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Chinese Bloggers Encouraged to Register Contact Info

samzenpus posted more than 6 years ago | from the and-where-can-we-arrest-you dept.

Privacy 95

Raver32 writes "Blog service providers in China are "encouraged" to register users with their real names and contact information, according to a new government document that tones down an earlier proposal banning anonymous online blogging. At least 10 major Chinese blog service providers have agreed to sign the "self-discipline pledge" issued by the Internet Society of China, the state-run Xinhua News Agency reported."

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95 comments

My contact info (4, Funny)

Joaz Banbeck (1105839) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334749)

dou.zanz.ded@tienamensquare

URANUS@lollerskaters.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335223)

HE he he

Re:URANUS@lollerskaters.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335421)

LOL mod parent up!

Re:My contact info (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335293)

real name Foo Ling Yu

Oblig: In the Soviet ... (-1, Redundant)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334761)

In the Soviet China the Government watches the bloggers.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

ircmaxell (1117387) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334821)

And this is different from anywhere else how? Don't forget about the US government's electronic spying... At least China has the balls to tell it's people it's watching them...

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (4, Interesting)

ReTay (164994) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334913)

And this is different from anywhere else how? Don't forget about the US government's electronic spying... At least China has the balls to tell it's people it's watching them...

Right and how many blogers are imprisoned because they don't like the government in the US?
How many people that visit the democratic underground are getting arrested for posting there?
Yeah really good comparison there.....
Also taking steps to make sure that the governments "electronic spying" does not catch you is trivial at best.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335037)

Right and how many blogers are imprisoned because they don't like the government in the US?
How many people that visit the democratic underground are getting arrested for posting there?

So you know for a fact that 0 people are in gitmo for this, or in CIA secret prisons, or have been exported for torture for any of these actions? Oh, right they won't tell us who is in these places so we really don't know. They could disappear people for this stuff and we would never know.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (5, Insightful)

OddThinking (1078509) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335251)

And how many would have to disappear before someone wondered where their blogger went to?

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

ReTay (164994) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335479)

And how many would have to disappear before someone wondered where their blogger went to?

You know THAT is one of the best questions I have ever heard.
And I don't think it could a number of people but rather how well know a blogger was that would start it.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

infonography (566403) | more than 6 years ago | (#20340085)

And you think this is a bad thing? Making inept bloggers disappear should be counted as a public service.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (2, Insightful)

ReTay (164994) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335255)

So you know for a fact that 0 people are in gitmo for this, or in CIA secret prisons, or have been exported for torture for any of these actions? Oh, right they won't tell us who is in these places so we really don't know. They could disappear people for this stuff and we would never know.

Ok take off the tinfoil
The difference is you are guessing. Second it is a known fact that people get imprisoned in China for speaking out about the government in a perceived incorrect manner. After all you are still posting right? They did not come get you now did they?

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335585)

Well Americans have been arrested for wearing the "wrong" shirt in a mall and for saying to dick cheney that the war in Iraq was morally reprehensible. Give it a little time and if we continue on this course people will be disappeared for free speech outside of a free speech zone.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (5, Insightful)

edumacator (910819) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335739)

The wonderful thing about believing in a government conspiracy is that no one can prove you wrong.

Having no proof of the conspiracy just proves that it's a really good one, and therefore we should be more afraid.

I think we should be vigilant about protecting our rights, but let's be careful about assuming things that are unsubstantiated.

You 'know' this how? (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335109)

The US Gov't doesn't need to tell anyone about who they spy on...that's Bush's warrent-less wiretapping scheme! No judge will ever find out, and the agencies doing the snooping are protected from testifying because it is a 'state secret'. You could be spied on, branded a "terrorist" with no paper trail and disappeared forever.

I hope you are trolling, I really do. Especially since the pro-business concerns in the USA would LOVE to turn the clock back on environmental protections and consumer safety in order to turn a bigger profit.

