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Music Industry Set To Introduce the "Ringle"

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the latest-brain-damage dept.

Music 348

mrneutron2003 writes "The RIAA has officially backed a move by the recording industry to reintroduce the CD single. Populated with three songs and a ringtone, this brilliantly clueless idea is to be marketed as a 'ringle,' complete with an even more clueless retail price of $6-7 per CD. Apart from the fact the industry hasn't agreed on how the ringtone is to be redeemed (Sony BMG, the initial proponent of the idea, is the exception here), the pricing puts it way out of line with legitimate digital music downloads." At $7, retailers would enjoy a profit margin they haven't seen since the days of cassette tapes and vinyl.

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348 comments

Huh? What's wrong with this? (1, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559303)

THREE uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs for $6? That's about $2.00 per song, not much higher than Apple's DRM-free pricing.

In fact, since you're getting it uncompressed, I'm not seeing the problem here... Their pricing is in line with digital downloads.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (5, Interesting)

Gorm the DBA (581373) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559363)

"Hmm...I can get the one song I want for 99 cents...*OR* I can get the one song I want, a remix of a song I hated anyhow, some crappy B-side number *AND a ringtone that isn't compatible with my phone for only TWICE AS MUCH??!!! where do I sign????!!!111"

That's what's wrong with that.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559499)

Well - there's nothing wrong with them trying to sell people stuff. Just because we won't buy it doesn't make it wrong. It just makes it a failed attempt. I'm also starting to wonder why the heck the editors are allowing through these "news" pieces where even the summary is calling people clueless? I mean - "news for nerds" - let US decide what is clueless. News isn't supposed to be so damn slanted, I mean slashed.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (3, Insightful)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559845)

Wasn't it us lot that said SMS messaging would never take off, I mean 160characters for 10p or so?

Giving the consumer a product which gives them what they think they need will be an amazing moneyspinner.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (2, Insightful)

bostonkarl (795447) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559787)

Or, browse a bit in my local used CD store and perhaps pick up an entire CD that I'm interested in, bring it home, rip it, and use it for whatever I want.

Don't be stupid, you moron. (3, Interesting)

mcmonkey (96054) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559855)

I can get the one song I want, a remix of a song I hated anyhow, some crappy B-side number

If you don't want it, don't buy it. Same with full-length CDs. No, only wanting one song from a CD does not justify illicit downloads anymore than it justifies stealing a physical CD.

With all the options available--CD singles, CD albums, greatest hits collections, "That's What I Call Crap for Your Ears" mixes, online shops with single song downloads, etc.--it is not reasonable to complain that there is no way for you to purchase the music you want.

(FWIW, I have little empathy on the issue perhaps due to out of the many 100s of CDs, cassette tapes, LPs, and 78s I've purchased over the years, in only 1 case did it turn out that the 1 song that prompted the purchase was the only song on the album I liked. Maybe it means I like a better class of musician who is able to come up with more than 1 catchy tune at a time. Maybe it means I have lower standards. Whatever.)

People who balk at paying 99 cents for a song someone how end up paying many times that for just a piece of that same song as a ring tone, so using ring tones to move songs makes sense. The only issue I have is with the name. The thought of someone talking about 'ringles' on their 'blog' makes me want to hit someone in the 'face' with a 'shovel'.

Ringtone (2, Funny)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559373)

Wow, and you are getting a ringtone as well. That's a $3 value absolutely free!

Re:Ringtone (1)

toQDuj (806112) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559833)

This value is not to be repeated! 3$! 3$!

(apologies to "crazy warehouse guy" from the Chaser's War on Everything).

B.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (2, Insightful)

pieaholicx (1148705) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559375)

So it makes sense that I have to go to a store and buy the CD even though they're providing the ringtone as a digital download?

Sure. Provided ... (4, Insightful)

SengirV (203400) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559385)

... They are the 3 songs you like. Isn't that the whole point of downloading songs? Getting only the ones you want? This combines the worst of both worlds - high price and no consumer choice. Well, no choice other than not buying them. Which seems in line with the rest of the music industry in general.

