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Lenovo Looking to Buy Seagate, May Raise Political Concerns

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the this-is-what-we're-worried-about dept.

Businesses 255

andy1307 writes "According to an article in the New York Times, Lenovo has expressed an interest in buying Seagate. This has raised concerns among American government officials about the risks to national security in transferring high technology to China. From the article: 'In recent years, modern disk drives, used to store vast quantities of digital information securely, have become complex computing systems, complete with hundreds of thousands of lines of software that are used to ensure the integrity of data and to offer data encryption.'"

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Tor like oatmeals! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20377929)

Tor like oatmeals!

Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (3, Insightful)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377935)

Quick! Where's McCarthy when we need him?

Honestly, they're raising the same fuss as when IBM sold off their PC and laptop divisions to Lenovo. There's no reason why we should be paranoid about stuff this. It's business.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378217)

I understand being paranoid about it. What I don't understand is why they don't simply write into all those wonderful governmental contracts "Must not be manufactured in China", which would simply cut out a HUGE market for these companies that outsource.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378631)

You're assuming that the US Government really cares that much about secrecy, national security, or any of that crap.

By manufacturing stuff in China, corporations are able to save lots of money, and make much bigger profits. Corporate profits are far more important to the elites in Washington than national security.

Plus, the free-trade crowd would be angered by such a move, as would the anti-government waste crowd, who would whine about the government paying 10 times as much for something that they could get made in China cheaply.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378229)

s/McCarthy/Bush/g
s/communist/terrorist/g
Closer than you think

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378237)

It's just an excuse to cheat in global competition. If the gov't gets too adventurous, they'll get punished by the WTO like they did for illegal steel tariffs. oh wait.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (0)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378367)

No, its not 'just business' when you directly invove a government like china.

And yes, ANY business in that country is directly controlled by the government. Thats how it works there.

Paranoia is healthy at times. As the world becomes more and more 'tech-bound', this is a far worse long term risk then us continuing to rely on oil provided by people that want to see our way of life ended.

Scary times ahead.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (3, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378397)

Honestly, they're raising the same fuss as when IBM sold off their PC and laptop divisions to Lenovo. There's no reason why we should be paranoid about stuff this. It's business.

Yes, it is. And when those Chinese-owned leaders get certain hints to store certain things in "bad" sectors who might suddenly resurface in "slack" space seeded with a salt to look like random noise or risk being shut down, that's also business. Or there's a kill code that they can send out to wipe itself and bring down military systems in an emergency situation. No, it's not just a gag China does just to pull off something like that, they're certainly in it for the business. But when business and government go hand in hand like they do in China, you'd also be naive to think they don't further each other's goals. It's not like that the lust for money is mutually exclusive with the lust for power, quite rather the opposite.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378953)

Mod +1 inventive. Mod -1 paranoid. Mod 1 qubit -- both mods are equally true.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378399)

There's no reason why we should be paranoid about stuff this.

Except for the fact that China will be running the world in a decade or two.

Remember... (1)

Jon.Laslow (809215) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378577)

...just because you aren't paranoid doesn't mean the whole would ISN'T out to get you.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (3, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378711)

wow. You need to study history. The business world is used heavily to spy or screw on each other. For example, Xerox copiers as well as pipe controls come to mind. And yes, this still occurs. I wrote about this earlier, but it bears repeating. In a start-up that I was part of, we had a Taiwanese who wanted to invest in us. Only he wanted access to the machine that we had (it was hard to send it even to Britain or Canada, china was out of the question). Turns out that he wanted to take the device to China. Said that he could get 100's of millions for it (no doubt). And that is just one story. America has been selling off far too much business. For something like this, it needs to stop.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

megaditto (982598) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378883)

Inquiring minds wish to know: what kind of a machine from an American startup would China pay "100's of millions" for?

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379281)

One that sells to DOD and No Such Agency.

Re:Oh my god, it's the Red Scare! (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379291)

Inquiring minds do not have the need to know. Besides, any US startup can raise funds and buy almost any machine, even one that requires ten times its weight in paperwork to ship to Canada. See ITAR [state.gov] for details.

Cisco (2, Interesting)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379203)

I thought the Chinese already owned Cisco, or am I misinformed?

Who says it's lenovo? (5, Informative)

Tragek (772040) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377941)

The article says nobody will say WHICH Chinese tech company wants to buy.

Re:Who says it's lenovo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378215)

The submitter misread the article and claimed it was Lenovo. And of course the editor did not verify anything in the submittal.

It may be Great Wall (1)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378391)

Link [chinatechnews.com]

Re:Who says it's lenovo? (5, Informative)

andy1307 (656570) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378913)

The editors changed my post. I submitted this 2 days ago and no company was named.

So don't buy Seagate (4, Insightful)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377957)

So a Chinese Company wants to buy a Canadian (?!?!?) company that makes hard drives. Fine. Stop buying Seagate for the NSA, and move on with our lives.

Re:So don't buy Seagate (1)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378513)

Yeah, but think about how many Semi trailers of hard drives a day they must get at the NSA for all their "wiretapping" needs.. That could be a huge chunk of revenue!

Re:So don't buy Seagate (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378557)

Yeah, but think about how many Semi trailers of hard drives a day they must get at the NSA for all their "wiretapping" needs.. That could be a huge chunk of revenue!

And by having their own factory, they can have economy of scale PLUS being able to sell their own proprietary back door drives to the public.

Re:So don't buy Seagate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378541)

Only the software division of Seagate was Canadian (Crystal Reports) and that has been divested and sold off to Business Objects.

Seagate itself is a US company, though being purchased by a Chinese company probably wouldn't make much of a difference, all the hard drives I have bought from them recently were manufactured in China anyways.

Re:So don't buy Seagate (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378575)

Thus raising the question- why the heck is the government buying from them to begin with? Or did they miss the fact that all the drives were "Made in China" with the fine quality control (or lack thereof) that implies?

Re:So don't buy Seagate (1)

2ms (232331) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378801)

Hey storage tech master, are you really so naive as to think that it's Seagate-only tech that's at issue and that all the US govt would have to do to make the the Seagate tech useless is to hot-swap to all Maxtors or something?