Re:You 'know' this how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335275)

Especially since the pro-business concerns in the USA would LOVE to turn the clock back on environmental protections and consumer safety

Phew! time to take your meds. Ooh better not..those big greedy pharmaceutical companies are probably mixing your pills with unsafe filler illegally imported by the Rove-Bush industrial cabal. [sigh]

Re:You 'know' this how? (3, Interesting)

OddThinking (1078509) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335325)

I may not be a fan of the current administration, but comparing the US to China in this instance is a bit much. If I disappear forever, someone is going to notice. How many bloggers have disappeared in the last 6 years. I mean truly disappeared, not just quit blogging. Wouldn't their family, friends, or readers go public with the information they could no longer be found (you know, like going to the police or something). How long would it take for the story to be known to a large number of people after that happens? Has anyone even heard urban myths of disappearing bloggers? I haven't, and I think I would hear at least an urban myth or two if it was happening.

Didn't say it IS happening... (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336839)

Just making a point that with the recent law changes, this scenario inches closer to possibility.

I always found it amusing that we had to invade Iraq because Saddam was committing genocide and all of his human rights violations, but we bend over backwards for China. I think the same geniuses who thought Iraq would pull a 180 if they got democracy think that China will undergo a similar change once the people taste the fruits of capitalism.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (-1, Offtopic)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335131)

> and how many bloggers are imprisoned because they don't like the government in the US?

"Look, just because we turned off all the compiler warnings, didn't check the lengths of input strings, didn't do bounds-checking on my arrays, ran multiple network-facing services with full Administrator privileges, how many XP systems have been remotely compromised? UPnP, DCOM, RPC, Messenger, IE, Outlook, and Word are totally secure!"
- Some marketroid at a Windows XP release party in late 2001.

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335267)

Going from Chinese civil rights violations to nonsensical ranting about Microsoft in three steps isn't in itself remarkable. But doing it with an "In Soviet Russia..." post in the middle certainly is!

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (3, Insightful)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335707)

> Going from Chinese civil rights violations to nonsensical ranting about Microsoft in three steps isn't in itself remarkable. But doing it with an "In Soviet Russia..." post in the middle certainly is!

Really?

The original poster wasn't talking about China -- he was claiming that Post-9/11 America is a "freer" country than China, because relatively few Americans' rights had been abused.

Programmers (application developers or operating systems designers) secure computer systems from malicious users by denying our programs the ability to escalate their own privileges.

Pre-9/11 America was designed along the same principles: Governments, in order to secure the liberty of their citizens, limited their own powers.

An operating system isn't secure "because it hasn't been hacked". It can only be deemed secure when userland processes can't be compromised by bad input, and if (that is, when) a userland process is compromised, the operating system denies the compromised process the ability to take over the rest of the machine. Segmentation fault: Core dumped.

Likewise, a country isn't free "because no US bloggers have been imprisoned for criticizing the US government". A country can only be deemed free when a blogger can't be legally imprisoned for criticizing his or her government, and if (that is, when) some grandstanding politician manages to pass law like that, the law is immediately struck down as unconstitutional.

You secure a system by making it hard to compromise. When the guy in Marketing wants software to be automatically installed when a user visits a web page "because everyone hates installing software", the only correct response is "NO."

You secure a citizen's rights by making it hard for anyone, even yourself, to take them away. When the guy on the campaign trail wants to spy on everyone "because it's for the children", the correct response must again be "NO."

Re:Oblig: In the Soviet ... (1)

AppyPappy (64817) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342837)

If the government controlled the media, everyone who writes a letter to the editor of a newspaper would go to jail. They all complain about the government. Someone calls George Bush a "liar" on a daily basis.

I'm sure there is some deep dark conspiracy that can explain the rationale behind this. Maybe they can explain it to the Chinese so that they can get it on the action.

Makes sense (0, Flamebait)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334799)

It is good for society when you take responsibility for the things The Party tells you to take responsibility for.

Why don't these antics from communist China surprise me? These agreements don't mean much since Chinese courts do whatever the hell they feel like anyways.

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335273)

It is good for society when you take responsibility for the things The Party tells you to take responsibility for.

Why don't these antics from communist China surprise me? These agreements don't mean much since Chinese courts do whatever the hell they feel like anyways.

 
You're right, cause here in the USA our courts respect the Constit....oh wait...

Re:Makes sense (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335463)

Liberal BS. I'll ignore it.

Why don't you explore outside your own country and examine other systems of government before you decide the US is the great satan.

