Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

640gb PCIe Solid-State Drive Demonstrated

Zonk posted more than 5 years ago | from the super-fast-super-small dept.

Data Storage 324

Lisandro writes "TG Daily reports that the company Fusion io has presented a massively fast, massively large solid-state flash hard drive on a PCIe card at the Demofall 07 conference in San Diego. Fusion is promising sustained data rates of 800Mb/sec for reading and 600Mb/sec for writing. The company plans to start releasing the cards at 80 GB and will scale to 320 and 640 GB. '[Fusion io's CTO David Flynn] set the benchmark for the worst case scenario by using small 4K blocks and then streaming eight simultaneous 1 GB reads and writes. In that test, the ioDrive clocked in at 100,000 operations per second. "That would have just thrashed a regular hard drive," said Flynn. The company plans on releasing the first cards in December 2007 and will follow up with higher capacity versions later.'"

cancel ×

324 comments

Oblig. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785353)

640gb ought to be enough for anybody.

Re:Oblig. (2, Funny)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785415)

Maybe for your pr0n collection ;)

Re:Oblig. (5, Insightful)

ady1 (873490) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785421)

Its not the size of the harddrive which is amazing. Its the read/write speed.
Even if you get a 32GB model, you can install windows on it and use the regular SATA2 HDD for movies/music storage. Think of the booting time.

Re:Oblig. (-1, Flamebait)

gawiedeboef (940586) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785609)

mmm just think how fast your window system will able to infect itself with all those 100% MS compatible viruses

Re:Oblig. (1, Interesting)

Lisandro (799651) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785659)

Uh oh. These solid state drives are not intended to be used in desktops, where things like swap files [wikipedia.org] are very common - this device is flash based, and flash still has a lot of issues regarding limited write cycles (i recall the best current flash chips have a maximum of 1,000,000 write cycles per cell). You wouldn't be able to boot from them either, since this hardware is unknown to current BIOSes.

The way i see it is a very, very neat way of replacing hard disk arrays for enterprise use; the device itself it's surely very expensive, but way smaller, cooler, quieter, with less power consumption and near zero manteinance costs. A hd array with similar write/read performance would also be extremely expensive, if even feasible.

Re:Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785781)

Funny...

*looks at his K6-III booting from a PCI-SATA card.*

Just FYI, the mobo is from 1997 or 1998

There's some standards for bootable PCI devices, and PCIe I suspect...

Re:Oblig. (1)

Lisandro (799651) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785879)

Funny...

*looks at his K6-III booting from a PCI-SATA card.*


That'd be a PCI SATA controller card? You can boot from them alright, but the article mentions that drivers are available for several platforms - if drivers are involved, it's most likely not using a regular ATA/SATA interfase.

Re:Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20786051)

so...

since drivers are available for several platforms for my SATA card (that I'm booting from)... It's not using a regular ATA/SATA setup and can't be booted?

Re:Oblig. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785893)

Couldn't you mostly boot from it by putting your boot information on a standard drive, just enough to load up the controller for this drive, and then loading everything else off the solid state? I mean, it wouldn't be quite as fast, but you'd still save quite a bit of time.

Re:Oblig. (2, Interesting)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785945)

Which brings to mind an interesting point..

Why even have swap files? Shouldn't caching decisions be done a bit more intelligently at the application level? I have 10 times more RAM in my current PC than all of the memory (including the HDD) on my first PC. At some point, can't we drop swap?

Re:Oblig. (2, Informative)

jamie (78724) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786101)

Once you get above $500 desktop computers, it doesn't much matter. A properly tuned system will only use swap, if at all, to drop a few MB from RAM to disk because it's just never accessed. A server that swaps during use is just not set up properly.

Re:Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785981)

Uh oh. These solid state drives are not intended to be used in desktops, where things like swap files are very common - this device is flash based, and flash still has a lot of issues regarding limited write cycles (i recall the best current flash chips have a maximum of 1,000,000 write cycles per cell). You wouldn't be able to boot from them either, since this hardware is unknown to current BIOSes.

Your childish "uh oh" introduction, your completely un-cited "a lot of issues" comment, and your vague "I recall" interruption reveal the fact that you're spouting off some crap on a subject you have no direct, real-world experience with. Find another subject with which to stroke your ego kid, because you're looking like a pompous dumbass on this one.

Uhh, Price? (4, Interesting)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785379)


Who, what, when, where, why?

Price would seem to be a pretty important detail...

