Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

290 comments

Fired (2, Funny)

Cassius Corodes (1084513) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381013)

Fired... out of a cannon... into the sun.

Re:Fired (1)

the_tsi (19767) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381527)

You gotta do what you gotta do.

Why not George Lucas? (4, Funny)

writertype (541679) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381021)

Basically, this is the equivalent of "first post", for this topic, at least.

Re:Why not George Lucas? (1)

ilovegeorgebush (923173) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381029)

While you're there, can you send Ben Affleck with them too. It'd be great if you could 'accidentally' jettison him into the sun; we'd all appreciate it.

Glad to see... (5, Insightful)

speaker of the truth (1112181) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381023)

Glad to see NASA focusing on the important stuff when it comes to space.

Re:Glad to see... (4, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381071)

Rutan recently said, "Admitting that the shuttle was wrong is an honest thing, but there is not the courage to actually try something we don't know will work. It means that we are absolutely, positively guaranteed to not solve the problem" of the dangers and expense of spaceflight.

Re:Glad to see... (0)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381445)

How was the shuttle "wrong"? and i don't know about you, but there's no way i'd go into space not knowing if shit was going to work or not.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381627)

If he needs to tell you then you won't understand. Go read about the failure that is the shuttle program.

They tried to make a vehicle that would be everything to everyone. They got a vehicle that does just that.. poorly.

Re:Glad to see... (-1, Troll)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381689)

"If he needs to tell you then you won't understand."

1. i'm guessing since you are reffering to yourself in the third person like that you either meant to post as AC, or your the kind of wierdo that just does that kind of thing all the time.

2. if your going to get all defensive and refuse to answer such a simple question, you probably don't have any facts to begin with and are bashing the space program for some other reason.

3. are you suggesting anyone that who asks a question should know the answer before asking? if so why would anyone ask any questions? do you not see the failure in this logic.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381703)

Uhhh, by "he" I was referring to Burt Rutan.. the guy I quoted.

And as for me, personally, not wanting to educate you on the inadequacy of the shuttle program, I just couldn't be fucked ok?

I don't wanna argue with you about it.

Re:Glad to see... (0, Offtopic)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381771)

ok, the post certainly looked like you were referring to your own post when you said "he" not he as in the person you quoted

Re:Glad to see... (1)

edmicman (830206) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381989)

Anything specific, or should I just Google "shuttle program failures" and take a crap shoot? Of course, I could probably get just as many results if I Googled "shuttle program successes". So who's right? There's that thing about opinions and assholes and everyone having one...

The Next Generation (2, Insightful)

Nymz (905908) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381167)

If firing a Star Wars movie prop into space, is what it takes, to get the next generations attention and acceptance of continued funding of NASA programs, then perhaps we should rethink the whole thing. Isn't teaching the truth about outer-space enough? because I don't think another Lance Bass [people.com] is the way to save NASA.

Re:The Next Generation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381281)

But are we being told the truth?
I highly doubt we're being told any of the real interesting stuff they're learning.

Yes I'm talking about aliens. Find some aliens or produce proof that you've already found em.
You'll get your renewed interest.

We went to the moon almost 40 years ago. Even back then they thought that by now we'd be seeing some useful real world gadgets and machinery.
Not that we don't have some pretty damn cool toys, but I think we as a nation expected a little bit more out of space than what we've seen.

But more on topic, firing the light saber into space is just stupid. What is that possibly going to accomplish other than to get nerds gasping.
And not /. nerds, real hardcore basement dwelling nerds (see comic book guy, et al)

Re:The Next Generation (5, Insightful)

kamapuaa (555446) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381369)

Lance Bass didn't actually go into space, but as a rich person who wanted to spend his own money to make it into space, that sort of thing is exactly what the space program needs. Private enterprise realizing financial opportunities in space flight would be about the best possible thing that could happen to NASA, whether it's exotic vacations, or increased satellites, or zero-G research, or mining some exotic kind of space narcotic, or whatever the fuck people might want from outer space and be willing to spend money for. NASA right now exists somewhere between being a long term investment and as a propaganda arm of the US government, its future is always going to be in doubt while that's true.

