Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

170 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

More than you might suspect... (5, Informative)

BWJones (18351) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545065)

From the linked list:Secrecy level: High. Two reporters from the local newspaper are the only media who've been inside the compound and written about it (See "Inside the World of Google"): Google treats any and all details as though they belong to the National Security Agency.

Well.... I know they were trying to be funny, but the authors could be more correct that they might have known given the history of Google (startup partially funded by CIA $$s) and how tight they are with NGIA [nga.mil] (Google Earth [google.com] projects), CIA [cia.gov] etc..., it would not surprise me to see Google working intimately with NSA [nsa.gov] . After all, Google has been competing with NSA for PhD mathematicians for some time now (and winning) and it seems like a natural fit. Of course such a "hypothetical" collaboration would raise all sorts of ethical questions, but assuming one could appropriately compartmentalize those concerns, it could certainly be mutually beneficial.

Personally, I'd like to think that this little project [utah.edu] (when complete) will certainly contribute to the creation of one or more of the Seven Wonders of the IT world. After all, we all have little wetware parallel supercomputers sitting in the backs of our eyes that can process massive amounts of data, pre-encode it, filter it and more all while dealing with a certain level of data corruption, particularly in disease.

Re:More than you might suspect... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545229)

Google has in the past had jobs available that required national security clearance.

Re:More than you might suspect... (4, Informative)

BWJones (18351) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545323)

Google has in the past had jobs available that required national security clearance.

Sure, but a security clearance can apply to lots of types of data and a diverse group of companies and government agencies. Everything from a basic collateral "secret" clearance (relatively easy to obtain) to "top secret" and compartmentalized programs are being worked on and participated in by people from not just government, but also a number of private companies. No big deal and I would certainly expect Google to have a significant number of folks possessing those clearances.

Re:More than you might suspect... (3, Funny)

rk (6314) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545249)

"After all, Google has been competing with NSA for PhD mathematicians for some time now (and winning) and it seems like a natural fit."

If only the NSA would offer stock options and a splashy IPO, I'll bet they could get some of those candidates back.

Re:More than you might suspect... (1)

blhack (921171) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545293)

On google being top secret about some things; Aren't they required to disclose everything, and I mean EVERYTHING down to how much they spent on every light bulb in the bathroom on the 3rd floor as a part of the SEC filings?

Isn't this exactly the reason that a lot of companies are taking themselves private again lately, disclosing everything is a HUGE hassle.

Re:More than you might suspect... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545765)

I wish this were Wikipedia, because I'd edit your post with about 4 {{citationneeded}}. Google funded by the CIA? Really? What?

Re:More than you might suspect... (1, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546003)

I wish this were Wikipedia, because I'd edit your post with about 4 {{citationneeded}}. Google funded by the CIA? Really? What?

The CIA helped Google from the very beginning and has continued to fund Google's spin offs and start ups like Google Earth (Interesting side story with Keyhole nee Google Earth as the revolutionary UI of Google Earth had many in the remote sensing communities picking their jaws up off the floor when they first saw it and realized the implications for everything from temporal analysis to community supported contribution to databases). I can't give you many publicly available references, but do a little research on a company known as Peleus nee In-Q-It, nee In-Q-Tel. Note: I don't see anything necessarily wrong with this arrangement and can see many good things to come out of such an arrangement. In fact, I have been a big supporter of these sorts of cross fertilizations of business and government as long as appropriate ethical guidelines are followed.

Re:More than you might suspect... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546917)

"Google (startup partially funded by CIA $$s)" is extremely different from "has continued to fund Google's spin offs and start ups like Google Earth".

You can't claim Google was funded by the CIA in its start up days without some kind of source. Seriously. You're just mongering. If you can't back up sensational claims like "Google was funded by the CIA", then don't make them. You're cheapening Slashdot.

Re:More than you might suspect... (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547053)

Just for a hoot, I looked around, and found this link [prisonplanet.com] out there. I have NO idea if this guy's on the level and/or sane, but he's fairly convinced...

Re:More than you might suspect... (2, Insightful)

Clay Pigeon -TPF-VS- (624050) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547315)

Citing prison planet is like citing info wars... It's barely one step above citing the x-files.

