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Wine 0.9.44 Released

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the in-old-bottles dept.

Wine 201

jshriverWVU writes to let us know about the release of Wine 0.9.44. Wine is a free implementation of Windows on Unix/Linux. New in this release are: better heuristics for making windows managed; automatic detection of timezone parameters; improvements to the built-in WordPad; better signatures support in crypt32; still more gdiplus functions; and of course lots of bug fixes.

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201 comments

useful yet? (-1, Troll)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352401)

Last time i tried wine, after hours of pain i got it to work, and it was totally useless. has this changed?

Re:useful yet? (4, Informative)

chaosite (930734) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352435)

Yes, it has gotten way better.
It has support for Direct3D, tons of winapi functions, etc... It's pretty awesome at this stage, really.

Re:useful yet? (5, Informative)

tom17 (659054) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352525)

I find it is pretty good at what it runs. The problem is that for me, the kind of things it runs are the things that I can get on Linux natively anyway.

The things it falls short on are things like the latest office products, latest adobe products and some of the games I like to play. It's helpful in places but does not yet close the gap for me.

Re:useful yet? (1)

AVryhof (142320) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353471)

If you don't mind copying them over from a Windows installation, at least *some* Adobe apps run.

Photoshop CS2 [luiscosio.com]

I haven't tried this with CS3... but here is Dreamweaver 8 [luiscosio.com]

I was able to get the extension manager, fireworks, and flash working this way.... but not contribute.... but I'm still working on that since I think it uses the IE component, and I just have to install IE.

Seeing that they work under WINE... and quite well, it would be cool if they could work with Codeweavers like Google did to at least hit the Linux market.

Re:useful yet? (1)

Vexorian (959249) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353907)

Complaint to the guys that made the latest office products, adobe and games, because it turns out that the most frequent reason WINE can't run something is a copy protection...

Re:useful yet? (1)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353001)

Wine is one of the most useful open source projects if you are a BSD or Linux user and there is at least one M-Windows application that you can't replace.

In my case, I run the Oxford English Dictionary under Wine.

Newer != Better (1)

omnirealm (244599) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353373)

chaosite wrote:
> Yes, it has gotten way better.
> It has support for Direct3D, tons of winapi functions, etc... It's pretty awesome at this stage, really.

Oblivion, perhaps the most widely acclaimed game from last year, runs pretty well on Wine 0.9.38. Someone made changes to the DirectX thread-related code that causes Oblivion under Wine to crash for every version since [winehq.org]. The lesson here is that the newest version of Wine is not necessarily the best one to use for any given application.

Good going (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353761)

These guys work really hard to address Lunix's greatest deficiency: that it isn't Windows.

Re:useful yet? (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352463)

What were you trying to run?

Took me a while to get the last app I tried going too. One of the biggest problems was the lack of support for signatures in crypt32.. which co-incidentally this release fixes :)

I should write a tutorial or something.

Re:useful yet? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352469)

Try getting it to run on Cygwin. That's lots of fun!

Re:useful yet? (1)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352767)

If you got the source, you can do that yourself.
All you need is to comment out a few lines, you'll know which.

Re:useful yet? (5, Funny)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352769)

Ha! try getting it to run Cygwin and then using it to run Qemu to run Windows XP to VMware to run Linux. When you have completed that young grasshopper then your training is complete.

But face it (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352781)

the very existance of Wine is proof that Linux isn't able to exist without windows.

Re:But face it (5, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352899)

the very existance of Wine is proof that Linux isn't able to exist without windows.

...and the very existence of SFU is proof that Windows isn't able to exist without Linux.

So let's all have a big group hug and make up. We need each other.

Re:But face it (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353441)

Wrong. It's called "Services For Unix", not "Services For Linux". And it doesn't provide Linux binary compatibility (like SCO, Solaris, and *BSD provide).

Re:But face it (5, Insightful)

pakar (813627) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352947)

Nope, but the existence of wine is proof that people don't like windows and want their apps running on gnu/linux systems..

Re:useful yet? (1)

m50d (797211) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353447)

It's good enough now that I've found a windows program (presumably written for ~win98) that will run under wine but not on windows 2000. Unfortunately I'm not willing to publicly admit to posessing the program in question, so you'll have to take my word for it.

