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Don't Let Your Boss Catch You Reading This

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the you're-all-here-doing-research-not-a-problem dept.

The Internet 368

Stony Stevenson writes "iTnews is running a piece on the culture of cyberslacking in the business arena. Studies worldwide suggest employees spend about a fifth of their work shifts engaging in personal activities. Most of that 'wasted time' is, of course, spent online. From the article: 'A recent survey by online compensation firm Salary.com showed about six out of 10 employees in the United States acknowledged wasting time at work. About 34 percent listed personal Internet use as the leading time-wasting activity in the workplace. Employees said they did so because they were bored, worked too many hours, were underpaid or were unchallenged at work. Firms all over the world are concerned about potentially harmful effects of surfing they deem to be inappropriate may have on their company's image.'"

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368 comments

Heh. (1, Insightful)

Mattintosh (758112) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399389)

"Nothing for you to see here. Please move along" never seemed more appropriate.

Poll: When reloading Slashdot every five... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399657)

...seconds, what do you do when your boss comes in?


1. Claim you are researching business value of deploying Linux.

2. Fess up and tell your boss you are cyberslacking.

3. Tell your boss you are researching the viability of a CmdrTaco-based CRM.

4. You quickly hit the "boss" key combination which brings up vi in a console and opens the source code you were supposed to be finishing by the deadline.

5. You point out the window and tell your boss someone is picking the lock on his car.

Thank you. I'll be here all week!

Anonymous Coward Sig 2.0:
--
Madonna > *

Re:Poll: When reloading Slashdot every five... (-1, Offtopic)

trolltalk.com (1108067) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400261)

6. You show them your pr0n collection. Or you threaten to show them this dickhead [trolltalk.com] or this [trolltalk.com] and he hopefully goes blind ...

" Almost a fifth of those surveyed in a 2006 Israeli-American poll said they accessed online sex sites at work."

Yeah, riiiight ... only 1 in 5 surfs porn at work? Lies, damned lies, and statistics. Everyone knows the internet is for porn.

Hold on there, junior... (5, Insightful)

It doesn't come easy (695416) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399399)

In the first place, the Internet didn't create the ability to waste time at work. These "studies" never quantify the amount of time wasted at work today to that which was wasted before the Internet. Without comparing before vs. after, one cannot reach any absolute conclusions.

In the second place, I work practically everywhere these days because of the Internet. I work at home, in the airport, in restaurants, in the car, etc. So counting all these other working locations, my productivity is significantly better than it was 20 years ago.

In the third place, people aren't machines. People are more productive, and more creative, if they take a mental break now and then. And people make better business decisions if they stay current with social trends and events. It's not a time waster, it's a cost of doing business.

Nuff said. Now quit bothering me, I really need to get back to work before my boss comes in.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (5, Insightful)

Bin Naden (910327) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399517)

I feel that the fact that most people waste 1/5 of their time on the internet may be a good indication that work weeks are 1/5th too long. In fact, if I could find a job where I would only work 4 days a week, I would probably be as if not more productive than now that I work 5 days a week. This is a case where corporations should revisit their policies instead of the other way around.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (5, Insightful)

Da Fokka (94074) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399637)

Be careful what you ask for - you might just end up with a 32 hour workweek getting 80% of the pay and end up browsing slashdot in your own time. Anyway, I think you're wrong. There is no intrinsic reason why 40 hours a week would be too much and 32 hours just enough. Smart employers (like mine, I'm typing this from work) don't mind some personal browsing and just care about the job getting done.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (4, Interesting)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399823)

This is more or less where my company stands on things...as long as you aren't looking at "innappropriate material" (porn and such) and you get all your work done by the end of the day, they don't care....you could spend 5 hours a day on the internet just screwing around, and as long as you finish everything assigned to you before the time you are supposed to leave, you won't ever be talked to about it.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20400169)

Unless you have one of those bosses with the "If you aren't doing anything then grab a broom" busy-work mentality.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (3, Interesting)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400255)

Luckily, with the way our company and our "teams" are structured, each person is assigned specfici tasks to do and are trained to do those tasks...as such, unless you have been trained to do something, they could be short 5 people and they STILL won't ask you to help out.

It sounds assbackwords, I know, but in doing it this way people are EXTREMELY proficient at what they do...our revenues are massive, and our clients are always happy...not to mention you never get someone who is "luke warm" about their job...if you don't like what you are doing, you are simply moved to another role.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (3, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399857)

Smart employers (like mine, I'm typing this from work) don't mind some personal browsing and just care about the job getting done.
That tends to work well, within reason. I had an employer a number of years ago where the policy was that if all the work was done for the day, that we could come in early and relax. Unfortunately in practice, if there was a project manager at the site, they would have us come back in early and do some other work. Really demoralizing when ones group was the only group which ended up with extra work.

But done in a fair minded way, it can definitely encourage efficiency gains. And in general if there is that much extra time being spent, it would make sense to just hand out some sort of bonus and give the worker(s) a bit more work to fill out most of the extra time.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (1)

kc2keo (694222) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400013)

Yeah, maybe they should cut down on the work week. Who wants to work weekends? I hate it. Right now I have no job and going to college. Looking for a part time job though...

Re:Hold on there, junior... (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399651)

That won't scale, though. It might work for a systems architect, possibly not for your help desk or customer service(where you are paying for availability), definitely not for food or retail service.

I'd like to see the work week shortened, as a benefit of the much vaunted increase in productivity that technology has afforded us, but we'd have to accept some changes that might prove unpopular, including higher prices for services from businesses that would need to hire additional help.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399769)

Meh. Just adjust your work habits. I do mentally intensive crap for about 5 hours a day...Programming, Systems work, debugging, etc. The rest of the time I do some of the piles of pointless crap that are also part of my job...Checking logs, talking to people, writing documentation, doing security audits, fixing stupid problems...Boring, mindless crap.

They may pay you to do X, but there is plenty of other stuff to do when you can't concentrate on X for another second without going berzerk...Or if there isn't, you need to start looking for a job, because your company has problems (or you're doing something really repetitive and menial).