Re:More than you might suspect... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20547353)

Sorry dude but a prisonplanet url is your proof? Prisonplanet is Alex Jones website. The guy is a well known fruitcake.

Re:More than you might suspect... (4, Insightful)

Reaperducer (871695) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547067)

So, in other words you're still not able to back up anything you said.

I don't know much about the history of Google, but Keyhole was a company independent of Google for quite years. I worked for a company that subscribed to its service. Google bought Keyhole years later.

Your original post is completely worthless, with a bunch of home page links pretending to be citations. Lemme take a shot at your style of online journalism:

Google is a company owned by the Dairy Queen [dairyqueen.com] corporation with the stated goal of infiltrating homes worldwide Radio Shack microphones and transmitters. They are carrying out this nefarious deed at the behest of the Queen of England [royal.gov.uk] , and the president of Mexico [www.gob.mx] .

There. I'm just as factual as you are. And my references are just as good.

People like you are the reason smart people don't trust the internet.

Yeah, yeah, Google, CIA, OBL, M$. (1)

gnutoo (1154137) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546573)

No group has gotten more money from the CIA than Google. Except Osama Bin Laden. Except Microsoft. OMG, did I just call M$ a CIA sponsored terrorist? What a smear. This internet thing, is not fair.

Polar Photography (4, Interesting)

Kelson (129150) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545085)

Semi-off-topic, but Webcam #1 at the north pole reminded me: on Friday the Astronomy Picture of the Day posted a multiple-exposure image of last month's lunar eclipse [nasa.gov] as seen from the south pole. Not an IT-specific wonder, but still seriously impressive, when you think about it, that we've actually got people near the south pole who are in a position to take photos like this.

And hey, for once I can use the term "polar opposite" and know that it's literally true!

120 degrees F (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545263)

Operating temperature: From a chilly minus 40 degrees F to a balmy 120 degrees F.

That was the most impressive thing to me. I had no idea that it gets up to 120 degrees Fahrenheit at the north pole. And I thought our string of 100+ degree F days this summer was bad!

Re:120 degrees F (1)

blhack (921171) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545447)

that is the operating temperature for the camera, not the actual temperature at the north pole...at least i hope....maybe i need to start riding my bike to work!

Re:120 degrees F (1)

Reaperducer (871695) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547159)

Maybe it's the temperature achieved in the inside of the camera enclosure since it receives direct sunlight for months on end. Maybe it's 30 degrees outside, and 120 inside after baking for that long.

suggestedtag (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545089)

sentencefragmentsinthesummary

I hope... (0, Offtopic)

replete phoenix (1092639) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545103)

...That Job's iPod is on there, after all, it is the seventh wonder of the actual world

#8... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545143)

Steve "Monkeyboy" Ballmer and his Flying Chair Routine.

Re:#8... (4, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545317)

Steve "Monkeyboy" Ballmer and his Flying Chair Routine.

The article said WONDERS, not HORRORS.

Slightly Dissapointed (4, Interesting)

COMON$ (806135) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545199)

I dont know about other slashdotters but I was rather unimpressed with the 7 wonders of the IT world. Not much on there in the way of impressive other than my boy blue. What about impressive symbolic marvels like The Teapot [computerhistory.org] which were the icons of modern Graphics shaping science and technology. Or code that drives technology like C++ or Perl, or dare I even say it, BASIC. These current wonders are very temporary whereas the original wonders are a bit more timeless, more representative of human innovation than just something that looks cool.

Agreed (3, Interesting)

mbeans (1082073) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545273)

The lamest one was "small computer that runs Vista".

Forgotten Wonder (3, Funny)

Bastardchyld (889185) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546067)

The lamest one was "small computer that runs Vista".
I agree as well, although a better wonder, and slightly more in touch with reality, would have been "any computer that runs Vista well"

Re:Agreed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546595)

yeah...that was piss poor. And more like a miracle than a wonder.

Storm brewing? (5, Interesting)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545343)

Disappointed, too.

But only because they missed something I think should apply - the Storm Trojan network. I mean, come on! Arguably the world's most powerful centrally-controlled computing resource, and it's all comprised of horked computers? How is that not a wonder?

You should hate its existence. But it's still quite amazing.