Re:The Next Generation (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381787)

Yu know, I have to wonder if sending the damn thing up is really as cheap as you think. I've worked at NASA for well over 20 years and not much of anything that flies is cheap - if for no other reason than than the testing which must be done first and I am not talking about the testing required to ensure functionality in the on-orbit environment. I am talking about safety of flight issues. Just about everything we fly is tested for things like: 1. If it gets broken will it spew nasty little fragments into the air - fragments which in a weightless environment might float around intil they were inhaled by a crew member of mucked up some piece of equipment. Think about the average broken light bulb here. 2. If per chance it were to be invloved in a fire what if any toxic gases would be released? 3. Out gassing - what little nasty things could be released into the cabin's atmosphere when exposed to the reduced pressure found in both the shuttle and the ISS crew cabins? This is just a short list of the many things NASA checks for before sending an item up - so did NASA wive some of their own safety requirements to send this object up, or are they admitting that they often go overboard with the expensive testing because no one wants to be the one who takes the risk of admitting that some of this is overkill?

Re:Glad to see... (4, Insightful)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381169)

If you're sending up space shuttle Discovery, I doubt there's a lot of wasted costs on putting a lightsabre in there. :-p

You could look at it in another way too -- without publicity for the masses (and not just space geeks), theye will lose interest in it. This seems like a very effort free way of raising publicity, and quite different on truly having their wrong focus by launching satellites for fun.

Re:Glad to see... (2, Informative)

opec (755488) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381191)

If you're sending up space shuttle Discovery, I doubt there's a lot of wasted costs on putting a lightsabre in there. :-p

The average cost per pound to send to Low Earth Orbit is $3632 - $4587. [1]

[1] Source: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewnews.html?id=301 [spaceref.com]

Re:Glad to see... (5, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381429)

So what you're saying is that this is really cheap advertising.

Personally, I think NASA could more easily improve their image by putting a few cameras on the shuttle.. and showing us what the astronauts are actually doing when they're going through the procedures to return to earth, say, instead of showing us shot after shot of the landing strip, 4 hours before the shuttle is even scheduled to enter the atmosphere.

Maybe put together some CG of the shuttle doing what it does when the astronauts press the buttons on the flight deck. Show us that when they're going through the procedures.. instead of the same shot of the earth from the ISS for 40 minutes.

Ya know, actually engage the people on the ground in the process.

Re:Glad to see... (5, Informative)

fr4nk (1077037) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381475)

Personally, I think NASA could more easily improve their image by putting a few cameras on the shuttle.. and showing us what the astronauts are actually doing when they're going through the procedures to return to earth, say, instead of showing us shot after shot of the landing strip, 4 hours before the shuttle is even scheduled to enter the atmosphere.
You should have a look at NASA TV [nasa.gov] during Shuttle missions.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381615)

That's what I'm talking about (what else would I be talking about).

Last shuttle mission, coming down, 3 hours of looking at the runway.. or looking at the guys in the control center looking at the runway.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

bytesex (112972) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381671)

The US admin will never go for it; another camera that can be accidentally left on when they're doing supersecret stuff up there.

Re:Glad to see... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381867)

Nah... Joe sixpack isn't interested in all that high-falutin sciency shit! He is more interested in the light sabre.

glass of water (2, Insightful)

7bit (1031746) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381459)

If you're sending up space shuttle Discovery, I doubt there's a lot of wasted costs on putting a lightsabre in there. :-p

The average cost per pound to send to Low Earth Orbit is $3632 - $4587. [1]

WoWz! So why aren't we training horse-jockeys [jockeysroom.com] to be astronauts?

And if each astronaught has a glass of water before getting onto the shuttle? That would be pretty expensive too!

