Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

2.5 Mile Deep Hole Drilled Into San Andreas Fault

CowboyNeal posted more than 6 years ago | from the heart-of-the-matter dept.

News 204

iandoh writes "Cool research: Geologists at Stanford University and the US Geological Survey have drilled a 2.5 mile deep borehole into the San Andreas fault. They've extracted over one ton of rock from 2 miles down, and they'll be installing sensors down the length of the borehole."

cancel ×

204 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Lex Luthor is Pleased (5, Funny)

hedgemage (934558) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861753)

Oh, sure, just do his work for him. Why not install some nuclear warheads down there while you're at it.

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (3, Funny)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861927)

Wasn't it Christopher Walken? And wasn't it TNT?

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862015)

Because the hole's not big enough. Sure it's deep. But your typical underground nuclear blast involved drilling a hole 6000 feet deep and 10 or 15 feet in diameter. Now that's a hole. Something you can fall into....

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862039)

"Otisville?"

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862083)

Otisburg.

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (1)

Dusthead Jr. (937949) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863567)

That's Otisburg

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (4, Funny)

SpectreBlofeld (886224) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862385)

Time to start investing in midwestern property - it'll soon be prime beachfront real estate!

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (2, Insightful)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863161)

Midwestern property?!?! What ever happened to Arizona & Nevada?!?!

Re:Lex Luthor is Pleased (3, Interesting)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863463)

Everyone seems to think that, but given that the area in question is up to a mile above sea-level, none of the land you buy before the lithoforming will actually be "waterfront". The best you can hope for is "ocean view."

A Movie (1)

rustalot42684 (1055008) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861759)

This sounds like a bad scifi film where they have to mine some tachyon fracture fault or the universe will explode.

No, it's Doctor Who (1)

kalpol (714519) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861787)

Inferno [wikipedia.org]

Re:No, it's Doctor Who (1)

ShaneThePain (929627) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863195)

I like your sig.
aronofsky is a genius. Best film director of all time as far as im concerned.

And soon, they'll have... (0)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861769)

... one milllllion dollars!

Or was it a Lex Luthor thing? Can't keep the earthquake inducing villains straight.

Re:And soon, they'll have... (4, Funny)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862343)

Can't keep the earthquake inducing villains straight.
There are gay earthquake inducing villains? Who knew?

Re:And soon, they'll have... (1)

ROMRIX (912502) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863229)

... one milllllion dollars!
In Oklahoma you get way more than that every time you drill a hole that deep..

Only 2.5 miles? (3, Insightful)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861771)

The fault is between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, both of which IIRC are more than 50 miles thick. Why are we looking at only the upper 5%? ( Modern oil wells are drilled as deep as 6 miles or more now. )

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (4, Insightful)

Protonk (599901) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861877)

Seems deeper than the average depth [doe.gov] of most oil and gas wells. Were you thinking of the depth of wells on the ocean floor from sea level?

It does seem to be less than the record [findarticles.com] there. But we can hardly fualt (har har) the team for not digging the full 50 miles to the asthenosphere. :)

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (5, Informative)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862311)

A quick google revealed the following:

The deepest oil well penetrates a mere six miles (ten kilometers) into the crust (the center of the Earth is about 4,000 miles [6,000 kilometers] deeper). Russian scientists dug the deepest hole on the planet in Siberia, but bottomed out at about 7.5 miles (12 kilometers) below the surface. The Mohole project, a 1950s-era U.S. plan, called for drilling a hole 25 miles (40 kilometers) down to the Mohorovicic discontinuity, the boundary between the hard rocks of the crust and the gooey mantle. Sadly, the only discontinuity Mohole ever encountered involved government funding.
It gets harder and harder to drill deep into the Earth because rocks get softer and softer. Brittle at the surface, rocks become plastic at depth, and the pressure caused by the weight of the overlaying crust--about 52,800 pounds per square inch (3,700 kilograms per square centimeter) at a depth of ten miles (16 kilometers), says drilling consultant William Maurer--collapses deep wells, making further drilling impossible.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863321)

Wait, wait... they "bottomed out" at 7.5 miles? Somebody's not telling us something. Did they hit the table on which the earth sits? Or perhaps the impervious shell of a turtle?