Re:So don't buy Seagate (2, Informative)

WallaceAndGromit (910755) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379119)

I don't know if you knew this, but Seagate acquired Maxtor a while ago.

http://www.seagate.com/maxtor/ [seagate.com]

The real tragedy here: (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20377959)

Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda is a 29-year old white male with a stocky build and a goatee. He responded to my ad to be interviewed for this article wearing only leather pants, leather boots and a leather vest. I could see that both of his nipples were pierced with large-gauge silver rings.

Questioner: I hope you won't be offended if I ask you to prove to me that you're a nullo. Just so that my readers will know that this isn't a fake.

CmdrTaco: Sure, no problem. (stands and unbuckles pants and drops them to his ankles, revealing a smooth, shaven crotch with only a thin scar to show where his genitals once were).

Q: Thank you. That's a remarkable sight.

(laughs and pulls pants back up). Most people think so.

Q: What made you decide to become a nullo?

(pauses). Well, it really wasn't entirely my decision.

Q: Excuse me?

The idea wasn't mine. It was my lover's idea.

Q: Please explain what you mean.

Okay, it's a long story. You have to understand my relationship with Hemos before you'll know what happened.

Q: We have plenty of time. Please go on.

Both of us were into the leather lifestyle when we met through a personal ad. Hemos's ad was very specific: he was looking for someone to completely dominate and modify to his pleasure. In other word, a slave.

The ad intrigued me. I had been in a number of B&D scenes and also some S&M, but I found them unsatisfying because they were all temporary. After the fun was over, everybody went on with life as usual.

I was looking for a complete life change. I wanted to meet someone who would be part of my life forever. Someone who would control me and change me at his whim.

Q: In other words, you're a true masochist.

Oh yes, no doubt about that. I've always been totally passive in my sexual relationships.

Anyway, we met and there was instant chemistry. Hemos is about my age and is a complete loser. Our personalities meshed totally. He's very dominant.

I went back to his place after drinks and had the best sex of my life. That's when I knew I was going to be with Hemos for a long, long time.

Q: What sort of things did you two do?

It was very heavy right away. He restrained me and whipped me for quite awhile. He put clamps on my nipples and a ball gag in my mouth. And he hung a ball bag on my sack with some very heavy weights. That bag really bounced around when Hemos fucked me from behind.

Q: Ouch.

(laughs) Yeah, no kidding. At first I didn't think I could take the pain, but Hemos worked me through it and after awhile I was flying. I was sorry when it was over.

Hemos enjoyed it as much as I did. Afterwards he talked about what kind of a commitment I'd have to make if I wanted to stay with him.

Q: What did he say exactly?

Well, besides agreeing to be his slave in every way, I'd have to be ready to be modified. To have my body modified.

Q: Did he explain what he meant by that?

Not specifically, but I got the general idea. I guessed that something like castration might be part of it.

Q: How did that make you feel?

(laughs) I think it would make any guy a little hesitant.

Q: But it didn't stop you from agreeing to Hemos's terms?

No it didn't. I was totally hooked on this man. I knew that I was willing to pay any price to be with him.

Anyway, a few days later I moved in with Hemos. He gave me the rules right away: I'd have to be naked at all times while we were indoors, except for a leather dog collar that I could never take off. I had to keep my balls shaved. And I had to wear a butt plug except when I needed to take a shit or when we were having sex.

I had to sleep on the floor next to his bed. I ate all my food on the floor, too.

The next day he took me to a piercing parlor where he had my nipples done, and a Prince Albert put into the head of my cock.

Q: Heavy stuff.

Yeah, and it got heavier. He used me as a toilet, pissing in my mouth. I had to lick his asshole clean after he took a shit, too. It was all part of a process to break down any sense of individuality I had. After awhile, I wouldn't hesitate to do anything he asked.

Q: Did the sex get rougher?

Oh God, yeah. He started fisting me every time we had sex. But he really started concentrating on my cock and balls, working them over for hours at a time.

He put pins into the head of my cock and into my sack. He attached clothespins up and down my cock and around my sack. The pain was pretty bad. He had to gag me to keep me from screaming.

Q: When did the idea of nullification come up?

Well, it wasn't nullification at first. He started talking about how I needed to make a greater commitment to him, to do something to show that I was dedicated to him for life.

When I asked him what he meant, he said that he wanted to take my balls.

Q: How did you respond?

Not very well at first. I told him that I liked being a man and didn't want to become a eunuch. But he kept at me, and wore me down. He reminded me that I agreed to be modified according to his wishes, and this is what he wanted for me. Anything less would show that I wasn't really committed to the relationship. And besides, I was a total bottom and didn't really need my balls.

It took about a week before I agreed to be castrated. But I wasn't happy about it, believe me.

Q: How did he castrate you?

Hemos had a friend, Zonk, who was into the eunuch scene. One night he came over with his bag of toys, and Hemos told me that this was it. I was gonna lose my nuts then and there.

Q: Did you think of resisting?

I did for a minute, but deep down I knew there was no way. I just didn't want to lose Hemos. I'd rather lose my balls.

Zonk restrained me on the living room floor while Hemos videotaped us. He used an elastrator to put a band around my sack.

Q: That must have really hurt.

Hell yeah. It's liked getting kicked in the balls over and over again. I screamed for him to cut the band off, but he just kept on going, putting more bands on me. I had four bands around my sack when he finished.

I was rolling around on the floor screaming, while Hemos just videotaped me. Eventually, my sack got numb and the pain subsided. I looked between my legs and could see my sack was a dark purple. I knew my balls were dying inside.

Hemos and his friend left the room and turned out the light. I lay there for hours, crying because I was turning into a eunuch and there wasn't anything I could do about it.

Q: What happened then?

Eventually I fell asleep from exhaustion. Then the light switched on and I could see Hemos's friend kneeling between my legs, touching my sack. I heard him tell Hemos that my balls were dead.

Q: How did Hemos react?

Very pleased. He bent down and felt around my sack. He said that it felt cold.

Zonk told me that I needed to keep the bands on. He said that eventually my balls and sack would dry up and fall off. I just nodded. What else could I do at that point?