Save the trees (2, Funny)

daveywest (937112) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399645)

I personally would like to thank the internet for saving the trees. Think of all the stupid faxes the office secretary used to forward every day. There is scientific proof the net is saving the planet.

Hold on there, employee... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399671)

"In the first place, the Internet didn't create the ability to waste time at work. These "studies" never quantify the amount of time wasted at work today to that which was wasted before the Internet. Without comparing before vs. after, one cannot reach any absolute conclusions."

No the internet didn't. However technology does what technology does and makes it easier to waste time.

"In the second place, I work practically everywhere these days because of the Internet. I work at home, in the airport, in restaurants, in the car, etc. So counting all these other working locations, my productivity is significantly better than it was 20 years ago."

Since were doing personals. I work in a warehouse. The internet wouldn't improve my productivity, and might have hurt it.

"In the third place, people aren't machines. People are more productive, and more creative, if they take a mental break now and then. And people make better business decisions if they stay current with social trends and events. It's not a time waster, it's a cost of doing business."

The issue is two-fold. One moderation should apply as much to the social aspects as any other. Second I find the social aspect argument a bit weak. The internet has been one of the forces that's isolated people from face to face interaction, and I think you'll find that surfing for porn isn't staying current on trends and events.

"Nuff said. Now quit bothering me, I really need to get back to work before my boss comes in."

Turn around.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (4, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399739)

I definitely agree with the spirit of your post. People waste time at work? So what?

You ask people to spend the majority of their waking life, somewhere in the neighborhood of 10 hours a day 5 days a week, in a little cubical, and you're surprised that they aren't hard at work for that entire time? They're people. They should be able to occasionally talk to people and read things that interest them.

It'd be a problem if you were only asking people to work 5 hours a day, 4 days a week, and people were wasting time on the job. I've had too many jobs, though, where there simply isn't more than 6 hours of work each day, but i had to be there for 10 hours. And those 6 hours of work were stressful, and the breaks kept me from snapping someone's neck.

Also, there's a question in my mind about what constitutes "wasting time". I work in IT. Is it a wast of my time to read Slashdot? Sometimes. But sometimes it's very informative. I've learned a lot from my web browsing while "wasting time", and a lot of that knowledge has benefitted my employers. I also used to "waste" a lot of time screwing around with various hardware/software products, which also lead to increasing my knowledge.

Being "productive" 24/7 just shouldn't be anyone's goal. A little experimentation/exploration/contemplation is useful.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (2, Interesting)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399939)

You ask people to spend the majority of their waking life, somewhere in the neighborhood of 10 hours a day 5 days a week, in a little cubical, and you're surprised that they aren't hard at work for that entire time? They're people. They should be able to occasionally talk to people and read things that interest them.

It's part of time management -- both on the parts of the worker and the manager.

I have a co-worker who constantly complains she's busy but spends a good portion of her day talking to other co-workers who aren't doing anything, takes personal calls at least two to three hours of the day, and spends most of the rest of the time playing Hearts while complaining loudly how busy she is. At least she looks like she's working for a portion of the day, I work with another douchebag that literally stares at the screensavers he just downloaded (they come on after 15 minutes of inactivity -- gives you an idea of how much work he does) and takes over an hour to type a three line e-mail.

I'm no perfect wonder (here I am posting on Slashdot) but I do take my breaks when queries are running and I'm out of paperwork to do. I also come in about 20 minutes early (a direct result of a final bus that my wife takes to work daily and my not feeling the need to sit at home for 5 more minutes and then rush to work) and may or may not start work immediately. That time is then spread throughout the day for various activities.

But this all comes down to a problem with managers not managing properly. If they expect people to work 8 hours straight, then they better have the work available to be done. The three examples I've outlined above reach from one end of the spectrum to the other. Managers should have the skills to properly motivate all three of those people. If not, they've failed in their job and are probably busy surfing websites, reading their AOL e-mail, and leaving work early to bid at an auction on a lake home they don't need.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (2, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400167)

Good point. A good manager will find work for his/her employees, will help motivate people, and will monitor people to make sure they're doing the expected work. However, I think that a good manager will also expect that no one is going to work 8 straight hours each and every day. It's not even all that healthy for people when you can get them to do it.

In fact, I think that 1/5 of an 8 hour work day (about an hour and a half) is pretty close to the right amount of "wasting time". I might drop it down to an hour instead, but people need a little down-time. 15 minutes here and 15 minutes there-- it adds up.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (1)

bocin (886008) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399775)

I am not the greatest at math but 34% of 6 out of 10 is quite a low number. What are all the real slackers doing?

Re:Hold on there, junior... (3, Insightful)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399901)

heh, FTA

Walter Block, a professor of economics at Loyola University in New Orleans, pointed to similarities between employees who slacked off before the computer age and those who waste time in cyberspace.
Your latter two points however are exactly correct. I hear meetings involving the words "Employee Morale" quite often, and yet no one seems to truely understand what that entails. Having the ability to "Waste" such time at work makes for a much happier workforce, who see their efforts much less like work due to such "Slacking". Such employees tend to deliver much higher quality results and care a lot more about actually HELPING the company and actually BEING creative. When we add to that your points of keeping the employees minds fresh and the fact that such employees can work MORE because of internet usage, this really does seem to be a seriously overblown concern.

Course it would depend entirely on the type of work ones site is doing as to whether such morale boosts would actually add value, but it doesnt change the fact that in many situations this can be a very good thing.

Re:Hold on there, junior... (1)

raddan (519638) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399943)

Precisely. The decision came down the chain today that we were going to install some Blue Coat web-blocking appliances. The "productivity" argument goes right out the window for starters-- we're the most profitable division of the company, by far.