Re:Uhh, Price? (5, Funny)

thegnu (557446) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785427)

I think it's safe to assume you won't be buying one soon.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

Major Blud (789630) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785461)

If it can achieve the performance numbers that they claim (which it probably can based on NAND technology), then price price wont' keep people from buying this. This has been what enterprise DBA's have been waiting to have for awhile; the solution to high disk queues and wait times. I can't wait to get my hands on a test unit; SQL should smoke on this sucker.

Re:Uhh, Price? (5, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785489)

FTFA:

So how much will these cards cost? Flynn told us that the company is aiming to beat $30 dollars a GB, something that should seem very cheap to large corporations, adding "You can drop ship or Fedex this card and be up and running in a few minutes... you can't do that with a storage area network."
So, let's say they get to $29 a GB, a reasonable price for NAND flash-based memory devices. 640*30==$19,200. Sorry, but that doesn't seem to beat an inexpensive SAN in price. I recently priced out a 12TB iSCSI SAN for a little bit more than that, and even 1-2 TB fibre SAN from IBM should be around the same price.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

BlueBlade (123303) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785855)

Not to nitpick, but you're not even close to the price of flash memory with your estimate there. $29 per GB? Newegg lists several 16GB USB key drives [newegg.com] for about $130, or $8.12 per GB. And that's retail. It's safe to assume that the actual price per GB for a mass-produced drive would be much lower than that. Even at $8, that hypothetical drive would be about $5120.

Right now, flash RAM prices drop in half every 6 months or so, meaning it won't be that long until this drive isn't outrageously expensive anymore.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

PineHall (206441) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785497)

From the article they are "aiming to beat $30 a GB". Not cheap! Figuring $30/GB, a 640GB drive would cost $19,200. So it is way out of my price range.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785505)

So how much will these cards cost? Flynn told us that the company is aiming to beat $30 dollars a GB

At $30/GB, that would make an 80GB drive around $2,400. Hopefully the price will eventually come down, as "He even hinted that the company is looking into some gaming applications, but didn't want to give any further details."

Re:Uhh, Price? (2, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785925)

I could buy a 10 GB drive for most of my OS and software, and just keep my media on a traditional hard drive. You don't need a super fast drive for your MP3s and Videos, but it would be nice to increase boot times as well as application start up times.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

t00le (136364) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785509)

ffs rtfa:

"If you were crazy enough, you could use this in a high end game machine."

So how much will these cards cost? Flynn told us that the company is aiming to beat $30 dollars a GB, something that should seem very cheap to large corporations, adding "You can drop ship or Fedex this card and be up and running in a few minutes... you can't do that with a storage area network."

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

schnoid (834307) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785513)

All i can say is for the right price, count me in! It would be awesome to stop worrying about hard drives dying all the time.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785563)

Who, what, when, where, why?

Price would seem to be a pretty important detail...


$30 a GB.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785681)

I'll take 2 gigs please.

Re:Uhh, Price? (1)

Black Copter Control (464012) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786043)

If price is an important detail, then you should wait 5 years for this to hit the mass market.

Speaking as someone who remembers paying $2500 for a 1GB drive (and that was with a 30% educational discount...
If that kind of I/O speed is important enough for a business, I can see them not only paying the $2400 for an 80GB drive, but buying 5 of them to put in a 4 disk raid-5 configuration with hot-swap spare. (because FLASH drives have a nasty history of dying after too many writes when used in place of an OS drive).

As long as the performance increase provides a business advantage, it's worth it... Think of it this way... that 5-disk configuration would cost them about the same as 1-2 months worth of wages for the senior sysadmin who's tasked with installing and maintaining it.

in mother russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785393)

massively large PCI-e drive stores you!

Still Expensive (1)

EvilSpudBoy (1159091) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785395)

$30/GB is still expensive but I bet in less than 2 years solid state drives in this capacity will come down to a few dollars/GB.

I hope this means that laptops and large capacate media players with extremely long battery life are not too far away.

Re:Still Expensive (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785511)

I hope this means that laptops and large capacate media players with extremely long battery life are not too far away.

At least as far as laptops are concerned, I thought a limited number of write cycles was a problem for solid-state drives.

Re:Still Expensive (4, Insightful)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785579)

I hope this means that laptops and large capacate media players with extremely long battery life are not too far away.