Re:Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335555)

Wow. Lol. Sensitive arent we?
 
China doesnt fly all over the world waving its disk in everyones face, pissing and shitting in every corner of the globe.
At least they have the decency to keep their oppression within their own borders.

Re:Makes sense (1)

Andrew Kismet (955764) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337733)

Yes, until you notice that their definition of "their own borders" includes Tibet and Taiwan...

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335603)

Liberal BS. I'll ignore it.

Why don't you explore outside your own country and examine other systems of government before you decide the US is the great satan.


Whos a liberal? The freedom of the individual is paramount, and that unfortunately is neither a liberal or conservative idea. Neither party fully support the Constitution. I believe in the Constitution as its written. The 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, the commerce clause, especially. Who has a better system of goverment than our constitution as written? I don't think the US is the great satan, I just don't like those that trample the Constitution, and those that allow it to happen (the courts).

Re:Makes sense (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337315)

Yes it's all a big conspiracy. Nobody can get a fair trial anymore, especially if you're a minority. All judges are bought off by corporate interests.

It's fine to dislike flaws in the US judicial system, and seek to correct them. But the liberal BS is when you compared the US to other systems and ignore when the US is more fair just because you take issue with a relatively minor problem.

You have blinders on if you think when I am critical of Chinese courts that I am holding up US courts as perfect and unassailable. Please don't bring in off topic discussion of the minor problems of US (or EU) courts when they are trivial in comparison to other legal systems around the world.

A flea in your home is not the same as a rhinoceros in your home.

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337493)

Well I would rather be on trial here in the US than China. My point was all courts do whatever the hell they want in a matter of speaking. Which court is worse is a matter of your point of view.

Re:Makes sense (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20338015)

Yea, I guess I'm just not smoking enough cannabis to understand your point of view.

Sorry for all the insults, but I felt it was necessary to fight stupid with stupid. Perhaps liberalism is a mental disorder [amazon.com] , who knows.

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20339141)

Bill O' Reilly is that you? Anyone who disagrees with you is dumb and liberal, now thats a sign of a superior intellect. And for the last time Im not a Liberal, Im a registered Libertarian. Speaking of intelligence, and stereotypes, I bet you spend your Sundays at church with the rest of the conservative sheeple.

Re:Makes sense (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20344829)

What does Bill O'Reilly have to do with Michael Savage? I fail to see the connection. Howard Stern has a radio show too, let's include him in the discussion as well.

Your stupidity has nothing to do with your being a Libertarian. I myself am a small-l lbertarian (and read publications of groups like the Cato Institute regularly). And one of my favourite books is by Milton Friedman. All of which is irrelevant to the discussion.

Just because you don't think you're one of those nancy boy far left card carrying democrats does not mean I can not point out the stupidity of your position and the obvious liberal brainwashing you have received. And I'm not talking about the nice liberals who want to help the poor, save working class jobs, and promote peace throughout the world. I'm talking about the vile leaders of the self-labelled liberal movement who wish to disassemble the foundations of this country so they can rebuild it in their own image.

When people try to blow minor problems in America to the same proportions as significant problems that are running rampant through our world, you do everyone a disservice, and you make yourself appear as a fool. This knee jerk response to any criticism of another nation by an American is completely unproductive, if you want to discuss problems with the American judicial system, fine. But that was not the topic. (besides our prison system is in far more crisis than our courts, if you want to start getting critical)

The problems of our courts have nothing to do with the dysfunction of Chinese courts. They are not on the same scale, they are not related in any way, the problems lack any similarity. The only similarity between the two topics is that they are both heavy criticism, if all you can think of is to criticize your own country and end any constructive discussion about the problems outside our borders, then you are working for Them.

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20347035)

if all you can think of is to criticize your own country and end any constructive discussion about the problems outside our borders, then you are working for Them.

and who is this nefarious "Them"?

Re:Makes sense (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 6 years ago | (#20347129)

I thought you said you were a big-L Libertarian, I'm sure you can come up with plenty of conspiracy theories without my help.

Re:Makes sense (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20418107)

I capitalized a noun, not everyone falls into your neat categories. Not to mention you dodged the question. Are you a professional politician?