I am opposed to this, of course, not just for the reasons you outlined, but that it seems like the decision happened for another reason: the "cover our asses" legal argument. I don't really see the rationale here, since anyone can sue anyone for anything. Someone who is easily offended is going to be easily offended regardless of filtering. Maybe they just want to show that they made an "effort", even if it doesn't work. But there are also important costs to consider: we publish textbooks on things like political science, gender studies, and so on. Will our employees suffer because they cannot access the information they need? And what about the added technological and bureaucratic layer this adds to everything? Not to mention: we're all adults! If your head explodes every time you see a little skin, the internet ain't your problem, buddy.

Sorry, I guess I'm just in rant mode since I heard about this...

Didn't read the article (0)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399413)

I was too busy poking people on Facebook.

Re:Didn't read the article (3, Funny)

xvicex (1096231) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399459)

Facebook didnt spend all my time, so I signed up for myspace as well

Re:Didn't read the article (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399565)

"Facebook didnt spend all my time, so I signed up for myspace as well"

The bigger question should be...what percentage of this wasted time, was wasted on Slashdot??

Re:Didn't read the article (3, Funny)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399893)

Facebook and MySpace are blocked here, but not Slashdot. Presumably because IT read it.

I don't waste time at work! (4, Funny)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399441)

Just because I read Slashdot at work means I'm slacking off.

Just a sec, I see someone in my monitor mirror *alt-tabs to Eclipse*

Okay, I'm back, just started a 6000 test JUnit test suite so if anyone wonders if I'm being productive, I can point to the green status bar slowly approaching 100%...

Re:I don't waste time at work! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399519)

As always, XKCD [xkcd.com] comes through with the goods: Compiling! [xkcd.com]

Re:I don't waste time at work! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399557)

Hey, /. is one of my sources for information about security problems! My boss already asks me to do it more. :)

Re:I don't waste time at work! (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399917)

Virtual desktops are more effective. With KDE you can set the taskbar icons to only show windows on the current desktop too (so right now, you see a terminal, my personal mail and Slashdot, Win-F1 and it's Eclipse and 4 terminals and a browser showing an API).

limit access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399463)

for the general office population:

at our place terminals don't have speakers or local USB devices enabled (no youtube / stage6 sound for you)

internet access is enabled/allowed in only a few 15min time windows during the day.

I shudder to think of the productivity loss at other places.

Re:limit access (4, Funny)

mikkelm (1000451) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399607)

Yeah, productivity thrives in tightly controlled workplaces where the management doesn't trust the employees.

limit consequences. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399839)

"Yeah, productivity thrives in tightly controlled workplaces where the management doesn't trust the employees."

Can they be trusted? Your post makes it sound like all employees are trustworthy.* Considering the slash-attitude on IP, business, and other issues. I'd frankly would be worried that someone would get a bee in their bonnet, and declare my business model "obsolete", frees my corporate information under the guise "information wants to be free", and in general walks out with some of the office supplies because "I owe them" something.

*Yes, yes, I shouldn't hire those kind of people. Keep that in mind next time you have to jump through so many hoops just to get a job, and how unfair it all seems.

Re:limit consequences. (2, Insightful)

mikkelm (1000451) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399981)

So you're saying that you're making your job application process arduous to weed out the useless, and you still claim not to trust your employees?

If an employer has a reason to complain about workforce productivity and sketchy work ethics, he can logically surmise that the problem began when he hired the people he's complaining about.

Re:limit access (1)

cbreaker (561297) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399691)

I dunno. People that are going to slack off are going to slack off other ways. Reading the paper, talking a walk to the cafeteria, whatever.

I'd be willing to bet that almost everyone in your organization completely stops all work during those "few 15min time windows" though, because people want to stay connected to their lives outside of work.

I do personal Internet all the time during the day; 3 minutes here, 5 minutes there, and I don't feel like I'm wasting time at all. I think it makes me more productive by slicing up the day a little bit.

As an employer, I ask: who cares? (4, Interesting)

dada21 (163177) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399473)

My employees are free to spend as much time as they want in the office surfing any site they want do: slashdot, porn, the anarchist's cookbook, whatever. It is useless to me to tell them what they can or can't do when they've met their personal goals for projects.

I also pay my employees differently than most consulting firms. We pay close to minimum wage, plus a very large bonus on each project. I've never had anyone quit, and I've never had anyone complain about their monthly paychecks. By offering a large portion of a project's profits, I know my employees won't waste my money (in salary), won't have to lie on their time sheets, and they'll do the best job they can do because they won't want to go and finish a punch list without pay or handle warranty work at a low rate. It is win-win, and a big reason why I'd prefer full 1099's than W2's if the IRS didn't prevent us from working that way.

When you're salaried or on wages, the employer has to focus a lot more on containing the employee and sending them in the proper direction, constantly. We have zero managers at my company, just consultants. It works fine. Our customers love us because we're 40% cheaper than others in the industry but we excel at handling their needs.

So this all lets me "not care" if an employee decides to spend all day long on the web, and only 1 hour on a project. If the customer is happy, and the work is good, and they do it quickly and correctly, they'll make a killing on the profit sharing, and they'll have a ton of free time to kill at the office if they want to be there. Our top employee works 2 days a week, I think, and earns a very respectable income. He can now spend 3 days at the office playing some MMOG, or go home and sleep. I could care less, the customers are happy.

No, we're not hiring.

Re:As an employer, I ask: who cares? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399513)

No, we're not hiring.
Ouch! You bastard.

Re:As an employer, I ask: who cares? (1)

dada21 (163177) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399547)

Actually, I offered 2 consulting gigs (1099) to people I met from here. My concern is an impending Recession (big "R") in the next year, so we're capping our expenses until the market shakes itself out. If it tanks, Dubai here we come.

Re:As an employer, I ask: who cares? (1)

Gulthek (12570) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400209)

Double ouch, you forward thinking heartless bastard. How dare you provide your employees with your best efforts to protect the company and their employment?

Now look, someone "got" it. (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399719)

Are you hiring?

My focus is to get the job done. Not spend the 38.5 hours in the office. If a problem exists that needs a solution NOW, I solve it. Now. There's a good reason why I recreated my complete office PC at home (as far as company policy allowed, of course).