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (4, Informative)

ShatteredArm (1123533) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863641)

Actually, their drill began melting. Heat is the biggest obstacle to drilling further than 7 or 8 miles into the earth.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863657)

No they did not find any turtle shell, however I have it on good authority that they found some leathery grey substance but some guy's flashing UU badges came and took it. It's funny though no one saw what vehicle they came in.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (4, Interesting)

tyrione (134248) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861885)

Modern oil rigs don't drill into one of the world's largest fault lines. This depth will give a very broad understanding, topologically the distribution of vibration analysis, fracture mechanics, etc., etc.

Models will be developed to study and help with how the Earth expands and contracts.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

GPL Apostate (1138631) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862287)

One thing I don't understand is whether installing the sensors is worth it or not. It's on a fault line. Isn't it likely that the first subsequent earthquake will misalign the hole and disconnect the sensors?

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (2, Interesting)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862313)

Heh, if an oil company *did* dig this deep into the San Andreas Fault, I'm *sure* they would be applauded for the scientific discovery they've facilitated...

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

fireboy1919 (257783) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863931)

While this is possibly true, the real purpose of the drilling is not understanding, but prevention of earthquakes.

Over five tons of sheep's bladders are going to be dumped directly into the hole. It is the firm belief of Arthur and all of his brave knights (and also Sir Robin), that this allow many more years of peace within this land...at least, as soon as the duck-weight based justice system is instituded.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862445)

We aren't drilling 6 miles into the fault because any oil that might have been in there would have already oozed out onto the surface.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1, Interesting)

skelly33 (891182) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862663)

Last summer I took a guided tour down into a hard-rock mine shaft several miles deep here in California. One of the questions that was asked was what happens if there is an earthquake and people are in the mine. The answer surprised me: they can't feel earthquakes down there, so the effect is nil.

Apparently, we were told, the destructive force of earthquakes is carried along the upper couple hundred feet of the surface. I am reminded of a body of water that has waves and turmoil on the surface but which is quite calm below the surface.

My guess would be that the sensors don't go any further down because they don't need to.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (4, Interesting)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863037)

I suspect that they were lying to you to prevent panic. Mines are a favored place to study earthquakes. Indeed, being in a mine probably gets you closer to the epicenter, as most eathquakes are centered miles below ground.

from iopd.og:

Hundreds to thousands of small to moderate earthquakes per day are recorded in a typical deep mine; the strongest may reach an intensity of magnitude 5. Given that many of these earthquakes are controlled directly by the mining activity, their location, timing, and magnitude can be forecast, and instruments can be installed at sites where earthquakes of interest are predicted to occur. The mine infrastructure provides access to the earthquakes' source region and allows three-dimensional mapping of the fault zone. It also allows installation of a three-dimensional array of instruments 1-100 m from an anticipated hypocenter to monitor fault activity before, during, and after an earthquake. Most expected earthquakes exhibit a moment-magnitude range (-2 to 4) that bridges the scale gap between laboratory experiments and tectonic earthquakes in the crust. The mine infrastructure provides an opportunity to investigate the effects of fracturing during earthquakes on fault fluid, gas chemistry, and microbiological communities. These promising conditions have led to the building of an earthquake laboratory in the TauTona gold mine in January 2005 as part of the DAFSAM-NELSAM project
From the Southern California Earthquake Center:

Northridge earthquake had a hypocentral depth of 18 kilometers (11 miles), deep for a California earthquake, but considered shallow compared to other regions.
( In California even the earthquakes are shallow. )

An interesting map is at http://seismo.berkeley.edu/istat/ex_depth_plot/ [berkeley.edu]

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (3, Informative)

E++99 (880734) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863605)

I suspect that they were lying to you to prevent panic. Mines are a favored place to study earthquakes. Indeed, being in a mine probably gets you closer to the epicenter, as most eathquakes are centered miles below ground.