Re:Storm brewing? (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546837)

My feeling on the matter is that there should be some permanence to the achievement. The Storm Trojan network is merely the latest stage and it's being used (AFAIK) for spam and maybe cracking encryption. Will it be around in ten years or a century? Will it mark an acheivement that holds up well even when more capable worm network systems come around? I don't think so.

In comparison, I think the SETI@HOME project has some potential for being a "wonder". Inspiring purpose, pervasive reach, and was an early adopter. If they continue with later versions, then it will solidify its position.

Re:Slightly Dissapointed (3, Funny)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545359)

I dont know about other slashdotters but I was rather unimpressed with the 7 wonders of the IT world

I agree. My name isn't on the list ANYWHERE!!! Geez, come on, people!

Re:Slightly Dissapointed (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545767)

Voyager One won't continue functioning for much longer, but as a piece of space junk it'll outlast the Pyramids. That puts it solidly in Wonder of the World material.

Re:Slightly Dissapointed (3, Insightful)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546071)

It might outlast Earth.

Agreed: (4, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546461)

Considering that both Voyagers each carry a mechanical device and a gold disk that bears lots of rich data about Earth and Humanity, I'd say that the best damned Backup/DR data storage effort we've made so far in the history of mankind.

/P

Re:Slightly Dissapointed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546007)

As far as standard test images go, I much prefer Lenna [wikipedia.org] to the Utah Teacup.

The fact that it originates from Playboy has NOTHING to do with it! Honest!

Re:Slightly Dissapointed (2, Interesting)

rm999 (775449) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547027)

I was amazed the internet wasn't on the list. Maybe I misunderstood what the rules of the list?

Small computer running Vista (3, Insightful)

ShatteredArm (1123533) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545221)

WOW! A small really small computer runs Vista! This is groundbreaking!

Seriously, though, the only "wonderous" things on there were the Voyager and the supercomputer. Most of the other stuff is not the most groundbreaking or superlative for its kind out there. I thought the idea of a "wonder" was something that we can only try and imagine how they managed to do it or how they came up with the idea.

Re:Small computer running Vista (1)

click2005 (921437) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545385)

Seriously, though, the only "wonderous" things on there were the Voyager and the supercomputer.

I agree although I wouldn't even class the supercomputer as that impressive. Its not like any number of large companies/organisations couldn't build something bigger/faster/better if they really wanted to (the NSA probably has). The Voyager computer is the only one that will still be impressive in 5 years.

I would think wonders of the world would be something that would still be considered impressive to a later generation.

I'd be more impressed if this 50 million zombie PC Storm worm network could beat a 9/10-dan at Go. :)

Re:Small computer running Vista (5, Funny)

This_Is_My_Happening (1151393) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545777)

The Voyager computer is the only one that will still be impressive in 5 years.
Just wait. In ~250 years when it comes back home [wikipedia.org] it will be even more impressive!

Re:Small computer running Vista (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545485)

must have been like stuffing a hippopotamus in to a compact car...

I guess when you look at it that way... (1)

ShatteredArm (1123533) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545703)

Who is going to make the official Nobel nomination?

Re:Small computer running Vista (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545643)

WOW! A small really small computer runs Vista! This is groundbreaking! Seriously, though, the only "wonderous" things on there were the Voyager and ...

Let's celebrate by putting all the Vista disks on a new Voyager and launching it beyond Pluto.
         

New list needed (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545225)

The 7 Wonders of 7 Wonders Lists

Really- is there any more tired and lame excuse to grab eyeballs out there? Please, lets end these.

Re:New list needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545433)

Indeed, there is a term for it now: lazy journalism. We get inundated with these especially towards the end of the year (10 events that etc.), or slow news days.

Re:New list needed (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545593)

I agree...

So I'm compiling a top ten list of reasons to stop making 7 Wonders of the world lists

1. Wasted bandwidth
2. They're only for pageview whores
3. Most of the items are only 'wondrous' because people wonder why the hell its on the list.
4. If anything really is that wondrous, humans will probably destroy it.
5. Google will sell the #1 spot to someone else.
6. I.T. is moving so fast that in a few months, most will be obsolete.

thats as far as I got.