I suspect the weight of the light saber safely falls within the margin of error they build into their fuel calculations and as such won't really cost them any more than they are already going to spend/use in fuel anyway. Well worth it in my opinion. There isn't any reason why we can't make all our endeavors a little more fun and inspiring, it's what humans are all about.

Re:glass of water (1)

YGingras (605709) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381613)

I just fail to see what is inspiring in launching a cheap flashlight handle in the great void. Launch the ratchet used by Rutan or take the solemn moment of the light saber throw to have an astronaut read an essay on _his_ quest for science instead. I want to hear about this real space explorer, not about a cheesy fictional hero from an over hyped space opera.

Re:glass of water (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381631)

~ Chinese astronaut weight limit: men's weight under 50kg; women under 45kg.

BTT: This is pretty strained even as a publicity stunt, the light sabre prop itself doesn't exactly glow like in the movie, I guess they could post-produce the interview where the astronauts wave it around, but its getting too stupid. Its symptomatic of NASA running out of ideas.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

BuR4N (512430) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381487)

I would say that its a bigger issue that they still send upp the shuttle than the lightsaber in question.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

kill.yr.transistors (1099435) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381507)

Jesus, no kidding. I wouldn't think this is exactly the kind of publicity NASA needs. Replacing moon rocks with light sabers? That's sacreligious.

Re:Glad to see... (5, Funny)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381775)

Jesus, no kidding. I wouldn't think this is exactly the kind of publicity NASA needs. Replacing moon rocks with light sabers? That's sacreligious.

Just wait. Soon enough, they'll be modifying the Moon to look like the Death Star.

At least they'll want us to believe they're only modifying it to look like the Death Star, while actual"#$//" NO CARRIER.

Re:Glad to see... (1)

jjig (1148563) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381863)

I agree, nothing else deserves to go into space more than a 30 year old movie prop.

Careful... (5, Funny)

Treskin (555947) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381033)

Hey, now. That's one of the great artifacts of geekdom, and they're risking it on a shuttle launch? I seem to recall NASA's shuttles being a little... what's the word... explody, at times. Losing another crew would be bad enough, but Luke's saber? C'mon!

Re:Careful... (0, Redundant)

SC-James (1142747) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381121)

Your attempt at humor was lost when it involved real people dying.

Re:Careful... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381569)

No, it was funny up until people dying, then it became genious!

Re:Careful... (5, Funny)

tsm_sf (545316) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381583)

Tragedy is when I cut my finger, comedy is when you fall into an open manhole and die.

- Mel Brooks

Re:Careful... (2, Insightful)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381753)

On the contrary, he raises a very good point. NASA is sending up a priceless (at lest to many of people) artifact in a vehicle that has a history of well blowing up. Now granted this isn't the first time that they've done such things and it is still more then likely that it will survive it's just kind of funny to think that the lightsaber might be lost forever just because the damn shuttle blew up. (again)

Re:Careful... (2, Informative)

Richard W.M. Jones (591125) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381901)

An irreplaceable (though probably not priceless) drawing by an Auschwitz victim was lost aboard Columbia (reference [wikipedia.org] ).

Rich.

huh, isn't this dangerous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381037)

Wouldn't that lightsaber cause problems? Like damaging the heat shield or such. You know, these shuttles are rather vulnerable.

Re:huh, isn't this dangerous? (1)

Curien (267780) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381273)

It'll be fine. In a pinch, the saber can substitute for an inanimate carbon rod.

Obligatory (0, Redundant)

JustinVanHorne (825036) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381039)

Suddenly, in a basement far, far away... a lone Star Wars fanboy cries out in pain.

Really cool if (5, Funny)

dotslashdot (694478) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381045)

What would be really cool is if some aliens found it and made operational and then shipped it to me using GalEx (GalaxyExpress). Then I could go up to my boss, rattle my light saber by saying "Look. I am your fodder." Khoo khaa.

Re:Really cool if (1)

Phydaux (1135819) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381541)

If only you'd extended your fantasy to use Planet Express instead. You could have a sexy one-eyed mutant with purple hair deliver it.

