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Meteorite Causes Illness in Peru

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the i've-read-a-book-about-this dept.

Space 357

eldavojohn writes "A meteorite struck in Peru on Saturday leaving cinders, rock & water boiling out of the ground. Villagers nearby reported headaches & vomiting and attributed it to the event. From the article, 'Seven policemen who went to check on the reports also became ill and had to be given oxygen before being hospitalized, Lopez said. Rescue teams and experts were dispatched to the scene, where the meteorite left a 100-foot-wide (30-meter-wide) and 20-foot-deep (six-meter-deep) crater, said local official Marco Limache.' It's not yet clear whether this is from the meteorite, gas trapped underground that was released or a chemical reaction between the two."

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357 comments

Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (5, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655185)

Ah, I suspect this was either not a meteorite or there is something else going on given that any meteor leaving a 30 meter wide and 20 foot deep crater (meteor being approximately 30 inches wide) [arizona.edu] is not going to hit the ground steaming hot. On the contrary, it will be cold as ice (or colder) given its composition and time for heating. However, I suppose it could also be a re-entry event from a satellite carrying a toxic payload like plutonium... After all, we have the remnants of many satellites and the debris associated with them still in decaying orbits and you can easily spot many of them [utah.edu] . Some satellites particularly those from the former Soviet Union and China have a history of toxic components. Though I suspect we'll know soon enough if it were a satellite, it would have been tracked by numerous agencies and individuals who monitor that sort of thing.

Plutonium thermal generators (3, Insightful)

swb (14022) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655253)

I thought I'd read those were built to withstand re-entry without vaporizing or breaking open. I seem to recall Danger-Will-Robinson arm-waving paranoia about these thermal generators the last time NASA sent one up, but the NASA boys being basically on top of it and packaging them in a way that wasn't a threat.

Re:Plutonium thermal generators (3, Insightful)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655399)

And the Titanic was built to not sink, and Chernobyl was built not to melt down, and Challenger was built not to explode, and the Tacoma Narrows bridge was built not to collapse, etc, etc, etc...

Re:Plutonium thermal generators (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655457)

Titanic design was good, hubris caused bad operation. Chernobyl was a know bad design before it was built.

Oblig. Beavis and Butthead (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655533)

Titi-ca-ca!!

nonsense (4, Informative)

name_already_taken (540581) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655667)

And the Titanic was built to not sink, and Chernobyl was built not to melt down, and Challenger was built not to explode, and the Tacoma Narrows bridge was built not to collapse, etc, etc, etc...

Ok, let's refute your specious points one by one.

The Chernobyl reactor that failed was not built to not melt down - and it was being operated outside of its designed normal operating envelope which is what actually caused the catastrophic failure. Hell, the thing didn't even have a containment vessel.

The Space Shuttle Challenger didn't initiate the explosion, the solid rocket boosters did, which was because they were being used at too cold of an environmental temperature and, against warnings from the manufacturer, the shuttle was launched anyway (human error once again, but not in the design, in the use of the machine in question).

The Tacoma Narrows bridge apparently was not designed not to collapse - the designer failed to factor in the high wind speeds in the Tacoma Narrows and the resulting resonant effect on the structure into the bridge design.

In other words, your post is a bunch of pointless fear mongering along the lines of "humans can't do anything right". That is complete and utter nonsense - humans design things that work in extreme circumstances all the time. You might as well have said "Won't somebody think of the children!?!?".

Re:nonsense (-1, Flamebait)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655871)

Wow, I didn't realize that I was entering some sort of official debate here. My point is simply "shit breaks". Or are you going to argue with that too?

Re:nonsense (1)

swb (14022) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655945)

"Shit breaks" isn't exactly a very good analysis of the potential failure modes for a plutonium thermal generator.

Re:nonsense (3, Funny)

xs650 (741277) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656047)

"Shit breaks" is an excellent analysis of one hitting the Earth at a high percentage of orbital velocity.

Re:nonsense (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655953)

Congratulations! You've won today's "Pedantic Weenie" award. Visit your local Der Wienerschnitzel to claim your prize. In addition, you can take great comfort that you and you alone, in your mother's basement, know what really caused the Challenger to go bye-bye.

