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Astronomers Find Huge Hole in Universe

CowboyNeal posted about 7 years ago | from the no-it's-not-rosie-o'donnell dept.

Space 628

realwx writes "Astronomers are surprised by a recent discovery of a space hole that is nearly a billion light years across. "Not only has no one ever found a void this big, but we never even expected to find one this size," said researcher Lawrence Rudnick of the University of Minnesota. Rudnick's colleague Liliya R. Williams also had not anticipated this finding. "What we've found is not normal, based on either observational studies or on computer simulations of the large-scale evolution of the universe," said Williams, also of the University of Minnesota.""

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Well I guess the joke is on us. (5, Funny)

earnest murderer (888716) | about 7 years ago | (#20340699)

God is giving you the goatse.

And all of a sudden.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340725)

A million astrophysicists cried out in pain!
-"Where are they John, where are they!?"
*"They.... they are gone Bill, GONE!"

Re:And all of a sudden.... (-1, Flamebait)

earnest murderer (888716) | about 7 years ago | (#20340741)

A million astrophysicists cried out in pain!
-"Where are they John, where are they!?"
*"They.... they are gone Bill, GONE!"
By "astrophysicists" you mean "evangelical christians"?*

*substitute whatever spaghetti monster bullshit you like.

Re:And all of a sudden.... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340829)

Old question to the Christians that insist we are the only intelligent life in the universe: Do you really think God gave up after just one mistake?

Newer question: Are you really sure we were the first mistake?

Re:Well I guess the joke is on us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340813)

How could this post be modded troll? If I could actually be bothered to register an account here and post enough to earn the right to mod points, I would totally give this a funny mod.

Re:Well I guess the joke is on us. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340843)

The look [flickr.com] on the lead astronomer's face when she found this discovery is priceless!

Re:Well I guess the joke is on us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340875)

Well, yeah, but if that big goatse hole in the sky is the goatse receiver, I'd hate to see the goatse giver's (presumably God's) equipment!

Re:Well I guess the joke is on us. (2, Funny)

serialdogma (883470) | about 7 years ago | (#20341133)

Not quite; it is no so much a hole in the goatse sense, but rather an lack of anything at all. If anything it is where the Invisible Pink Unicorn [wikipedia.org] lives.

hm.. (5, Funny)

tpwch (748980) | about 7 years ago | (#20340705)

Maybe its a civilization that managed to blow themselves out of history trought an accident somehow? If it is, I hope we can control that technology better when we advance enough to have it.

Re:hm.. (5, Funny)

phagstrom (451510) | about 7 years ago | (#20340723)

Just digging a hole to build a new bypass.

Re:hm.. (3, Funny)

Whiteox (919863) | about 7 years ago | (#20341279)

NO IT ISN'T!!!!

It's the MUTANT STAR GOAT!!!!

Those Golgafrincham's were right after all!

Re:hm.. (2, Interesting)

austior (1063772) | about 7 years ago | (#20340955)

If the civilization blew itself up, we would probably see some sign of the super-heated matter being ejected from the region. More likely is that the civilization gobbled up all the available matter and then decided to slip into a universe with favorable physical properties and more room for computation.

Re:hm.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341105)

The answer: Mantrid drones

Re:hm.. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341141)

Maybe its a civilization that managed to blow themselves out of history trought an accident somehow? If it is, I hope we can control that technology better when we advance enough to have it.

Yes, this seems like the most reasonable explaination.

More info here (5, Informative)

Mr Europe (657225) | about 7 years ago | (#20340707)

Now this is *big* news ! The scientific world is waiting for good explanations.

More info here (with pictures..)
http://www.nrao.edu/pr/2007/coldspot/index.shtml [nrao.edu]

Re:More info here (5, Funny)

UserGoogol (623581) | about 7 years ago | (#20340715)

Sounds like a whole lot of nothing to me.

The explanation is perfectly clear (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | about 7 years ago | (#20340795)

It's the plug hole of course.
 

Re:More info here (4, Funny)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | about 7 years ago | (#20340937)

``More info here (with pictures..)''

Pictures?! Of nothing?!

Wow! (4, Funny)

Toreo asesino (951231) | about 7 years ago | (#20340947)

A photo of a hole...in the the biggest emptiness in the universe. I can see that one winning competitions.