Re:useful yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353623)

It's good enough now that I've found a windows program (presumably written for ~win98) that will run under wine but not on windows 2000. Unfortunately I'm not willing to publicly admit to posessing the program in question, so you'll have to take my word for it.

About six months ago I was given the task of modifying an ancient program "designed for windows 95." The program installs and runs fine on Windows XP as long as you don't try to change anything. However, once you run the editor you quickly discover that it doesn't display or accept clicks for some of the dialog box buttons, so you have to guess the accelerator shortcuts.

I tried running it with Windows 95 compatibility mode. No luck. I was at my wits end, and then finally I remembered I had an old copy of Windows 95 on a hard disk in the closet, so I dug it out and tried to boot it on my 2.5GHz machine. CRASH! There's a documented bug in the NDIS driver for CPUs over 2.2 GHz. Safe mode didn't help.

I gave up on the project for a few months, until one day I was introduced to VMware by a friend. I tried running the program on Windows XP under VMware. No luck. Then I tried Windows 2000. No luck either. Finally I managed to scrape the install .CABs off of the Windows 95 hard disk. BINGO! The program runs correctly under Windows 95, but it's PAINFUL to use it under emulation (due to video related issues; the emulated CPU runs faster than the one that powered my fastest Windows 95 box).

If Wine will run the program correctly at close to native speed, I'd be willing to give it a try. By chance, is this mysterious program you mention also made by Borland?

Re:useful yet? (1)

babbling (952366) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353797)

Getting programs to work using WINE can still be a pain. If you take a look at games like Command & Conquer 3 or Supreme Commander, there is a way to get them to work in WINE, but it's not as simple as running the installer and then running the game immediately after.

WINE has mostly likely improved a lot since you last used it, but these sorts of issues (apply this patch, download this dll, etc) will probably be around for a while to come. The important thing is that it's continually improving and will one day probably be quite good at running almost anything painlessly.

Re:useful yet? (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353913)

The important thing is that it's continually improving and will one day probably be quite good at running almost anything painlessly.
Yes,but will it run Linux?

Wine 1.0? (4, Interesting)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352403)

What ever happened to the impending release of Wine 1.0? I seem to remember it was coming very soon 6 months ago. It would be a great publicity boost for the software if it reached that point.

Wine 1.0 would be a great mistake! (2, Insightful)

z0M6 (1103593) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353087)

At least at the moment. It would be like marking a half-built car (WARNING! car-analogy) as ready for use. I think it would be pointless to push such a product because it is simply not ready yet. Users would also have higher expectations of the product than what should be realistic. That said, Wine has come a long way. Playing opengl games works great. The same can't be said for directx. Some installers does not function at all. And there is a lot of other issues as well. Wine 9.64 seems more realistic than wine 1.0 at the moment.

Re:Wine 1.0 would be a great mistake! (1)

Enleth (947766) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353729)

Can't be? Well, I've just finished the Age of Mythology campaign - in case you don't know, this is a Microsoft game, a close relative of the Age of Empires series, uses DirectX exclusively and works perfectly, including playing over DirectPlay with copies running natively on Windows. The only reason some games still don't work is that their programmers were trying to be too smart and invented things that work by chance alone even on Windows, due to some hard-to-mimic memory allocation behaviours, undocumented "features" that allowed them to get away with programming mistakes and such things. Sure, the implementation of Direct3D in Wine isn't complete, but every well-written game either works or gives a very clear indication of the lacking 3D features, as it would under Windows with bad video drivers.

How is this /.-worthy news? (4, Interesting)

ketilwaa (1095727) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352439)

Wine releases every 14 days, see http://winehq.org/ [winehq.org] Are we now going to see these kinds of news on /. every time there's a trivial update? I can think of a couple of apps and releases that are a little more important...

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (4, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352451)

The fact that they have 5 major improvements every 14 days is kinda impressive.

But yes, good point.

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (-1, Flamebait)

ketilwaa (1095727) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352487)

I'd like to see they fix the fact that Wine remains the only app that manages to raise my computers CPU-temperature 15 degrees C. Now, that would be newsworthy. Or maybe that's a fature?

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (2, Informative)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352513)

Wine isn't an app.

What are you running under Wine when this happens?

Have you filed a bug report?

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (1, Insightful)

ketilwaa (1095727) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352657)

All right. It's not an app, it's not an emulator. Trouble is, I don't think I use many compatibility layers other than Wine.