Still, I'm currently in trouble for not spending enough time on my desk. Was there a problem with a project? No. Did my work suffer in any way? By far not, I'm the most productive analyst in the company. What's the problem? That that slacker ass of me didn't keep my office chair from flying away long enough.

Re:As an employer, I ask: who cares? (1)

_14k4 (5085) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399761)

That is interesting - what do you use to allow employees to bill time? Just a simple note, or something different like Act! or (for the tax prep folks)Lacerte (something similar).

As a salaried employee, I know my employer doesn't care if I write a note or surf here or there; checking my bank account, etc... for much the same reasons. The 8,000 employee firm I work for has payroll out on time, charges go out and come in, etc etc...

But, you are very much right - employing salaried people means you have to contain them, have them "on site" in some way or form, and point them in the right direction.

As a lawyer, I ask: what me, worry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399983)

"My employees are free to spend as much time as they want in the office surfing any site they want do: slashdot, porn, the anarchist's cookbook, whatever. It is useless to me to tell them what they can or can't do when they've met their personal goals for projects."

Apparently it's useless to you to pay attention to the legal can of worms your attitude opens.

"I also pay my employees differently than most consulting firms. We pay close to minimum wage, plus a very large bonus on each project. I've never had anyone quit, and I've never had anyone complain about their monthly paychecks."

The slashcrowd can look at previous reactions to this bit.

"So this all lets me "not care" if an employee decides to spend all day long on the web, and only 1 hour on a project. If the customer is happy, and the work is good, and they do it quickly and correctly, they'll make a killing on the profit sharing, and they'll have a ton of free time to kill at the office if they want to be there."

Blurring the distinction between home and work is going to bite you sooner or later.

Re:As an employer, I ask: who cares? (1)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400081)

Sounds good if you
a) have realistic project plans.
b) don't pull people off their projects randomly to (hopefully) save other projects that seem to be failing.

In other words, if your employees actually have a good chance of succeding with their projects if they have the skills and put in the effort. Unfortunately, project planning at my current employer is inadequate for that, so your method might not work for us.

Which reminds me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399483)

I'd better get back to work.

Also, wasting a fifth of your time at work is much better than downing a fifth at work (former boss from hell. :)

1/5th of the time wasted? (4, Insightful)

elenaran (649639) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399485)

I think 1/5th of the time wasted is a huge underestimate. At my former job (IT), I easily spent the greater part of my days idly surfing the web. I wasn't avoiding work either - I really just had nothing else to do, but if in those situations I asked my boss for some more work, he would just give me some BS busy work like organizing a file cabinet. So after a few instances of that I just stopped asking him for things to do.

Re:1/5th of the time wasted? (5, Insightful)

svendsen (1029716) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399643)

Amen. Right now I am 8 weeks into a 24 week contract. I do on avg. 1 hour of work a day. They hired me to do A,B,C,D. When I started I wasn't allowed to work on B,C, and D because the person who was paying for me said it wasn't their project and it was their money. Hmmm politics. Project A got delayed by 2 months so things I should have worked on when I started won't happen till late Sept.

In the beginning I asked for more work every day and would either get a be patient or crap work (please proof read this, wtf). Then I only asked twice a week, same answer, same grunt work. Example please make sure 5 people review a manual and give feedback. Glad I got my masters for this

Now I don't care. I don't ask. I surf 7 hours a day (Slashdot, news, stocks, LinkedIn, etc) and look for jobs during the day. My boss does comment the work I do is outstanding so when I have work I do it well.

Do I feel bad? Not one bit. I turned down another gig for this one and then got screwed here. So the 7 hours a day they pay me to surf is the opportunity cost to me for having accepted this job.

How come they never do a study showing how a boss or company wastes the employees time?

Re:1/5th of the time wasted? (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399661)

Sounds familiar. The last time I complained to my boss about not having enough to do, I got stuck in boring meetings for months.

Re:1/5th of the time wasted? (1)

kcbanner (929309) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399749)

Yea its almost the same for me. I surf the web while I'm working...I do some technician work and lots of times your just waiting for things to load. If I asked for something to do then I would just get a job that isn't very efficient in terms of time used/benefits (like organizing a filing cabinet etc).

Re:1/5th of the time wasted? (1)

pedrop357 (681672) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400201)

Mine is like this.

Since our org is large, IT is splintered into groups that handle: securing the systems, profile administration, storage issues, other resource issues and general management issues, engineering new systems, programmers, application support (which is aligned by application vs platform unlike nearly all other groups).

So if I'm in the resource and management side, I spend my time looking at logs and answering inane, but panicked, questions about why an As400s CPU usage is so high (because there's a lot of stuff running right now)-they never bother to find out if users are being affected, it shows up on a monitor and they panic. Or diagnosing printing issues that are easily troubleshot as being exclusively on the user side and handled by another group not listed above.

So, after an hour or two of this menial nonsense, it's here to slashdot to see what else is happening in the world.

We have 9 hour days with 1 hour for lunch. It seems vitally important that you be here before 9am. Why? No clue. We're on-call every 3 weeks in my group and a backup on-call the week after and we get called at all hours of the day and night when on call (24 hour operation).

We have the burdens of being salaried, but not the benefits.

I love monster.com and have begun to love seeing my cell phone ring with a number I've never seen before (hoping it's a recruiter).

Re:1/5th of the time wasted? (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400273)

This was what I was up against in my old position. When I asked for more work, I was told to make some. Then, when I came up with projects that would have had a real, positive impact on our work environment (not to mention, provide me with some interesting work in the long term), the ideas were shot down--time after time.

I've been in my new position (under different management) for almost a year now. It was a great change. Update your resume and get looking! A better position is waiting for you!

Solitaire (5, Funny)

Viceroy Potatohead (954845) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399491)

about six out of 10 employees in the United States acknowledged wasting time at work
The other four in ten were too stupefied to respond, having just played 900 consecutive games of solitaire.

