misread this, surely you don't have to pay to go the beach.

In the US, we have a constitutional guarantee of access to the ocean - No one can privately own the strip of land between the low and high tide marks or block your access to the same (though in practice, some entities, in particular shipping ports, can do so in the name of "security").

As for the massive expanses of shining white sand above the high tide mark - No such guarantee exists for that; And the actual rights-of-way to get to the high-tide line also form something of a questionable issue, in that you can have a right to stand somewhere you have no right to get to. On sandy beaches that doesn't so much apply, but on some of our more rugged (and IMO far more beautiful than sand) coastal areas, you can only legally get there by water.

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

Scutter (18425) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995611)

In the US, we have a constitutional guarantee of access to the ocean

Really? I don't remember that part of the Constitution. Where was that, exactly?

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

pla (258480) | more than 7 years ago | (#19996037)

Really? I don't remember that part of the Constitution. Where was that, exactly?

Curiously, it would seem that such a right does not explicitly exist (in the US constitution), instead occuring only as a matter of common law (from Illinois Central Railroad v. Illinois).

Several state constitutions do explicitly spell it out, but not the Big Daddy.

My mistake.

Re:Pay to go to the beach (1)

pulse2600 (625694) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995311)

Yes you pay to go to the beach in NJ. Even if you own a beach house, your property taxes/association fees are partially used for your family's beach tags for the summer. However, access to the beach is unrestricted during certain hours (such as after 5 PM), and during the off-season. While I believe the state pays for major beach/ocean maintenance (like cleaning up polluted water, or reclaiming lost sand after a major storm), lifeguard salaries and other beach-associated costs are the responsibility of the association that is responsible for their section of the beach (unless you go to a beach that is part of a state or national park). These costs are paid for by proceeds from beach tags. This is done this way mostly to prevent a large hotel or developer from pushing out private ownership of beachfront property to build hotels and condos. Much of the Jersey Shore consists of housing associations. Each block or street forms their own corporation (i.e. ABC Beach Housing Association, Inc), complete with a board of directors. The coproration owns the land while the individual owns the house. Each resident is a shareholder in the coproration, the "share" meaning the parcel of land on which their house is built. So now you have a stretch of beach (for example, on a barrier island - Jersey has a bunch of these) that is owned by about 40-50 separate corporations that each own maybe 1/4 mile long stretch of beachfront property. Now let's say the shareholders of one corporation vote to sell to Mariott, it is still not in Mariott's interest to buy that corporation's property because maybe the corporation on the adjacent street won't sell and therefore there would not be enough room for Mariott to build a resort. They can't be pushed out by eminent domain either, because the property is already be owned by "corporations" and is not considered "blighted". So for once the little people beat the pants off big business. BTW, not every area of the Jersey Shore follows this model, but this is typical in many areas.

Re:Pay to go to the beach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995815)

If we didn't have to pay to go to beaches in NJ then how could the shore towns afford to pay the beach fee collectors? Think about it...
Oh, wait...

BTW, having lived in NJ all my life, I can assure you that no one goes "to the beach"; it's called going "down the shore".

One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (5, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994909)

I grew up going to the beach. Some of my earliest memories are of fun days at the beach. One thing I've never seen in the last 30 years was public lockers. It just seems like such an obvious thing to me. You go to the beach, you can't swim with your wallet in your pocket. So where do you put it? Under your towel and hope no-one steals it? Pretty much. I asked a friend who is a lifesaver once if he'd ever seen lockers available. He had, but it's pretty rare. Apparently the most common excuse is that the lockers would attract thieves. That's, umm, interesting logic.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995151)

Maybe it's not logic but experience. I'm sure the beaches can compare the number of theft complaints when they had lockers to when they didn't and see the difference. (Comparing different beaches is harder, of course.)

There are quite a few thieves out there that see unattended storage as a beacon, where leaving your wallet in your car or house or hotel room, hidden, isn't so much of a beacon.