Q: Did it happen just like Zonk said?

Yeah, a week or so later my package just fell off. Hemos put it in a jar of alcohol to preserve it. It's on the table next to his bed.

Q: How did things go after that?

Hemos was really loving to me. He kept saying how proud he was of me, how grateful that I had made the commitment to him. He even let me sleep in his bed.

Q: What about the sex?

We waited awhile after my castration, and then took it easy until I was completely healed. At first I was able to get hard, but as the weeks went by my erections began to disappear.

That pleased Hemos. He liked fucking me and feeling my limp cock. It made his dominance over me even greater.

Q: When did he start talking about making you a nullo?

A couple of months after he took my nuts. Our sex had gotten to be just as rough as before the castration. He really got off on torturing my cock. Then he started saying stuff like, "Why do you even need this anymore?"

That freaked me out. I always thought that he might someday take my balls, but I never imagined that he'd go all the way. I told him that I wanted to keep my dick.

Q: How did he react to that?

At first he didn't say much. But he kept pushing. Hemos said I would look so nice being smooth between my legs. He said my dick was small and never got hard anymore, so what was the point of having it.

But I still resisted. I wanted to keep my cock. I felt like I wouldn't be a man anymore without it.

Q: So how did he get you to agree?

He didn't. He took it against my will.

Q: How did that happen?

We were having sex in the basement, and I was tied up and bent over this wooden bench as he fucked me. Then I heard the doorbell ring. Hemos answered it, and he brought this guy into the room.

At first I couldn't see anything because of the way I was tied. But then I felt these hands lift me up and put me on my back. And I could see it was Zonk, the guy who took my nuts.

Q: How did you react?

I started screaming and crying, but the guy just gagged me. The two of them dragged me to the other side of the room where they tied me spread eagled on the floor.

Zonk snaked a catheter up my dick, and gave me a shot to numb my crotch. I was grateful for that, at least. I remember how bad it hurt to lose my balls.

Q: What was Hemos doing at this time?

He was kneeling next to me talking quietly. He said I'd be happy that they were doing this. That it would make our relationship better. That kind of calmed me down. I thought, "Well, maybe it won't be so bad."

Q: How long did the penectomy take?

It took awhile. Some of the penis is inside the body, so he had to dig inside to get all of it. There was a lot of stitching up and stuff. He put my cock in the same jar with my balls. You can even see the Prince Albert sticking out of the head.

Then they made me a new pisshole. It's between my asshole and where my sack used to be. So now I have to squat to piss.

Q: What has life been like since you were nullified?

After I got over the surgery and my anger, things got better. When I healed up, I began to like my smooth look. Hemos brought friends over and they all admired it, saying how pretty I looked. It made me feel good that Hemos was proud of me.

Q: Do you have any sexual feeling anymore?

Yes, my prostate still responds when Hemos fucks me or uses the buttplug. And my nipples are quite sensitive. If Hemos plays with them while fucking me, I have a kind of orgasm. It's hard to describe, but it's definitely an orgasm.

Sometimes Hemos says he's gonna have my prostate and nipples removed, but he's just kidding around. He's happy with what he's done to me.

Q: So are you glad Hemos had you nullified?

Well, I wouldn't say I'm glad. If I could, I'd like to have my cock and balls back. But I know that I'm a nullo forever. So I'm making the best of it.

Hemos and I are very happy. I know that he'll take care of me and we'll be together always. I guess losing my manhood was worth it to make that happen for us.

Isn't it a bit late to worry? (3, Insightful)

tftp (111690) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377963)

This has raised concerns among American government officials about the risks to national security in transferring high technology to China

I think the horse has not only left the barn, it's off the planet by now. What were those "government officials" thinking for last decades? And this process is not [easily] reversible - China has all the factories now, and rephrasing Mao, "Power comes out of the gates of the factory." This much we see already.

Re:Isn't it a bit late to worry? (1)

refactored (260886) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378025)

Look, you have your economy in hock. China has much more than enough dollars. So the time has come to Pay up in hard goods or your currency suddenly isn't worth the paper its printed on.

Yup, it's way too late for worrying....

You yanks should move on a little towards the PANIC NOW stage.

Re:Isn't it a bit late to worry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378719)

But my book has the words 'DON'T PANIC' inscribed in large friendly letters on its cover!

Re:Isn't it a bit late to worry? (3, Interesting)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378737)

The problem with your panicking concept is that, at least for now, China's economy is highly dependent on the USA's. After all, we're the ones buying most of the junk their factories make. In exchange, they're getting a bunch of our green paper currency. So I would have to assume that China is not interested in our currency devaluing rapidly any time soon, because then they'll have sold us all that stuff and done all that work for nothing, and they'll have a much smaller market to sell to.

So basically, since Dollar bills are basically IOUs, we're in debt to China. In a normal trade relationship, they would be using those dollars to buy stuff back from us. The problem here is that we don't really make much to sell to them. I know Buicks are really popular there for some strange reason (bad taste? Are the Chinese going to start dying their hair blue and wearing really ugly clothes next?), but that's not enough, plus those Buicks are probably made in Chinese factories anyway.

What's the endpoint of this? Honestly, I don't know. I'm an engineer, dammit, not an economist. But it doesn't look good to me. I guess, if nothing else, China will wind up with lots of great technology, and spiffy new factories to build it with, and while we're sitting around with worthless currency trying to figure out how to survive when we've all forgotten how to do anything practical because we were too busy studying marketing and law, China will be self-sufficient. Does China have expansionist of imperialist aims? Would they be interested in conquering the USA and enslaving us while stealing our resources? The way we've been acting, we probably deserve it.

Re:Isn't it a bit late to worry? (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379223)

The problem here is that we don't really make much to sell to them.

And to make things worse, ITAR stops many US companies from selling some high-tech stuff that China would love to have, but which has dual use or military use. And much of US export is military and high-tech stuff. The USA can't compete with China on rice, for example, or on metals; not even on cars - China flooded Russia with cheap cars, and if anyone wants something better then Honda and Toyota are just a ferry ride [waytorussia.net] away, and always glad to sell.