Re:Solitaire (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399957)

No, the other four in ten were just plain lying.

I am a systems administrator.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399509)

...and reading /. is part of my research into the latest security flaws!

Honest!!!

1/5th of our time is spent working, more like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399523)

4/5: regular development phase (AKA reading Slashdot)
1/5: "oh shit, this isn't done yet?"

Re:1/5th of our time is spent working, more like (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400221)

LOL. There's some truth to it. For me, the time spent looking at news, headlines, etc. (albeit not 4/5 of my time) is often the fuel that gets me through the rest of the day.

What's else to expect? (4, Insightful)

hatchet (528688) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399569)

As a developer i'm productive at work for 2-4 hours per day. That's less than 50%. You cannot expect from developer to code non-stop for 8 hours and be proficient at it. It simply doesn't work that way... and any employer expecting this is an idiot.

Re:What's else to expect? (2, Insightful)

BrianRoach (614397) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399967)


I work at a place that actually understands this, and love it. We do agile dev, and 4 "hours" is the daily level.

I don't think I've ever worked in a better environment, and to be honest, I probably get *more* done in an average day than at any other place I've ever worked.

Obviously this doesn't mean that on some days I don't code for more than 4 hours, or don't work at home sometimes when things need to get done, etc. That just comes with the territory. But it's the environment where I don't have someone standing over me expecting me to be jamming out code for 8 hours a day that really, really makes going to work enjoyable. Basically ... if your projects are getting done, they don't really care how you're archiving that.

- Roach

Re:What's else to expect? (2, Interesting)

Wylfing (144940) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400225)

This is something that is pretty well understood in jobs that are creative like programming or writing. You simply cannot be creative all the time. When something grabs you, and you're inspired by it, you might go all night without sleep in order to keep working on it. At other times, things are flat. You might force yourself to hammer out 2 or 3 hours worth of material, but it's not great output even then.

After being in that kind of business for a number of years, you learn to find a way to become moderately creative more or less every day. The presence or absence of inspiration is still a factor though. So we put ping pong tables up at work and just accept that we're not going to be 100% creative 100% of the time.

It's not that non-creative jobs have higher productivity, it's that lapses in productivity aren't understood or recognized. People I talk to who work in non-creative jobs are often astonished at the all the time we "waste" at my company. They just don't think about how much of their day is spent BSing at the coffee station, or surfing eBay, or any number of other time wasters people do.

Company Image (2, Insightful)

Joebert (946227) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399595)

Because in todays economy, it's not how good you are, it's how good you look.

If I look like I'm working, logicly, the company must also look like it's doing good, right ?

Easy solution! Or is it? (4, Informative)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399677)

My bosses fixed this by having me implement an unavoidable proxy server with a whitelist of approved sites. If you want to get onto a site that's not on the list, a manager must approve the site. Needless to say, anything not work related (including news, weather, banking sites, etc) are not on the list. Oh, and they're not playing Solitaire, either, thanks to the group policies in place that prevent the running of sol.exe and all other Windows games. And it's not like they're going to download new ones.

Problem solved, says management, who are not subject to the filter!

Of course all the employees resent being treated like children, and it's created a tremendous amount of ill will toward management, and people gripe about it all the time. At least one good employee switched companies because of the restrictive policy. But hey, at least they aren't wasting time on the 'net!

Re:Easy solution! Or is it? (4, Interesting)

dtouchet (1065652) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399863)

Management is usually exempt from these things.
Our old IT manager wanted his surfing taken out of the firewall logs so I happy obeyed.

Last year we get a call from our ISP that SPAM is coming from our site. I searched the logs to no avail, we found the PC doing the most surfing and my boss accused them of doing it on purpose. In the meantime, I kept looking at current packets going out....you've guessed it by now....the IT manager had the spam producer on his PC. He never noticed his anti-spyware/virus was out of date.

Lucky for me, I had in writing, his policy of exempting himself so it wasn't my problem.
Always get this weird stuff from your boss in writing because it will always come back to get you if you don't.

If management had to obey the rules of the lowly workers, the Internet would be free for all to use (as it is at my company now).

Re:Easy solution! Or is it? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399889)

So time is now wasted trying to find ways to circumvent the filtering proxy. Hey, it's educational!

Re:Easy solution! Or is it? (3, Interesting)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400185)

Block access to the web, and people will go back to other topics (as if they don't already)--who's on Dancing with the Stars, LOST, some YouTube video, their pets, beading hobby, weekend at the lake, et. al. ad infinitum.

Let's face it. People are not going to be 100% productive 100% of the time while they are at work. As other posters have noted, there are different dynamics depending on the type of job, but I won't go so far as to suggesting that similar slacking does not exist for those in the lower-end wage brackets. The biggest way slacking occurs there is through productivity slowdowns.

Sure, it might only take an enthusiastic new employee 15 minutes to clean the breakroom, but it becomes clear very quickly that doing so makes the rest of the employees look bad, since they are allocated 30 minutes to do the job. I knew a guy who went to work (with his buddy) at a silo manufacturing facility many years ago. They got the hang of it soon enough and were soon completing nearly two structures a night. The pace was fair, and they were able to hold some great discussions while they were working. After a couple of weeks, they wondered how many silos they could make if they shut up and focused on the work. First night that way, they made five. The next night, they made seven. After about a week like that, the union steward showed up and told my friend and his buddy that, "it is physically impossible to build more than 2.5 silos per night." Excitedly, they told him what they did, but the guy just repeated his line. For the rest of the summer, they built 2.5 silos a night. Neither opted for full time jobs with that place.

It's not a union thing--it's an establishment thing. Once people have an accepted "norm" for how something is done, it's hard to break away. That's one reason why "face time" is still valued (in some offices) more than productivity. Viva la revolution!