I'm sure the headache of people that lose their key/combination or are just plain scamming is another large part of the problem.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995191)

Well, the best way to avoid complaints is to have no-one to complain to.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

CaseyB (1105) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995569)

How is a beach fundamentally different from a pool, for any of the issues you mention? By your logic, everyone should keep their wallets wrapped in their poolside towel.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995917)

Size? Public accessibility? Ownership? Location? All of these things mean that the people are easier to watch and control.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

toQDuj (806112) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995341)

Yes, and somehow, everyone assumes that if they put their watch/gsm in their shoe, it is safe. No wait, make that the tip of the shoe, because the thief will only check the first bit of the shoe!

Just.... don't bring anything valuable or bring friends.

B.

Re:One thing beaches do need (and this aint it) (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 7 years ago | (#19996007)

One thing beaches do need (and this aint it)

If you'd ever been a lifeguard, you'd definitely see the value of a way to track kids who have wandered off. Reconnecting little kids and parents (or older siblings) is about 40% of what you do on a normal beach, and I can't imagine how much there is on a zoo-like beach like this.

You have to pay to go to the beach ?!? (0, Redundant)

dargaud (518470) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994915)

Subject says it all. Hard to believe.

Re:You have to pay to go to the beach ?!? (2)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995177)

The only beaches I've been to that DIDN'T have a fee were pretty gross and littered.

Those fees go towards cleanup (and other maintenance) and lifeguards.

If you haven't been paying fees to the beach where you are, it's because it's included in the tax you already pay, whether you go to the beach or not. I'd rather pay for my own trips to the beach than pay for everyone's, whether I go or not. (And I don't, generally.)

Madness (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995711)

I've been to beaches in the England, beaches in Australia, beaches in Spain, beaches in France and beaches in Scotland and haven't had to pay for any of them. All of them, the Australian ones in particular have been prisine, despite the large number of people using them, and with good facilities.

I certainly wouldn't want to have to pay to go to the beach, I mean what next, would you have to pay to go the park, or to a national park or walk by a lake or a mountain ? Madness.

Re:Madness (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#19996005)

National Park? Yes.

http://www.valdosta.edu/~dlscott/national_parks/fe es.html [valdosta.edu]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dade_Battlefield_Hist oric_State_Park [wikipedia.org] This is a park where I grew up and has charged an entrance fee for as long as I remember.

I think I should be clear that the 'fees' are usually 'parking fees' at the beaches I've been to, and if you walk up, you can avoid the fee. The fees are not just for fixing the parking lot, but all of the beach's needs.

Re:You have to pay to go to the beach ?!? (1)

simong (32944) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995207)

I know, these wacky Americans. Still, I know of beaches in the UK where the enterprising local council has built a car park on the main approach for which they charge an arm and a leg.

Wi-fi on the beach (1)

ilovegeorgebush (923173) | more than 7 years ago | (#19994945)

The Wi-fi aspect is nothing new. Brighton [wikipedia.org] beach in East Sussex, southern England, has had wi-fi access [piertopier.net] for years now. I believe it's free too...

Re:Wi-fi on the beach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995109)

Who the fsck would want to go to Brighton beach? Most people think of beaches as sea and sand, not eleven bazzilion pebbles that you can't walk over without looking like a poor mime artist.

About Time, sort of (1)

Thyamine (531612) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995003)

We go down to Ocean City a few times a summer, and at least at one point we're doing there for a week straight. Needless to say, sometimes it rains, sometimes you're bored, but regardless the reason I've had need/desire to get online. I for one welcome the idea that we may be able to get wireless access in OC or on the Boardwalk or wherever.

However I agree with RFID complaints. Right now teenagers stand at the top of the steps leading down to the beach, and 'check' that you have you beach tags. Most people of course buy the tags or don't complain, but it's a big beach and easy to slide in with a group of people or just run out into the water when they start randomly checking for them on the beach.

I suppose it's just extra revenue, but the idea of wanting RFID seems like overkill. All those people coming down are having to: buy gas, pay tolls, buy food, possibly rent places to stay, buy souvenirs, buy random fudge/salt water taffy/sweets, and all the other junk that you feel it's ok to buy because you're on vacation. Do they really need to make sure they are _also_ getting that $5 for me being on the beach? All that money is going to NJ or local businesses, who pay taxes, so does the cost of the RFID system somehow equal out to meaning more dollars, and not a complete money pit. (Oops, I dropped my scanner in the sand again, I suppose I'll have to go report another one needs to be replaced)

Linus on the Beach (1)

emil10001 (985596) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995063)

Linus Torvalds had something to say [kerneltrap.org] about the evil beaches:

So what's a pasty white nerd to do? You can't go out on the beach, because the goodlooking people will laugh at you, and kick sand in your face.