Re:Isn't it a bit late to worry? (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378031)

exactly!!! All the drives are BUILT in China right now. When the Chinese want to, they will do whatever they want to spy on us and we won't be able to stop it!

I'm no expert, but (2, Insightful)

Bombula (670389) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377967)

the statement that, "the risks to national security in transferring high technology to China" referring to hard drive technology just sounds a bit silly. I'd bet dollars to donuts that any technology latent in a commercial hard drive that the Chinese might be after can be reverse engineered right off the shelf. The only exception might be the encryption component, but - someone correct me here if I'm completely wrong - as I understand it 128-bit encryption is no longer restricted by the US government, presumably because they can break it, and that is why 128-bit is also the current 'limit' or whatever on commercial encryption products.

Re:I'm no expert, but (1)

click2005 (921437) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378051)

It wouldn't surprise me if the hard drives, or at least some of the components are constructed or assembled in China anyway.

Re:I'm no expert, but (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378089)

> the statement that, "the risks to national security in transferring high technology to China" referring to hard drive technology just sounds a bit silly. I'd bet dollars to donuts that any technology latent in a commercial hard drive that the Chinese might be after can be reverse engineered right off the shelf. The only exception might be the encryption component, but - someone correct me here if I'm completely wrong - as I understand it 128-bit encryption is no longer restricted by the US government, presumably because they can break it, and that is why 128-bit is also the current 'limit' or whatever on commercial encryption products.

When all else fails, question your initial assumption.

From TFA:

"Seagate would be extremely sensitive," said an industry executive who participates in classified government advisory groups. "I do not think anyone in the U.S. wants the Chinese to have access to the controller chips for a disk drive. One never knows what the Chinese could do to instrument the drive."

Allow me to attempt a translation: "Seagate would be extremely sensitive", said someone who may have had a need to know more about hard drives than you or I do. "I do not think anyone in the US wants the Chinese to have access to the controller chips for a disk drive. One never wants the Chinese or the US public to know what we're already doing to instrument the drives."

To put it another way... if the 128-bit encryption standards, as publicly documented, aren't a concern for reverse-engineering, there are plenty of sorts of things hidden in the bowels of the firmware that could be.

The US government is wise not trust a Chinese implementation of those standards for its data, because the US government can't guarentee the absence of Chinese-added backdoors.

Unfortunately, that same logic leads to only one conclusion: The US consumer is wise to trust neither Chinese nor American implementations of standards for its data, because the US consumer can't guarantee the absence of Chinese- or US-added backdoors.

Re:I'm no expert, but (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378251)

The US government is wise not trust a Chinese implementation of those standards for its data, because the US government can't guarentee the absence of Chinese-added backdoors.

So stop buying from Seagate and put a few tax dollars back into manufacturing hard drives here. You provide jobs for Americans *and* data security for the federal government. Win-win to me.

Re:I'm no expert, but (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378455)

> > The US government is wise not trust a Chinese implementation of those standards for its data, because the US government can't guarentee the absence of Chinese-added backdoors.
>
>So stop buying from Seagate and put a few tax dollars back into manufacturing hard drives here. You provide jobs for Americans *and* data security for the federal government. Win-win to me.

Sure, that's better than selling our secrets to the Chinese, but where's the win to the American hard drive user?

Geek: Have you got anything without added backdoors?
NSA: Try that Hitachi Deathstar, it doesn't have that many backdoors in it since the Japanese bought IBM's hard drive division.
Geek: I don't want any government's backdoors!
CIA: Can't hd have the Western Digital? Hasn't got as many backdoors in it as the Hitachi Deathstar!
Yankees (Singing): Back-door-back-door! Back-DOOOR! For Homeland and more!
Geek: How about this old IDE drive and this 8-bit ISA-bus IDE controller?
Everyone: Eeeew!
Geek: What do you mean 'Eeeww'? I don't like backdoors!
Yankees: Lovely backdoors! Wonderful backdoors!
DHS: Shut up! Bloody Yankees! You can't have an IDE without the controller card, and you can't have the controller card without the backdoor! Unless he wants to go back to MFM/RLL, and then we can recover everything even after a low-level format! The very first backdoor!
Geek: I don't like backdoors!
DHS: Sshh, citizen, don't cause a fuss, or we'll have your backdoor! We love it. Mmm, backdoors, CALEA for the telephone switches, backdoors, the Clipper Chip for the phones, backdoors in newfangled BIOSes, TPMs, DRMs, backdoors into the backdoors, it's backdoors into everything!
Yankees (singing): Back-door-back-door! Back-DOOOR! Lovely backdoor! Backity door! Safety galore! For homeland and more! Backdoor! Lovely backdoor! Backity door! For the children and more...

Re:I'm no expert, but (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378767)

"I do not think anyone in the US wants the Chinese to have access to the controller chips for a disk drive.

This is an interesting statement, since Seagate drives are all already made in China.

Re:I'm no expert, but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378811)

The US consumer is wise to trust neither Chinese nor American implementations of standards for its data, because the US consumer can't guarantee the absence of Chinese- or US-added backdoors.
That's only really sensible for someone storing data that merits being absolutely sure there aren't back doors. These would be back doors that would be highly classified in either government and would be reserved for retrieving very sensitive information. They're not about to let those back doors be used to retrieve anything that any normal consumer would put on a HD, even if it were a criminal case.

So yes, there may be back doors, but they'd be back doors with a pretty hefty lock keeping pretty much everyone except the creator out. If you're stealing classified documents or developing some weaponized virus, by all means be paranoid. But if you're just using the drive to store warez, porn, music and other illicit file-sharing downloads, you're probably fine.

Re:I'm no expert, but (1)

InvalidError (771317) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378545)

Who cares if the NSA has found a way to solve AES128 in a timely fashion? Many of the AES candidate algorithms can be extended to arbitrary key lengths and some 4096bits variants are currently out in the wild. Rijindael (today's AES) itself supports 128, 192 and 256bits as standard (required by NSA) and 160/224 as common extras. With more rounds and larger S-tables, larger keys could be supported. The main parameters that really limit key lengths of most AES candidates is throughput and implementation complexity: among other things, AES had to lend itself reasonably well to both software and hardware implementations.