Actually, I was imprecise. There looks to have been some progress on this (I update Wine every two weeks through apt), and things like ie6 dowsn't raise the temperature much. Installing stuff through Wine though, raises the temperature from ~50 to ~65 degrees.

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (4, Insightful)

robbak (775424) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352709)

That is unsurprising. Windows installers have always been heavyweight. I don't think that this is wine's problem.
Indeed, wine has had a very hard time supporting Installshield, which seems like a very badly written application.

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353385)

Wine Is Not an Emulator. (OK, so that's a backronym).

An emulator, for example a Gameboy emulator, has to translate machine instructions to simulate the behaviour of the target's processor. Wine simly allows execution of x86 code on an x86 processor. It implements the win32 API, and therefore lets you run code which expects to make calls to functions of that API. So Wine more or less does the same thing the official Windows API does: provides functions which win32 applications need. This is why it is a lot faster than any emulator.

When it is slow, it is because it's way of doing things is a bit slower than Windows's way (I haven't checked, but I suspect the drawing of windows is a bit slower), or because, SHOCKINGLY, many Windows applications are, in fact, amazingly slow.

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353701)

The fact that they have 5 major improvements every 14 days is kinda impressive.

WINE is racing towards completion; I mean, look how far they've come in a mere 14 years. Slow down, guys!

Re:How is this /.-worthy news? (1)

zukinux (1094199) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352577)

I will have to agree on this one.
K.D.E/GNOME/GIMP/Distributions/Firefox/Thunderbird /...... got new versions all the time, we cannot insert them as a slashdot worthy news cause there will be a spam of news every day.

WordPad? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352455)

I'm sure there are some great new features, but mentioning improvements to WordPad is some serious flamebait...

Re:WordPad? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352643)

vi vs. emacs vs. WordPad?

Wordpad is actually important... (3, Informative)

robbak (775424) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352717)

Because parts of Wordpad are often used as a text editing component in other programs. In addition, Wordpad acts as a good test case for much of wine's infrastructure.

Re:Wordpad is actually important... (2)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352755)

You mean the rich text box of it? Yes, it's a reusable component, but it's not clear to me that control was a problem before, although maybe you're right.

WordPad is also an MFC application, like many others, and in case there were something to fix there, that could be pretty important due to MFC's wide use.

Re:Wordpad is actually important... (1)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352831)

Actually, I think implementing Wordpad is much more important because some apps may use it. I was pretty amazed when I installed an application and I was guessing it'd get in serious trouble when it was going to display the readme - nope, a clone of Notepad starts up and everything is nice and clean. In similar vein, I'm guessing a lot of Windows app developers may think "I need to show this .rtf file to the user - I guess I'll just start up Wordpad to show it."

It's useful as a document viewer in a pinch, but not really that useful as an application. Everyone uses some other program anyway to write stuff. =)

Re:Wordpad is actually important... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353751)

Yeah like write.exe

Re:WordPad? (1)

Caesar Tjalbo (1010523) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352815)

Not if the Wine developers use it for programming Wine, "eat your own dog food". Although WINN, Wordpad Is Not Notepad, of course.

Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352495)

When I say "run" I mean "work properly" not "it compiles. Ship it".

Btw, I'm aware that OpenBSD's port of WINE dates from 1999, just another sign that BSD is dying, I guess!

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352749)

``Btw, I'm aware that OpenBSD's port of WINE dates from 1999, just another sign that BSD is dying, I guess!''

Or it could just mean that the demographic that runs OpenBSD (security conscious people, I'd imagine) isn't interested in running Windows apps.

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (1)

JonJ (907502) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352851)

Yeah none of those two users are running windows apps.

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (1)

Liinux (1051016) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353085)

But I am running Windows apps! And where is that other guy you are talking about? We should ask him too, we are talking about a 50%-100% usage rate here.

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353239)

No wine on my openbsd, there you go 50/50 split.

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353923)

I don't use WINE on OpenBSD either, but since my OpenBSD system is PowerPC that's not entirely surprising. That said, the only legacy Windows apps I have these days are some oldish games, and since OpenBSD lacks DRI they probably wouldn't run well under WINE anyway.