Re:Makes sense (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 6 years ago | (#20349205)

I just don't like those that trample the Constitution, and those that allow it to happen (the courts).

But that's the job of the courts. This is the legacy of the idiotic British Common Law system. In Common Law countries, laws as written by legislatures really aren't very important; what's ultimately binding is what some weasely lawyer can convince a jury of morons of in a court. Then, whatever idiocy this decision is, becomes law through something called "legal precendent".

A lot of people seem to complain about "judicial activism" whenever a judge or court decides something in a way they don't like. However, they continually fail to understand that that is what the court's role is: to create laws.

Even worse, we're continually lied to in our Civics classes in school, where we're told that our government has three branches, the legislative to create laws, the executive to enforce laws, and the judicial to interpret them. That's complete crap. The "laws" written by the legislative branch are little more than advisories for the judicial branch.

If we wanted a sensible system of laws and government, where the branches of government really work like I said above, we'd adopt the French Civil Law system, which is descended directly from Roman Law, and is the form of law used in nearly every other country in the world, for good reason. In Civil Law, weasely lawyers don't have as much power or importance, and courts are actually bound by written laws. Instead of our system, where two people committing the exact same crime can get totally different results, the Civil Law system is consistent in its application.

The idea of a single judge (or worse, a jury of twelve morons) making the laws that we must all live by, instead of having them made by an elected legislature, is as insane as having a dictator make all the decisions for a country.

Re:Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20348905)

I know it doesn't sound quite so Fox Newsy, but china really isn't communist anymore. It is a one-party state; you could argue it is totalitarian, in the same way that Zimbabwe and Turkmenistan are. Or maybe even South Dakota. Kidding.

Actual text of the Chinese "warning" (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20334809)

Me so horny

Me rove you rong time

Me so horny

Boom boom rong time

Too beaucoup, too beaucoup

They should what? (5, Funny)

make dev (1004307) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334829)

"Blog providers should monitor and manage comments ... and delete illegal and bad information in a timely manner,"

Delete "Bad" information? Is that the one with the evil bit turned on?

The Chinese brogosphere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20334831)

Is abuzz about this.

Re:The Chinese brogosphere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335213)

Is abruzz abrout this.
kekeke ^___________^
fixed

Made By The Cheapest Communist Labor (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20334867)

Call It A Night, Cowboy!

Slashdot only allows anonymous users to post 10 times per day (more or less, depending on moderation). A user from your IP has already shared his or her thoughts with us that many times. Take a breather, and come back and see us in 24 hours or so.

If you think this is unfair, please email posting@slashdot.org with your MD5'd IPID, which is 4b9c718772a992ec092caf00525c6443. Let us know how many comments you think you've posted in the last 24 hours.
Edit Comment You are not logged in. You can log in now using the convenient form below, or Create an Account, or post as Anonymous Coward.

Nick

All your Republicans are belong to us.

Re:Made By The Cheapest Communist Labor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335671)

Slow Down Cowboy!

Slashdot requires you to wait longer between hitting 'reply' and submitting a comment.

It's been 5 minutes since you last successfully posted a comment

Chances are, you're behind a firewall or proxy, or clicked the Back button to accidentally reuse a form. Please try again. If the problem persists, and all other options have been tried, contact the site administrator.

Use fake name, post, get arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20334871)

Its trickery. Use your real name.

Re:Use fake name, post, get arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20336467)

Then use your neighbors name. Even better, pretend you are your neighbor using a fake name.

There's a logical reason for recording addresses.. (4, Interesting)

8127972 (73495) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334921)

.... When the government decides to execute you for dissident activities, they can send your family an invoice for the bullet.

Re:There's a logical reason for recording addresse (1)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335197)

When the government decides to execute you for dissident activities, they can send your family an invoice for the bullet.

You misunderstand the communist system.
There is no private property, hence bullets are distributed free of charge.
In fact, they will probably distribute bullets to your family as well - *Gratis*.
It's really a wonderful system.

Does anyone know (5, Interesting)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 6 years ago | (#20334985)

Is it common knowledge in China how much the government restricts freedom? Or is it something that barely anyone inside the country is aware of?