I think people expect too much from SSDs. The hard drive is far from the dominant power consumption component in a notebook. The CPU, chipset, GPU and display panel each consume more power than a notebook hard drive does. If you follow a modified version of Amdahl's law (not a law, but whatever), you want to fix the biggest problem first, and that is either the display or CPU. An LED backlit display can save some power, and running a lower power rating CPU saves power too. Compared to that, the savings of swapping HDD for SSD is negligible. On a standard notebook, I think you might add 15 minutes to battery life, which is still far from "extremely long battery life".

In media players, doubling in capacity every year is a reasonable expectation.

Re:Still Expensive (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785631)

$30/GB is still expensive but I bet in less than 2 years solid state drives in this capacity will come down to a few dollars/GB.
The price will fall, but not that drastically. Magnetic hard drives and related technology are likely to continue to dominate for many more years due to their price being pennies a GB and their performance being deemed good enough, especially in RAID systems with large caches.

Re:Still Expensive (1)

duerra (684053) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785635)

Even at a few dollars per GB, that is too expensive to hope that this technology could re-introduce cartridge-based gaming as opposed to disc-based gaming on consoles. I can't wait for the return of 3 second load times in gaming - having to wait 30 seconds for a level to load (especially in games where the action you are performing, and may want to repeat, is as long as the load time).

Re:Still Expensive (1)

Eccles (932) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785643)

Is there any sign they have a significant patent on this tech, or are they just counting on being first to market? If there are no patents, we could expect the price to go down fast, just price flash drives.

Re:Still Expensive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785705)

You youngins... I remember when $30/MB was CHEAP and we liked it!

$30GB Expensive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785747)

I bought my first 1GB drive back in 1992. A SCSI Seagate 1.1GB for $900.00 for my SPARC Classic. I compare that with the 750GB Seagate SATA I just bought for around $200.

The return of HSM? (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785397)

With small but fast flash drives appearing on the market, it would be nice to have storage systems that can automatically migrate data between disk and flash to maximize performance.

1x10^6 (0, Redundant)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785409)

640 GB ought to be enough for anybody.

Re:1x10^6 (0, Redundant)

FinchWorld (845331) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785877)

640 GB ought to be enough for anybody.

Please, my po.. er... some peoples porn collections are bigger than that!

And another question. (4, Insightful)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785413)

What's the MTBF? [wikipedia.org]

Re:And another question. (4, Informative)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785523)

Hitachi are saying that they have solved the overwrite problem (at least mitigated it by a factor of 100)

They appear to want to use normal DRAM memory for the running of the drive but then write it permanently to the NAND flash at shutdown/memory full time.
I would assume this involves charging of a small battery and dumping the data later on.

http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2007/09/26/hitachi-reckons-solid-state [theinquirer.net]

Re:And another question. (1)

fragmentate (908035) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785593)

The only MTBF I've found is based solely on stress testing. Estimates vary wildly from 500,000 hours, up to 1 million hours.

I think that getting this to market will improve MTBF (and, of course, give us REAL numbers). It will also spur competition in two areas. First, other companies that provide storage solutions will take it seriously, which may drive prices way down. Second, the NAND flash drive companies will try to improve MTBF to be able to sell more flash. Of course, their prices may drop as well -- spurred by competition.

I haven't personally experienced any flash RAM failures, yet. I used my flash drives quite heavily, and swap data on them frequently. So far, so good; and I'm not even a big spender (in fact, I buy the cheapest I can find).

Going to flash based storage would be a boon for RDBMS (DMBS in general, really). And people would devise clever ways of syncing to magnetic media (warehousing?), and using the flash for the hardcore querying.

I want one of these drives... NOW!

Re:And another question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785837)

Another good question that TFA didn't answer is what average seek times are. I'd imagine it's better than a standard disk drive, but it would still be nice to know.

Re:And another question. (1)

brunascle (994197) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786007)

i suspect it's around 0, give or take a few nanoseconds.

Ya, know...before WikiPedia... (1)

StressGuy (472374) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786049)

We'd have said something like, "What's the Mean Time Between Failures?"

WTF?

Wow (3, Interesting)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785435)

I could imagine using this as an OS drive. No sooner do you let your finger off the power button than the login screen appears.

Re:Wow (1)

Jerome H (990344) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785543)

Welcome in Utopia, I hope you will enjoy your trip !

Re:Wow (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785645)

What's the big deal about that? My Commodore 64 can do the same thing.

Re:Wow (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785695)

Yeah? How does WoW play on your C64?

Re:Wow (4, Funny)

FiveLights (1012605) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785899)

You are standing in a field, facing East. A river runs East and West to the North of you and a path runs to the South and East.

