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China Now Blocking RSS Feeds

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the keeping-things-simple dept.

Censorship 73

Phurge passed us an Ars Technica link covering China's newest internet-based crackdown: RSS feeds. Real Simple Syndication has apparently been a fairly foolproof way to get around Chinese government censors in recent years. As long ago as August, though, access to feeds has been curtailed by the Great Firewall. "More recent reports tell us that the PSB appears to have extended this block to all incoming URLs that begin with 'feeds,' 'rss,' and 'blog,' thus rendering the RSS feeds from many sites — including ones that aren't blocked in China, such as Ars Technica — useless ... there are a few workarounds, some of which may be simpler than others. Some of our readers in China tell us that web-based feed aggregators, such as NewsGator Online, (sort of) help provide access to RSS feeds. One reader says that if he has the aggregator set to display the full post (or however much of the post is made available) and clicks through to read more, everything is just fine."

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China... yeah... (1)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869653)

For we all know that nothing bad may come from the land of the free(dom fries).

Politics For Nerds??!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20869693)

The Slashdot FAQ clearly states [slashdot.org] the politics section was for "news relevant to United States government politics. ".

There's is no relevance here to the US government or US politics whatsoever.

In any case, I don't know why slashdot posts so many stories about the Chinese government's censoring or limiting of freedoms. That's what have been doing for 50 years. It's not news.

Re:Politics For Nerds??!!! (1)

groovymon (1168089) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869841)

Uh, don't you get it? It is relevant to the US. You've just witnessed the Fairness Doctrine in play. You can split hairs but thats whats in the current US government politic right now. It's highly relevant.

If it is just the heading that gets blocked. (4, Funny)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869755)

Change RSS to LSS and we'll call it even.

Re:If it is just the heading that gets blocked. (1)

chuck (477) | more than 6 years ago | (#20873489)

Ludicrously simple syndication?

Re:If it is just the heading that gets blocked. (1)

cindysthongs (1168367) | more than 6 years ago | (#20876891)

Or xml to lml http to lttp i'm sure the developers working for china can block things just as easy as someone can rename something - the real answer is democratic freedoms, and not in the "we say your free but have big brother" type of way, but in the real democracy type of way

The usual story (0, Redundant)

superbrose (1030148) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869777)

China blocks access to a service. People find a way to get around it.

Re:The usual story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20869921)

China blocks access to a service. People find a way to get around it.


But there is always an American company looking for profit to make it difficult to people to exercise their human rights.

Re:The usual story (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 6 years ago | (#20872559)

In other news American company build large wireless network that stretch to Beijing. Communists try blocking air signals with toxic smoke.... oh wait....

Re:The usual story (1)

Teresita (982888) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869957)

RIAA sees China's success, gets Congress to block Shoutcast. China does it to block commentary on their regime curtailing freedom. Our regime doesn't give a crap about the freedom-curtailing commentary as long as no digital performance of Britney's latest crapfest goes unpaid.

Re:The usual story (1)

jamar0303 (896820) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877861)

Yep- for me, that means using Opera Mini inztead of a standard browser.

Communist Chinese don't understand proxies. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20869783)

Read my thesis here [2girls1cup.com]

wow (2, Funny)

thegnu (557446) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869909)

I can't help thinking that those girls must be getting underpaid.

Nefarious? (1)

FST (766202) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869857)

We've heard of other nefarious tricks to get around the firewall, too. One involves an SSH connection to somewhere outside the country, such as the US, in order to have unrestricted access to RSS, the web, you name it. Another involves the popular Firefox extension gladder, which is a proxy tool that advertises itself as a "Great Ladder" to get over the Great Firewall. Finally, the Tor tool is also popular; it allows a client computer to access the Internet anonymously through a network of virtual tunnels--a series of tubes, one might say. This would allow Chinese users to eventually gain access to the Internet through a Tor node that is located outside of the country.
  1. Tor is nefarious? Isn't nefarious necessarily something evil (as opposed to tricky)?
  2. Wouldn't you be in deep trouble if they caught you using a bypassing method? I wouldn't put it above the government to make you "go missing" after they catch you. SSH, after all, is relatively easy to track.