Damn it (0)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 7 years ago | (#20377997)

I'm assuming if they buy them, the just want the tech and will move manufacturing to China, in which case I will stop buying. Not that I care about all the recent crap in the news, I just hate Chinese products because the quality is very hit or miss, and I'd rather it be hit most of the time. Just my personal experience maybe though. What's the only other decent maker though? WD?

(Way OT) (1)

lmnfrs (829146) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378211)

I've had very mixed experiences with WD drives. I know people who have always had good experiences with them, but I've noticed that some don't work with certain drive controllers.

Twice I have had WD drives that were functional stop working, randomly or when connected to a different motherboard/controller. Through testing on other motherboards/controllers, in both cases, I found that the drive was not recognized at all by some controllers (major brand names, that detected other Seagate, Maxtor, and WD drives with no problems). I was eventually able to find a PCI card that did recognize the drive.

Based on my first experience I stopped buying them, but helped a friend several years later with his drive that had randomly failed. It was SATA instead of PATA and had the same weird incompatibility. It worked on a Silicon Image based controller that is known to have a slight deviation from the SATA spec. (and it cost him an extra $35).

Re:(Way OT) (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378351)

Interesting. Sounds like their testing phase of manufacturing could use some improvement.

Although that is annoying, I've yet to have a WD or Seagate go bad on me and cause me to loose data. In fact, the only ones to go bad were Maxtor (got it running again later, but something happened that killed large sections of sectors so I never really trusted it again) and a Fujitsu (dead as a door-nail).

Re:Damn it (2, Insightful)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378213)

[Insert country name here]'s products are hit or miss to. That's why most people judge product quality on reviews and the reputation of the individual maker rather than the region in which they are manufactured.

Now if you have political reasons for not giving business to a particular country or government, that's another story, and is perfectly respectable.

Re:Damn it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378311)

Where exactly do you think they make most hard drives today? Detroit perhaps?

Care to elaborate? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378543)

Which Chinese products are "miss" for you? Do you actually personally have any Chinese make shit that did you wrong? Or are just hearing all that bad news and believe everything from China are poison? Quick, throw away that iPod, iPhone, laptop, Wii. Should I go on?

You paranoid fool.

Your truly, a lowly Chinese laborer

Double Standard (2, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378001)

The US Government will gladly take/steal technology however they can, but they always have this hissy fit when when another country is trying to advance their own technology, directly, or indirectly.

Re:Double Standard (1)

IthnkImParanoid (410494) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378127)

Yeah, and did you know the US Government spends all this money on roads and military and social programs for itself, but the highway from Tongjian to Beijing needs a couple potholes fixed or the Chinese army needs a couple new QSZ-92s and suddenly they get all stingy! Like pursuing their own interests is so important, as if!

Re:Double Standard (2, Insightful)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378295)

Aaaaannnd? Really how is that any different than any other country. Let me break it down Technology=Power Governments like power so naturally governments want to keep power and get more power. So advancing technology is in the best interest of the country and giving it away is not. Of course there's going to be a double standard, as long as there's war (SPOILER ALERT: with humans there always will be until we destroy ourselves) it's in every country's best interest to hoard technology/power and keep it away from potential enemies. I know it's great to slam the US, it's a pretty popular hobby lately what with how much of an ass GW can be, but with this one it's not just the US any country with the resources to do so would do it too. Do you really think that China are altruistic and benevolent? Really? I would love to have this ideological view of the world where everything is fluffy bunnies and every human is out to help other humans, but that's just not the case. When it comes down to it every country is out for its best interests, I don't care where they're from or what kind of people live there.

No Double Standard (2, Informative)

chebucto (992517) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379091)

In both cases, the US Government is looking out for the interests of the US - as it should. It's good for the US if it can steal others' technology; it's bad for the US if others steal its technology. Any successful country will do the same; unsuccessful ones will end up like Russia in the 90s - making others richer while it gets poorer.

Re:Double Standard (1)

phantomcircuit (938963) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379199)

Of course there is a double standard.

The United States government's main objective is to look out for the poeple of the United States (or it should be...)

The same people who say that government should be minimized and removed entirely from that market (complete free economy) also know that it is not to there advantage to do so.

hundreds of thousands of lines (1)

pabrown85 (1128059) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378005)

Isn't that the job of the OS? If not, wouldn't dban [sourceforge.net] , et al, take care of it?

The irony of it all (3, Insightful)

v3xt0r (799856) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378011)

This government, the same one who has no problem allowing China to take hundreds of thousands of jobs away from Americans simply by our failed international trade policies, wants us to worry about national security issues related to 1 corporation. What about all the other national security issues that are caused by trade w. China, or any other socialist/communist country for that matter? What about all the (60%+) staff @ Los Alamos?? Lenovo is the least of my concerns, at this point.

If they buy, the big question is: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378013)

What will be the impact on their upcoming frash drives?

Lenovo Laptops (1)

lmnfrs (829146) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378021)

At least the government seems to realize there is a potential risk before they buy Chinese hardware. It was rather silly when they bought Lenovo's laptops then spent thousands auditing them.

But, then again, how else could they manage to waste money on bulk purchases of computer hardware?

hehe National what??? (4, Insightful)

xednieht (1117791) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378053)

China buys blocks and blocks of our national debt, and they're concerned about the Seagate purchase? pfft

With their ownership of US debt, China is probably as concerned about our national security as we are.

National debt is intrinsically worthless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378207)

National debt is intrinsically worthless. It only has value because people believe it has value. It's much like IP.

Hard drives, on the other hand, are not. Even if just for scrap, they have intrinsic, physical value. The manufacturing facilities also have intrinsic value. Seagate's development staff and their knowledge offers intrinsic value.

So, yes, it does make sense to get worried when actual value is being sent overseas. On the other hand, it's not really worth getting worked up over the transfer of intrinsically-worthless debt.

Re:hehe National what??? (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378431)

I love the sweet irony you raise.... Bitter and SWEET. China IS as worried about US security as the US supposedly is...

Captcha: Crystal, hehehe (crystal clear?)