Re:Bridge failure (5, Informative)

Technician (215283) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656133)

The Tacoma Narrows bridge apparently was not designed not to collapse - the designer failed to factor in the high wind speeds in the Tacoma Narrows and the resulting resonant effect on the structure into the bridge design.

Before you re-write history, check the news reports of the day. It wasn't a very windy day. The bridge was stable at much higher winds. The moderate wind and the direction was just right to produce a resonant feedback. It wasn't high winds that too the bridge down. It was steady mild wind that kept putting more motion into a resonant system.

References;

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/bridge/meetsusp.html [pbs.org]
  At the time it opened for traffic in 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge was the third longest suspension bridge in the world. It was promptly nicknamed "Galloping Gertie," due to its behavior in wind. Not only did the deck sway sideways, but vertical undulations also appeared in quite moderate winds. Drivers of cars reported that vehicles ahead of them would completely disappear and reappear from view several times as they crossed the bridge. Attempts were made to stabilize the structure with cables and hydraulic buffers, but they were unsuccessful. On November 7, 1940, only four months after it opened, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed in a wind of 42 mph--even though the structure was designed to withstand winds of up to 120 mph.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacoma_Narrows_Bridge [wikipedia.org]
The wind-induced collapse occurred on November 7, 1940 at 11:00 AM(Pacific time), due partially to a physical phenomenon known as mechanical resonance. [4]

And for sake of balance here is a modern study stating it wasn't resonance but instead a negative feedback;
http://www.ketchum.org/wind.html [ketchum.org]
" . . . in many undergraduate physics texts the (1940 Tacoma Narrows bridge) disaster is presented as an example of elementary forced resonance . . . Engineers, on the other hand, have studied the phenomenon . . . and their current understanding differs fundamentally from the viewpoint expressed in most physics texts. In the present article the engineers' viewpoint is presented . . . It is then demonstrated that the ultimate failure of the bridge was in fact related to an aerodynamically induced condition of self-excitation or "negative damping" . . . This paper emphasizes the fact that. physically as well as mathematically, forced resonance and self- excitation are fundamentally different phenomena.

The one common thread in all the above is it was not a high wind that took the bridge down. It was the feedback pumping energy into the motion.

Re:nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20656245)

But won't someone think of the children?!

Meteorites are nothing but extinction-event simulators and they should banned by the government immediately!

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655287)

What satellites around the Earth carry plutonium? The only thing I've heard of launched with plutonium was a space probe now far away from us, and that caused a big public uproar.

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (1)

mpoulton (689851) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655571)

What satellites around the Earth carry plutonium?

Most of them. If not plutonium, then a different radioisotope like 90Sr. Radioisotope Thermal Generators (RTG's) are a very common method of providing power for electronics in satellites.

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (5, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655745)

Most of them.

No, sorry. That's horrendously incorrect. There have only been a handful of missions that used RTGs as power sources. Most satellites rely on Solar Power and batteries to operate. The reasoning is simple: Nuclear materials are EXPENSIVE. Far too expensive for anyone other than NASA to use. And NASA only uses them for very specific missions where no other option is feasible. (For example, while the current rovers have a few grains of plutonium to keep the joints from freezing on Mars, they are still powered by solar panels. The follow-up mission was supposed to use RTGs to provide a longer-lasting robot, but that's being reevaluated in light of the longevity of Spirit and Opportunity.)

Wikipedia has a list of RTGs and their missions here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator#RTG_models [wikipedia.org]

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (5, Insightful)

CheshireCatCO (185193) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655969)

Far too expensive for anyone other than NASA to use.
Almost true. Lose one of the A's and you'd get another agency that's known to use RTGs on satellites. (Shortly after 9/11, the plutonium that was to be used for New Horizons was suddenly reallocated to an "unnamed Federal agency". It wasn't NASA, New Horizons was their only mission to the outer solar system being prepared just then. Most people were able to conclude, reasonably, that the RTGs were heading for spy sats.)