Yes, being a couple km down gets you probably closer to the epicenter. But since the weight pressure on the rock increases linearly with depth, it is reasonable to think that the movement in earthquakes decreases linearly with depth, until it reaches whatever movement was at the epicenter.

Imagine if you took a large compression spring, held it vertically from the bottom, placing a rock on top. Any sudden movement you make with your hand (the epicenter), will result in an amplified oscillation of the rock (the surface), with linearly smaller movements along the spring. IANA earthquakeologist, but it seems to me like an roughly appropriate model.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863337)

The answer surprised me: they can't feel earthquakes down there, so the effect is nil.

As someone who has experienced a relatively minor tremor while underground, I can tell you the effect is definitely not nil

In my case, it almost resulted in needing a change of trousers.

Re:Only 2.5 miles? (5, Funny)

doktorjayd (469473) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862963)

Modern oil wells are drilled as deep as 6 miles or more now.

heh,

and modern measures are in metric.

In other news (1)

kpainter (901021) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861773)

Geologists at Stanford University and the US Geological Survey by drilling a 2.5 mile deep borehole into the San Andreas fault, caused a magnitude 9.0 earthquake.

Re:In other news (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861869)

My company (we do geological services) covered that rig when they started drilling. They were drilling outside of Parkfield, CA where there was a fault lock. Approx every 30 years there, an earthquake about Magnitude 6-7 happened. I believe 2004 was 32 years since the last quake. I know Stanford was hoping to put some geophones down there to see what kind of readings they could get when the quake went off.

I was only down there for a week, but I was talking to the person who was there to finish the job. She said the quake went off before they had finished drilling and it was pretty wild.

I guess they didn't get the geophone data, but it looks like they finally passed the fault and got some pretty good geological data. Cool!

Don't let them fool you! (3, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861775)

It's probably the CIA trying to recover a lost Soviet rock diver.

Re:Don't let them fool you! (1)

Captain Nitpick (16515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863317)

It's probably the CIA trying to recover a lost Soviet rock diver.

A land-based Project Jennifer? Anybody know what the Glomar Explorer [wikipedia.org] has been up to?

The fools! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861789)

Don't they know this will cause a fault to spread across the hemisphere and cause a major part of the planet to fly away.

Re:The fools! (0, Flamebait)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862031)

this will cause a fault to spread across the hemisphere and cause a major part of the planet to fly away.

      Hopefully the United States.

Re:The fools! (1)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862167)

You'll miss us. Who'll blow stuff up when we're gone?

Re:The fools! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862249)

The country we all love to hate!!!

comedy gold (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862865)

c'mon mods. You need to drill down a bit for your sense of humor indicators.

Re:comedy gold (1)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863639)

Who said anything about joking?

Re:The fools! (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862243)

Someone please mark parent as flamebait.

Re:The fools! (0, Offtopic)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862335)

Real slashdotters read at -1 anyway, so mod me down all you want.

Verteiron actually gets it, without being all "offended" and reactionary like you are being.

Re:The fools! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862555)

I was born and raised in the usa. I see where your comment is coming from but it's way late. Western influence spread like a disease (and it is) across the face of the planet long ago. Even if all of the usa was completely destroyed and everyone inside her boarders killed it wouldn't make much of a difference, the materialism and hatered we have created as idols are already bowed down to by people all across the globe.

You don't have to look at it like that though- even though the usa contributed to this sad reality it had been stirring since the dawn of time. We as a nation may have done more to push its spread but the truth is it would have happened even if the north american continent never existed.

What it boils down to is people. Not people from this country, people from that country, people with this color skin, people with this color hair, people with this taste in fashion or music, people with this political stance-- none of that matters. People, simply people, are the problem.

Does that mean everyone should die? I used to think so. The truth is though, believe it or not, there are decent people out there that understand what really matters and I believe it is for these peoples sake that everything hasn't completely collapsed yet. These are the people most often ridiculed without cause, leaned on and despised without cause. I would know. I did it to many of them myself.