Re:Sure. Provided ... (3, Interesting)

croddy (659025) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559551)

Do people really only tend to like a handful of songs from an album? This ball gets kicked around quite a bit here, but I have to say I honestly have no idea what people are referring to. I can only think of cases where I've liked most or all of an album, or disliked everything from beginning to end.

Re:Sure. Provided ... (1)

Kamots (321174) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560015)

Happened to me with a couple of CDs that I picked up a few weeks ago. (Was at GenCon, fell in love with The Muses, bought 6 CDs...) Anyways, one of those CDs I wind up skipping over half the songs on when it's turn comes up in my cars changer. I keep it in because there's 2-3 songs on it that I really like.

It does happen... but yeah, it's not something that I hit often.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

Froboz23 (690392) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559449)

Plus, since it's Sony BMG, you may be getting some free "software" with that, too.

The problem with the pricing is that it 6 bucks for one hit song, and then a remix and an "older track". So really you're just buying the single song, unless you're really into remixes. The "older track" is probably anything they want to slap in there.

It's nice to see that Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy and Amazon have agreed to support the configuration. The only people that won't support it are the consumers. Details. Details...

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (2)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559575)

The first thing that is wrong is that anybody would ever want a ringtone. You'd have to pay ME, AND remove the ringtone before I'd even consider your offer of a crappy pop-single with an even crappier "remix" and a third filler to go along with the ringtone that only idiots want. Then there's the whole issue of, WHO USES CD'S ANYMORE????

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (2, Funny)

Tsiangkun (746511) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559677)

The price could be fine, but are the three songs of value ?

1) HotSingle (Radio edit)
2) HotSingle (Explicit)
3) HotSingle (Extended dub mix)
4) Free* ringtone

*actually costs freedom, requires personal contact information to redeem.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559699)

uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs
Says who?
Seriously, where did you see this information? Where did they say "uncompressed", and where did they say "DRM-free"?

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

theelectron (973857) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559911)

It says it is a CD single, which I would assume would be in CD format (uncompressed digitally speaking). It's no great leap of logic there, but you have a very good point about questioning the DRM free part. Everyone remembers where the Sony rootkit was installed from right? But think about this, it is 3 versions of the same song. Is that worth $6-7?

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (0, Flamebait)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559701)

THREE uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs for $6? That's about $2.00 per song, not much higher than Apple's DRM-free pricing.

What the fuck are you on about? There shouldn't be ANY DRM on music distributed by the conglomerates as it helps to disable fair use.

How dare you accept this bone throw from the music industry as acceptable? Remember when they were found guilty of price fixing [bbc.co.uk] and had to give us all back $13 and then give out millions more in overstocked worthless inventory to non-profits and educational institutions? If anything, that taught them nothing and they are continuing to win their media blitz by having people like you believe that $2/song is acceptable.

MOD PARENT UP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20560051)

What? He's spot on. Mod up!

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

dstiggy (1145347) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559771)

I actually had to go RTFA when I heard that the CD is providing DRM-FREE songs. Where exactly in the article does it state this? Maybe it's DRM free to you after you use some "illegal" ripping program to take it from the CD to your computer, but then you'll most likely end up compressing it anyway which nulls the uncompressed aspect which is the other stated advantage. This doesn't even delve into all over the other disadvantages (you don't like all of the songs, extra stuff to carry, inconvenience of going to the store, incompatible ringtone with phone, etc..) mentioned in other posts here. I can honestly see no reason for buying one of these disks. My money is still going to Apple and itunes.

3? (1)

TheAxeMaster (762000) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559781)

They aren't clear as to what they mean by "ringtone," especially since most new phones can play songs as ringtones, but I'm assuming it isn't a song. So that's only two songs...for $6-7...I'm guessing the ringtone will be a midi version of the single but that is just speculation. Maybe if you're looking for a midi it might be worth it, but modern phones can play non-midi files as ringtones. They should have done it 4 years ago when we would actually buy ringtones.