Re:Does anyone know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335101)

I hear it's known to a lot. They're a large part of the global economy. It's just that nobody wants to talk about it. You'd get in trouble. You never know which friend would turn you in to look like a better citizen. It's just easier to ignore it and live on.

And a lot don't know what they're missing out on because they believe the brainwashing/propaganda/lies that say everything is good and getting better because of how they're living.

Re:Does anyone know (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335767)

I hear it's known to a lot. They're a large part of the global economy. It's just that nobody wants to talk about it. You'd get in trouble. You never know which friend would turn you in to look like a better citizen. It's just easier to ignore it and live on.
This is true. I am close friends with 2 Chinese guys at my university and both of them are trying desperately to take as long as possible for their education so that they can get permanent resident status in Canada and not have to go back to China.

Don't get me wrong, they love their country, but it's not the kind of place they want to raise a family in at its current state.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337301)

Love the country, hate the government.

Is this to be a universal constant?

Re:Does anyone know (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335893)

I hear it's known to a lot. They're a large part of the global economy. It's just that nobody wants to talk about it. You'd get in trouble.

It's visible in interviews of chinese tourists as well. When a clueless journalists asks them if they support decision X in China, the chinese person always bursts out in nervous laughter, avoiding the question completely.
They know it, and they do not talk about it, because what nobody talks about they can't be shot for.

It's a pressure boiler and history tells us it's going to burst ... it will happend like in Soviet Union or Germany or even like when the US freed itself of the queen.

Re:Does anyone know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20336239)

I am writing this behind a proxy for obvious reasons. This applies to major mainland cities, such as Beijing or Chongqing.

It is not common knowledge, but widely known among the upper-middle class and above. The general ignorance is true of restrictions on virtually any medium. For example, the recent movie "Transformers" mentioned hackers potentially coming from China and attacking the U.S. - the sound track in domestic Chinese theaters was mangled such you did not hear which country this was. In some cases, like with the latest "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie, all the scenes with an entire actor (in that case Chow Yun Fat) was cut out without explanation. Of course,

In regards to print media you might wish you were in Dubai - at least there you can get the material, if not see much of it. You cannot really get much foreign print media in mainland China, except for Chinese-market versions (like a Chinese Cosmo or Vogue). If you can get it - say, an Economist issue - it's probably untouched from a foreign hotel or direct-subscription. However it almost doesn't exist: Not in airports, newsstands, bookstores, libraries, or most hotels.

For TV, wealthly people get three satellite dishes: One for the mainland, one for Taiwan, and one for Hong Kong. Only two of these are legal. Everyone else gets the local major-city TV and CCTV channels for free.

The Internet is the most complex medium to censor. However, it is also the one for which most Internet users in China do not have any real idea about what is happening - partly technological ignorance, but mostly just a matter of habits. Most people use the Internet for basic entertainment: Movies, music, chat, and games. Many Chinese users do not have email addresses and only value their QQ number (which are hoarded) and QQ homepage. Further, most users simply don't walk outside their box of the Chinese-language internet, or even Baidu.com, and don't wish too (despite the fact that virtually all Internet users can read some English, by virtue of its invasion in education and business). Rampant "piracy" of Western things means that most of what people want is delivered to them in some way or another.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

SIGALRM (784769) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337963)

That's very interesting, thanks for taking the time to comment. Just curious, though, what it a "QQ number"?

Re:Does anyone know (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 6 years ago | (#20338473)

QQ is like a clone of ICQ. As with ICQ, you also have a UNI (Unique Number Identifier) as your logon account.

I'm not sure why they are horded, but my fiance' in Shanghai tells me that the Chinese love a form of numerology that plays a part in "luck". I suspect new accounts are always being opened in order to obtain a string of numbers in the right order.

OTOH, it could be because they're getting spammed and need to open up a fresh non-tainted account.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

cshay (79326) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336287)

You should check out this Frontline piece on China [pbs.org] . In it they manage to candidly interview a couple students from a top university there and showed them photos of "Tank Man" [wikipedia.org] , and they did not recognize the image. It seems as though any recorded history of the 1989 uprising ha been eliminated in China.

Re:Does anyone know (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20336981)

You ever watch the "Jaywalking" segment on The Tonight Show? Go out on the street and show young adults footage of the Iranian hostage rescue. You'll find that plenty of them will have no idea what is going on in those images. That must mean that the US government has been actively suppressing information about the Iran Contra affair, right?