China's reasoning and the planned US response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378625)

Buying up all that debt helps ensure a market stays around for their goods until their economy grows enough to start providing a market for their manufacturing.

Our so called leaders in Washington are actually very well educated people who are well aware of the history of Roman civilization, ancient Greek civilization, and some in the government, of even older civilizations. It's a historically established fact that the US is in decline, and war is the most effective way of staving off and reversing such decline. So...they're using it as a opportunity to line their pockets. Sell off whatever businesses they can to China, and prepare for a war against them.

I hear you say, "that's nuts, China has nukes."

The thing is, the government has a long history of developing working military technology, then canceling the project, declaring it a failure and a waste of money. I recall one by the name of Star Wars Strategic Defense.

Yes, in all likelihood we have orbiting lasers and particle weapons, and nukes up in orbit, and probably have for well over 20 years, upgraded from time to time. Provided they're believed to be effective in downing most of what China can send our way, and war is the logical conclusion of a doctrine of using preemptive aggression "to ensure another world power never surpasses the United States."

Finally, consider we have either a madman or an occultist as president, (take your pick,) and the pieces of the puzzle rapidly fit together.

Extent of the legit concerns? (3, Interesting)

neapolitan (1100101) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378067)

We (the US) have long had a ban on the export of 'strong' (>40 bit, now >64 bit key) technology to foreign governments / citizens. I've long wondered about this.

It seems to me that:

- All concerns regarding exporting of technology that is not guarded as a trade secret is ineffective. If China wants a technology that is freely available over here (USA), just have one of their numerous graduate students download the technology and send it over there. AFAIK, no American internet provider actively prohibits strong encryption connections to Chinese IPs (their "great firewall" may be different).

However, my second immediate thought is:

- Seagate likely has numerous trade secrets that are *not* public domain, and thus can now be exclusively owned and operated by the Chinese. Imagine if DES had a backdoor (or Seagate's equivalent), and my organization uses Seagate's out of box encryption (not likely ;) -- now a foreign government controls this. Legitimately scary.

As for the 'manufacturing techniques' -- as long as there is an oligopoly of storage makers, I'm not concerned. We have bright minds here coming out of graduate school and going to work at Seagate as well as Western Digital, IBM, Intel, etc.

All the more reason to use published cryptographic standards, and not rely on any proprietary solutions -- they can never fall exclusively into the "wrong hands."

Outside the U.S. (1)

smurfsurf (892933) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378597)

> Imagine if DES had a backdoor (or Seagate's equivalent), and my organization uses Seagate's
> out of box encryption (not likely ;) -- now a foreign government controls this. Legitimately scary.

So you are saying that currently every state besides the U.S. should be scared?

If you're *really* concerned about the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378105)

Learn to speak Mandarin. If not, just buy from Western Digital, a company name that no self-respecting commie would want.

War of Quality (1, Flamebait)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378135)

Seagate have given me years of rock-solid hard drivers. Own many, but never lost one due to failure.

Now Lenovo wants to buy them out? For all that is holy, stop them. China just doesn't get quality, and the hard drive is one place more than anything else in a PC where quality counts.

Re:War of Quality (1)

eclectro (227083) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378591)

China just doesn't get quality, and the hard drive is one place more than anything else in a PC where quality counts.

But would we really care if they put lead in the hard drives??

Re:War of Quality (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378695)

> But would we really care if they put lead in the hard drives??

Memo to self: When my new Lenovo hard drives fails outside of its 7-day warranty period, do not give to kids as 'toy'.

Re:War of Quality (1)

McNihil (612243) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378617)

I wholeheartedly agree. My knee jerk reaction was actually to hand in my resignation for anything to do with IT period if the deal goes through.

I for one count my blessings on hard drive up time.

Re:War of Quality (2, Informative)

Alex Zepeda (10955) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379055)

You're kidding, right? My last Seagate ('Cuda.10 - 320GB) was made in China.

Re:War of Quality (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20379131)

Same here. I couldn't believe it when I pulled my nifty new 300 GB Seagate hard drive out of the box last year and it said MADE IN CHINA.

So far so good though.

It seems like everything is made in China now. There's just no way to avoid it any longer. Although I'll tell you this, the stuff coming out of China today is cheaper than the stuff from Japan, Taiwan, etc.. that was made 10 ~ 15 years ago.

The last time I bought a CD player a couple years ago the $100 ones looked as cheaply made as the $30 ones. It's actually rather sad how much quality has fallen. Not only is the labor cheap now but they also make everything cheaply there. Not that I'm saying China is at fault. In most cases it's the foreign companies who either contract with companies in China to make this cheap crap for them or they buy Chinese designed products and just re-brand them.

Re-branding of Chinese products is so common now it isn't even funny. When you buy a "name brand" there's always a good chance that they didn't even design it!

Although one cool thing we now have because of China. The dollar store! I can't believe the stuff the Dollar Tree can sell for a buck! It's amazing! I'm in there every week.

Re:War of Quality (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379151)

> You're kidding, right? My last Seagate ('Cuda.10 - 320GB) was made in China.

NOOOOO!!!!!!!!

Seriously, bummer. The good news is The Samsung Corporation have entered the HDD market to good reviews. I have two of their drives, and yes, they're made in Korea: http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=30 31 [anandtech.com]

Noticed since HP switched PC manufacture to China they've been getting shoddier quality too. Bad News, so I reach for my security blanket: http://news.top100.biz/shopping/Made-in-China-blan kets-withdrawn-in-New-Zealand-Australia [top100.biz]

Re: Thinkpad? Thinkagain. Lenovo Customer Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20379187)

Lenovo has at least done well at keeping up the high quality standards that IBM started with the Thinkpad laptops. Customer service however is another matter entirely.