Someone explain this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340965)

Photons of the CMB gain a small amount of energy when they pass through a region of space populated by matter. This effect is caused by the enigmatic "dark energy" that is accelerating the expansion of the Universe. This gain in photon energy makes the CMB appear slightly warmer in that direction. When the photons pass through an empty void, they lose a small amount of energy from this effect, and so the CMB radiation passing through such a region appears cooler.


So this void is filled with more than average dark energy causing it to expand quicker than other places and thereby enlengthening wavelengths?

Re:More info here (1)

SL Baur (19540) | about 7 years ago | (#20341121)

That's a better article than the original. Thanks.

I'm confused on one point. (This is not a flame). Why would photons going through a void lose energy? OK, I will accept the statement that photons gain energy going through dark matter, but the losing energy part sounds like the standard BS of baseline budgeting. I got a 5% increase last year, but equal funding and no increase this year so it's a budget cut. Why wouldn't this just be the same thing? Photons get a boost going through dark matter and no boost whatsoever going through a void?

Someone please enlighten me.

Hmm (1)

phagstrom (451510) | about 7 years ago | (#20340711)

I sure hope it's still under warranty, 'cause I'll be damned if I chip in for a new one.

Common problem (5, Funny)

wombatmobile (623057) | about 7 years ago | (#20340713)

Next time, remove the lens cap.

a civilization (1)

hof (210084) | about 7 years ago | (#20340727)

....that uses all the energy from their stars, colonizing the neighboring stars and galaxies, coming our way...

Re:a civilization (1)

RuBLed (995686) | about 7 years ago | (#20340887)

I suddenly remembered a classic anime Gunbuster [wikipedia.org]

Re:a civilization (1)

Platupous (316849) | about 7 years ago | (#20340895)

I thought the exact same thing. . . but then I too have read "Learning The World". Lets hope we are still alive when the universe decides to pop with intelligent species. . . I sure could use a set of genetically added wings.

Homer Simpson was right (5, Funny)

Chlorus (1146335) | about 7 years ago | (#20340733)

Your theory of a donut shaped universe intrigues me, Homer. I may have to steal it. That's the first thing I thought of when I read this.

But how do they know? (1)

gluechucker (976140) | about 7 years ago | (#20340743)

I don't get how they would know something that huge... Wouldn't that mean observing it for a billion years? Could someone shed some light on that?

Re:But how do they know? (5, Interesting)

mr_mischief (456295) | about 7 years ago | (#20340867)

No. That's what makes it interesting, is that there's no way to shine a light on such a big area. ;-)

I don't think they're saying it's necessarily like this now or that it will continue to be like this. What they're saying is that right now, as observed, this region of space shows these odd properties. That means that at the time the light and other radiation being observed around it would have passed by it or through it, that it was huge and as far as our scientists know very odd. I don't think any long-term study of it is required to find out that much.

The Itching Question (5, Funny)

RuBLed (995686) | about 7 years ago | (#20340747)

The scientists had just recently answered the bugging question "Is there a hole on Mars?" but now they too had answered a bigger question still.. "Is there a hole out there, in the expanse of the universe?"

A great day to be alive....

Well I guess the ones who used to live out there had something similar like our LHC...

Re:The Itching Question (1)

kestasjk (933987) | about 7 years ago | (#20341235)

I don't think everyone saying this is a "hole" is quite right. I think it might just be a large area that isn't filled with anything, not necessarily a "hole" that is more (or less) than just an unusually large empty space.

Feel free to correct me, IANAA

Nothing to see here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340749)

God's just preparing space for William Shatner's ego.

A hole nearly a billion lightyears across... (5, Funny)

mrjb (547783) | about 7 years ago | (#20340759)

...and it was overlooked all this time. How's that for a security flaw?

Re:A hole nearly a billion lightyears across... (1)

Repossessed (1117929) | about 7 years ago | (#20341087)

Be fair, They actually caught it before anything nasty came through.

Of course, God is never going to apply the patch until after it's too late.

This is, for reference, only about .005% of the observable universe though. Which is probably important somehow.

Re:A hole nearly a billion lightyears across... (5, Funny)

loganrapp (975327) | about 7 years ago | (#20341285)

Be fair, They actually caught it before anything nasty came through.


Did they? We're here.