What's wrong with this? Um ... Numbers? (4, Informative)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559963)

THREE uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs for $6?
The Summary says THREE, but TFA says (quote):

Populated with two songs and a "ringtone"
Which of course makes the $6 seem so much better value.

For the Record Companies.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

christurkel (520220) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559981)

THREE uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs for $6? That's about $2.00 per song, not much higher than Apple's DRM-free pricing.

Not much higher? .99 cents vs 2.00. I'd say that's a lot higher...like double.

Re:Huh? What's wrong with this? (1)

BrookHarty (9119) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560057)

For 2 dollars a song, id rather have better quality than "cd quality", cd quality isn't all thats its cracked up to be. Too loud, not enough channels, not high enough sample rates. After 20 years of cd's, you experience high quality that dwarfs CD's, you know you have been ripped off if you buy a CD now.

Since when is a ringtone considered CD quality? (1)

SilverJets (131916) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560063)

THREE uncompressed (CD-quality) DRM-free songs for $6? That's about $2.00 per song, not much higher than Apple's DRM-free pricing.

In fact, since you're getting it uncompressed, I'm not seeing the problem here... Their pricing is in line with digital downloads.


According to the article it is TWO DRM-free songs and a ringtone of $6. That's $3.00 per song actual song and a crappy ringtone.

/Why would I buy this?
//Hates ringtones.

This Brings to Mind a Question (5, Insightful)

Catiline (186878) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559347)

Here's a question I'd love to ask the music industry:

How many times must I buy the same music in order to "legally" hear it on any music-playing device I own? (No, I will not tell you what devices they are, nor what formats they can play.)

Re:This Brings to Mind a Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20560043)

That's easy. How many devices do you own? At least once per device, just to make sure you keep it legal.

Plus the ringtone... (2)

cb_is_cool (1084665) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559353)

Midi ringtones are outrageously priced..real tones even more so. The price isn't THAT inflated compared to what we already spend.

WOW! (1)

wamerocity (1106155) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559369)

With all the problems the music industry is having right now, a SEVEN DOLLAR 3-SINGLE/ RINGTONE COMBO (which incidently costs FOUR DOLLARS on iTunes), this is bound to be the cure that brings things around for them... Actually with the new iPhone ringtone easy hack on engadget, it only costs 3. This is a seriously sad attempt to drive sales. Do they not see the trend? People don't want to carry around physical media anymore! I don't want to carry 50 CD's with me, because I can use my ipod. Notice how ipod's keep going UP in capacity? It's because people want to be able to carry more music without carry around idiotic discs that can scratch. Maybe they should offer something like 3 singles and ringtones for 3 dollars and undercut itunes. They need a lesson in Econ 101 about how supply and demand only works with things that are in DEMAND.

Re:WOW! (1)

Applekid (993327) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559431)

They need a lesson in Econ 101 about how supply and demand only works with things that are in DEMAND.
Considering the profit margins on physical sales is what's keeping the RIAA machine going, they've got to do something. This is just another sign that their ship is sinking.

Ringle sounds like it'd be a delicious snack, though. Like a Pringle, only flatter.

No way... (5, Interesting)

djupedal (584558) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559391)

One thing hanging over the 'maybe new, maybe not' idea that didn't factor in twenty years ago, is the 'green' factor.

What is the carbon footprint of three songs on a packaged CD versus three songs purchased over the internet? And to bring it into even sharper focus, the CD packaged songs will end up on a player just like the downloads.

Game over, man...

Re:No way... (1)

BloodyIron (939359) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559873)

Perhaps they will provide it on the mini cds you rarely see distributed? That would help the 'green' factor, and have a marketing edge of sorts; would even reduce shipping costs, and other manufacturing costs (smaller cover, less plastic for a jewel case, etc).