Re:Wow (3, Insightful)

HarvardAce (771954) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786017)

You are likely to be eaten by a gnome.

Re:Wow (1)

TheDreadSlashdotterD (966361) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786047)

grab rock

smash self

Re:Wow (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786107)

You are standing in a field, facing East. A river runs East and West to the North of you and a path runs to the South and East.

Come on now, this is MMO! It should read:

You are standing in a field, facing East. A river runs East and West to the North of you and a path runs to the South and East.
Also here: John lvl 12 Cleric

Re:Wow (4, Funny)

east coast (590680) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786053)

Yeah? How does WoW play on your C64?

It plays very nice.

[turns to the other Commodore users] I told him it plays very nice [chuckling from users]

Now! Go away or I shall taunt you a second time.

Re:Wow (1)

z0M6 (1103593) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785779)

Sorry, but I think you are a bit optimistic here. I recommend that you have a look at some of the videos of people on youtube that boot xp on ramdrives. You should also notice another great lag. Hint: the time spent from pushing the power button to booting the OS. http://linuxbios.org/ [linuxbios.org] could fix this.

write limit? (0)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785443)

What is the write limit for their device? It would be a damn shame to buy a $10,000 solid-state drive only to have it burn out after a month because you forgot to mount it with the "noatime" option.

Can you boot from them? (1)

IceCreamGuy (904648) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785447)

I can't find any mention in the article of whether you'll be able to boot from them with current BIOSs. Surely any system they'll be in will have a decent amount of RAM for the OS, but it would be pretty cool solely for the fast boot times.

Re:Can you boot from them? (1)

king-manic (409855) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785743)

I can't find any mention in the article of whether you'll be able to boot from them with current BIOSs. Surely any system they'll be in will have a decent amount of RAM for the OS, but it would be pretty cool solely for the fast boot times.

Hey,
We all use Linux right.. we never have to reboot /sarcasm.

Flash Memory == Vanished Data (-1, Troll)

egg troll (515396) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785459)

Sadly while something like this has potential for use in certain limited academic settings, I think it would easily fail the real-world test. I would not want my data to be held hostage to a whim of electrical malfunctions. Flash cards are notoriously fickle and should its battery fall out, your data will be gone. Much like turning your computer off without saving your work. As a professor of Computer Science at a major California university, it galls me to see such devices as these promoted without a clear explanation of their drawbacks being made public.

Re:Flash Memory == Vanished Data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785639)

If you were my C++ Professor, then F you... Ah now I feel better

Re:Flash Memory == Vanished Data (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785667)

He who drops nearly $20,000 for such a unit will have investigated the drawbacks.
And decided they are outweighed by the advantages, no worries professor!

Re:Flash Memory == Vanished Data (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785679)

should its battery fall out

The fuck?

by egg troll (515396)

Oh, carry on.

Number of write cycles? (1)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785463)

Will it last as long as a standard hard drive?

Re:Number of write cycles? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785909)

Longer...MUCH longer.

Lifespan? (0, Redundant)

rossdee (243626) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785473)

I thought Flash memory had a limited (write cycle) lifespan. If they have solved that problem it would be great.
When are they coming out with a laptop version?

Re:Lifespan? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785701)

Your concern is answered fifty times in every flash HD article here.

Expect to pay big (1)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785477)

So how much will these cards cost? Flynn told us that the company is aiming to beat $30 dollars a GB
So the initial 80GB model will hopefully cost less than $2400. I suspect these will be limited to servers demanding immense I/O with a large amount of data.

Re:Expect to pay big (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785569)

Sounds like it'd be more cost effective to just have a ton of RAM and a good UPS.

Re:Expect to pay big (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785769)

ram, especailly server ram is more that $30/gigabyte.

also even ignoring the issue of power using system ram for long term storage is a bad idea because it is so vulnerable to crashes and you can't have very much of it (32 gigabytes is the limit of most server boards you see and that is only achievable by using very expensive 4 gigabyte sticks). Ramdrive cards with built in battery backup do exist but that drives up the price even more as you have to buy the adaptor card as well as the sticks of ram.

Re:Expect to pay big (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785703)

I suspect these will be limited to servers..

I remember hearing the same thing about the 80386.

Almost no tech is ever limited to servers.

Perfect external journal device (1)

clawsoon (748629) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785721)

This would be the perfect external journal device for databases and filesystems like XFS. Transactions would be guaranteed and super-fast, and could be lazily shuffled out to slower, bigger disk.