Or, maybe, kids in China are just like the kids in the US, which is that they watch too much TV and play too much Pokemon to give a rat's ass about political events that happened when they were still babies.

A better question is why the Tank Man photo is so easily recognizable in the US by the same people who can't easily name who was president of the US at the time. What reason could there possibly be to explain that? Could it be... propaganda? No, not in the US, never. The history books never said anything about the US using propaganda.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

cshay (79326) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337139)

Watch the segment. These were students at the Chinese equivalent of Harvard. It's not comparable to "Jaywalking".

Re:Does anyone know (1)

Wootery (1087023) | more than 6 years ago | (#20347143)

On clicking "The Struggle to Control Information", I was informed that

We regret that we are unable to stream this video for visitors from the U.K. and Ireland due to a contractual rights agreement with Channel 4.
I believe that qualifies as supremely ironic.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

jacobfan (1147411) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353003)

For a Chinese, there are at least two possible interpretation for this
1. These students really do not know what the photo means;
2. Some of them actually recognized what it is, but decided not to comment on it, because it is politically sensitive.

Re:Does anyone know (2, Insightful)

Chandon Seldon (43083) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336455)

Is it common knowledge in the USA just how much the government / mainstream media warps people's view of the world through carefully constructed propaganda?

Your reaction to that statement is probably about the same as the way a Chinese person of similar political awareness would react to your statement. Actually, if anything, the big difference between a Chinese and American person is acceptance vs. denial.

Re:Does anyone know (3, Insightful)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 6 years ago | (#20337261)

Is it common knowledge in the USA just how much the government / mainstream media warps people's view of the world through carefully constructed propaganda?

Honestly? I have no idea. I know that I know that the government and media warp everything, and my friends are aware of it too. But I have no idea how much the average person is aware of it.

Re:Does anyone know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20339661)

I know that I know that the government and media warp everything, and my friends are aware of it too. But I have no idea how much the average person is aware of it.

Oh, if you consider the current administration, the polls would suggest that at least about 70-75% people polled are aware. However, apparently 99% of people are on the side of apathy to do something about it.

Re:Does anyone know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20336745)

It will be interesting to see what happens next year. It looks to me like the Olympics may shape up to be an absolute disaster for them. Amnesty International etc etc are already happily planning to go daft over there - banners, protests, having a wander and finding average Joe's and chatting to them about 1989. China have rather stupidly created a trap for themselves - human rights groups can't lose - they go over (covert and overt) and make noise - if they make noise then it gets air time - if they get arrested/detained/deported by the cops then it gets air time. Images of people being huckled and removed from the Olympic stadium for unfurling a banner is pretty iconic stuff.

They are trying to merge the wealth creation of a capitalist society with the oppression of a communist one - the two don't mix - especially when you try and host a world event like the Olympics. It is going to be fun and games a year from now.

Re:Does anyone know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20337923)

My freedoms are not restricted any more than they are in the West. I am from Finland and currently I live in China. I think, or should I say, I know that most westerners have a very inaccurate picture of China.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

CharmElCheikh (1140197) | more than 6 years ago | (#20338397)

I leave in China. My co-workers and friends know it... but it's not something to talk about, even if I live in a relatively free-minded area of the country (i.e. here you don't get executed for talking about it in public, just moved away (for your own good) by guards). It's part of the overall acceptance of one's fate.

Re:Does anyone know (1)

XchristX (839963) | more than 6 years ago | (#20346841)

Is it common knowledge in China how much the government restricts freedom
It's fairly common knowledge among expats. A co-student in my Uni is the son of Chinese expatriate (the fellow came across the Pacific in a tugboat, no less) and he's quite aware of the brutalities of the PRC communists. Presumably they found out inside the PRC itself.

Dissent is alive, though fiercely opposed by the Beijing politburo.

PRC apologists here on slashdot (or anywhere) should talk to more geeks in the Chinese diaspora. They use google.tw more than google.cn for a reason.

If people knew the real ubuntudupe (1, Troll)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335137)

I can't even imagine how many death threats I would have gotten by now for saying bad things about Ubuntu, if people had my real contact information.