Fact of the matter is, some people, *gasp* do not have the internet, or a good internet connection at that. It is proven that there are still a significant ammount of people in the US that are still on dial-up. Even still, some people prefer CDs, be it for a car, or cd player. Even still, some can afford CD players, but not a MP3 player and a computer.

Despite my support for such a concept, I will not buy anything sony. This is triggered from their DRM scandals ( http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/10/31/2016223&tid=172&tid=158 [slashdot.org] ).

So they are turning their head back to CDs.... (1)

soccer_Dude88888 (1043938) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559393)

... and I am right again for not owning any product which its name starts with a letter "i".....

Brilliant!!! (3, Insightful)

Ecuador (740021) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559433)

Brilliant! Finaly, the solution to piracy! Increase the profit margin, how didn't they think of it earlier? ...wait...what???

lovely quote from TFA (4, Funny)

shystershep (643874) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559437)

Just when you thought stupid ideas had become an endangered species

Uh, right . . .

Thanks for that little gem, which helps prove there's not much danger of that ever happening.

Re:lovely quote from TFA (2, Insightful)

pilgrim23 (716938) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559581)

I only know of one bit of media that would benifit from a re-release in its original format...Cheech & Chong: BIG BAMBU -those liner notes... ya just can't download art!

1990 called... (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559457)

And in Cupertino and Austin, the iTunes business teams are high-fiving. As the industry insists on implementing 20-year old business models, Apple Inc. no longer really needs to update their iTunes services, as it will be another 25 years before the industry realizes that PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO BUY PLASTIC DISCS ANYMORE......

Re:1990 called... (2, Insightful)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559601)

I, for one, really do stil want to buy plastic discs. It's just that I can traipse over to any major shop, and get a used or sale copy of the full album for less than they'd like me to spend on three songs.

Re:1990 called... (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560055)

That's Ok, they're still sort of getting money from you.

Why do you think people "sell" their disks to the used disk stores? Because they're tired of them, and the money offsets the cost of a new disk.

So, since more disks are bought because you're supporting the secondary market, the labels are richer for your purchase.

Re:1990 called... (1)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559869)

I really DO want to buy plastic discs, but not at the absurd cartel prices. $5-$6 USD is about what I'd pay, regularly, for a standard CD, and $9-$10 for losslessly compressed 56K+/20-bit+ material. Then I can convert them to OGG for my Samsung stick, or rip/recode throw-away backups for my car.

Right now, I buy 0 CDs per month. Change the prices and I'll be back to 4-5.

I DO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559989)

As a person, I like to have the physical item in my hand, that is proof I legally own the song, which I can just put into device, and it will just work. PERIOD.

People (teenagers) are still going to watch TV and listen to the radio and be susceptible to the paid for hype which turns a garage band into a rock and roll sensation.

Re:1990 called... (1)

evilninjax (930108) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559995)

And in Cupertino and Austin, the iTunes business teams are high-fiving. As the industry insists on implementing 20-year old business models, Apple Inc. no longer really needs to update their iTunes services, as it will be another 25 years before the industry realizes that PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO BUY PLASTIC DISCS ANYMORE...... --- At which time, the RIAA will re-introduce magnetic tape media... -goro-

Three songs or two? (2, Informative)

hasbeard (982620) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559461)

The summary says three songs and a ringtone, but the article reads, two songs and a ring tone. Which is it?

Re:Three songs or two? (1)

FroBugg (24957) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559625)

The article says three songs. "Each ringle is expected to contain three songs -- one hit and maybe one remix and an older track -- and one ringtone."

Unless you're counting the remix as the same as the main song, which makes sense. They're still separate tracks, though.

Ok, the Reuters article reads three songs (1)

hasbeard (982620) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559653)

Ok, I clicked through to the Reuters article linked to from the article linked to by the summary, and the Reuters article talks about three songs and a ring tone.