Don't forget depression... (3, Insightful)

glindsey (73730) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399693)

Employees said they did so because they were bored, worked too many hours, were underpaid or were unchallenged at work.
I'd like to add the following to the list: depressed employees. And by depressed, I mean clinically, not just feeling down every now and then. Seriously, being depressed leads to apathy and lack of motivation. This is why I fully believe that workplace insurance programs should always cover psychological and psychiatric treatment at an equal level as other medical concerns; in the end, employees who aren't depressed are more productive, and therefore more profitable to the employer.

Surveys (1)

lbmouse (473316) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399703)

"A recent survey by online compensation firm Salary.com showed about six out of 10 employees in the United States acknowledged wasting time at work."
...and another survey showed that four out of 10 employees in the United States are habitual lairs.

Well, what do you expect? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399707)

Most tech jobs informally require at least 50-60+ hours a week at the job site. This leaves little time after work to commute, eat, shower, and go to bed to get ready for the next day. You have little time after work to take care of personal business. I don't screw around too much at work, however, I do take care of personal business that I know I wouldn't be able to otherwise.

Article on cyberslacking on /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399733)

== self-referential journalism

much more (1)

SolusSD (680489) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399737)

I'm an intern at a small software company and I keep busy. That said, I sit next to a full time employee that does less work in a weel than i do in in a day (according to ticket logs and time he spends on youtube, collegehumor, etc). Just like most other businesses, the more you get paid-- the less work you actually do.

for the record-- he's our network admin.

Re:much more (4, Interesting)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399953)

I'm just guessing here, but...

When the network takes a dive, he's the one working nights and weekends to get it back up, while you're at home playing WoW or watching Firefly on DVD.

If he never puts in the time, then he is a slacker and I hope he gets canned. If he is like most other netadmins I know, he probably logs a crapload of time when everyone else is away, yet he's still expected to put in face time during the workday. In cases like that, he's probably judged on network availability and other metrics. When all is going well, he has slack time. When all is not going well, he could put in a couple hundred hours in a couple of weeks.

If I were your manager, I'd be wondering how you found time to look at your netadmin's time in the ticket logs if you are already so busy--just something to think about.

Re:much more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20400023)

I'm an intern at a large software company (kinda) and I'm currently doing fuck all. If it was interesting work I'd do more, but my line manager told me my project manager is very pleased with what I've done, so why do more?
(My project sounds interesting, but once I found out /why/ the company is using this project I was less enthusiastic about it. Also, after they gave the list of things that needed doing in the next year and chose the 2 most boring things for me to do).

You can't work 100% of the time (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399751)

This whole subject of "losing time at work" is idiotic for all intellectual professions. Especially ones involving creativity, such as programming, or systems development in general.

Of course there are guys that are paied and do nothing. But even the most job-oriented person needs some time to let the brain do its work.

This entire hype of "spending time on the internet" is IMHO a production of HR staff that want to further decrease wages. Something like the RIAA counting losses.

Re:You can't work 100% of the time (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399887)

Of course there are guys that are paied and do nothing.
Isn't there some joke about management lurking in the wings here?

No worries (1)

LParks (927321) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399753)

This is pretty much a self correcting system. A company can purchase software from Websense or Surf Control (which I imagine this is a slashvertisement for, without checking) to monitor/restrict internet access. The employees will either accept it, waste time doing somewhere other than online, or quit and go to companies that do not restrict Internet access.

Re:No worries (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399933)

I can tell you exactly what's happening.

Instead of wasting time surfing, they waste time sitting together trying to find ways around the filter and swapping information about it. Which is kinda good in an odd way, it increases informal communication within the company.

The drawback is that it's almost invariably strictly forbidden to circumvent it, so whenever the computer blows up because they managed to acquire some kind of malware they will keep up the "didn't do anything" story forever, even under torture, because telling the truth costs their job.

In other words, with Websense and other filters you only shift the time wasting. From the "office grunts" to the admins. Dunno which work hours are cheaper.

Look at the reasons why instead!!! (2, Insightful)

forgoil (104808) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399755)

1. People work too many hours == freakin' unproductive
2. People are poorly managed (nothing to do, boring tasks, other crap)

The problem isn't the internet, nor talking to your co-workers about other stuff that work. The problem is the way we work today. It's freakin' unproductive! We are worn out and tired, and there are few things that require less effort than surfing on the web. Attack the real problem and you'll see that productivity will skyrocket, employees will be a lot happier and have a lot more spare time where they can *gasp* surf on their own, or go hiking, or learn a new language, or travel the world (lots of vacation is GOOD for productivity, not the other way around!).

Re:Look at the reasons why instead!!! (2, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400075)

The problem is in both cases poor management.

Most managers are still in the 20s, where mindless conveyor belt work did actually work along the lines of "more hours == more productivity". Yes, it increased accidents as well, but unskilled labour is easily replaced. Throw the injured one away, grab the next guy from the street.

It does not work in at least minimum skilled labour situations. And even less so where skill plays a key role. More hours only means more errors, and programming is an error prone occupation in the first place.

Hiring more people would solve it. This would cost money, though, and so managers loathe doing that. Instead, they try to squeeze more hours out of their employees. This does not work out, though. In no field.

Use one admin where you'd need at least one and a half, and you'll see errors skyrocket. I was in the lucky situation to be the second admin in an environment that needed only one. Productivity increased incredibly, simply because we had time to sit down with the people and explain some things to them. The trouble ticket count dropped to an all time low 2 months after we started.

Which of course made management realize that two admins are by no means necessary anymore and one can easily handle that...

Yes, I waste time at work sometimes. (5, Insightful)

seebs (15766) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399765)

And yet, somehow, I'm pretty productive.

See, brains are complicated things, and sometimes what I really need is a half hour or so NOT looking straight at the problem, although I tend to be sort of absently thinking about it. And then suddenly I know what to do, and I go do it.

Obligatory Office Space (1)

z0rprim3 (670716) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399897)

BOB SLYDELL
Y'see, what we're trying to do here, we're just trying to get a feel
for how people spend their day. So, if you would, would you just walk
us through a typical day for you?

PETER
Yeah.

BOB SLYDELL
Great.