We don't know everything!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340761)

Holy crap, I thought mankind knew everything!

nothing to see here (1)

wardk (3037) | about 7 years ago | (#20340769)

move along earthlings, you are not worthy of viewing this area

So basically the big news... (4, Funny)

Bin_jammin (684517) | about 7 years ago | (#20340779)

is that in the middle of all of infinite space, they've now found space without anything in it? Let me know when they build something exciting there.

Re:So basically the big news... (4, Funny)

RuBLed (995686) | about 7 years ago | (#20341003)

We know that missions spawn there in deadspace..

Re:So basically the big news... (1)

Trikenstein (571493) | about 7 years ago | (#20341037)

Comming soon to a Space Viod near you: Wal-Mart

Re:So basically the big news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341263)

The new Void Wal-Mart owner: "Daaamn, I knew the franchise offer with this "no-competition-in-the-area" deal was too sweet to be true!"

Re:So basically the big news... (1)

BarfBits (94167) | about 7 years ago | (#20341267)

The developers were planning a gated community, but the
current credit crunch stopped all that.

Holier than thou (1)

dotslashdot (694478) | about 7 years ago | (#20340783)

Universe to God: I'm holier than thou. I'm the one who pulls all the weight around here.

Re:Holier than thou (1)

rvw (755107) | about 7 years ago | (#20340821)

Universe to God: I'm holier than thou. I'm the one who pulls all the weight around here.
And maybe it's God pulling the plug. Who knows!

Hopefully, ... (1)

nbharatvarma (784546) | about 7 years ago | (#20340797)

..this will help explain what is "outside" the universe.. to me, a hole can exist on an object . in this case, the universe has a hole.. does this mean there is something outside the universe ?

Re:Hopefully, ... (2)

m2943 (1140797) | about 7 years ago | (#20341031)

This isn't really a "hole", it's more of a void.

Nevertheless, mathematically, it is possible to have holes in a body without anything being "outside" the body.

Re:Hopefully, ... (2, Interesting)

Gabest (852807) | about 7 years ago | (#20341069)

That must be the surface of the universe, it's just an inside-out shape, concave at every point!

yeah (4, Funny)

Almir (1096395) | about 7 years ago | (#20340803)

don't worry about it, god is patching that on tuesday.

Maybe (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20340805)

It's the center of the "Big Bang", if that's what happened. All the material would have been ejected away.

?

Re:Maybe (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341119)

Your understanding of cosmology is deeply flawed. You clearly know nothing about the metric expansion of spacetime, or else you would see the absurdity of declaring any particular spot in space to be "the center" of the Big Bang.

This reminds me of studies of young children who were asked to model the Earth using clay and to place small plastic houses on their model anywhere where they thought people lived on the real Earth. At a certain age, the most common result is a ball of clay with a top that's either slightly or completely flattened, and houses placed only there. The Earth is round, as everyone knows, but people can't live in sideways or upside down houses, so most of the Earth's surface is uninhabitable. Obviously.

The children believe in the verbal sentence "the world is round" with no idea what it actually means, so in their heads it just describes the shape of the dirt on the bottom of a flat Earth. In modern times, people hear that the universe is expanding, take it on trust because science has a great reputation, and they devise intuitively appealing fantasies in their minds where, somewhere out there in space, there exists a point that everything is moving away from. Fantasies where the Universe cannot be larger than a sphere 13.7 billion light years in diameter because everything came from the Big Bang, nothing can travel faster than light, and they heard once on PBS that the Universe is 13.7 billion years old. The existence of galaxies outside of this limiting sphere would violate these obvious truths, and would be just as absurd as people living in sideways houses. I mean, jeeze, what would stop them from falling out of the windows?

Re:Maybe (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20341173)

I mean, jeeze, what would stop them from falling out of the windows?

Would you rather they were pushed?

Re:Maybe (4, Insightful)

VagaStorm (691999) | about 7 years ago | (#20341207)

Not to be nagging, but maybe cosmology is not common as knowledge as you would like to think, references to easily readable information should always accommodate a post like that, or it will easily come of as slightly elitist and patronizing flamebait instead of something useful and informative. :p

Re:Maybe (1)

SL Baur (19540) | about 7 years ago | (#20341199)

Not if the universe is generally radially symmetric, but due to speed of light issues there's no way we can see that region in real time any way. If farther distance means the farther back in time you see, I'd expect that the center of the big bang would be seen as a giant sphere around us. I have a hard time wrapping my mind around that thought, but I would also expect it to be undetectable. The three degree echo of the big bang comes from all around us. Anything beyond that ought then to be the same in any direction you look.