Redeeming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559469)

Redeeming the ringtone should be simple. Either place the ringtone as a final track on the single, or as a compressed file on a data track. Then convince the phone manufacturers to let all phones use a user-provided sound file as the ringtone. Simple. Of course, convincing the carriers to give up their business of overcharging for small sound files will be the difficult part.

3 singles and a sandwich maybe (1)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559471)

Why not just sell me a sandwich and 3 single download credits for $6? At least then I get something I can use, instead of a piece of plastic containing an exact, permanent copy of data that curiously, I'm permanently not allowed to copy.

Cutting editorial insight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559485)

At $7, retailers would enjoy a profit margin they haven't seen since the days of cassette tapes and vinyl.

Uh, I may be just talking out of my ass here, but I'm pretty sure that CDs with their way lower cost of manufacture and significantly higher retail price than cassettes, for years and years, were the peak years for gross margin for the music industry.

Re:Cutting editorial insight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559849)

"Uh, I may be just talking out of my ass here, but I'm pretty sure that CDs with their way lower cost of manufacture and significantly higher retail price than cassettes, for years and years, were the peak years for gross margin for the music industry."

I was thinking the same thing. I remember right before Compact Disks became the "big thing" I read/saw something about how, because of a CDs lower manufacturing cost, the consumer would reap the benefits of lower album prices. Then for some reason they jacked the prices by about seven bucks.

Re:Cutting editorial insight (1)

CeramicNuts (265664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559965)

They are talking margins for retailers, not labels. CD wholesale costs were always higher than tapes or vinyl. When I worked a music shop, CDs brought in a couple bucks for the latest hit albums. The owner made his real money on tshirts, bongs, stickers, posters, etc.

So I can see how a $7 single might make big retailers take notice if wholesale is low.

Re:Cutting editorial insight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559985)

But the quote says retailers. The relevant data here is the difference between the recommended sales price, and the price the retailer (Wal-mart/Borders/Mom and Pop record store) pays for the item.

reminds me of the Scrooge movie (5, Interesting)

okmijnuhb (575581) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559493)

"Ringle, ringle, coins how they jingle," Scrooge's lustful song of money and greed.
Quite appropriate name considering...

Dear Music Industry (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559545)


Your retail CD market has collapsed. The future is bittorrent.

Please send me U.S. $5,000,000 in 10 days or I will erase all of your songs on all of your CDs in all retail stores by virtue of my telepsychic powers.

As a token of my good will to the proletariat of the United Gulags of America, I, Kilgore Trout, do hereby authorize all of these funds be used to impeach this war criminal [whitehouse.org] .

PatRIOTically,
Kilgore Trout.

It's over. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559559)

Was listening to one of the smaller record label owners the other day on the Punk channel on my satellite radio. He was very matter of fact about the paradigm shift that's happened in the music industry. "The world has changed. People will not spend what they used to spend on music that they can get for free."

I was impressed that he didn't try to preach or necessarily make anyone feel bad (he probably knows better than to preach to people who listen to punk rock). It's just a simple reality that record companies have to adapt to. Their business model is gone. Whether they deserve it or whether they are victims is beside the point.

To survive, they must adapt. I suppose that's easier for someone who runs a smaller independent label, but the time will come for the big labels too, and they will fall much harder judging by their current approach to the problem.

Re:It's over. (1)

curmudgeon99 (1040054) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559755)

You're right. Bands like The Dead Kennedys never made any money selling records--they toured. What I love is how this shift allows musicians to still make money--and it still allows listeners to hear the music. It just slices out the corporate money suck.

I got a ringle on my kitchen table this morning... (1)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559577)

... when one of the soggy Cheerios in my bowl bounced out and landed on the table. Later, when I noticed it, I picked it up.

But not before it left a ringle on the table. :-|

3 Songs? (1)

moore.dustin (942289) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559585)

Or 1 song with 2 remixes and an instrumental? $7 is way to much. You can get a solid EP (4-7 tracks) for that price or just a little more. The EP also has new songs that would be otherwise unavailable on the bands LP(most of the time).