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (5, Informative)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655887)

This is incorrect. Very few satellites in earth orbit use any sort of RTG power source. Only satellites that are destined for the outer reaches of the solar system use RTGs, as the power available from the sun is inadequate at those distances.

There is an exception to this rule though:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator#Use [wikipedia.org]

By comparison, only a few space vehicles have been launched using full-fledged nuclear reactors: the Soviet RORSAT series and the American SNAP-10A.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RORSAT [wikipedia.org]

Radar-equipped Ocean Reconnaissance SATellite or RORSAT is the western name given to the Soviet Upravlyaemyj Sputnik Aktivnyj ( ) (US-A) satellites. These satellites were launched between 1967 and 1988 to monitor NATO and merchant vessels using active radar. RORSATs were launched under cover name of Cosmos satellites. Because a return signal from a target illuminated by a radar transmitter diminishes as the inverse of the fourth power of the signal emitted, for the surveillance radar to work effectively, RORSATs had to be placed in low earth orbit. Had they used large solar panels for power, the orbit would have rapidly decayed due to drag through the upper atmosphere. Further, the satellite would have been useless at night. Hence the majority of RORSATs carried type BES-5 nuclear reactors fuelled by uranium-235. Normally the nuclear reactor cores were ejected into high orbit (a so-called "disposal orbit") at the end of the mission, but there were several incidents, some of which resulted in radioactive material re-entering the Earth's atmosphere.

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655925)

Very few spacecraft carry RTGs. Their primary use is for deep space missions, not those that are in Earth orbit. Solar cells are simpler and cheaper.

Nuclear reactors have been used on spacecraft with very high power requirements, like Russian ocean surveillance satellites.

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (1)

CheshireCatCO (185193) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655873)

Spy satellites, as far as I know. It's considering prudent to *not* have large solar panels on your birds if you don't want to make it easy for others to know where your sats are at a given time.

As far as I have ever heard, most other satellites just use solar panels.

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (2, Funny)

that IT girl (864406) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655481)

When I read this, I thought "Woah! ALIEN DISEASES! It's like a comic book!"
Don't persuade me otherwise, my version is much cooler. ;D

Re: Foreigner (3, Funny)

operagost (62405) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655541)

On the contrary, it will be cold as ice

You're as cold as ice, create a 30 M. wide hole
Just a block of ice, hot as a meteorite is cold

I've seen it before, it happens a lot
Crash on some villagers, trash all they've got
They look out the door to see a rock in the sky
A big stinky mess, makes the poor suckers die

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (4, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655603)

PU-238 would be an unlikely source of problems of this sort. Most of the radiation is Alpha Particles which are easily rejected by human skin. (Alpha particle dangers are almost entirely due to internal consumption.) Even if we take possible Gamma and X-Ray emissions from long decay into account, the people who were near the meteor shouldn't feel sick until an hour or two after the exposure.

According to the article (coral cache [nyud.net] ), the problem was a "strange odor" that caused the headaches and vomiting. Such an odor suggests a strong chemical of some sort that has been aerosolized near the point of impact. The officials will probably send out a Hazmat team, take air samples, collect the debris from the crash and investigate the exact composition. (Assuming that the authorities have the necessary resources. Otherwise they'll probably get someone to dispose of it and let the air clear.)

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (2, Insightful)

kalirion (728907) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655691)

On the contrary, it will be cold as ice (or colder) given its composition and time for heating.

And how do you know its composition? How do you know it's 30 inches wide? All the article tells us is the size of the impact crater. That's not nearly enough for the calculator.

Perhaps Nickel Vapour (5, Informative)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655697)

If the meteorite was of Iron/Nickel composition there's a good chance a fair amount of nickel was boiled off and carried into the area, possibly some produced by the head of the impact and blast.