I recently purchase a Thinkpad directly from Lenovo, only to be lied to by one of their customer care reps, which resulted in my being completely screwed over. To sum it up, Lenovo lied to me, stole my money and told me to go away. (If anyone's interested, more details regarding this Lenovo customer service tragedy can be had here: http://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/0/269/RipOff02 69581.htm [ripoffreport.com] )

Which is a damn shame, considering how fantastic the thinkpad line of laptops are, it's a veritable tragedy that the customer service is being handled by outsourced call centers in far off lands where people are being paid pennies on the dollar. I'm all for people having jobs in India, but as far as I'm concerned, they should be paying said India call center reps the same wage(s) they would be paying someone stateside - this would result in a higher quality of living and boost the entire economy for the region that they outsource calls to. To top it off, it would ensure that people in these call centers take pride in doing their job properly because they cared about the work they were doing and they paycheck they would receive because of it. I know that in my particular situation, if the person I spoke to cared about her job, she would take the time to memorize the proper return procedure.

I'm not alone in any of this either, (If you do a google search for "Lenovo lied to me" all sorts of horror stories pop up.) heres another report about how someone else entirely had a somewhat similar problems in their dealings with Lenovo: (http://consumerist.com/consumer/complaints/consum ers-speak-lenovos-tricky-customer-service-144702.p hp) And that article was from 2005! So all these 'miscommunication' problems, and people being flat out *lied* to by Lenovo is an ongoing problem that no one inside Lenovo cares enough about to address properly.

If Lenovo succeeds in buying out Seagate, I for one will never be purchasing another Seagate hard drive, which again, really sucks, as I've always thought Seagate to be far more reliable than Maxtor and most other HD manufacturers.

Consolidation in hard drive market? (2, Insightful)

bomanbot (980297) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378171)

Wasnt Seagate the company that bought Maxtor not too long ago? And will the buyout end there or will we see the great consolidation in the hard drive business as well, so that in the end it may look like the CPU market, especially for x86 processors?

I mean, there are not that many hard drive companies left anyway, the big players are Seagate/Maxtor, Hitachi, Western Digital and Samsung and thats about it. Let Seagate be bought and maybe merge another company or two and the hard dirve market looks an awfully lot like AMD/Intel or ATI(AMD)/NVIDIA, which may not be as beneficial as we think....

Re:Consolidation in hard drive market? (1)

PsychoSlashDot (207849) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378527)

Ages ago, Seagate bought Conner, who made good drives. Later, Maxtor bought Quantum, who made good drives. Recently, Seagate bought Maxtor. These days the real players are Seagate, Western Digital, Samsung, Fujitsu (SCSI only I believe) and Hitachi.

Lenovo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378187)

I'm still pissed off at IBM for selling out to Lenovo.

It has nothing to do with Lenovo as a company or the country its based in. I loved the colored IBM logo and the T41 line had no windows key right up until the point Lenovo bought it which made it much easier to hit control-alt and map another key to windows if necessary.

So if Lenovo gets rid of the window keys and those stupid finger print readers I wouldn't much care if they bought Intel, HP and SGI.

IMHO hard drives are redicuously cool most people don't realize that the read heads hover just *nanometers* from the platters. Its incredible that they work at all.

Securely? (1)

The Null Repeater (1055874) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378189)

In recent years, modern disk drives, used to store vast quantities of digital information securely

I don't know of ANY hard drive that natively stores information securely.

A far stretching thought: "They" don't want Lenovo to make hard drives because Lenovo would probably make a hard drive that does store information securely through cryptographic means. Then "they" could no longer read your HDD. Yes, yes, I know there are full hard drive encryption programs out there but you pay a larger performance hit than you would if it was implemented in the HD's hardware.

Re:Securely? (1)

Logger (9214) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378517)

Seagate does sell a drive with hardware based encryption, but "modern disk drives" is an exageration.

http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/products/laptops/ momentus/momentus_5400_fde.2/ [seagate.com]

From what I've found, only Seagate and one company I've never heard of offer drives with hardware based encryption.

http://www.full-disk-encryption.net/Full_Disc_Encr yption.html [full-disk-encryption.net]

Of course, you can always go the route of a host controller that has hardware based encryption, and then you don't have to trust the drive at all.

Wake up and smell the roses (1)

Robowally (649265) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378253)

Wake up and smell the roses, United States. For every one of you, there are four Chinese. Do you all share a common happy worldview? Um, no way matey. Then why are you handing over all your intellectual property to them? e.g designs for every piece of equipment made in China. I think it is called cutting your own throats (but I guess that is not nice in today's multi-religious climate where we cannot criticize other religions and so on).

Fuck nationalism, what about quality? (4, Insightful)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378263)

Seagate is pretty much the only computer componets company that hasn't wavered much in quality over the years. IBM, Western Digital, and Maxtor have all gone through phases ranging from good quality to absolute crap, while Seagate has continued to put out consistently good products.

I understand that theory that larger companies can decrease overhead and thus be more efficient, but that never seems to happen. The success rate on mergers looks almost as bad as on startups. But this stupid economic model that is the stockmarket rewards growth (even artificial growth) over all else - quality, efficiency you name it. We created this system, and the laws that govern it, and then we act shocked, just shocked, when the market consolidates to the point of a monopoly. What is the point of even having anti-trust laws when we not only allow but encourage consolidation at every turn.

Sorry, I'm just so tired of seeing all these mergers that decrease the amount of competition in the field and end up destroying everything that was good about the company to begin with.

China Seagate (2, Insightful)

hackus (159037) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378297)

Question: These people allowed all of our technology such as computers...etc....out of the country and NOW they have a problem with simple storage devices?

Whats wrong with this picture?

China already owns Taiwan all nice and legal like.

The Chinese already HAVE everything they need to build anything they want.

The Chinese OWN the United States. China has been buying our treasury bills to float the home mortgages everyone has for christ sake, along with those credit cards everyone on average owes like $5K on!

NOW they have a problem with moving a relatively simple technology like drive storage out of the country?

Gimme a beak!

-Hack

Re:China Seagate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378531)

"China already owns Taiwan all nice and legal like."

, in reality it's the other way round, the growth in China is strongly due to heavy investment from Taiwan over the years, which makes this problem mute anyway as Taiwan has excelled in tech for the last 30 plus years, and many of it's hi tech companies outsource to china anyway.
If you look at many of the large businesses in China its Taiwanese Money, which btw is not China and has a completely independent Government which China is incredibly hostile to. Having lived in Taiwan for a while, a huge swath of the population are very pro maintaining or increasing their independent status.
Also never quote Mao on anything to do with Economics, as Mao's policies retarded China's development a good 30+ years, as he is conveniently forgotten about in China. to a large extent.

in reality it's the other way round (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378775)

Hehehehe, you should ask the U.N., the WHO, the Olympic and see how independent Taiwan is.