Re:Really cool if (1)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381633)

You mean "Galaxy Quest" style?

You got me thinking what would happen if some aliens saw other Sci-Fi films and made them real.

For example:

Alien? Then manufacture a 7ft killing machine of an alien.
Babylon5. I think that would be kind of cool.
'Trek, best not to go there. Galaxy Quest got there first.

But what would they make of 2001, A Scanner Darkly, Solaris or ET? I find the idea of making the ship from ET somehow ridiculous. The old classic Cygnus from "The Black Hole" would be most excellent - I always like that. Of course, if they made an "authentic" Millennium Falcon it would be constantly falling apart when you needed it the most.

Hey ho, better get back to doing some work... zzz.

NASA must have too much money (2, Insightful)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381053)

At a cost of about $9,000 per kilogramme to get something into orbit with the shuttle, is this really the best use of tax payers' money ?

Re:NASA must have too much money (5, Informative)

Ubitsa_teh_1337 (1006277) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381095)

Actually, though this may come as a surprise, the space shuttle is not fueled by money, it's fueled by rocket fuel. The $9,000/kilo figure is just an average based on how much it costs to launch the shuttle and how heavy the shuttle is. Adding a .5kg lightsaber doesn't change how expensive the launch will be, at all.

Re:NASA must have too much money (2, Insightful)

SamP2 (1097897) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381179)

No, but it means that something else (of potential scientific or utilitarian use) will be left behind.

Saying a lightsaber doesn't add an extra cost to a shuttle is like saying you should ride the bus free because the bus is driving anyways, and 1 more person won't change the cost of paying for the gas or the driver's salary. But that either means someone else won't be able to get on, or the bus generates less revenue which will simply rollover to either less bus service in the future or higher ticket costs for the rest, to cover for that loss.

There's a REASON there's such a huge pricetag on lifting anything in orbit, and you can't say "well the shuttle's gonna fly anyways so I might as well throw this trinket in", especially when there are a ton of legitimate things waiting YEARS for a chance of being lifted into space.

Re:NASA must have too much money (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381241)

especially when there are a ton of legitimate things waiting YEARS for a chance of being lifted into space.
Meh, the reason why things, and people, wait years to get a chance to fly has nothing to do with technical capability and everything to do with politics.

That's what being an astronaut is.. suckin' ass for your chance.

Re:NASA must have too much money (5, Insightful)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381363)

There's a REASON there's such a huge pricetag on lifting anything in orbit, and you can't say "well the shuttle's gonna fly anyways so I might as well throw this trinket in", especially when there are a ton of legitimate things waiting YEARS for a chance of being lifted into space.

Too bad they weigh enough that they don't fit in this flight's spare capacity, like the light saber does. There's a limit to how much each flight can carry. They fit as much scientific stuff as they can on each one. But there's often spare capacity.

You're just wrong.

Re:NASA must have too much money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381687)

*agree parent*; Not to mention the fact that George Lucas probably footed the bill. The publicity alone will earn him more than $9,000 * (weight of the light saber) in future revenues, so he might as well write a check for it.

If you've got some spare junk you want to send into orbit, I'm sure Nasa would be willing to consider taking it up if you pay them 2-3x the cost.

NASA to Astronauts: Lose Weight! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381421)

So NASA can save money by forcing the astronauts to lose mass ("weight"). Perhaps they will be sending waifs into space to save on money -- they'd have less mass, be more photogenic, and you needn't pack much food. Lastly, due to chronic malnutrition they'd have very little energy to engage in those lusty love triangles that seem to plague NASA. It's the perfect plan!

Re:NASA must have too much money (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381847)

Your understanding of economics is only valid when the bus is at a loss to begin with, the moment the bus breaks even or is profitable its an invalid comparison.

As for the value of sending Luke Lightsabre into orbit? 9 000 dollars/kg, the value of selling Luke Lightsabre (post-space travel) on eBay? Significantly more I'm betting.