I'm not bitter.

...

Beaches are overrated anyway, the sand gets into the laptop fan and soon it won't work.

So, I will ask the obvious question: Why would you bring a wifi enabled device would you bring to an area with a lot of sand and water?

Re:Linus on the Beach (1)

JimXugle (921609) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995293)

I think that's sort of the point... any geek who wants to keep his laptop (or DS or whatever) working knows that you don't let it go near the beach. So the WiFi on the beaches will only benefit those who don't know or don't care about what will happen to their hardware.

Although, I can see the benefit if services like Tmobile's Hotspot@home were more widely used.

Re:Linus on the Beach (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995807)

So, I will ask the obvious question: Why would you bring a wifi enabled device would you bring to an area with a lot of sand and water?


Because I always carry my cell phone.

some context (1)

conspirator57 (1123519) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995099)

Beach towns in NJ (and other high-density states) thought up tagged beach access to try to keep the beach an enjoyable experience for those living in the town. Or at least to offset the impact of the influx of out-of-town beach-goers has on infrastructure and aesthetic. Keep in mind that the closest of these beaches are less than 20 miles from NYC and you can deduce that something had to be done in order for locals to be able to get a square inch of beach.

I don't know about OC, NJ, but a lot of towns close their beaches at night, mostly because of the town liability insurance impact. Here's a great way to double-whammy beachgoers at night: if you paid for your tag and are wearing it at night, the town knows exactly when and where to send the officer to ticket you. if you either didn't pay or paid and left it behind because you knew they'd track you, then you might get caught by the random sweeps and get two tickets.

Re:some context (1)

Secrity (742221) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995275)

"Keep in mind that the closest of these beaches are less than 20 miles from NYC and you can deduce that something had to be done in order for locals to be able to get a square inch of beach."

Hmmm, I live in Washington, DC; perhaps we could get the National Park Service to institute tagged entrance to the National Mall so that locals can get a square inch of lawn. I wouldn't mind paying $20 a year if it meant fewer tourists on the Mall.

Re:some context (1)

conspirator57 (1123519) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995509)

I grew up in DC. DC is one of the greenest (parkwise) cities on the country. The Mall was set aside by the federal government as a national recreation and assembly area. Meaning there is no assumption of local service. Beach towns, on the other hand are supposedly the opposite. Also, in DC you have choices. There are plenty of other parks. Go exploring and I'm sure you'll find a park that suits your preferred balance of activities and population. Personal recommendations include:

National Parks:
Rock Creek Park,
C&O Canal Towpath, including Fletcher's Boathouse
Glover Archibold Park

City Parks:
Anacostia River Park
Battery Kimble Park,
Most schools have city parks next to them: the park between Wilson High school and its neighboring middle school is a good example.

Re:some context (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995527)

That's exactly right - I grew up on the Jersey Shore, and between the end of May and the beginning of September you couldn't swing a cat on the beach without hitting a "fucking Benny" (Brooklyn-Elizabeth-Newark-New York).

Savings? (1)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995113)

Wireless allows the City to save on ... T-1 lines,

How's that? Do they honestly think they can build a wireless network with sufficient capacity for an entire city? Presumably, they want to replace local T-1 connections (from the telecom exchange to customers) with WLAN. But with the limited number of channels available, they'll run out of bandwidth in no time (esp. near the exchange).

you have to pay to get on the beach? (-1, Redundant)

doktorjayd (469473) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995165)

WTF??

Re:you have to pay to get on the beach? (1)

doktorjayd (469473) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995319)

hmm.. then thinking about it a little more...

i'm paying $30 a day to get into the national park in order to pay ~$100 for a lift ticket to ski...

supply, demand... i get it!

having to wear a tag too.... at least here its cos some company had to shell out for the lift towers, to fuel the motors, and of course someone has to pay the lifties a minimum drinking wage :)

( at least this year theres snow is all i can say! )
 

OT: Why are you charging to go to the beach? (0, Redundant)

QX-Mat (460729) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995231)

Maybe I completely missed the point in capitalism 101, but why do you have to pay to go to the beach?