Re:Does it run on (Net||Open)BSD or Solaris yet? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352985)

It doesn't run on OpenBSD yet (I'm not sure about NetBSD or Solaris). OpenBSD porters continue to look at it, but it still has problems that are not easily solved (i.e. not a trivial port) and so they record their progress and move on to something more tractable. It will happen though. Neigh-sayers said OpenBSD would never crack the problems it had with Firefox or OpenOffice, or get native Java. It now has all of these, they are stable, and all up to date. In the meantime QEMU will run windows many Windows apps at a vaguely usable speed on OpenBSD ... just don't expect games or multimedia on Windows unless you dual-boot.

CourtTV has Latest news on the diaper Astronut !! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352523)



CourtTV has Latest news on the diaper Astronut !! Tune in !! Drop Out !! Turn on CourtTV !!

Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (3, Interesting)

baadger (764884) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352533)

I've been thinking of starting to ./configure --prefix a Wine install into a subdirectory of my home directory and applying a script wrapper to the wine binary.

Pretty much every application or game I use under Wine requires either a patch against wine or some app specific hack to get it working properly, and often they don't work in the next Wine version.

Wine is great but setting up multiple apps or games to work under it is horrible.

Re:Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (3, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352573)

So, err, just so I've got this right.. you're applying app specific patches to Wine to get it to work and then when you upgrade you're reapplying all those patches and finding that some of them don't apply anymore?

Ya know, Wine uses this revision control system that some Finnish guy wrote.. it's really good at helping you maintain a fork with your changes in it if that's what you want to do. I think it's called "git" or something. :)

Re:Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (3, Informative)

NickFortune (613926) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352975)

To be fair, Wine does suffer quite a lot from regressions. Don't take my word for it - look up a few of your favourite games on the AppDB [winehq.org] and notice how the playability level varies from one release to the next.

That's not so likely to be a problem with the major apps. World of Warcraft and MS Office are likely to be rested between releases, so they tend to be fairly stable. On the other hand, it's pretty much a crap-shoot whether Deus Ex (my favourite use for Wine) will work with any particular release.

Don't get me wrong; I think Wine is a fantastic project, and the number of apps they can handle has risen steadily over the time I've been using it. But being realistic, the do have a problem with regressions. Once it gets out of beta, that will hopefully change.

Re:Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (2, Interesting)

Shulai (34423) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353785)

I think they should try to raise their profile between Windows developers, in order to encourage them to do some testing on Wine. I guess they already does testing on half a dozen Windows environments, they'll add Wine to the list if they think it's a viable platform and a part of their potential market.

Re:Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (4, Interesting)

paskie (539112) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352599)

Actually, this was my experience in the past as well, but during the 0.9 series this got a lot better for me and now for a long time already I didn't need to change any actual wine settings for specific application at all (and I'm messing with relatively wide variety of applications and games. At most I have to tweak (e.g. graphics) settings of the application itself. New versions don't break apps that previously were working that much either (though it happens sometimes; I still have bisecting what broke SC3000 in my long TODO list ;).

Re:Wine breaks backward compatibility a lot. (1)

praedictus (61731) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352825)

I'm in agreement with paskie here, I haven't had to do any app-specific patching in a while. Sound seems to be the only thing that gives me any problems. Quite a few things that I hadn't expected to work, ran fine, for example some work specific software that I would expect had never been tested against wine. Some hoary old software like Fallout 2 now works as well as it did when I ran Windows, and all my Blizzard games are working as well. When the occasional app patch breaks things, a fix is usually available by the next release, and a workaround within a day or so. (Frex. the bizarre multiple library hack to get Eve Online running recently)

Slow news day? (-1, Troll)

Klaidas (981300) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352629)

A slow news day, eh? Is slashdot turning to digg, were every 0.0.0.1 wine release makes it to the front page because it's "so important"? Just saying...

securecrt in wine with correct screen size (1)

golemwashere (265567) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352739)

BTW, Has anyone managed to run securecrt under wine getting right the terminal screen size inside the window?
I always get mangled output when I scroll after the first screen rows....
Thanks
g.

Re:securecrt in wine with correct screen size (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20352819)

Why would you run SecureCRT under Wine? At work I run a Linux box so that I don't have to run SecureCRT.

Re:securecrt in wine with correct screen size (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352889)

If you want pointless, use PuTTY [greenend.org.uk] under Wine.