Why would NASA possibly do it? Because they're probably sick of being given bullshit objectives and being underfunded - they're planning to raise some money on the side so they can fund actual research instead of whatever hype-word is currently on the present administrations tongue - remember that they're geeks too and have geeky dreams of seeing progress occur. (or maybe this last part is just my wet dream of a space agency that produces results).

Re:NASA must have too much money (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381625)

Actually, though this may come as a surprise, the space shuttle is not fueled by money, it's fueled by rocket fuel. The $9,000/kilo figure is just an average based on how much it costs to launch the shuttle and how heavy the shuttle is. Adding a .5kg lightsaber doesn't change how expensive the launch will be, at all.

Actually, the Mercury astronauts hit it on the head in one when they said, "No bucks, no Buck Rogers." Gotta buy the rocket fuel...

Re:NASA must have too much money (1)

ijakings (982830) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381835)

America? BUYing fuel? America doesn't buy fuel they Invade middle eastern countries when they run out.

Oh in other news Iran IS building the death star, although they cant find it they are sure its there.

Thus the shuttle program has fuel for another several years.

Re:NASA must have too much money (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381165)

I'm pretty sure it's worth it. The astronauts are bored with their Force Push and Force Pull powers, they want something different to do in their idle times. I heard that they wanted to bring Darth Vader's mask too but they we're turned down.. too bad.. oh well..

Re:NASA must have too much money (2, Funny)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381743)

Use the budget Luke.

Yay tax dollars! (1)

Shwaffle (1145365) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381065)

Glad to see our tax dollars hard at work for something so trivial.

Re:Yay tax dollars! (1)

catbutt (469582) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381189)

Unless the reason they are doing this is to get some money from Lucas.

Where no Geek has gone before (1)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381073)

If they really wanted to fire imaginations and send it where Geeks dream of going they should send it to a whore house in Nevada. It'd be cheaper, get more press, and inspire generations of Geeks to shoot for the stars, former porn stars but they're still stars damnmit!

Actually not Luke's original lightsaber (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381083)

The picture is of his lightsaber from Ep. 6 - "Return of the Jedi" which he built after losing his hand and his original lightsaber (inherited from Anakin) during his battle with Darth Vader in Ep. 5. //no thanks necessary - it's my job as a pedant and Star Wars geek.

Do they let wookies on airplanes? (1)

NoxNoctis (936876) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381105)

How is Chewie getting on the plane? I doubt he has a driver's license, passport, or military ID. What about the metal detector? Hell, the bomb detector?!?! Wookies should not get preferential treatment in my not-so-humble opinion.

Re:Do they let wookies on airplanes? (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381159)

Uh huh. Maybe if more people ripped the arms off TSA agents we'd have more sensible air travel security.

Re:Do they let wookies on airplanes? (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381943)

I suspect they're going to pretend he's a prisoner or something. All it takes is some loosely-fitting wrist binders, you know.

American efficiency! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381107)

Think about it: Russia gets ~$20m for launching a 150lb person into space; by making itself popular, NASA gets _at least_ $20m in extra funding from Congress for sending a 1lb piece of pop culture into space. American efficiency at its best!

Um (1)

HillaryWBush (882804) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381119)

Is it going to come back?

Re:Um (5, Funny)

OldManAndTheC++ (723450) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381171)

Yes. It will be ejected into space, while miles below on the ground, Mark Hamill will reach spaceward, grimacing slightly as if straining on the toilet. The lightsaber will fly towards his outstretched hand through the power of The Force.

This is also how he retrieves his TV remote without getting up.

Re:Um (5, Funny)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381183)

This is also how he retrieves his TV remote without getting up.


from the toilet?

Re:Um (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381581)

Yes. It will be ejected into space, while miles below on the ground, Mark Hamill will reach spaceward, grimacing slightly as if straining on the toilet. The lightsaber will fly towards his outstretched hand through the power of The Force.