Re:If people knew the real ubuntudupe (1)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335219)

Who is Ubuntu?

Is he a dictator or something?

Re:If people knew the real ubuntudupe (1)

Experiment 626 (698257) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336417)

What, you haven't found the severed horse head I left in your bed yet?

Cue ... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335235)

Cue the "Record Number of Chinese ISP Owners Commit Suicide" headlines in 3 ... 2 ... 1 ...

The US and human rights (0, Flamebait)

Joseph1337 (1146047) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335253)

The US has alwaysplayed the imaginary role of the 'defender of freedom nad human rights', but in reality they always protected they`re own asses. In the WWII they only helped because the nazi attacked them. And they even now talk bullshit nad close eyes on what happens in China - it`s good for them until they trade and have cheap workforce. Freedom for Tibet and defending human rights end for the US when there is no oil in the defended country. The censorship and laughter from human rights will continue if no hard actions will be executed

Re:The US and human rights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335391)

I love how regardless of what goes wrong anywhere in the world, it's always the US fault.

Re:The US and human rights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335451)

Scenario: A dictator with a private army of privileged armed with power drills is reigning over a country filled with oil.

Rational way to get the oil: Trade for it in exchange for new and improved power drills.

At least the French did it the rational and most efficient way. I can hardly say that for the US.

Re:The US and human rights (0, Flamebait)

uncreativeslashnick (1130315) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335471)

And why exactly should American lives, American money, and American resources be spent to protect the human rights of non-Americans when there is no compelling interest to the American people? That, sir, would be a horrific mismanagement of American assets by the government elected by the American people to manage those assets.

The US shines in the human rights category for two reasons: 1) It protects the rights of its own people, which is something China does not do. In fact, China oppresses it's own people. 2) America has a pretty good (not perfect) track record in defending human rights in its dealings with other countries (i.e. in WWII we didn't indiscriminately slaughter the Germans like the Soviets did, we rebuit their country and provided a stable government during the rebuilding process).

Re:The US and human rights (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336555)

I know I have said a lot of smack on slashdot including trashing the president. And the FBI never showed up at my front door. That probably is the biggest difference between US and China.

Re:The US and human rights (1)

jacobfan (1147411) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353109)

In China, after doing similiar thing, there is a high probability that you will never see polices showed up at your front door. Just you are not granted to not be caught. That's probably the real difference.

Re:The US and human rights (2, Insightful)

burndive (855848) | more than 6 years ago | (#20335511)

Really? So how did the USA wind up on the side that was against the fascists in the first place? Could it be because of deep philosophical differences, namely the principles of human rights? Naw, that would be too obvious.

Also, the Nazis never attacked the USA, it was the Japanese who attacked Pearl Harbor.

And they even now talk bullshit nad close eyes on what happens in China

What would you suggest? Economic sanctions? Open war?

Freedom for Tibet and defending human rights end for the US when there is no oil in the defended country. The censorship and laughter from human rights will continue if no hard actions will be executed

Wait... so now you WANT America to come and make every corner of the world safe for democracy? It's so dizzying.

I suppose it's to be open war then, unless there's some other form of "hard action" you have in mind. That'll be real good for the world. Much better than gradual cultural reform. I'm sure China will simply hand Tibet over without a fight, because they're pretty reasonable about having things taken away from them.

If the people of Tibet really want to be free, they should stand up for their right to self-determination, or at least representation in government.

Re:The US and human rights (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 6 years ago | (#20342067)

Really? So how did the USA wind up on the side that was against the fascists in the first place? Could it be because of deep philosophical differences, namely the principles of human rights? Naw, that would be too obvious.
The USA was for all intents and purposes dragged into WW2. They did not declare war on Germany; Germany declared war on them 4 days after the Japanese declaration (and that happened because such were the terms of alliance between Germany and Japan). This was December 1941, 2 years after WW2 began.

Re:The US and human rights (1)

uncreativeslashnick (1130315) | more than 6 years ago | (#20343155)

Which is precisely as it should be, because why should the US be involved in a purely European/Asian war that did not concern them? If the Europeans and Asians can't get along with one another, why is that our problem? Until of course they attack us... then all bets are off.