Re:New list needed (3, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546115)

I agree...

So I'm compiling a top ten list of reasons to stop making 7 Wonders of the world lists

1. Wasted bandwidth
2. They're only for pageview whores
3. Most of the items are only 'wondrous' because people wonder why the hell its on the list.
4. If anything really is that wondrous, humans will probably destroy it.
5. Google will sell the #1 spot to someone else.
6. I.T. is moving so fast that in a few months, most will be obsolete.

thats as far as I got.
Ok, I'll finish it for you:

7. It will suffer from the Slashdot effect.
8. Most Slashdot posters won't read it anyway.
9. ???
10. Profit!

120F in North Pole? (1)

Brad_sk (919670) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545233)

>1. North Pole webcam >Operating temperature: From a chilly minus 40 degrees F to a balmy 120 degrees F.
How can it get to 120F in North Pole?

Re:120F in North Pole? (1)

ShatteredArm (1123533) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545271)

I don't know, do magic Christmas reindeer fart alot?

Alternate response: OMG Global Warming!!

Re:120F in North Pole? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545373)

xmas reindeer fart like you wouldn't believe.

Re:120F in North Pole? (2, Insightful)

jmauro (32523) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545279)

Webcam's rated temperature, not the temperature at the North Pole. I'm also quite sad it get's "disposed" of every year by letting it sink to the bottom. That kind of sucks.

Re:120F in North Pole? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545835)

Maybe the elves steal it.

Re:120F in North Pole? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20547387)

How the hell you think Santa gets the hardware to watch all the little kids, the original perv..

Oh, man I'll never get that small vista computer for christmas now. DAMN!!

Re:120F in North Pole? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546641)

but on the other hand, it might be fun to watch it sink...

Re:120F in North Pole? (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545327)

I'm guessing that is the operating temperature for the chips. The north pole will never reach 120 degrees, but maybe it'll get to 70 degrees and the computer might warm up to 120.

Re:120F in North Pole? (2, Funny)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545377)

That's when Chuck Norris tracks fugitives there.

Re:120F in North Pole? (2, Funny)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545459)

It can't be 120F in North Pole, it is outside US. If something it would be 49C.

Re:120F in North Pole? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546365)

Last I checked, the book "Fahrenheit 451" doesn't change names when it's printed outside the united states.

Not impressed (1)

Nick of NSTime (597712) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545257)

For the most part, the list is unimpressive. Voyager is hardly "IT," wonder that it is. The whole story reeks of that article from Copyblogger about which headlines get the most Diggs.

Voyager 1 is not IT (4, Interesting)

michaelmalak (91262) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545275)

Voyager 1 launched in 1977, about a dozen years prior to the coining of the term "information technology".

There is a deeper, underlying beef here. IT is about boring business data and came to dominate an industry that previously was the domain of science (often but obviously not always for military purposes). CIO is trying to make its readers feel good about themselves by co-opting non-business domains of computer use.

The list (1)

Nick of NSTime (597712) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545285)

1. Webcam #1
2. Voyager 1
3. Google's Datacenter
4. EGEE-II
5. Blue Gene/L
6. OQO
7. Linux kernel

Re:The list (1)

MBCook (132727) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545365)

Some of those, especially Voyager, are quite impressive.

I'm I the only one that thinks the OQO is really out of place?

Re:The list (3, Funny)

idontgno (624372) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545425)

No; I for one thought CueCat belonged in that slot.

Re:The list (1)

i.of.the.storm (907783) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546619)

Nope, if anyone has actually used an OQO they would know how incredibly useless and impractical it is. I wrote the software for our high school's entry in the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle competition (http://auvsi.org) and we used an OQO as our onboard computer, and it is a pain to actually use. It didn't help that we wrote the software in Java, but that's what they teach in high schools now so that's what we went with. At least remote desktopping in over ethernet made it useable, but for daily use it's just pointless. That thing gets incredibly hot in an incredibly short amount of time. Not to mention that the batteries are complete crap, and we had three of them die on us right before the competition. (shameless plug: http://avbotz.net/ [avbotz.net] our site, made by me.)

Re:The list (4, Funny)

Repton (60818) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546317)

I would have put "The Internet" on the list, personally.