Why No Mention of Apple's Profit Margin? (2, Insightful)

BSDetector (1056962) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559611)

Why No Mention of Apple's Profit Margin?

Re:Why No Mention of Apple's Profit Margin? (1)

timster (32400) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559805)

Perhaps because every single Apple product has competitors attacking it from all sides, so their profit margin is being determined fairly by an open market. Whereas the music industry has established a cartel that prevents real competition.

Ringtone Hell (5, Funny)

warren_spencer_1977 (1124617) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559617)

My bet is that people will avoid buying these in droves simply because they can't find a CD slot on their cellphones. Imagine the customer support calls?

What's a CD ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559719)

Isn't that something you buy at bank and get interest?

Already pointless (1)

pHZero (790342) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559725)

A lot of my non-computer savvy friends got sick of paying for ringtones about a year ago and figured out how to use free music editing software to create little clips of their favorite songs. In fact, I don't know anyone anymore who doesn't know how to do this. How do these music companies think they're going to get away with charging $6-7 just because they threw in a ringtone?

Target Consumers (1)

mastershake82 (948396) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559735)

I don't think that Slashdot, or computer literate mp3 player owners in general, are really the target audience of this, or many other physical media marketing and deployment strategies.

The extent of technology that many non-tech people are familiar with is their cell phone; and for their music, their cd player. This combines those things. So while we, the tech friendly crowd, may have been finding value in purchasing singles from online music stores for a few years, others have not, and still buy full albums for $12 to $16 from retail outlets even though they know they only want one track. While this may not provide an alternative as cheap as the luxury that we have with online content distribution, it does provide and alternative that certain consumers will find valuable.

I'm also sure that these will fill many stockings and snail mail gifts this holiday season as well. Sure you can buy someone a gift card for their favorite online store... but the consumer often feels that they can provide greater sentimentality by showing that they know what the giftee wants and getting them an actual gift.

Too little, too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559737)

Too little, too late. If the record companies did this in the mid-1990s, they may (or may not) be in better shape than they are now. The recording industry has always tried to place draconian control over their music. Who else remembers their threats to sue anyone who made a DAT machine available to consumers at a reasonable price in the 1990s, and the passing of the HRRA which made DRM the law of the land for non-computer digital audio products.

The RIAA won in the 1990s, and independent musicians such as myself had to pay a fortune for digital recording technology (over $1200 for a digital stereo tape deck in 1992 that would have cost about $300 if it was not for the RIAA).

Around the same time, with vinyl dying and CDs taking over, instead of making inexpensive 3" CD singles available, just as there were inexpensive 7" vinyl singles, the RIAA decided that singles should not be sold any more, since they cut in to CD sales.

With DRM in place and music costing at least $10, the RIAA sucessfully sowed the seeds of discontent that eventually resulted in the Napsterization of the internet. In other words, an internet where people do not respect copyright. Now, I do not feel that it is morally right to copy music without authorization. Of course, I've done it; I used my DAT machine in the 1990s to copy CDs, and have a MP3 collection today which is mainly my friends CD collections. But I don't feel good about it.

But I feel that the RIAA brought the Napsterization of the internet upon themselves. Their need to completely control how people listen to music caused their demographic, mainly rebellous young people, to revolt against the RIAA and illegally download music instead of buying CDs.

If the RIAA made this available in the mid-1990s instead of forcing people to buy CDs when they only wanted one song, maybe the Napsterization of the internet would have been delayed, and maybe the RIAA would still be selling a decent number of singles.

And, no, I don't think singles cut in to CDs sales that much. A lot of popular music was music where you bought the entire album. Rush comes to mind; they only ever had one top-40 single, but sold boatloads of albums in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

Ringle Haiku! (4, Funny)

middlemen (765373) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559747)

I am single,
If I buy a ringle,
With me will women mingle ?

or will it be an iPod haiku - ( scene: chic sees guy with iPod )

My Gawd,
An iPod,
Must have a big rod.