This is also how he retrieves his TV remote without getting up.
Coincidentally, it's also how he managed to eject himself through the windshield of a vehicle after straining to get a fart out.
 

UGH (0, Redundant)

posterlogo (943853) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381139)

I wish they'd launch George Lucas into space. Enough already.

Great... (4, Funny)

Chlorus (1146335) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381173)

...now some alien civilization will find it and a) sell it on Ebay for a ludicrous amount or b) brag to various and sundry that they own the original prop. Or they'll just do with it what they'll probably do to the Voyager probes: Toss it in the trash.

Re:Great... (-1, Offtopic)

speaker of the truth (1112181) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381495)

I don't think there are many Mexicans in space, so no alien civilization should get it.

Re:Great... (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381829)

d) or V'ger it and send it back with an army of lightsaber wielding sharks!

Why? (4, Interesting)

Jartan (219704) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381175)

I'm not much of the sort to care about this thing usually but I have to question what the point is of sending a expensive cultural item flinging off into space is? Shouldn't the thing be in a museum or something somewhere? Or perhaps sell it and get the Astronauts some new cupholders?

Re:Why? (1)

Bottlemaster (449635) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381299)

Shouldn't the thing be in a museum or something somewhere?
It belongs in a museum!

Sorry, that was one in a million.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

edmazur (958154) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381773)

FTA:

The laser-like Jedi weapon is being flown to the orbiting outpost and back in honor of the 30th anniversary of director George Lucas' franchise.

Not a big deal (5, Funny)

Derek Loev (1050412) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381249)

Guys, don't worry, I'm sure it's not the real lightsaber. The real one was lost years ago. This is a digitally remastered (better) lightsaber with added features and toys! Very soon you will be able to buy your own original (digitally remastered and better) lightsaber at your local convenience store and you too can shoot it off into space. And it really is a good buy, George Lucas has assured us the money will go to deleting the entire Obi-Wan Darth Vader duel of A New Hope and adding a new scene (digitally remastered and better, of course) with Ewan McGregor. It's going to be great!

Re:Not a big deal (1, Offtopic)

gbobeck (926553) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381367)

Also, with this lightsaber, Greedo shoots first.

Re:Not a big deal (1)

Derek Loev (1050412) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381521)

It's so nice to have a big picture of Hayden Christiansen on this lightsaber, the old lightsaber was just boring.

We seem to be... (4, Informative)

Derek Loev (1050412) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381267)

Star Wars Fans: We seem to be made to suffer. It's our lot in life.

Luke was my nick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381343)

I was called Luke when I was 16. You know, computer guys called me Luke on BBSs. We had the dial up underground. Those were the days.

Star Wars episodes I, II and III .... (1)

jmhowitt (212498) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381365)

..... Could they maybe take the masters for these with them and er, loose them?

Such a waste (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381395)

Now we may never know if ants can be trained to sort tiny screws in space.

Re:Such a waste (1)

shinmai (632532) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381577)

I was waiting for someone to make that reference. Hope no-one decided to sneak chips onboard, though...

New heat shield repair method? (1)

nadamucho (1063238) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381401)

Will this replace Standard Operating Procedure for in-orbit tile repair.

Shouldn't it already be in space? (5, Funny)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381425)

After Vader cut off Luke's hand, I thought the saber would be tumbling somewhere in the Bespin system.

The irony of that moment is that Luke's father "wanted him to have it", except Luke's father cut off his hand to disarm him of it. And apparently Obi-Wan's interpretation of "he wanted you to have it", is "I took it from him after I left the bastard for dead." Though, I imagine his phrasing seems a little more sentimental.

Re:Shouldn't it already be in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381737)

Yes, of course, as we all know, lightsabers are negatively affected by the force of a planet's gravity, so as soon as Luke's hand was cut off and fell down towards the gas giant Bespin, the lightsaber broke free of its weakened grasp and made its final break toward the heavens, where it now floats free.