It gives you a research lab in all your cities too :-)

Juniper (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545291)

Voyager 1: "Places it's dropped by: Juniper and Saturn"

Re:Juniper (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545371)

Good Eye

Re:Juniper (1)

tholomyes (610627) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545549)

Hey, if the Voyager's the first one there, it can call it whatever it wants!

(I noticed that too, though.)

Re:Juniper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545813)

Voyager 1: "Places it's dropped by: Juniper and Saturn"


At which point it pulled a slingshot maneuver using Cisco's gravitational field and then flew past the Sun.

Wonder #8 (3, Funny)

turgid (580780) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545305)

Why anyone pays money for anything from IBM, Microsoft. Oracle or MySQL AB.

Biggest Paradigm Change (5, Insightful)

Red Jesus (962106) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545355)

Biggest Paradigm Change in Enterprise Software: Linux kernel

Don't get me wrong: I love Linus and I love Linux. But don't forget what RMS likes to remind us at every opportunity: Linux is part of the GNU system. And GNU predated Linux by a long shot.

Stallman started the GNU project in 1983 and founded the Free Software Foundation in 1985. The Linux kernel appeared in 1991. Where did Torvalds get his compiler? Where did Torvalds get his editor? Where did Torvalds find people to work on his kernel? I understand that it can be pedantic to argue about big, abstract ideas like ``When did the paradigm shift really happen?'' Maybe the paradigm didn't ``shift'' until the Linux kernel came out. But Torvalds wasn't out to change paradigms. Stallman was. If we're going to hail the concept of free software, we should acknowledge the alphabet soup of RMS, the FSF, GNU, ETC. that gave it legs to stand on.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545417)

Maybe the paradigm didn't ``shift'' until the Linux kernel came out. But Torvalds wasn't out to change paradigms. Stallman was.

Community development was Torvalds' innovation, not Stallman's. Prior to Linux, the FSF was a GPL cathedral cranking out utilities to run on Sun OS.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546965)

bullshit. open source was around when your mom was pissing in diapers. i'm sick of you joe-sixpack-come-latelies acting like this is new. it just shows you don't know the first fucking thing about computing before you thought you discovered it.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545655)

This isn't meant to troll, but honestly, sincewhen does 0.75% of the overall market constitute a "wonder".

Microsoft and IBM putting a PC in every household, that's a wonder, Dethroning Unix as *the* operating system, and even mS managing to all but corner the market can constitute a wonder. AT&T creating Unix in the first place, that's arguably a wonder.

The most famous of many open kernels, with marginal to insignificant relative usage? No, not really.

And as far as Stallman and GU are concerned, weather or not he intended a paradigm shift (and weather this shift has even occured) is irrelevent.

I'd argue that Linus' kernel is what gave GNU legs to stand on.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545749)

On the server side Linux has way more penetration than 0.75%. That is what the article is talking about (read it again).

Therefore, you == idiot.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (2, Insightful)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545779)

The straw that breaks the camel's back may just be one straw. It may not even be the heaviest or biggest straw. It may owe it's entire fame to all the straws that came before it.

But it's still the straw that broke the camel's back. The first straw didn't, the straw just before the last straw didn't, just the one straw. The last straw.

Thats the straw that gets remembered.

How many people attempted to fly solo transatlantic before Charles? Can you name any, and if so, do you consider it an acheivement or a matter of 'everyone knows that'?

That isn't to belittle RMS or his works, but for all he put into it, it would have come to naught if Linus or someone else hadn't come along and given the final push.

Re:Biggest Paradigm Change (2, Insightful)

Red Jesus (962106) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545913)

That isn't to belittle RMS or his works, but for all he put into it, it would have come to naught if Linus or someone else hadn't come along and given the final push.

I guess I didn't make my point clear enough. Why was Linus even pushing at all? The FSF did more than write software. It fostered a community. It created a public license so folks wouldn't have to write their own. It established a list of goals: software that the GNU system sorely needed. Torvalds didn't come up with the paradigm of using open source software nor did he establish the basic rules by which open source projects would operate. The fact that his kernel was the last component to be written before the GNU/Linux system could stand alone isn't at issue here. The question is whether he was responsible for founding a paradigm.