Re:The fools! (1, Offtopic)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862607)

And if you said what you said about most other countries, you'd probably get modded flamebait. Double standards are lame.

I honestly don't know if I find the joke funny or offensive, but I do think that the same standard should be applied to all jokes in that vein. Then again, double standards for what people say are a problem of society in general, not just slashdot moderation.

Re:The fools! (2, Funny)

tjstork (137384) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862477)

Hopefully the United States.

That would be cool. We Yanks could gather 'round the edge of our continent and piss on the rest of you from low earth orbit. So, instead of bitching about 50 million Republicans pissing on the world in some figurative sense, you would get splashed in the face by the real deal!

Re:The fools! (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862521)

Like the Bugs Bunny episode where he saws Florida off the U.S. and lets it float away because he's pissed about the two cent fine for hunting rabbits out of season.

Whew (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861845)

Let me tell you something. After digging that hole I am ready for a six-pack. And I wish they would have thrown in a pair of gloves, cuz I gots some serious blisters.

Re:Whew (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862087)

Let me tell you something. After digging that hole I am ready for a six-pack

Q: But how many lawyers will it take to fill that hole?

A: I don't know, but keep pilling em in!

Deep! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861847)

Holy snappin' assholes that's deep!

Re:Deep! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862529)

Finally a hole tighter than the woman........

*BSD is Dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861855)

It is now official. Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be the Amazing Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be but among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

faulty logic. (4, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861863)

They've extracted over one ton of rock from 2 miles down, and they'll be installing sensors down the length of the borehole.

I wouldn't want to be the guy who's in charge of monitoring sensory data from something called "the bore hole". that sounds like a really tedious job.

Re:faulty logic. (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862373)

I wouldn't want to be the guy who's in charge of monitoring sensory data from something called "the bore hole". that sounds like a really tedious job.

Better that than "the boar hole" ... those things can be really dangerous when you piss them off.

Re:faulty logic. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20863111)

something called "the bore hole". that sounds like a really tedious job.

Or like my ex-girlfriend!

(posting anonymously out of shame)

Isn't that 2.6 miles Canadian? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861875)

or is it 4.2 KM?

About time (5, Funny)

Xeth (614132) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861897)

I feel our economy will be well served by the extra 6 energy.

Re:About time (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862105)

Damn, beat me to it. I'll spare y'all the obligatory joke about mindworm attacks.

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862405)

OK, help a brother out here. I don't get the reference.

Re:WTF? (4, Informative)

Xeth (614132) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862643)

In Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri (a spiritual branch from the Civilization series, which I consider better than any of the Civ proper games that followed it), thermal boreholes are terrain improvements that provide +6 energy and minerals (a great deal by the game's standards).

Re:About time (1)

Silverlancer (786390) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862489)

Energy? You build the boreholes for the MINERALS, the energy is just a side benefit!

Re:About time (1)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862545)

We require more vespene gas, not minerals or energy, dammit!

Re:About time (1)

Xeth (614132) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862667)

Yeah, but I figured that didn't have the same contemporary "pop"; The U.S. seems to have more of an energy problem than a mineral problem (it's my understanding that soaring metals prices are just a side-effect of an all-around plummeting dollar).

Installing sensors? (2, Funny)

baffled (1034554) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861901)

They should dump a few tons of super glue down there. That'll fix her.

Re:Installing sensors? (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862169)

Howabout some crude oil instead, to lubricate the friction and prevent further earthquakes.

Re:Installing sensors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862973)

When asked for comment about whether or not lubricating the 2.5 mile borehole might prevent earthquakes, legendary porn star Ron Jeremy said "Excuse me", immediately booked a flight to California, and departed with a 55 gallon drum of Astroglide.

Re:Installing sensors? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862269)

Might be a better idea then those Indonesians [terradaily.com] dumping concrete into a volcano I guess.