No, there is no ??? or profit step. The Chinese government already has better ways to gain money. </preemptive strike>

Re:Nefarious? (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870111)

Isn't nefarious necessarily something evil (as opposed to tricky)?
nefarious :
* abominable; atrociously sinful or villainous
* extremely wicked; "nefarious schemes"; "a villainous plot"; "a villainous band of thieves"
Yes

Re:Nefarious? (1)

jarl1976 (1000672) | more than 6 years ago | (#20876015)

Wouldn't you be in deep trouble if they caught you using a bypassing method? I wouldn't put it above the government to make you "go missing" after they catch you. SSH, after all, is relatively easy to track.
The chinese government doesn't quite work like that.. They don't care to much about a few people being able to bypass any measures, they care about the huge masses of internet users who just give up immediately if a page is blocked. A few geeks (in addition to most foreigners in china) won't start a revolution..

can we (-1, Offtopic)

ellenbee (978615) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869875)

just nuke them already

Re:can we (1)

y86 (111726) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870407)

(can we) just nuke them already


No. Our economy would collapse.

Balance (in million USD)
2007 (July)
Export to CHINA: 35,325.6 Import to USA: 176,630.9
LOSS TO USA:-141,305.3

Re:can we (1)

jmpeax (936370) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871189)

LOSS TO USA:-141,305.3
Wouldn't the loss to the USA be +141,305.3?

Re:can we (1)

Alexx K (1167919) | more than 6 years ago | (#20875891)

If America lost $-141,305.3, then technically they would gain $141,305.3.

Re:can we (0, Flamebait)

akasch (1159557) | more than 6 years ago | (#20872123)

no we can't, favored trade status and all, we have a very supportive relationship [supportive...nship.info] with those Godless oppressive commie bastards

Re:can we (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20877717)

Thank fuck for that then. Look where' your god has taken your country.

why not use http? (1)

mmkkbb (816035) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869903)

That's all feed:// URLs use, innit? A fake protocol always seemed bogus to me. You already have a MIME type.

Re:why not use http? (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869965)

I've never heard of feed:// before this point. All my RSS feeds have used http://./ [.]

Re:why not use http? (3, Informative)

mini me (132455) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870309)

Safari uses the feed:// "protocol" for RSS/Atom feeds, even though it's still really just HTTP under the hood. It allows you to enter, for example, feed://slashdot.org and it will automatically find the appropriate feed for the site instead of having to type: http://rss.slashdot.org/Slashdot/slashdot [slashdot.org] .

Re:why not use http? (2, Informative)

brunascle (994197) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870025)

i think they meant the hostname or path part of the URL, not the protocol (as "blog" isnt a protocol, is it?).

Re:why not use http? (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870697)

blog:// is a popular protocol for wide distribution of disinformation and factoids.

The ironic thing (3, Insightful)

Enlarged to Show Tex (911413) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869905)

All China really has to do in order to control information flow nationwide is to deregulate the media and force them to compete vigorously against one another. They'll be so cost-pressured that they can't really do any journalism; instead, they'll end up so short-staffed that all they can do is publish the stuff that the government wants them to publish.

Barring that, the internet will simply detect the censorship and route around it, just like it always does...

Re:The ironic thing (2, Insightful)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871103)

All China really has to do in order to control information flow nationwide is to deregulate the media and force them to compete vigorously against one another. They'll be so cost-pressured that they can't really do any journalism; instead, they'll end up so short-staffed that all they can do is publish the stuff that the government wants them to publish.
I think that's just a little too ironic to be true. Can you give us a case study? I would have thought that deregulation would just open up a flood of negative press, true or not. And besides, there are always crackpots who'll do some investigative journalism.

Nope, if you want to censor the media, the iron fist has to come in somewhere.

Re:The ironic thing (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 6 years ago | (#20874443)

And besides, there are always crackpots who'll do some investigative journalism.
Is this a "velvet flamebait"?

It wouldn't make much difference (1)

diegocn (1109503) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869911)

I doubt chinese government's efford. For a normal person will almost never visit sites other than in Chinese. Those who does however will always find a work around.

block all incoming URLs that begin with 'blog'... (5, Funny)

Sam H (3979) | more than 6 years ago | (#20869951)

By far the best evidence of a civilised country. Ever.