Re:Ringle Haiku! (5, Funny)

dstiggy (1145347) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559897)

While absolutely hilarious I'd just like to let you and all of the other science and math nerd here (I include myself in that) know that haikus follow a 5, 7, 5 syllable format. Consider:

Haikus can be fun!
But sometimes they don't make any sense.
refrigerator

Re:Ringle Haiku! (1)

archieaa (961120) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560077)

Hello Everyone

    2 Things, #1. Haiku's form is 5,7,5 not 5,5,7. #2. The best Haiku ever is:
Lets go krogering
For the best of everything
including the price

What more can I say?

Some basic math (5, Funny)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559767)

Lemme see. I have one of them funky new iPods that holds, what, 40,000 songs? And let's see, I'm going to fill it up with ringles? Hmmm. I don't think I'll bother putting the ringtone on the iPod, but the three songs? Sure. So, let's see. Divide 40,000 by 3 = 13,333.33 ringles. Each ringle is $6? 6 x 13,333.33 = $80,000. And that doesn't include sales tax. Here in Toronto, that's 14%, making it $91,200.

WTF ARE THESE IDIOTS THINKING??? That I'm going to spend over NINETY THOUSAND DOLLARS to load up my 160gig iPod?

They must be doing some mighty fine crack, because THAT is pure unadulterated BULLSHIT if they think I'm going to spend even 1/2 of one percent of $80,000 loading up my 160gig iPod, and it certainly isn't going to be spend on ringles...

Good god. What a bunch of losers. Left curve of the IQ bell chart. Morons. Mafiosi. Dead enders. Feh.

RS

Realistic Ipod Capacity (2, Interesting)

mastershake82 (948396) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559909)

While advertised based on the songs they hold... basically 4mb = 1 song. You will notice that the iPod database becomes bloated and the iPod becomes more and more unresponsive and slow when you get past 12,000 to 15,000 songs. It haven't tried it, but I believe the iPod would cease to function usefully if loaded with a full 40,000 songs (it would probably still function to the extent that you can't sue Apple, as they make no guarantee of usability when loaded to the advertised maximum).

I imagine the only reason Apple is adding more space is almost exclusively for TV, movie, and music video content.

Re:Some basic math (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559931)

Well, the RIAA feels that you don't have to load up your iPod. You can go outside and do something useful, like jump in a lake and drown yourself. It is their songs and they don't give a rat's ass about your iPod.

To quote "WarGames"... (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559779)

Falken: I never could get Joshua to learn the most important lesson.
Lightman: What's that?
Falken: Futility. That there's a time when you should just give up.

MY GOD! THIS IS SERIOUS! (1)

dexomn (147950) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559799)

When I was in 9th grade I had a pretty bad case of the ringles; oh did I itch and squirm and cry out in pain! I fear that with our healthcare system in the shape it is; people like me who have no health insurance should stay the hell away from promotions like this lest the need for unattainable medical care to treat this awful malady shall arise!

not a bad idea (1)

fattmatt (1042156) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559803)

I'm into downloading music but I don't think the idea is bad at all.

The younger consumers, the ones who parents are buying them most of the pop music these days, are more into ring tones than the gang of tech clowns that lurk here at slashdot. ...so it comes down to having a hot single and two secondary tracks. There have been a number of wonderful B sides over the years and some interesting remixes ... so it comes down putting some thought into which three tracks are included to back up the "hit" ... which undoubtedly where this where this product will be mismanaged and ultimately it's failure point.

Uh, It's 1982 on the phone.. (3, Funny)

Nonillion (266505) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559809)

They want their marketing and manufacturing excuse back. 6-7 dollars? Don't you think that's a little steep?

How do these people get jobs? (3, Insightful)

Zelocka (1152505) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559821)

This pretty much is the usual from the music industry. Badly thought out plan that has no chance at all of succeeding spearheaded by some management guy that lives in a fantasy world of catch phases. I will bet that this will be dead before first quarter 2008.