Re:Installing sensors? (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863197)

What blows me away is that this a) never made the national news and b) you can't find ANY photos of it online, anywhere. Total radio silence on it.

You said borehole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20861929)

Maybe they'll name it after George Takei.

talc as a lubricant (4, Insightful)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20861957)

They drilled in a part of the San Andreas fault that creeps and doesn't generate big earthquakes. My take is that they're looking for a lubricant, something that allows the fault to slide. Another possibility would be merely that the fault doesn't have bends or splits in it unlike the faulting at the south end of the San Francisco Bay. The San Andreas fault runs along a chain of mountains south of Silicon Valley and then north through San Francisco, following the coast thereafter, while the Haywood fault runs along the base of mountains east of the Bay area from Milpitas to north of Oakland.

If a lubricant is responsible for the fault creep, there are apparently several possibilities: water, serpentine [wikipedia.org] (which can be formed by weathering or metamorphization of several minerals including olivene/peridot), or talc (formed by serpentine exposed to water). If you have talc, you probably have the other two as well. Serpentine is a bit harder than talc (the latter is soft enough to easily scratch with a fingernail), but both deform easily under pressure. I seem to recall cases where serpentine has "bubbled up" over millions of years through denser rock, acting as a very slow moving fluid.

As I see it, if we can understand how to lubricate faults, then it is possible to not just trigger faults, but also to ease pressure on a fault. Maybe the cost of the materials will make it infeasible, but we can consider it now.

Re:talc as a lubricant (5, Funny)

dustwun (662589) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862069)

Does a reply to this involving 'Lubing the bore hole" get modded as funny, or troll?.. you be the judge....

Re:talc as a lubricant (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862141)

"Pitching them easy", the story of my life as a slashdot straight man.

Re:talc as a lubricant (1)

ROMRIX (912502) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863405)

Does a reply to this involving 'Lubing the bore hole" get modded as funny, or troll?.. you be the judge....
It's not the bore hole needing the lube job, it's the crack.
I can't believe I just said that in a serious discussion...

Re:talc as a lubricant (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862377)

And when you ordered your degree in Geology from degreesdirect.com, did you frame it?

Re:talc as a lubricant (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863603)

And when you ordered your degree in Geology from degreesdirect.com, did you frame it?

Yea, cheap $20 frame. On the wall.

BTW, if you happen to ever have anything interesting to say, feel free to post.

Re:talc as a lubricant (2, Insightful)

dodongo (412749) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863107)

while the Haywood fault runs along the base of mountains east of the Bay area from Milpitas to north of Oakland


It's called the Hayward fault, and it experiences plenty of creep all along the East Bay. The last quake greater than 4 that happened on it was basically across the street from my apartment. Trust, it's moving, and generally nonviolently (though noticeably at times). In fact, it runs through the middle of Memorial Stadium [wikipedia.org] in Berkeley, which is built in two halves that have crept about a foot and a half offset since the stadium's construction.

Re:talc as a lubricant (1)

dodongo (412749) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863127)

I should note that while it is creeping, it's also the strongest candidate for major quakeage based on many recent San Francisco doomesday predictions.

Re:talc as a lubricant (1)

E++99 (880734) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863659)

In fact, it runs through the middle of Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, which is built in two halves that have crept about a foot and a half offset since the stadium's construction.

Talk about home field advantage! "Upon further review, the 10-yard-line is now 11 yards from the goal line, and the first down is voided. Bears' ball!"

How the hell ? (1)

garett_spencley (193892) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862007)

Can someone please explain how to unlock this feature ? Is it similar to the Hot Coffee mod ? Where can I download it ? I've been playing San Andreas for years but have never encountered any kind of drilling mission or mod.

Re:How the hell ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862065)

The two and a half mile hole is the Hot Coffee mod.

Re:How the hell ? (1)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863757)

Wrong one, we are talking 2 1/2 mile deep not 2 1/2 wide

Re:How the hell ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20863231)

You don't consider Hot Coffee to be a drilling mission?