With the exception of a few private beaches attached to sea-side hotels, I don't think I've ever, or will ever, pay to go to a beach. The concept sounds ridiculous to my European brain :(

Matt

Re:OT: Why are you charging to go to the beach? (1)

Meatloaf Surprise (1017210) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995669)

Well, considering taxes are much higher in Europe, I would agree that paying to go to the beach would be a little ridiculous. But...considering it is in the United States, where taxes are much lower, and it is very popular place to the surrounding area (North Jersey, New York City, PA, etc.) $5 doesn't seem very unreasonable.

In North Jersey it costs around $5/game/person to bowl, $7-$9/hr/person to shoot pool, and $10/person to go to the movies. $5 to spend a day at the beach isn't that bad of a deal if you're into that sort of thing.

Re:OT: Why are you charging to go to the beach? (2, Informative)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995731)

Maybe I completely missed the point in capitalism 101, but why do you have to pay to go to the beach?

Good beach in that area is limited. There is a population of tens of millions a few miles up the road. Even with a fee, it is still incredibly crowded.

The vast majority of beaches in the US are entirely free.

YOU FAIL IT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995505)

And she 8an [goat.cx]

Get ready (2)

AbbyNormal (216235) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995549)

for my family and my dollars to leave this cesspool. Beach tags at the beach for $5/$10 a day? 7-8 dollar cheesburgers on the boardwalk without fries? Ocean city used to be a family friendly destination, but its turning into a playground for the rich. Now a network that monitors all of its visitors? No longer family friendly in my book. Its a shame to see this place degrade in such a short period of time. I've been going down there since I was a kid. Not anymore.

A Call for National Wireless (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995601)

I think that it is time that the USA puts together some Federal investment into national infrastructure. The Internet is a highway, and just as much as the federal highways repay themselves many times over from the increased economic activity they generate, so to will pervasive broadband.

We should have broadband wireless in the entire northeast corridor, and along all the major highways and railways. All the trains, commuter and Amtrak, should also offer free public wireless service. How much could it cost? A few billion dollars? A hundred billion dollars? So what? WE've blown that much on stupider stuff, and wireless would be a national shot in the arm.

TechSupport (1)

Mockylock (1087585) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995757)

IT professionals across the eastern shore experience a surge in sand and saltwater repairs after employees return from vacation.

Still sober, and smoking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995803)

Ocean City, NJ - You can bring your laptop to the beach, but no pina colada.

I'm not sure ubiquitous wireless is enough to entice nerds to visit. Not only do they forbid drinking on the sand, but you can't buy alcohol in any form. The nearest place that sells it is back on the mainland.

Furthermore, many New Jersey/Philly types think that the smell of nicotine gives the seabreeze a certain "New Jersey authenticity," and that the beach is nature's ashtray.

Nonetheless, it is one of the safer beaches to visit with a plethora of lifeguards.

I read it wrong (1)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995821)

Git reddy fo' da hi-tek, Biatch!

pay to get on public property?!?!? (0, Redundant)

mwilliamson (672411) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995831)

As a Texan I must say I would NEVER pay for my RIGHT to be on PUBLIC PROPERTY. I can see paying to bring my car along with and I have no problem with that, but to change people to be on the beach is an outrage.

Keep track (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#19995871)

high-tech beach will be the ability to track beachgoers
Cool, I will be able to track hot chicks !!

WTF??? pay to get on the PUBLIC beach? (0, Redundant)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 7 years ago | (#19995875)

Jebus! New Jersey is screwed up. Here in Michigan we have 60 times the coastline that NJ has and we dont gouge our residents by charging for beach access.

how about not wasting money on stupid crap instead of finding different ways to suck money out of the residents.

what's next? an Air tax? Charging the family $25.00 per person that breathes inside the state. you get a $50.00 fine of you dont have your breathing bracelet.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?