I'd love to read a paper describing how one _would_ go about detecting where the big bang occurred. Anyone have references? Or is my speculation above considered correct?

Oh dear, I hadn't thought of that... (3, Funny)

BluBrick (1924) | about 7 years ago | (#20340811)

...said God, and promptly vanished in a puff of logic.

Re:Oh dear, I hadn't thought of that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341089)

much love for adams.

Not considered serious (4, Funny)

jsiren (886858) | about 7 years ago | (#20340815)

The hole is not considered serious, since it is not remotely exploitable. It will be fixed in Universe 1.1, which is to be released shortly.

Re:Not considered serious (2, Funny)

Welsh Dwarf (743630) | about 7 years ago | (#20341145)

I don't know about that, 6 billion light years away seems pretty remote to me!

Viral (1)

Knutsi (959723) | about 7 years ago | (#20340825)

Could it possibly be that someone unleashed an exponentially growing pack of machinery that does nothing but turns the matter it find into more copies of itself...? Should give you a pretty nice bubble filled with nothing.

Given enough time, it's not totally unlikely this is bound to happen, also by human hands.

Re:Viral (1)

nyctopterus (717502) | about 7 years ago | (#20341241)

Could it possibly be that someone unleashed an exponentially growing pack of machinery that does nothing but turns the matter it find into more copies of itself...?
Machinery? That's what life does!

Nearly but not quite (1)

ynotds (318243) | about 7 years ago | (#20341273)

an exponentially growing pack of machinery that does nothing but turns the matter it find into more copies of itself
Change that to: "an exponentially growing pack of machinery that does nothing but turn 'empty' space into more copies of itself" and you get very close to an idea I've been playing with for a while that the Hubble expansion is an aggregate of a space production process which naturally (anti)gravitates to the voids.

Some other comments in TFA certainly seem to add evidence that is better than consistent with my idea:

The region had been previously been dubbed the "WMAP Cold Spot," because it stood out in a map of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation made by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotopy Probe (WMAP) satellite. (...)

Photons of the CMB gain a small amount of energy when they pass through normal regions of space with matter, the researchers explained. But when the CMB passes through a void, the photons lose energy, making the CMB from that part of the sky appear cooler.
CMB photons are stretched by the expansion of space thereby losing energy.

A hole in the universe? (1, Funny)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about 7 years ago | (#20340835)

I blame George Bush.

Re:A hole in the universe? (1)

A beautiful mind (821714) | about 7 years ago | (#20341025)

He's a big enough ahole indeed.

A billion light years... (5, Funny)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20340847)

How many Albert Halls is that?

its the center of the big bang (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340853)

Thats an easy one... if the universe was created from a big bang, then naturally the center or point where that explosion took place would be void as all matter is expanding away from it. hence this big hole is where the universe was created.

Re:its the center of the big bang (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20340941)

...if the universe was created from a big bang, then naturally the center or point where that explosion took place...

HA! Beat you [slashdot.org] that time [72.14.253.104] .

Re:its the center of the big bang (4, Interesting)

ElderKorean (49299) | about 7 years ago | (#20340949)

The unfortunate flaw in your comment, is that with a universe that started from a simple point (like ours) then all locations in the universe are at the centre, no matter how far things have spread out.

Reminds me of a Babylon 5 quote.
'There is a hole in your mind'

I know it's a /. tradition ... (1)

IchBinEinPenguin (589252) | about 7 years ago | (#20340855)

"Not only has no one ever found a void this big, but we never even expected to find one this size,"

... but I wish the goatse* jokes would finally stop.

Re:I know it's a /. tradition ... (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 7 years ago | (#20340993)

I concur. Let it die.

Re:I know it's a /. tradition ... (1)

zeromorph (1009305) | about 7 years ago | (#20341063)

I always (at least every Monday morning) had the feeling that god is just trolling, but now there is a proof.

I think there is a theory that he is trying to quit smoking.

It could be because of the... (1)

psychicsword (1036852) | about 7 years ago | (#20340857)

It could be because of the Planet Eater [wikipedia.org]

Re:It could be because of the... (1)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | about 7 years ago | (#20341231)

Maybe it's where the ancient evils such as Cthulhu and his ilk hang out.