Please see: Toxicity Summary for NICKEL AND NICKEL COMPOUNDS [ornl.gov]

Acute inhalation exposure of humans to nickel may produce headache, nausea, respiratory disorders, and death (Goyer 1991, Rendall et al. 1994).

what makes you think its cold? (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655961)

The sucker coming in has a huge kinetic energy (0.5 * m * V * V) and potential energy ( m * g * h ) ... as the body falls the potential energy converts to kinetic energy, and the sucker has zero kinetic energy after impact. That energy has to go somewhere: some of it gets converted into heat as it reenters the atmosphere (heat being transferred both into the body and into the air), the rest on impact changes into translational energy for the dirt (very crude analysis of course ... the dirt will warm up, everything will reach thermal equilibrium, etc.)

If you think you can bring something from deep space to the earths surface 'as cold as ice', NASA/RSC Energia/ESA might want to talk to you ...

Re:Andromeda Strain!!! or not... (1)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656081)

You're making assumptions here. Meteorites have often been reported falling quite hot, at least the outside of the rock if not the core. There is very little hard data on landing temperatures anyway, so we shouldn't be using temperature as a valid variable. To say it's not a meteorite because it's not hot is fallacious.

Confirmation on this one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655189)


Not news: Meteor hits the earth

News: Strange substance associated with the meteor impact.

Now this has made international news. It seems that there should be a reaction from the scientific community. Hopefully they can verify what really happened.

If what the story is true, then there are only a few things that this could be.

1. A meteor with a strange substance (perhaps sulfur based)
2. A chunk of comet with unique properties
3. Space Junk
4. A regular piece of extra-terrestrial stuff (any of the above) that hit something on earth that caused the stink/sickeness.

Personally, I am breaking out the tin-foil hardhat.

Re:Confirmation on this one? (3, Insightful)

Akaihiryuu (786040) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655285)

It's gotta be a Leviathan, the strange substance is Phazon. Someone tag this with phazon or metroidprime.

Re:Confirmation on this one? (4, Insightful)

Goaway (82658) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655295)

Even if it is "true", it is more likely than anything else mass hysteria.

Re:Confirmation on this one? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655709)

The picture show swampy ground (tundra?), so it could well have caused some methane to be released.

Re:Confirmation on this one? (1)

nizo (81281) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656007)

Personally, I am breaking out the tin-foil hardhat.


How many rolls of tinfoil do you use up making your own hardhat???

Fungus is among us (4, Interesting)

dattaway (3088) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655205)

Looking at the pictures, the ground looks like a prime area for fungus to release spores when disturbed, like anthrax.

Re:Fungus is among us (2, Funny)

TheeBlueRoom (809813) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655535)

Let me know when the Space Spore Zombies show up...

Re:Fungus is among us (1)

y86 (111726) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656231)

I for one welcome our space zombie overlords.

As a systems analyst with positive Karma I can be used to help herd up fellow slashdoters with the purpose to serve your brain eating needs.....

Re:Fungus is among us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655681)

Looking at WHAT pictures? The article contains but a dull, thumb-sized image of a green streek.

Re:Fungus is among us (2, Informative)

the plant doctor (842044) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655829)

You might be right about a fungus being released, but Anthrax is not a fungus. I expect better from /. to know the difference between a bacterium and a fungus ought to be trivial.

(Almost) Useless without pics (4, Insightful)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655233)

Now tell me: who here doesn't want to see the darn crater? Of all things in TFA, what I really missed is a picture of the crater that the alleged meteorite created. Just seeing it would give us some idea of whether it was a meteorite at all, and if so, how big.

Re:(Almost) Useless without pics (5, Informative)

ObjetDart (700355) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655325)

Re:(Almost) Useless without pics (1)

pla (258480) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655699)

Maybe this will help

Call me crazy, but does anyone else notice that that hole looks more like something dug with a backhoe than an impact crater?

Re:(Almost) Useless without pics (2, Insightful)

januth (1000892) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655751)

Based on that picture (and the perspective may be misleading) that is not a 30m crater. Maybe the ejecta is out to 30m, but that hole in the ground looks like maybe 7-8m. That would mean whatever impacted there was substantially smaller.

Re:(Almost) Useless without pics (1)

mikesd81 (518581) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655443)

Those are of the wrong crater (1)

crovira (10242) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655595)

by about an order of magnitude.