Re:block all incoming URLs that begin with 'blog'. (1)

Frozen Void (831218) | more than 6 years ago | (#20880901)

One of my adblock filters in the past had been *blog* simply because it removes all the cruft from blog sites,leaving only html(ads are already blocked) which i can access directly.
I don't use it currently and moved to more specific filters.

Start the queue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20869999)

Queue the people saying there is no firewall...

5
4
3
2 ...

Re:Start the queue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20870539)

There is no firewall.

Re:Start the queue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20870679)

Firewalls are used to prevent the spread of firewalls. What the Chinese have is a Moat that is quickly filling in with too much information and will always overflow no matter how much depth you dig out nor whether you pour oil on it and set fire, they will just go through around etc.

this should go to YRO (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870003)

... not {politics for nerds}.

btw I've been under the shadow of the Great Firewall since China has internet. This is just normal case. Something is not being smart enough in the GFW API the Communist Party bought from you Americans. Perhaps somebody's LAN got trojaned and tried to slashdot a moderately sensitive (pardon me) site and the GFW got soooooo exited by the event .... :-)

Workarounds are illegal in China... (2, Insightful)

Yahma (1004476) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870099)

While its interesting to find a workaround to the great firewall of China, one has to remember that it is illegal for a Chinese citizen to violate the Firewall. Furthermore, if you, as a foreigner are visiting China, it is just as illegal for you to bypass the Chinese Firewall.. If the authorities find out, you will likely face severe penalties. You have to ask yourself, is it worth it to read Slashdot or Ars RSS feeds, while you are on vacation in China? Perhaps you should wait till you get back, so you dont find yourself rotting away in a Chinese Prison.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (2, Interesting)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870291)

Illlllegal? As far as I know there's no law banning me from SSHing some remote host not explicitly blacklisted by the Chinese Gov't (i'm Chinese). And we don't even know who we are against. We don't know who operate and are responsible for the GFW. No*body*. The GFW is a more a cult, or humor, or both, than someting substantial for me, but it is _really_ there. The GFW works just like the Babylonian Lottery of Jorge L. Borges (at least for me). Errrr, am I offtoopic?

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (3, Funny)

fbjon (692006) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870759)

Illlllegal?
Sans-serif must die.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 6 years ago | (#20874867)

We don't know who operate and are responsible for the GFW.
There's a lot of info at Wikipedia: Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China [wikipedia.org] . Yeah, it's Wikipedia. Maybe it's a CIA misinformation page. Then again, a lot of it may be true. You live in China, you can verify it better than I.

The GFW works just like the Babylonian Lottery of Jorge L. Borges (at least for me).
I had never heard of that story [wikipedia.org] before. Quite an interesting perspective :) The Wikipedia article talks about some of that:

"Internet censorship in the PRC has been called "a panopticon that encourages self-censorship through the perception that users are being watched".[7] The enforcement (or threat of enforcement) of censorship creates a chilling effect where individuals and businesses willingly censor their own communications to avoid legal and economic repercussions."

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (2, Informative)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 6 years ago | (#20879831)

Thank you for the info but...
unfortunately we are not able to read Wikipedia now in China without the 'workarounds'. It has been blocked by the Firewall. Btw, we hear rumors that the Chinese government is running proxy servers outside China in order to find out who (or at least, how many people) are using proxy servers as a Firewall workaround.
As far as I know there hasn't been any lawsuit against the Firewall's operators. So, if I own a site and I lost 1 million Renminbi because of the Firewall's behavior, that's the Babylonian lottery..... ha.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (1)

GnarlyDoug (1109205) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870555)

The problem for China is that if they become effective at imposing these draconion rules, then using the internet in any fashion will become such a risk that no one will do it. They will cripple their economic growth. The Sarbanes-Oxley [wikipedia.org] can be used as a model for what happens [realclearpolitics.com] when a country makes doing business to expensive and risky that no one wants to invest in it. In this case the USA has seen a massive shift of capital investment out of the country. The same thing will happen to China if they keep this up. The internet is becoming a critical tool of business. China cannot keep crippling it and making it worth your life to use the internet and continue to develop into a big player in the global economy.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#20872859)

Have you actually been to China?
I've lived there for a few years and I have to say that this is nonsense. The concept of a "great firewall" is pretty misleading to start with, but I digress.