Obligatory (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20340883)

They wanted to call it Uranus, but that name was given

It turns out (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20340903)

There really is a Doomsday Machine [indiana.edu]

Wow (-1, Offtopic)

Joseph1337 (1146047) | about 7 years ago | (#20340925)

You say 10 bilion diameter hole? Well... that turns me on

Normal (2, Insightful)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | about 7 years ago | (#20340927)

How can it not be normal if it occurs in nature?

Declaring something is not normal because it doesn't agree with our imperfect idea about how things work seems to be the wrong way about it to me.

Re:Normal (4, Insightful)

Baumi (148744) | about 7 years ago | (#20340971)

How can it not be normal if it occurs in nature?

Declaring something is not normal because it doesn't agree with our imperfect idea about how things work seems to be the wrong way about it to me.
The full quote is: "What we've found is not normal, based on either observational studies or on computer simulations of the large-scale evolution of the universe."

That doesn't mean it's not normal per se. It means that this void is caused by some factor not previously observed or taken into account in simulations, i.e. "If these simulations were 100% correct, something like this couldn't occur."

(Let the speculations commence...)

Re:Normal (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | about 7 years ago | (#20341017)

``It means that this void is caused by some factor not previously observed or taken into account in simulations, i.e. "If these simulations were 100% correct, something like this couldn't occur."''

Yes, exactly. And the conclusion that follows from that is that your model is not correct, not that what you observe is not normal.

Re:Normal (2, Insightful)

k8to (9046) | about 7 years ago | (#20341131)

Uh, you are railing against the phrasing. The fact is the scientist did not mean what you think she meant. The phrasing validly can be seen to mean (in context) what you think it should say. In short, you are nitpicking the phrasing while believing you are complaining about the content.

-1 Boring.

Re:Normal (5, Interesting)

pln2bz (449850) | about 7 years ago | (#20341295)

I think you guys are missing the point. The void correlates with a cold spot within the CMB. The CMB is not supposed to have artifacts. It's supposed to be unrelated to the items between us and it. When you find a relation, that would tend to suggest that the CMB may have a more local source -- which actually threatens the primary proof for the Big Bang in the first place.

If I may, can I suggest that you guys are not being skeptical about what you're reading? I don't mean to be critical here, but a local source for the CMB would confirm what the Electric Universe Theorists have been telling people for some time now: that the CMB is an electric fog that is generated locally.

I highly recommend that you pay attention to the logic being used at the end of the article:

Photons of the CMB gain a small amount of energy when they pass through normal regions of space with matter, the researchers explained. But when the CMB passes through a void, the photons lose energy, making the CMB from that part of the sky appear cooler.

At some point in time within the development of the Big Bang Theory, it became normal to say that light can be absorbed more by nothingness than by matter. In another article here (http://science.nasa.gov/NEWHOME/headlines/ast22fe b99_1.htm [nasa.gov] ), they explain this theory, called the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect:

The Universe is filled with conglomerations of galaxies called clusters that are millions of light years across, consisting of hundreds or thousands of galaxies held together by gravity. Mostly clusters have atmospheres of very hot gas that we can see because of the X-rays they emit. Sunyaev and Zeldovich realized that something interesting happens when a CMBR photon passes through such a cluster. There is a good chance that it will collide with one of the electrons in the hot atmosphere. In the process, some photons would gain energy while others would lose energy. At microwave radio frequencies, they predicted, the intensity of the CMBR would appear to be depleted in the direction of the cluster because the photons would be "scattered" to other frequencies outside the microwave frequency band. This process is called the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect.

[...]

Typically, the deficit in the CMBR is only 0.05% of the cosmic microwave background intensity. Detecting these small perturbations requires lots of observing time and painstaking data reduction.

So, the SZ effect allows them to explain away the fact that some galaxies are not casting shadows against the CMB. If there isn't a shadow for some of them, then perhaps that's because the photons are being energized by the obstruction. One is left wondering if the nothingness in the void is absorbing the quantity of light that they were predicting that nothingness should even absorb?

But, let me ask you guys this: Isn't it just possible that the cold spot *is* related to the void, and that the Big Bang is a paradigm in its death throws?

Re:Normal (1)

Jugalator (259273) | about 7 years ago | (#20341071)

How can it not be normal if it occurs in nature?
Because it doesn't commonly occur in nature? I think they're using "not normal" in the sense of "rare".

Oh No!! (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | about 7 years ago | (#20340943)

Oh no!!! The Nothing [wikipedia.org] will eat the universe!! Quick, take me to the empress!