There is a lot of Taiwanese business in China and China is all too happy to encourage this. If not for the restrictive policy the current administration in Taiwan, Taiwan business would invest even more in China. Taiwan is choking itself for not trade with China directly. Its economy was the best of Asia not long ago but now has fallen far behind while China has grown.

Taiwanese are Chinese. You may not like this but you don't get to choose you parents.

Re:in reality it's the other way round (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378963)

So Americans are British?

Sorry, no. We used to be British, then we told them to fuck off, and now we're independent. That's how it works. It doesn't matter what happened in the past; the people's current desires are what's important. If the people in a geographic region want to be an independent country, that's the way it should be. Otherwise, most of Europe would still belong to Italy.

Re:in reality it's the other way round (1)

fliptout (9217) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379269)

Most Taiwanese are *ethnically* Chinese. You sound like another mainlander who has never been to Taiwan. Taiwan has a seperate government, military, currency.. This adds up to a *de facto* independent Taiwan. The Mainlander military will have a hard time invading Taiwan with their Audi A6s, I bet.

NO (0, Flamebait)

unity100 (970058) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378383)

excuse me, im no racist, but i dont want chinese in control of seagate. seagate is some firm that works exceptionally good. i dont want any mishaps happening after some other corp buying it and "restructuring". mergers and acquisitions thing is one of the most harmful concepts in business world.

Re:NO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378935)

YOUR A RACIST!! At the drop of a hat, Slashdotters will label you a racist! Are you backpedaling yet?

Re:NO (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379001)

being cautious as to a corporation which is under a strictly tight government's rule buying out the biggest, most important hard drive maker in the WORLD, is what it is - cautious.

its not a european country or a japanese company or american or canadian or even brazilian - its a COMMUNIST country's company. which will do whatever they are told, without excuses if government orders.

curious though, despite im not afraid to say what i mean to say without hiding my identity, some people like you post as anonymous cowards. why is that ?

Momentus 5400 FDE.2 (1)

pjcreath (513472) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378425)

On-disk encryption [seagate.com] is why the U.S. government would be nervous about Chinese ownership of Seagate. They'd be afraid of a back door in their "secure" hard drives.

inevitable (1)

operato (782224) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378491)

things like this is inevitable. grow big or be bought.

I think a fair amount of concern is warranted here (1)

LoofWaffle (976969) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378773)

China buying Seagate doesn't mean that they only get access to storage devices

From Wikipedia:

Seagate was traded for most of its life as a public company under the symbol "SGAT" on the NASDAQ system, then moved to the NYSE system under the symbol "SEG" in the 1990s. In 2000, the company was taken private by an investment group composed of Seagate management, Silver Lake Partners and Texas Pacific Group in a 3-way merger-spinoff with Veritas Software; Veritas merged with Seagate, which was bought by the investment group. Veritas was then immediately spun off to shareholders, gaining rights to Seagate Software Network and Storage Management Group (with products such as Backup Exec), as well as Seagate's shares in SanDisk and Dragon Systems. Seagate Software Information Management Group was renamed Crystal Decisions in May 2001. Seagate re-entered the public market in December 2002 on the New York Stock Exchange as STX.


The US has every right to be concerned.

Horse, cart, barn door, etc etc etc. (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378807)

This has raised concerns among American government officials about the risks to national security in transferring high technology to China.

Why start now?

Too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20378923)

They already do all their manufacturing in China, anyway.

What I want to know is why all, or nearly all, manufacturing of consumer products has gone to China in the past fifteen years. Is the price advantage really that big? Have North Americans forgotten how to run factories, and how to work in them? There are inherent advantages to owning your own factories: you avoid giving a percentage of your profits to a third-party firm, and you can do quality control &tc much more effectively (see the Mattel recalls). The PHBs at our companies should stop focusing on buying each other out, and start looking at how to bring down the cost of manufacturing in their own companies. Then, if there is a 1/$ price differential with Chinese goods, they can slap a big flag on the box and say 'Made in America'. By now, that should be worth something - at least for any American who's been watching the news.

No wonder the US$ is in free fall (1)

gvc (167165) | more than 7 years ago | (#20378927)

Americans like to buy Chinese stuff with their greenbacks, but refuse to honor them when the Chinese attempt to purchase anything of value.

Re:No wonder the US$ is in free fall (1)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379175)

Americans like to buy Chinese stuff with their greenbacks

Not really, it's just hard to find stuff that ISN'T made in China.

but refuse to honor them when the Chinese attempt to purchase anything of value.

Two responses come to mind:
We're glad to sell the stuff. Just not companies. Cars come to mind.
We'll sell them something of value when they finally sell us something of value.

just don't lick them... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20379027)

For you geeks that don't have lights in your basements, it is no longer safe to determine computer parts by taste due to lead content in hard drives (because, you know... no electronics have EVER contained lead!)

Too Little, Too Late (1)

YetAnotherBob (988800) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379083)

The time when this could have been done was in the 1970's. now, with Globalization, the technical 'secrets' are spread out all over the world.

Quick, somebody lock the door, the horse just go out of the barn!

Outrage? (1)

king-manic (409855) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379213)

You do know a large amount of drives are made in Taiwan. Which is within arms reach of Chinese technology spies. I can't imagine sea gate has much technology that China hasn't already stolen.

Future merger ideas... (1)

supremebob (574732) | more than 7 years ago | (#20379261)

Perhaps they should buy Hitachi Global Storage instead, and then pick up Lexmark as well. Do that, and they've basically rebuilt a Chinese version IBM's former hardware division!

Pfff... NON-sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#20379299)

Just about all Seagate drives are currently made in Singapore, China, Taiwan, and one other south-east Asian country that escapes me. I deal with an insanely high volume of seagate drives in my profession. This is complete FUD imo.
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