Re:Expect to pay big (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785727)

It sounds like a gamers dream, they are the driving force behind a lot of speed improvements and will pay about anything to have the latest HW.
On the other hand, do (present) games really benefit from this massive speed bump?

Re:Expect to pay big (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785957)

I suspect these will be limited to servers demanding immense I/O with a large amount of data.
I could see some uses for them, especially in environments where things will get bounced around quite a bit. For example, airplanes, military vehicles, off-road vehicles, etc. could all benefit.

Hmmm....I wonder how good it would be for submersibles, perhaps they could push new depths since they wouldn't have worry about the air pressure within the hard drive enclosures.

on behalf of all of slashdot, i would like to say (4, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785481)

(drool!)

$30 per gb, ouch (2, Insightful)

dnamaners (770001) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785495)

Its fast, but not as fast as I would have hopped with parallel access. They better get the speed up or the cost down to hit it big. Right now I'd take either direction, as they both have decent applications. Good progress though, time will tell.

PCIe (1)

Gadgetfreak (97865) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785503)

Seems like finally a newer reason to upgrade my hardware. I've never bothered with Vista, and I'm not big into gaming, so my P4/2.2GHz rig has been more than adequate for (surprisingly) over 5 years. Haven't needed a high end graphics card for a while, and only upgraded that for DVI output 3 yrs ago. When I built the thing in '02, I figured I'd get 3 yrs tops before it became a file server.

But it doesn't have a PCIe slot. Something like this would finally give me a reason to build an all new PC. Anyone else in a similar boat?

RAID!! (1)

mulvane (692631) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785515)

Imagine a RAID6 of these. With a parallel interface between then for parity calculations..

Re:RAID!! (1)

kalirion (728907) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786005)

Would it be worth a second mortgage?

Very important spec omitted (1)

Whuffo (1043790) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785519)

This could be a revolutionary product - or something that dies a quick death. The difference is "how much does it cost?"

Even a guess would be helpful. As a "proof of concept" it's pretty well useless - putting memory on a interface card isn't something that was invented recently. Heck, Microsoft was selling memory boards for the PC-XT way back when.

It was a good idea back then and it's still a good idea now - but what's kept it from becoming a widespread technology has always been the price. If they haven't found a way to make it affordable they haven't invented anything.

$30 bucks a gig (2, Informative)

niola (74324) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785581)

According to the article, they are looking at pricing to be 30 dollars a gig. That is pretty pricey.

That means their low-end 80GB drive will be around $2400+ or so US dollars depending on tax, shipping, retail prices etc.

Re:$30 bucks a gig (1)

PoconoPCDoctor (912001) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785791)

Mod me down for sour grapes - I am fairly certain my story, which is still listed as "pending" will be rejected!

007-09-28 15:05:44 Would you buy a $2,400.00 80 gig Flash Hard Drive? (Hardware,Data Storage) (pending)

Oh the pain of rejection!

B-)

At least I got to shake the hand of the next POTUS! [eburgobama08.org]

Peace out!

Re:Very important spec omitted (1)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785803)

They priced it at $30 per gig but said the price may change.

Price (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785533)

Let's be generous and say they actually hit... 25 bucks a gig.

$25 x 640 = $16,000

There's your problem.

At 100 dollars apiece, you could snag a WHOLE lot of 500GB drives, plus cases, boards, PSUs, etc. to run an array MUCH more massive than this.

Nice trick. Try again in about 5 years.

Re:Price (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785757)

You forget the power consumption and space factors.

Southbridge (1)

eepok (545733) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785587)

Wow... adding 800gb/s to the workload of a southbridge would be quite a jump in required power, no? If they want such a possibility, would we have to accept another mboard form factor? Make room for yet another heatsink. O.o

Re:Southbridge (1)

wirelessbuzzers (552513) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785841)

Wow... adding 800gb/s to the workload of a southbridge would be quite a jump in required power, no?
PCI-e is usually on the north bridge for exactly that reason.

Sounds like a nice place to put a Page File! (1)

The Assistant (1162547) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785601)

I would think this could help for those people who like to keep their computers multitasking! Swapping data in/out of memory would go a lot better if you send it to a faster medium, Si?

Re:Sounds like a nice place to put a Page File! (1)

brunascle (994197) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785851)

a ramdisk [wikipedia.org] would be much cheaper, and (if you could find a PCI-e one) should have more bandwidth too.

of course, if you're using it for a page file, when you plug it in you gotta be thinking "why dont i just use this ram as ram?"