Try this instead: Go out into the street and ask people to name a piece of free software. Odds are, they'll name Firefox. Firefox is the first piece of open source software to attract a userbase of that many non-technical people. Firefox drew the public's eye to OSS in a way that no other software has. But would you say that the Mozilla Foundation was responsible for a paradigm shift? Of course not! They just exposed a larger number of people to the concept. As fine as their software is, it's just software. And right now we're looking for paradigms. The Linux kernel is no more foundational in this respect than is Firefox.

No Storm? (1)

Orthuberra (1145497) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545363)

What no storm botnet on there? It's the most powerful supercomputer in the world!
Seriously though this list isn't that good and their are many things I could think of that could just as easily be on there. Doug Englebart's ideas (NLS and the mother of all demos in 68) now that is a wonder we are still trying to implement successfully and yet hardly anyone has heard of it. But instead we have world's smallest computer running Vista? Pretty lame list here folks...

An upcoming sucessor (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545375)

The smallest computer to run Windows Vista on page 7 is soon to be overtaken by the first computer to actually run-run Windows Vista, like without crashing and stuff

the biggest wonder (2, Insightful)

hguorbray (967940) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545387)

is that IT works at all considering that the stakeholders and implementers have little common ground or understanding or sympathy for the other.

-I'm just sayin...

More content than fluff here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545565)

And the readable version [cio.com]

It's all about the satellites (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545619)

And they're not, technically, on the world.

Think of the pics from space - that's what the public cares about.

Google at the "end of the Oregon Trail"? (2, Insightful)

tholomyes (610627) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545629)

TFA: "Pioneers knew The Dalles as the end of the Oregon trail."

I was just in Seaside this weekend, and they had a big sign next to a statue of Lewis and Clark proclaiming that that was the end of the Oregon Trail... The oceanside makes more sense IMO.

Re:Google at the "end of the Oregon Trail"? (1)

yourexhalekiss (833943) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545783)

Lewis and Clark went first... they did indeed hit the Pacific at Seaside. However, the Oregon Trail was some time afterwards, and was composed of people who were actually moving west. Lewis and Clark were explorers, the first white men in the area, while the people who followed the Oregon Trail, as it was known, were settlers.

Re:Google at the "end of the Oregon Trail"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546681)

Really? And here I thought that the game ended at Willamette Valley, provided that your party hadn't died yet.

DNS Servers missing? (2, Interesting)

Ghostalker474 (1022885) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545683)

I woulda thought that the core DNS servers.... the ones that keep the internet going, would have made the list. Without them, everyone would have to resort to numbers (which a lot of us here can do, but not the general public). Ya figure they do massive amounts of work, replying to millions of requests per minute, keep the internet going [which is critical to most developed nations economies]... yet didn't receive any attention here :( I'm all for NASA with the Voyager probe... but in all reality, its a satellite that we barely keep in contact with, thats ~40 years old.

Not that impressive (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546745)

That's not that much load. Keep in mind that DNS is firstly distributed. So those servers receive only a minute portion of the total DNS load. And you can spread what they do get across a number of servers. The Google server farms are more impressive. They handle much higher loads, do significant data mining and processing, and cache some where around a billion or two webpages.

Seven Wonders Of The Security Software World (2, Interesting)

nickh01uk (749576) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545711)

The guys over at Three Sixty Information Security [360is.com] have published the results of their analysis on 7 of the most popular security tools in common use [360is.com] by systems administrators. The articles examines the tools on their merits and attempts to pull together common threads running through each. Finally they put forward their answer to the question "What makes this software so uncommonly good?"

NH

Wow (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 6 years ago | (#20545799)

I was wondering if goatse.cx had made the list, so I checked it out. Lo and behold - no article, just a big Symantec ad. Must be the work-safe way to display something large and stretched that produces feces.

8th wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20545879)


is how a spammers site masquerading as website for CIO's still gets linked from Slashdot
ive seen less adverts and more content on a domain squatters/typo site, they must be desperate

My own suggestions (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546005)

  • NASA's Deep Space Network - the Voyager spacecraft still function because of this.
  • The Granite Mountain Record Vault [longnow.org] at Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah. Maintained by the Church of Latter Day Saints.
  • Google's server farms. I believe they got that one correct.
  • SETI@HOME - my "grid computing" example
  • Linux OS/GNU tools. Got that one partially correct.
  • the US's early warning system for detecting nuclear explosions, missile launches, etc.