PETER
Well, I generally come in at least fifteen minutes late. I use the side
door, that way Lumbergh can't see me. Uh, and after that, I just sorta
space out for about an hour.

BOB PORTER
Space out?

PETER
Yeah. I just stare at my desk but it looks like I'm working. I do that
for probably another hour after lunch too. I'd probably, say, in a
given week, I probably do about fifteen minutes of real, actual work.

And now I'm going to go burn the building down cuz I got moved again

Re:Yes, I waste time at work sometimes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399991)

I'm self-employed and (somewhat unusually) I give fixed-price quotes on software development. But I always quote the elapsed time for a job as twice what it will actually take me. Then if I get stuck I can go and do something else while my subconscious solves the problem, without worrying about deadlines.

The other question... (1)

Opalima (744615) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399787)

... other than are people slacking at work [which is a resounding Duh - Of Course], is are people still getting their jobs done and meeting their productivity requirements whilst working Slack time into their daily work routines. If someone can Slack and still contribute what's expected of them then I don't see it as an issue. If someone can't Slack and get their work done, then that's a definitely problem and should be dealt with using whatever disciplinary modalities are in place at the individuals place of business.

Now try to explain that to a manager (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400111)

His response will most likely be along the lines of "Well, if he wasn't slacking, he could not only get his work done but more, and thus I could fire someone and save money".

Low-Wage Jobs (5, Interesting)

Gman14msu (993012) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399817)

While it's interesting to see the statistics for the workforce as a whole, I think it's interesting to point out that this is another major disadvantage for low wage workers. The types of jobs where you can slack off for 1/5th of the day aren't things like janitors, factory workers, or other lower level service personnel. If you factor that into the amount of work done per hour paid, the disparity between salaried office type work and low wage service work is even greater.

When I first started at my office job during college, I was so used to being in the basic service industry that I didn't fit in right away. I was used to just taking a task, doing it, and immediately going back to the boss for the next thing. I didn't realize that the culture I was in was for slower progress on tasks and there wasn't a need to rush and be essentially managed by the boss every second of the day.

Just some things to think about. A lot of people don't realize that for a lot of American workers, and 8 hour day really means 8 hours.

Fine line (4, Insightful)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399831)

I think there's a fine line (for some) between cyberslacking and taking periodic breaks from the tedium of work. For me, my periodic checks at Slashdot and other news sites are a way to stay sane, so I can hyper focus for other periods of time during the day to get things done. I have a set of sites I visit daily, mostly news/information sites, and my flow works something like this (my days average nine hours sans lunch):

*Arrive, log in, check voice/email messages, responding as appropriate. 30 min.
*Check my preferred websites. 30 min.
*Tackle biggest task(s) for the day. 2-3 hrs.
*Check my preferred websites. 10min.
*Tackle those annoying-but-not-critical tasks. 1-2 hrs.
*Lunch. 15-30 min. (usually at my desk while checking and replying to messages).
*Check my preferred websites. 10min.
*Project work, progress on multi-stage tasks. 2-3 hrs.
*Check my preferred websites. 10 min.
*Follow-up tasks, and assignments to other technology groups. 1-2 hrs.
*IF NOT at the end of the day, check some secondary sites or research some new topics until end of day. 15-30 minutes. This is the one time of day that, for me, comes closest to true cyberslacking. Often I'm just waiting for any final help calls or trouble tickets before our designated end-of-day.

The first site check of the day is longer because most headlines/topics refreshed overnight. Later in the day, I'm only scanning for new headlines or topics of interest. Of course, some days (about once a week), I never get to check my sites. Perhaps once a month I'll have a day where I can read every article that interests me. This works well for me and my employer, as my reading keeps me well aware of numerous trends in and outside of our industry, and it allows me to dive in with greater intesity when I am working. Of course, some will not believe this works without a scientific study, and I'll be the first to say this does not work for everyone. For me, however, I'm glad to work for an employer that allows for some personal use during the workday and is more focused on results than on managing every minute we're in the building. I get my work done on time, seek extra assignments, and pick up slack from my coworkers. Some would argue that my employer is overstaffed [I tried to make that point to a former employer for years until I finally bailed for my current gig, so I know the difference], but that is not the case--it comes down to how I handle my workload. I sprint, then I walk, then I sprint again. My diversions are those little walks that let me run full bore from time to time.

Am I the only one who operates like this?

Self Employed... (2, Interesting)

Tatisimo (1061320) | more than 6 years ago | (#20399881)

I do spend most time I should be working "researching" interesting information (the eating habits of horseshoe crabs, super Mario bros. villains, Cambodian cuisine, etc.) and I have no problem getting work done. I used to feel guilty about it, but by now I realize it's part of work, so I work, slack off, work some more, slack off twice as much time as I worked, and repeat. There's too much to "learn", and 8 hours a day work get too much in the way of it. I say find a way to make a living that doesn't take up too much time, and enjoy the rest of your life.

This is very true (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399885)

My company has an authenticating web proxy that users must use to access the internet, and they track personal web use in this way. We also have a VPN that can dial in to the corporate network from home, which is also authenticating but which traffic statistics, for obvious reasons, aren't monitored.

I've been so committed to slacking, as it were, that I committed significant time to creating a backwards web gateway for myself using an automated dial-in from home, which creates a remote ssh tunnel to my work computer that forwards certain port traffic back to a proxy server on my home network. So now at work I just set my web proxy to the localhost at the specified port and surf backwards through the VPN, only using our corporate web-proxy to do job-related surfing.

And all so I can slack. Never underestimate the laziness of a programmer.

Half the time you are a Gov. employee so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20399985)

With taxes the way they are..
We are Gov. employees for half the day..
So, act like a Gov. employee and..
SLACK..
And remember you pay the homeland security, police, and IRS agents that take good care of you..

healthy (2, Insightful)

Tom (822) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400065)

People do what they feel necessary to keep themselves "running". You can outlaw it, but that doesn't change the fact that they do it, maybe you can change what exactly they do.