Borehole Fetish (1)

eggman9713 (714915) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862067)

Oh yeah, I love boreholes. Damn that just sounds so dirty, it sounds like a really weird sexual fetish.

Dear God, No! (2, Funny)

cmcguffin (156798) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862115)

Keep the Mole Men down there where they belong!

Hiroki Sone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862123)

This guy needs some serious upper body development. Look at his arms! If he is going to keep working drill rigs, he will need to start getting some serious guns if he plans on packing drill cores around.

Either that, or he better stick to chalk boards.

We did it, the Russian's did it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20862163)

I say in place of the sensors, we put a flag there - so we know who's fault it is!

Geology kegger (1)

jayemcee (605967) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862237)

'In early December, a "sample party" will be held at the USGS office in Menlo Park, where the cores will be on display and scientists will offer their proposals to do research projects in a bid to be allowed to analyze part of the core.' I can only imagine the carnage after some disappointed geologist grabs a sample of core and teaches them all whose fault it is...

2.5 miles down? (2, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862403)

No, thank you. I'm not checking there for a hidden package.

Silica Gel reducing friction in fault zones? (4, Interesting)

Diamonddavej (851495) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862413)

My favored culprit for drastic friction reduction during faulting is lubricating Silica Gel; finely crushed quartz in the active fault zone reacts with water forming fluidic silica gel. There is excellent laboratory evidence of silica gel lubrication in simulated fault zones (see Mineral Gel May Reduce Rock Friction to Zero During Earthquakes, http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=100325 [nsf.gov] . All that is needed is field evidence, and I think I have it.

Now I've somewhere to dump my used motor oil! (1)

TofuDog (735357) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862509)

Then again, maybe we shouldn't butter her up. I hope Pele's bad sista' Shake-Shake doesn't feel violated and go tectonic on us -I live on the fault!

Slow News Day? (1)

Canar (46407) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862513)

I don't get why this is newsworthy. Pretty boring to me.

*rimshot*

*runs and hides from the angry mob*

Oh i thought that... (1)

garompeta (1068578) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862927)

...it was again about us crossing the frontier to California...
I was like, holy madre de Dios, wtf?

Why was this tagged goatse? (1)

smegged (1067080) | more than 6 years ago | (#20862989)

Seriously, was this tagged goatse to stop me clicking the link? I mean this is slashdot, it's not like I would have clicked the link anyway.

Re:Why was this tagged goatse? (0, Offtopic)

dirtyhippie (259852) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863247)

mod parent up. what's up with the repeated tag malfunctions? the tagging system seems to have some serious flaws (remember itsatrap day when every single story was tagged that way?)

Earthscope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20863055)

SAFOD [earthscope.org] is part of the Earthscope [earthscope.org] project. I work on the GPS portion of the project called the Plate Boundary Observatory [unavco.org] in a consultant role.

There is actually a funny story I was told about the original earthscope project proposal. I have no reason to doubt its validity, but I wasn't there:

The original proposal was made to the higher ups at the National Science Foundation. While the scientists made their grand sweeping pitch to NSF, there was a debate in the background on whether or not to show the final slide with the cost of the project.

At the end of the presentation, the NSF manager says "How much is this going to cost me?"

They pause and finally put up the last slide: $400,000,000 (400 million) over 5 years

The response of the NSF manager: "YES! Your finally bringing me a project that isn't some nickle and dime deal that I have to cover out of my budget. I can go to congress and make this a congressional line item. Excellent."

And he managed to pull it off. That is the way government works.

Regards,

--Keith

Primitive Tribe ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20863351)

worships hole in ground.

Borehole (1)

Dolly_Llama (267016) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863471)

All adjacent areas are reporting increased energy and mineral production. Peculiar worms have also been reported in the area.

Well to Hell (1)

skeftomai (1057866) | more than 6 years ago | (#20863495)

Ooh...maybe a bat-like apparition will fly out again...

Quick! Someone spread a rumor and see if it shows up on TBN!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?