Re:My own suggestions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546987)

Allow me to be pedantic:

The correct name of the church is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [lds.org] :)

Re:My own suggestions (1)

zrq (794138) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546993)

  • SETI@HOME - my "grid computing" example

I'd agree with this, but for me, the new website design has lost the 'wow' factor.

When I first joined the seti@home project, their website produced amazing statistics like 'number of years cpu time in the last 24hrs'. I found that absolutely fantastic, and made me feel that I was contributing to something really big.

Their new website design shows you how many 'credits' your account has scored, but not what the project overall has achieved in terms of raw cpu power. Personally I find this kind of disappointing. I didn't join the project to earn 'credits', I joined to participate in the biggest compute project the world has ever seen.

I must admit that I've been less motivated to keep my seti processing machines updated. In fact, I don't think I have bothered to install the seti processor on any of my recent machines.

Paradigm Shift? (1)

Cajun Hell (725246) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546435)

Before 1991, most of the servers on the Internet ran stuff like sendmail and bind on Unix.

Nowdays, most of the servers on the Internet run stuff like sendmail and bind on a Unix-like OS.

Thanks, article, for going into such detail about what changed. It's like a whole different world now!

We run bigger data centers (0)

gelfling (6534) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546467)

MUCH bigger. Shhhhh

-you know who.

OQO? (2, Insightful)

ynososiduts (1064782) | more than 6 years ago | (#20546563)

What is that doing in the mix with Google, Blue Gene, and Voyager. It's not even useful. It's too small to be used as a regular office PC, and too large to be a bring everywhere gadget. It should be replaced with like, Ethernet or something similar.

it would be a wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20546615)

if the linux community contained any heterosexuals.

Stevie? (1)

jaypolka (1101133) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547005)

Stevie Wonders of the IT World? I dunno.. Whistler from Sneakers?

What no robots? (1)

adamclarke77 (843213) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547057)

Should be at least one, should there not?

New 7 Wonders (2, Insightful)

dm0527 (975468) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547197)

I was also disappointed by the list. Mostly because of content, but also because it contained a link to the New 7 Wonders [new7wonders.com] website, which has simply got to be a joke. A list that some place put together to "represent global heritage throughout history" and the pyramids at Giza was simply a runner up?!?!? How lame do you have to be to put together a "seven wonders of the world" list where the pyramids don't warrant a place on the list, especially considering that they're the only thing still around from the bloody original list...

The Dalles Data Center (1)

Johnny Mnemonic (176043) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547375)


They list The Dalles Data Center as one of the 7 wonders in the IT world, but they admit themselves that they have no idea what's inside of it? Those warehouses may be full of hay, for all we know. The design of it may be terrible and inefficient, even if it has servers. It's a pretty cheeky thing to claim on zero evidence.

Which is only par for the course. That was one of the worst signal-to-noise ratios of any news site, besides, oh, the last time /. linked to a CIO World article. Seriously, can we stop linking to them? They have nothing but crap articles, with no insight, surrounded by a 100-to-1 ad ratio. Linking to them only validates their strategy, and in fact the story on /. was probably from a shill for them in the first place.

Re:The Dalles Data Center (2, Informative)

Johnny Mnemonic (176043) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547425)


in fact the story on /. was probably from a shill for them in the first place

In fact, it absolutely was. Check the guy's email address on the linked submission; it goes to @cio.com; and the article was written by the same user. Please. I know it's was a fad and is now passe to complain about the editors on /., but can we have some more review of the articles that are posted than this? Not linking to the same domain as the submitter's email address would be start, especially if that's coupled with a uid that has accumulated some karma (so shows that they've been active in the community).

Yeah, but do they have a theme song? (0, Offtopic)

dswensen (252552) | more than 6 years ago | (#20547407)

Yeah, but do they have a hard-rockin' flute ballad [broadjam.com] , like the "New Seven Wonders of the World?" It's probably Chocolate Love or All Your Base or some damn thing, isn't it?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>