Try again, it not 10 feet in diameter, its 100 feet!

Re:Those are of the wrong crater (1)

ObjetDart (700355) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655995)

Try again, it not 10 feet in diameter, its 100 feet!

I'm curious, what exactly in the photo makes you think the crater is only 10 feet in diameter? The only thing in the photo that gives any sense of scale at all are the people and car in the background, but since we don't know how far back they are from the rim, even they are of little use.

But if you assume the car is 12 feet long and fairly close to the rim, that would put the crater at 60-70 feet across at least.

Kryptonite Radiation (3, Funny)

Sciros (986030) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655251)

There's no other rational explanation. Especially if the meteorite was green. Though there's different kinds of kryptonite out there. For instance Superman is very allergic to red, although it doesn't kill him. ... This is not off topic! :-(

Funny... How about Nickel content? (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655553)

There's no other rational explanation. Especially if the meteorite was green. Though there's different kinds of kryptonite out there. For instance Superman is very allergic to red, although it doesn't kill him. ... This is not off topic! :-(

If the meteorite was of Iron/Nickel composition there's a good chance superheated Nickel became vapourous. Nickel as a gas is highly toxic.

Re:Kryptonite Radiation (1)

edraven (45764) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655821)

All the evidence collected so far suggests that kryptonite radiation affects only Kryptonians. Unless you're suggesting they've established a colony and managed to keep their remarkable superhuman abilities a secret... Oh, crap.

Re:Kryptonite Radiation (1)

phedre (1125345) | more than 6 years ago | (#20656179)

I think it's perfectly clear that this is an alien spacecraft. They are purposely releasing toxic fumes, for what purpose I'm not sure. Possibly more will arrive in an attempt to enslave us. You just wait until they tell us the meteor has opened up and something strange is coming out. Oh wait, they won't tell us that will they? Well, I'm going to go amass guns and provisions in the basement and cover the house in pretty shiny tin foil. I suggest you do the same!

/in Steven King voice: (4, Funny)

pimpbott (642033) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655257)

Meeeteyer sheeit!

Re:/in Steven King voice: (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655323)

Mod parent up for semi-obscure reference (for those that don't know, this is from the movie "Creepshow")

Re:/in Steven King voice: (1)

u-bend (1095729) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655605)

Thanks for clearing up a vague memory I've had since I was a kid! I remember it being funny, but then creepy and sad when he offs himself at the end, reduced to a gravelly-voiced moss pile. Or at least that's what I remember. Nice reference tho!

There can be other explanations (3, Interesting)

unity100 (970058) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655319)

yet, this for now seems like radiation poisoning, with headache, vomitting and such.

Re:There can be other explanations (1)

that IT girl (864406) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655729)

It would, except for the reports of a strange smell, and the fact that the symptoms started immediately. Radiation sickness takes a bit longer to develop. It could also be psychological for a lot of people at this point. It will be difficult to determine how many people are actually suffering because of the meteor, and how many people's brains are making them sick.

Spreading misinformation (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655913)

MANY diseases, chemical exposures, etc. induce nausea and headaches. If radiation is causing these people to have headaches so soon after their being exposed to the meteor (I'm assuming the headaches started soon after, like within hours) they'll be dead inside of a few days. Headaches and nausea from radiation--ASSUMING, and that's a big assumption, that these are radiation-related--indicate either the gastrointestinal or the cerebrovascular stages of ARS. If it's the latter, people will die in days; the former, inside of weeks. If they ARE radiation-damaged, chromosomal analysis could be done to show it.

Given the amount of information we have to go on from the articles, there is little chance this is ARS. More information may come to light later, but for now I think it's premature to try to blame radiation.

Re:There can be other explanations (1)

sofar (317980) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655951)

absolutely not. Any poisening symptoms include headaches and vomiting. Even rat poison will produce those already.

While it is absolutely 100% assured that radiation levels of meteorites will be above normal levels, it's unlikely that they will achieve high levels that cause immediate symptoms as widespread as reported.