Re:securecrt in wine with correct screen size (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353093)

If you want pointless, use PuTTY under Wine to SSH to a Linux machine and then run PuTTY on the Linux machine to SSH to a Windows machine running Cygwin...

Any chance of a merge? (2, Interesting)

UED++ (1043486) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352751)

I know this is highly unlikely Is it possible in the future that the wine and Cedega projects merge to create a truly powerful tool for running windows games and applications on Linux? Something like point2run for everything. Or maybe someone can fork a new project based on CVS cedega with some added wine? Sorry if my questions sound noobish...

Re:Any chance of a merge? (5, Informative)

ozamosi (615254) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352797)

Cedega is based of an old version of Wine, which was forked off and made proprietary. Since then, Wine changed it's license to make it impossible to do another Cedega-style fork.

So, to merge, we would have to either convince transgaming to make their code completely free and LGPL, or convince all Wine authors to make their code non-free and a part of transgamings commercial product. I don't think either of those two alternatives are very likely.

Re:Any chance of a merge? (1)

CyDharttha (939997) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353573)

However, Transgaming is considering allowing wine versions to be installed via the Cedega UI; this is being voted on currently in the polls. The UI allows one to choose which version of Cedega will run the selected game. Adding the ability to do this with various wine versions could be very helpful in working around regressions, or tracking them down. Right now, I use a separate WINEPREFIX for any apps that I don't want to get screwed up in a default ~/.wine. I also have a wine with patches specifically for Joost that resides in /opt and won't be touched by wine upgrades. In response to the above, there is still a fair amount of code sharing going back and forth between the two projects. Some of the licensing restrictions in commercial Cedega are from the proprietary third-party CD Copy Protection code. I'm not saying the two projects could ever merge, but I am kind of glad to have them both around. Both dev teams are doing great work. :)

Re:Any chance of a merge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353251)

We don't need Cedega anymore. I'm actually running some games under Wine and they perform as expected under Windows. Yes, even those fast 3D FPS.
Of course not all games are supported, but the list is growing; take a look at the App DB list [winehq.org].
Some of them install just fine, some others need a bunch of dlls copied here and there, but usually you have a working game in a matter of minutes.

And it's not just about games: Wine is getting mature to a point it can actually replace Windows even in a development environment. Need to test web pages with IE and have no disk space to waste for a Windows partition? Here's IE for Linux [tatanka.com.br].
I've also succesfully installed and used different versions of Delphi (the best Windows RAD out there, don't even try to argue that:^) provided one doesn't try to use ActiveX components, something most non mcsd drones will see as an improvement rather than a setback.

Sorta reminds me of the old days when I used OS/2 as a multitasker for DOS programs. I needed a reliable way to test some client/server Clipper db apps I was writing and OS/2 was the only way to rapidly build and test on a single machine what had to work on several PCs in a netbios network.
Another funny thing is that the small fonts I used in those apps to gain maximum screen space worked perfectly under both native DOS and OS/2 VDMs (DOS boxes) but always crashed Windows 95 terminals.

To me it's history repeating again: looks like Windows is doomed to be beaten by something else even in its own field.

Finally! (5, Funny)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352807)

improvements to the built-in WordPad

That's been one thing that really bugs me about Linux. I'm fed up of having to use horrible outdated editors like emacs and vi. Now finally I can use a decent editor without having to dual-boot.

Re:Finally! (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352863)

hehe.. I have been known to use windows calculator under Wine.

Re:Finally! (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352937)

hehe.. I have been known to use windows calculator under Wine.
whats the point when bash/sh/ksh has it for you?
echo $(( ( 2**4 ) + 4 * 3 ))
if it's more advanced then using something like this might be better:
perl -e 'print 2**4 + (4*3.141592654)'
which is probably faster than trying to figure out why calc is not doing BODMAS

Re:Finally! (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352945)

idk, cause I'm not a freakin' gray beard?

Re:Finally! (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353695)

Mocking young programmers who haven't gotten their first facial hair yet would be harsh of me to do in a discussion group. But son, like building your own compiler, you don't want to go there without a bit more experience, or I'll be forced to write ASCII art of smiley faces with long gray beards.

Re:Finally! (1)

EvilRyry (1025309) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353037)

qalculate is freaking awesome! I especially love the conversions so you can do stuff like 15m/s = x mph and it just works.