Re:The US and human rights (1)

the_womble (580291) | more than 6 years ago | (#20364319)

If you cannot see why any decent human being would be involved in a war like that, you have a serious moral defect.

Re:The US and human rights (1)

XchristX (839963) | more than 6 years ago | (#20346755)

What would you suggest? Economic sanctions? Open war?
Economic Sanctions would be a good start, but no one wants to part with his "Made in China" cellphone. It's so disgusting I could retch. Tibetans are being wiped out systematically here. It's not just tyranny or oppression, it's annihilation.

If the people of Tibet really want to be free, they should stand up for their right to self-determination, or at least representation in government.
That's a bit difficult to do when a totalitarian, oppressive and genocidal regime ties them to chairs and yanks out their nails with pliers until they beg for death... ... and hypocrites like some slashdotters act as apologists for said regime with bogus arguments like "America is just as bad" (it's not; US government is not conducting planned genocides, unlike Communist China government).

Registration mechanism in Norway falls not short (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335319)


1. The majority of social networking sites, and the debate pages of every one of the major national media, require a mobile phone number for registration, which must be renewed regularly.

2. It is illegal to sell mobile phone subscriptions (even 'pay as you go' topup) without confirming the personal details of the one buying it, including the SSN equivalent, and these are stored in a database.

The effect is virtually indistinguishable from the Chinese 'draconian' scheme - an individual may not post to any of these sites without being identifiable and trackable. And if I remember correctly, Chomsky called it 'the most civilised society in the world', so it can't be all that bad.

Re:Registration mechanism in Norway falls not shor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20339085)

>>1. The majority of social networking sites, and the debate pages of every one of the major national media, require a mobile phone number for registration, which must be renewed regularly.

Topix.com does not require registration.

As for a mobile phone #, you gotta be kidding. I don't have a cell phone and that's no problem.

Re:Registration mechanism in Norway falls not shor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20342041)

Sorry, should have been clearer - this only applies to blog, social networking and discussion sites that are run by Norwegian or Scandinavian-based operators and newspapers. You are still completely free to sign up to any non-Scandinavian provider. I am not sure if there has been any government incitement towards requiring mobile phone numbers for all national sites, but they all seem to have started with the requirement at once, and there was however a widely-published government-led crackdown on unregistered mobile phones (for the reason that they were being used by criminals)

My point is that while the decision structures and context are quite different between China and Norway, the practicality of the situation and the potential for tracking posters is similar.

Re:Registration mechanism in Norway falls not shor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20348117)

Yes, because everything Chomsky says is gold.

Freedom and Patriotism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20335703)

I think its unfortunate that when such stories are posted about China, some posters try to draw equivalence to some negatives in US or such. Slashdot is a community of freedom lovers, and not US or western nationalists, people here respond equally vehemently when any issues that affect individual freedom is discussed irrespective of the country , this is not a forum to show China down or the USA up, just individuals who like liberty and make their opinions known.

The hypocrisy of the US in some instances can be astonishing and they get the flak for that, China has absolutely no respect for freedom of speech, and let's not make excuses for that.

"Encouraged" - funny word here (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#20336403)

encouraged with what, beatings in nearest state penitiary ?

mod $0p (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20337119)

Wanged for life (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 6 years ago | (#20339431)

> Blog service providers in China are "encouraged" to register users with their real names and contact information,

Or just use your Yahoo! account and they'll hand it (and you) over to the Communists for you.

Will never happen in US (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#20340627)

Oh wait, MySpace is supposed to close and report accounts of sex offenders. How are they going to do this without getting their real names or make sure the information doesn't end up in government's hands for other reasons?

No need for this info... (1)

SolitaryMan (538416) | more than 6 years ago | (#20343287)

Well, they actually don't need everyone to publish their name in order to know where to find "abusers". I work for one of the biggest blogging service company in Russia. In the last 3 - 4 years maybe 15 people were brought to court over something they wrote in their blog and our company was _never_ asked to release some info about the blogger in question. They somehow manage to do without us.

Re:No need for this info... (1)

jacobfan (1147411) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353063)

Psychologically, if you put your real name on the blog, you will do more self-censoring than before in a country without freedom of speech.
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