If it's not the Internet it's smoke-breaks, talking at the coffee/water machine, or just looking out of the window. Also, lots of people are good at appearing busy.

And I think that's ok.

One, if you really put people in the grinder, force them to work 8 hours, no breaks or diversions, I'm sure you will soon see the quality of their work plummet, as well as their motivation. If you're a factory in backland China that might be a winning strategy, if your business is in any way dependent on thinking employees, it isn't.

Two, if you pay by the hour, and your people are only there for the money, then two things shouldn't surprise you. One, that they try to get as much money for as little work as possible. You do the same, except that you don't call it "goofing off", but "profit maximizing", or maybe your consultants have found an even nicer buzzword. But it's just capitalism. If you don't like it, go somewhere where they haven't dumped Communism, yet.
Two, you shouldn't be surprised that someday soon, some institute, consultant or survey will reveal your employees are rather badly motivated. Money alone doesn't do it. Do your homework in leadership. Throughout history, brilliant leaders weren't the guys who paid best, and that's not they are remembered for.

Pair Programming's Impact? (1)

BrotherBeal (1100283) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400097)

As a developer, I've noticed that it's all too easy to fall into the trap of surfing the net mindlessly. Sure, it starts innocently at first looking for a solution to whatever bland problem I'm fixing in the code base, but there's the ever present temptation to open a new browser tab and find something of actual interest. The process isn't a lengthy one - only ten minutes or so at a time - but those context switches do add up. I don't mind since I'm salaried and have to be here to hold my chair down, but I know for a fact that, if I were allowed to go home early after putting in the productive 3-5 hours that seem to make up an average developer's programming day, instead of sitting around wasting time, I would do that in a heartbeat. I work in a shop that is transitioning to agile processes, and I am curious as to whether I can make a case for pair programming on this angle. The article doesn't mention this, but I am curious what views the group might have to offer on pair-programming in terms of reduced slack. Unless two people are blatantly unproductive in some sort of bizarre Office-Space conspiracy to steal bandwidth and time, it seems unlikely that the pair will get too far off track. Less time spent ctrl-T'ing your way across the internet through Firefox might equal a shorter workday. Anyone have any thoughts?

The web is a relief at times (1)

Magorak (85788) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400129)

I work for a company where I can pretty much sit at my desk and surf the internet anytime I want. The company is more focused on the end result and insuring that the clients are happy. As long as I get my work done and the client is happy, they could care less if I spend 4 hours on the internet.

For my job, I travel a lot so I spend countless Sunday's in airports with nothing to do when I could be home sleeping, or doing personal things. Because I give up PLENTY of my own time for the company and am paid a flat salary, the company has to find ways to compensate for that and it's not always about money. I know I can piss away an entire day of web surfing if I want to because of the amount of extra time I have put in on other projects.

It's all about balance. I've worked in places where they got all anal about web access and all it did was make the employee feel like their bosses didn't trust them and that they were being treated like little kids. The same company has had MAJOR problems with turnover because of the micro-managing of its staff.

The internet does make it easier to slack off, so there are those who abuse it, but if your HR department knew how to hire the right people, they would hire people that will give results, and deserve a little bit of slack time.

I personally believe that any company that gets so anal about people doing a little bit of personal stuff on company time, is not a company I want to work for. People are not drones and they need a little bit of a break or distraction once in awhile to bring them back to the real world. If a company wants to be anal about web access, they designate specific times for breaks, and give access during those times. At least that's something

Other side of the issue. (2, Interesting)

SynapseLapse (644398) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400161)

At my first real job, this side of the college world, I tried my damndest to make sure I was keeping busy 95% of the time I was on the clock. (Working a tech support line and burning CD patches for the shipping dept to send out.) As they inevitably do, things slowed down during a lean month and it became impossible to keep busy all the time. The real problem occurred when I asked my manager for more duties; since by 3pm I had finished all of my tasks for the day. My manager was incensed at the idea and wanted to know if I needed to resign or a new job. In the business world, managers don't care if you're wasting time or working efficiently. All they care about is if the work assigned to you gets finished in the timeframe they required. If that means you spend 2 hours in the morning checking your e-bay auctions, so be it. Who cares, the numbers on their reports are all within spec. Yet, 6 years later I'm the manager now and I'm perpetuating the somewhat hypocritical business world.

*sigh* Thanks for the title. :P (5, Funny)

arkham6 (24514) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400231)

So I'm eating lunch, glancing at slashdot.

My boss walks up behind me and says "Don't let your boss catch you reading this? What is that Dave?"

"Umm, its slashdot boss, and Its my lunch time."

"You know Dave, internet usage isnt for personal activities...."

*sigh*

I'm reading this from work! (1)

nadamucho (1063238) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400239)

I'm supposed to be getting up to date on my timesheets... Instead I read this article... The question is, if this article weren't published, would I still be wasting time?

Good ol' Days (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20400263)

cyberslacking at my old job didn't involve *just* looking @ porn on the internet (though we did do plenty of that). Here's a rundown of a typical day where I used to work:



7:00AM - arrive at work


7:30AM - 10:00AM - Watch a movie


10:00AM - 12:00PM - Target practice, setup plastic army guys and shoot them with a pellet gun


12:00PM - 2:00PM - lunch off-site


2:00PM - 3:30PM - work on daily problems, maintenance, etc



I was the IT manager, my co-worker was the maintenance manager, this was for a small production company where all the upper management and goodie-two-shoes were located about 5 blocks away and rarely visited or bothered us (provided everything was working properly). I'm not defending our slacking, when some problem came up, the movies stopped, the guns got put away and we cut lunch short to get things done. The rest of the time though, it was the best job ever.

_self_discipline_ (1)

benow (671946) | more than 6 years ago | (#20400269)

Because, yeah, you know, no one can work without a pointy haired boss with a whip. How else do you learn self discipline without doing it yourself? When self motivated, the quality of the product also tends to be better. Slacking is just an indication that the job sucks, and the employer should be making the work process more efficient and less tedious and workplace more productive, not supressing the symptom.
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