Re:Shouldn't it already be in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381877)

Actually, in one of the Hand of Thrawn novels (The Last Command, if I recall correctly), Luke's lightsaber and severed hand had been recovered by the Emperor. Why he needs NASA to put it back into space is anyone's guess.

Re:Shouldn't it already be in space? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381961)

I don't normally respond to AC posts, but I'm going to prove how much of a geek I am. When the Thrawn/Zahn novels had been writen, cannon was still that the Emperor died. Thrawn led the emperor, and the Jedi-nemesis of the time was named something like Jorus C'Boath. Damned if I can recall the spelling, but I haven't read the novel in over ten years. Either way, it was later introduced in the Dark Empire comics that the Emperor himself was cloned and brought back on the planet Byss, but it was Thrawn and C'Boath who cloned Luke in The Last Command, which Mara got to kill.

A better project would of been to (1)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381519)

To study of the effects of weightlessness on tiny screws.

Not everyone's happy about this ... (1)

krou (1027572) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381547)

Chewbacca apparently said, "ARRRRGHHH ARRR ARRR ARRR ARRR!" when he heard the news.

Doesn't sound good. Personally, I think NASA are crazy to upset a wookie that can rip your arms off.

In the year 2025... (1)

Perseid (660451) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381557)

...there will be a great battle between the Yodanians and the Jarjarites over possession of the staff of the great Lord Lucas.

You think the Star Wars geeks are scary now. You just wait.

Re:In the year 2025... (1)

laejoh (648921) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381815)

Jarjarites? Are those a race of java developers or what?

better use it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381591)

One of the astronauts had better get filmed waving it around wildly in the space station so we can add on the 'light' bit and swooshy sounds.

perhaps the others could pretend to get chopped up by it for added fun.

Great! Astronaut Fanfilms! (1, Funny)

erroneus (253617) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381599)

First the StarWars Kid and now this!

I can't wait to see astronauts "training with a remote" videos and letting people here on earth do the video editing. :) Please, someone donate some storm trooper armor and other stuff as well! :)

Your tax dollars at work (1, Insightful)

DrXym (126579) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381665)

What an utterly pointless and futile act. They should have auctioned the light sabre off and donated the proceeds to something that promotes or furthers science in some way.

Serenity beat them to it (4, Informative)

mattcoz (856085) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381779)

One of the crew members on a recent shuttle trip to the international space station brought the Firefly and Serenity DVDs up with them. Breaking Atmo [breakingatmo.com]

Some days I'm glad I'm not an astronaut (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381783)

NASA will launch Luke Skywalker's original Jedi lightsaber into space along with the crew of the space shuttle Discovery.
What I wanna know is how did NASA pick the crew? Pick a straw, any straw. If you pick the smallest you'll be sent tumbling into space attached to a Starwars toy lightsaber. Yup, even the pilot. Nope, we'll land the shuttle by remote control, nice try.

Wheres the training driod? (1)

Calathea (557538) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381823)

Surely they could have put a training droid on board so they could film it floating about and stick it on youtube.

Who is doing their PR? (-1, Flamebait)

merikari (205531) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381889)

I know they are doing a lot more than just stupid publicity stunts, but is this the kind of image they want to have? Next there will be a reality show with diaper wearing astronauts.

Some pretty cool people have worked and probably still work for NASA, but when an organisation that should concentrate on scientific research tries to be "hip" it rarely works in their favor.

Mark Hamill? (3, Insightful)

inicom (81356) | more than 6 years ago | (#20381903)

Am I the only one sad that Mark Hamill isn't part of the ceremony? I'm sure it couldn't be a question of cost. Instead, the only "dignataries" at the send off and return are costumes. If Luke's saber is being used for publicity, the hand that wielded it should be as well.

And should the shuttle explode.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20381919)

Then they already have their perfect excuse: The crew have become more powerful than we can possibly imagine. Come on, give me a break here. During the last launch they also had some serious problems, things seem to be getting worse again. Why don't they pay attention to things which matter?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...