If this meteorite was ferrous (heavy metal type), it's much more likely that the impact and subsequent vaporizing of material containing heavy metals (lead, copper are the immediate suspects) will cause these symptoms.

Re:There can be other explanations (1)

ErikZ (55491) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655999)

I would think radiation levels high enough to cause those symptoms that quickly, would kill the person after a day.

Photo (5, Informative)

PhotoGuy (189467) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655343)

Better article [ninemsn.com.au] with a photo of the impact site. Quite an impressive hole. One hopes it's just some underground gas, and not the realization of Andromeda Strain [wikipedia.org] ...

Re:Photo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655661)

that doesn't look anywhere near 30m wide

Re:Photo (1)

wximagery95 (993253) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655923)

Boiling water started coming out of the crater and particles of rock and cinders were found nearby.

Boiling water from a meteorite? Rock and cinders? That sounds a little odd. The meteorite was probably very small in size to make that hole (previous poster mentioned 30 inches). Hardly big enough to boil water for an extended period of time and produce molten rock.

This sounds more like the meteorite punch a hole into an underground hot spring or something and the noxious odor is perhaps the foul smell of sulfur, minerals, an other things in those types of environments. The landscape also looks very desolate, common in areas where there is thermal activity.

Colour Out of Space! (3, Interesting)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655369)

Show me a picture of the blasted heath, I want to see! Or maybe this will be the boring kind of meteorite, the one that just raises zombies.

Re:Colour Out of Space! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655573)

Maybe those "28" zombies that spit blood and scream, those guys are kinda freaky and seldom boring.

Personally I think it's the star wormwood and the end is nigh, but then - I always think that.

And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters; And the name of the star is called Wormwood: and the third part of the waters became wormwood; and many men died of the waters, because they were made bitter.

B-Movie (1)

MrSteveSD (801820) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655387)

It sounds like the beginning of some Sci-Fi B-Movie. When will the people start exhibiting strange powers?

Re:B-Movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655705)

this cornfield is a no wishing zone, the red zone is for zombie moaning and groaning only

clearly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655409)

clearly this 6,000 year old rock came down from the heavens as God's judgment on the unbelievers.

Re:clearly (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655915)

clearly this 6,000 year old rock came down from the heavens as God's judgment on the unbelievers.

No, it's actually an Illudium Pew 36 space modulator. Didn't you hear? Earth is obstructing the martian's view of Venus

Obligatory Revelation Quote (1)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655555)

"And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters; And the name of the star is called Wormwood: and the third part of the waters became wormwood; and many men died of the waters, because they were made bitter." (Revelation 8:10-11 KJV)


And yes, the Russian word for "wormwood" is Chernobyl. But ironically, this is not the FIRST thing I thought... I thought of the Phantoms from Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. I'd rather think about Aki Ross than some stupid beast.

Ok, where did I store my bio-aetherics shield generator...

Why Peru? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20655589)

From an above link:
"None of the meteorites that fall in Peru and make perforations of varied sizes are harmful for people, unless they fall on a house," he said. Another meteorite fell to Earth in Arequipa province in June.

Does Peru have some strange attraction for meteorites?

Alternative (4, Interesting)

aphxtwn (702841) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655769)

It could be a downed satellite - maybe some hydrazine or something is causing the illness.

too much TV (4, Funny)

LM741N (258038) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655805)

now that Britney has made her way on TV in S. America, there have been waves of vomiting and sickness.

Re:too much TV (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20656065)

Leave Britney ALONE!

- Chris Crocker

Was it green? (1)

rumith (983060) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655807)

I believe it was supposed to hit the Earth somewhere else...

Tiberium is named after the Tiber river in Italy where it was first discovered.

The SCO meteorite? (5, Funny)

Ang31us (1132361) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655817)

Here's a picture [yahoo.com] of what it looked like as SCO streaked across the sky and made that big, noxious, radioactive hole in the ground! ;-)

Those bugs sent it. (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 6 years ago | (#20655973)

It was meant to wipe out BA, but they were far enough that our planet looked REALLY small to those multi eyes. The next one will be to wipe us out.
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