Re:How do these people get jobs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20560033)

come back and tell us what you think when you finally have a job who's big catch phrase isn't "would you like fries with that?"

these guys are making bucks and you're a n00b. that pretty much sums it up.

Audacity and BitPim for me, thanks (2, Interesting)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559843)

No thank you, RIAA. I'll just take songs I currently own (either ripped from my purchases CDs or bought from AmieStreet.com) and use Audacity to cut/re-encode them. Then I'll use BitPIM to transfer the files to my phone for use as ringtones.

Cost for the music: Free (raiding old CD collection) or Free to 98 cents (AmieStreet.com)
Cost for the ringtone: Free.

(Expected a "priceless" joke here, didn't you? ;-) Well, it's the end of a long day and I'm not feeling witty, so I'll leave that to anyone replying to my post.)

Not THAT bad (1)

Creamsickle (792801) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559851)

I'm certainly not a music industry fan or a member of the Mafiaa fan club, but come on, this is a very biased article (and summary). It isn't that bad of a deal, actually. You get three songs and a ringtone for $6. Works out to about $1.50 a piece. Take into account that you are actually getting physical media (the CD) and some printed album art/lyrics, and it's really not that terrible of an idea. The RIAA et al is full of big, easy targets that can (and should) be gone after. This isn't one of them.

Dissenting View - it'll be a success (5, Insightful)

hirschma (187820) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559907)

Sure, this seems stupid, but consider some consumer behavior I've seen recently:

- A household where every family member has a Mac and an iPod. Family members often buy the same song instead of using sharing because it is "too difficult".

- A household where working computers are thrown out on a yearly basis and replaced with new ones because that's "easier".

- A household where computers with sensitive records are just left out on the curb.

Different households, all fairly affluent, all in the NYC area. So while ringles may be stupid to the Slashdot crowd, they'll sell to the people that are even dumber than the record execs.

Profit margin of 0% (1)

gorbachev (512743) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559967)

"At $7, retailers would enjoy a profit margin they haven't seen since the days of cassette tapes and vinyl."

The profit margin on $0 in sales is 0%.

Circular marketing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20559979)

Are consumers really gullible enough to fall for this kind of novelty CD? I guess so...

The whole music industry seems to be going round in circles, with DRM free music being hailed as the 'next big thing' -- hell, it won't be too long before they start trying to sell us 'normal' old fashioned audio CDs again!

The pieces finally fit. (1)

fastest fascist (1086001) | more than 6 years ago | (#20559997)

For a while now I've been wondering what type of brain cancer the RIAA and their members suffer from. Finally I figured out the logic in their actions.

Big Music is no longer in the business of making music. That's not news, they've long been in the business of selling music, which just happens to require burning some trash onto CDs. But they're not in that business any more, either. They now intend to make suing people their primary business. At 5000 dollars a song, the profit margins are pretty damn high. This explains the pricing, their attitude towards their customers, in general the way they seem to be doing everything they can to discourage people from actually paying for music. They WANT people to download without permission as much as possible, since it increases the number of people they can sue.

Why I didn't see it sooner, I don't know. It's obvious.

Dear RIAA and friends... (1)

BlueParrot (965239) | more than 6 years ago | (#20560079)

Let me explain this to you in simple terms:

Wikipedia -> Massive success
Youtube -> Massive success
GoogleTunes -> a question of time.

Now unlike video, music doesn't need gigs and gigs of storage space. Several thousand tracks fit easily on a standard drive, and even the most shitty dsl connection can stream it these days. You have at most a year or two before it happens, and when it does you are fucked. Really, just picture yourself directly competing for attention against the worlds biggest advertising agency. Sounds fun doesn't it? You can sue grannys and students ... oh wait my bad... you can't. How do you plan to take on Google? There you go, start shitting your pants, you've been mortally wounded already. I bet you Google is just waiting to finish you off. See you in hell.
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