Re:Sounds like a nice place to put a Page File! (1)

The Assistant (1162547) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785947)

Another thing to use this type of memory for is when the system hibernates. When system wakes up again, it should be nice and quick. Wouldn't it be nice if someone could create a utility that would automatically put the system in hibernate mode when certain conditions are met? I'm sure the local Electric Company wouldn't be thrilled, unless they're fighting with brown outs/black outs, but maybe you could justify the cost with savings in your electric bill.

Gb or GB??? (1, Insightful)

saleenS281 (859657) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785611)

You would think being a "geek" new site, one could at least get their GB's and Gb's correct. If the drive is running at 800Mb a second, that's hardly what I would call *impressive* or *extremely fast*. That's not even as fast as most 10k rpm scsi or sata drives.

I'm also wondering how one would make the jump from 800Mb to 1GB... that would be quite the feat. I'm guessing that the B's are screwed up somewhere... it's just sad that something so glaringly wrong can be posted to a site like this...

Re:Gb or GB??? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785729)

RTF Article

> Flynn said the card has 160 parallel pipelines that can read data at 800 megabytes per second and write at 600 MB/sec.

this is apr 10 times faster than 10k SATA
and 7 times than 15k scsi

most importantly - seek time=0

> Flynn set the benchmark for the worst case scenario by using small 4K blocks and then streaming eight simultaneous 1 GB reads and writes. In that test, the ioDrive clocked in at 100,000 operations per second. "That would have just thrashed a regular hard drive," said Flynn.

Re:Gb or GB??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20785815)

WRONG. Show me a single non-RAID drive that can do 800 megabit sustained throughput please. www.storagereview.com educate yourself.

RAID Raptors can get about 100MB but not a single drive, not even close. Then you have the seek time advantage of this flash drive...

Re:Gb or GB??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#20786079)

Even after the conversion it really isn't that impressive speed wise.

Mtron already has a drive w/ similar speed specs on the market, albeit their largest right now is 32 GB.

Misleading benchmark (4, Interesting)

Chris_Jefferson (581445) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785739)

"'[Fusion io's CTO David Flynn] set the benchmark for the worst case scenario.."

By which he means, set up a completely unrealistic benchmark which shows his flash drive in the best possible light, and a traditional drive in the worst possible light.

I still want one of these, but that benchmark is nothing to be proud of.

Re:Misleading benchmark (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785965)

400Mb/sec transfer rate with instant seek is "nothing to be proud of"?

I know people who would commit felonies to have one of those for their page file.

Re:Misleading benchmark (0, Offtopic)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786065)

You could do better - buy more RAM, set up a ramdrive and put the swap file on that.

Or, of course, just buy more RAM.

We need something bigger than 32 GB in laptops (1)

wile_e_wonka (934864) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785761)

These things sound great--I'm just afraid of Dell and other computer companies deciding that consumers don't want flash hard drives because we aren't buying the ones they offer. Then they attempt no development in this regard. The thing is, though, people are just not willing (for the most part) to pay extra to get a small capacity hard drive. They need to offer these things with similar capacies to their conventional hard drives--64GB just isn't that unreasonable for these things.

Then again, perhaps the computer manufacturers have not yet been impressed with the reliability of higher capacity SSDs.

Anyone have any idea why it's hard to find a laptop that comes with a 64GB or larger SSD?

Airborne/ruggedized storage (1)

quintessentialk (926161) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785929)

One obvious set of applicationa for large-capacity/high-speed flash storage are those which require not just greater speed but greater durability than moving media: planes, satelites, boats, military vehicles, etc. And these markets are possibly more able to pay for these benefits.

Excellent (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785989)

Now I can install even slower and more bloated software. Hard drives are the cassette tapes [ebay.com] of the new millennium.

OK, this is very cool (1)

ThoreauHD (213527) | more than 5 years ago | (#20785997)

Even if it's expensive now, it doesn't matter. Prices fall, but the technology solves that last problem for modern computers. The hard drive is no longer the bottleneck with this cards. They'll start selling in 2008 at 30/gig. So $2400 for 80GB's. That's the techie skim market they're looking at hitting, and not the server market. I'm sure at the middle of 2008 their prices will become more sane. 2 Mirrored SAS drives on your hp linux server may reach a grand on a bad day. Not a long way off really. I think this tech is very smart/helpful.

Wow, $19,200 for 640gb (2, Informative)

Acecoolco (1012419) | more than 5 years ago | (#20786031)

Damn expensive, $19,200 for 640GB......... I want it but cant afford it.. Josh
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...