Tell me about CO2 now (1)

should_be_linear (779431) | about 7 years ago | (#20340951)

We finally found trace of civilization that screw their ecosystem more then we are able to (so far!). When they converted to energy everything in range of 1 billion years for their gigantic SUVs they moved elsewhere. But where did they go? ... Oh... wait...

Ob (1)

edittard (805475) | about 7 years ago | (#20340987)

That's no hole ...

Re:Ob (1)

bateleur (814657) | about 7 years ago | (#20341125)

I find your lack of original commentary [xkcd.com] disturbing.

I just did laundry... (4, Funny)

mathfeel (937008) | about 7 years ago | (#20340997)

...so that's where my socks went.

Did they try... (1)

Karpe (1147) | about 7 years ago | (#20340999)

Cleaning up their lenses? You never know...

Aaaaggghhh! (1)

ThirdPrize (938147) | about 7 years ago | (#20341045)

We are all going to die!!!

There's a hole in my Universe (1)

tomrud (471930) | about 7 years ago | (#20341091)

There's a hole in my Universe dear Liza, dear Liza
There's a hole in my Universe dear Liza, a hole.

Well, fix it dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Well, fix it dear Henry, dear Henry, fix it.
...

One post, two eps, three oblig. Futurama quotes (5, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | about 7 years ago | (#20341097)

Fry: Let me ask you something. Has anyone ever discovered a hole in nothing with monsters in it? 'Cause if I'm the first, I want them to call it a "Fry Hole".

---

Fry: So what do you nerds want?
Nichelle Nichols: It's about that rip in space-time that you saw.
Stephen Hawking: I call it a Hawking Hole.
Fry: No fair! I saw it first!
Stephen Hawking: Who is the Journal of Quantum Physics going to believe?

---

Farnsworth: Yes, we tore the universe a new space-hole, alright. But it's clenching shut fast!

Good news... (1, Flamebait)

brui2 (1146955) | about 7 years ago | (#20341109)

Good news, Mr. President, they found your brain!

Duh (1)

quokkapox (847798) | about 7 years ago | (#20341149)

Of course there's a big hole somewhere in the universe of observable spacetime.

The universe is fractal, it's congruent across all scales and infinite in all dimensions.

The galaxies are just like young solar systems on a much grander scale. Every star is like an atom, and every atom is a like a star. Me, I'm a up quark. And root canals are quite tolerable with sufficient nitrous oxide followed by liberal doses of prescription opiates.

G'night.

fragmentation (5, Funny)

Carbon016 (1129067) | about 7 years ago | (#20341177)

Universe needs to stop running defrag every few million years, it's leaving giant empty space holes and confusing the scientists.

clearly... (1)

OnyxLilninja (1126557) | about 7 years ago | (#20341217)

a giant cloud of ink shat out by a god-squid... obvious when you think it through.

I for one (0, Redundant)

hey (83763) | about 7 years ago | (#20341219)

I, for one, welcome our new giant hole overlords.

It's nothing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341225)

You guys are getting all worked up about nothing.

Vanamonde's Little Brother (1)

djmoore (133520) | about 7 years ago | (#20341227)

Oh my gosh, I hope the Black Sun hasn't failed!

Re:Vanamonde's Little Brother (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341269)

... The entity trapped in the Black Sun would be Vanamonde's *big* brother!

they really dont was to see whats there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341265)

I see two reasons

1. Its like hole in the cheese. It's big for relatively dense cheese. And its common.

2. There is no hole, but cloaking device. In general there is no dark matter too.
There is a lot of alien life going around lot of habitable planets, but they are all hidden, because they don't want us to wait/pray/whatever for them. They just don't want us to find them too early or at all..

Oh, there it is! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20341281)

That's what I love about space science. The fact that you can 'find' something a billion light years across. Like it's small enough that you could losse it in the first place. Like, "hey, what's that over there? That little cluster of black pixels in the corner of this hubble image?" "What, that? Oh, that's just something a a billion light years across that we never even noticed before. Check this out though, I just found a nude sunbather on Betelgeuse 15b."

I mean a billion light years. It's insane. Take 168000 miles. Multiply it by 60, then by 60 again, then by 24, then by 365.25, then multiply it by a frickin BILLION! I mean, you thought it was a long way down the road to the chemist...
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