Re:Finally! (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353343)

I've been known to wish that 'dc' was available on Windows :-)

Sure I could install it on cygwin but I'm just saying I much prefer RPN to the Windows calculator app.

Re:Finally! (1)

LiquidFire_HK (952632) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353859)

To be fair, I've seen plenty of installers that launch their readme file with notepad or wordpad (rather than just using the default application for the file type).

Office 2003 (1)

E-Sabbath (42104) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352969)

Has anyone ever managed to get Office 2003 fully working under WINE yet? I spent a week trying once. Never got it right. Probably something to do with the fact that it doesn't have the ability to run as a Win98 program.

Re:Office 2003 (1)

deimios666 (1040904) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353155)

There is no incentive for the wine team to let office 2003 run flawlessly in Wine since they sell Crossover Office(Wine that can run office 2003)

Re:Office 2003 (1)

Tatsh (893946) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353461)

And I bet Wine developers do not see a problem with using OpenOffice or KOffice or even just gedit or Kate. Better yet, nano. No, better yet, ed.

Re:Office 2003 (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353561)

Since when is codeweavers the wine team? ( that may have happened, but last i heard they were separate entities )

Oh, and crossover doesnt run ALL of office 2003.

New wine project (5, Funny)

edxwelch (600979) | more than 6 years ago | (#20352987)

I would love to use Wine, but unfortunately I don't have Linux. Are there any plans to port Wine to Windows?

Re:New wine project (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353017)

do not laugh to soon..

like dosbox, and I'm pretty sure that under Vista you *may* need wine to run some legacy windows softwares....

Re:New wine project (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353311)

Not only that, but since MS isn't going to release DX10 on XP and Wine has already started implementing it, you might end up using Wine to run the new apps in a legacy OS.

Re:New wine project (1)

freeweed (309734) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353741)

We're already doing a proof of concept for softgrid, because we KNOW some of our mission-critical apps just won't go with Vista, ever.

And management has handed down the edict that we MUST be on Vista soon, so...

Re:New wine project (3, Funny)

caluml (551744) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353159)

Download Cygwin and try and compile it under that. Windows -> Cygwin -> Wine -> ..... VMWare? :)

Re:New wine project (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20353523)

-> Profit?

Re:New wine project (1)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353381)

My copy of Windows has a file called WOWEXEC (Wine on Windows?) - maybe it's been there all along?

Re:New wine project (1)

TCiecka (108224) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353655)

Windows-On-Windows (WOW). Often paired with Virtual DOS Machine (NTVDM).

Is WOWEXEC an emulator or is it more comparable to WINE?

What about 64 Bit? (1)

Krozy (755542) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353781)

It seems like WINE has been around forever. And here there is this minor update, yippee! What annoys me is this lack of 64 bit support. Late last year I finally switched completely (for the most part) to Linux due to Window's lack of 64bit support. Mind you, I was shocked and stunned (or is it the other way around) that I was getting better hardware support under Linux then Windows. But what has been disappointing is a need for some applications that do not exist under Linux, and where no comparable alternatives exist (Photoshop, Microsoft Visio, etc. - and no, Gimp is not comparable. Its not even comparable to Paint Shop Pro). For my college classes, I sometimes need to access systems that are in effect DRMed and only work under IE (that whole invasive ActiveX, junk up your system crud). Their solution to accessing this under Linux is to use WINE. Which, seems to be only 32 bit. I could have swore I read something awhile back suggesting they were going to be doing a 64 bit version this year. I take it this hasn't happened yet. In light of this slashdot article post, I've once again looked into WINE. I have recently discovered WineOn64Bit article on the WINE Wiki [winehq.org]. Will shoot for giving that a try in the next few days. Has anyone else done this successfully? Any caveats not mentioned in that article? Or does anyone know anything about some native 64 bit WINE?

subpar Windows apps, the reasoning? (1)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 6 years ago | (#20353849)

You can find all that you need on Linux nowadays, even decent office products. If Wine keeps taking up your time to install/configure/troubleshoot then what is that time worth to you (classic cost vs time)? If you really need those Windows apps for some reason then push the money into a Windows license. Better yet get your business to buy it for you. If it's just for personal use then you really have to ask yourself what the hell you're doing.
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