It doesn't need to be illegal to bypass the firewall, and students in the field of computing, I've talked to routinely use proxies, tor and encryption without getting thrown in prison. It doesn't need to be illegal because censorship works so long as most people can't reach most of the information most of the time. It is certainly sufficient to keep a generation from knowing what happened in Tiananmen square in 1989, and a connection reset message a few times is enough to convince people that there is no such site as "wikipedia" and that the link I sent them must be a dud.
Arresting a few bloggers who didn't have the sense to use tor is enough to chill any anti-government stuff.

To this, and the surrounding posts going on about "China will crush it's own economic growth because of censorship" ... ain't going to happen. They can safely hide a few embarrassing truths without grinding to a halt.

Although I wouldn't want to be a citizen of China, and live there much longer than I did, the fact is, it isn't censored to the extent that people seem to assume it is.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (1)

calix0815 (899216) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877351)

Worst case scenario for a foreigner is to get kicked out of the country. You'd need to do something really bad (we're talking political offences here) to land in jail or detention (for longer time anyway). Maybe a slightly higher risk for ethnic chinese foreigners, in particular if they are china born.

Re:Workarounds are illegal in China... (1)

jamar0303 (896820) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877949)

Well... I think it would be pretty high-profile if they did that, depending on who they threw in jail. If it was Steve Jobs in Shanghai demonstrating RSS feeds on Safari or whatever I wouldn't care, though.

Why does China do this? (3, Insightful)

cryfreedomlove (929828) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870143)

I thought Socialism was about the ideal of giving power to the people rather than an elite oligarchy. What the hell happened? Censorship usually comes from an insecure and weak oligarchy desperate to maintain privilege.

Re:Why does China do this? (1)

grahamd0 (1129971) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870511)

Because all animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

Re:Why does China do this? (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870639)

many years ago Deng Xiaoping (the Chinese president then) said something like "(the govenment should let) a few people 'get richer first' " when he refers to the interpretation of socialism (the official one). I don't know how to translate that well in English but it is a very famous saying now in China.
Now President Hu Jintao is advocating his 'harmony society' ideas and we have the next saying: let a few people get more harmony first.

Re:Why does China do this? (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#20872511)

Maybe because Socialism is the idea of giving power to the people rather than an elite oligarchy, to gain popular support among people for an elite oligarchy, so that power can be gained by that elite oligarchy. Censorship is then used to dumb down the population to maintain power.

Re:Why does China do this? (1)

the_womble (580291) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877565)

The problem with communism in every country that tried it, was that it concentrated power, which allowed it to be siezed by tyrants or oligarchies.

Any system that allows power to concentrate will end up an oligarchy.

Why the trouble? (1)

GroeFaZ (850443) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870147)

Why all the trouble blocking rss-this or blog-that? Deploy the backhoes and goatse your infrastructure!

There is no future for China if they keep this up (5, Interesting)

GnarlyDoug (1109205) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870201)

China is heading toward becoming a living example of a Reductio ad Absurdum. [wikipedia.org] The internet is now the critical infrastructure over which information flows. To use Marxist terms, it is becoming critical to defining the Mode of Production [wikipedia.org] for a society. It is becoming powerful for social relations, organization and management, and education among other elements. Their own philosophy tells them why thier own actions will cripple thier development.

China will have to choose between having the internet and being a world power using the tools of the 21st century, or becoming isolated from the rest of the world on all levels. The internet is becoming the primary infrastructure for a new future. The idea of becoming or staying economicaly and politically viable without it is naive and foolish. It would be like trying to become a economic and military power in the 20th century without an industrial base to build anything.

Re:There is no future for China if they keep this (1)

clampolo (1159617) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871843)

More proof that building closer economic ties to China will bring freedom and democracy there.

There is a huge future for China .... (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 6 years ago | (#20873289)

...if they keep this up. They'll just step up trade with bogus regimes like burma and the sudan and saudi arabia and such places where they can get natural resources and the leaders share a similar "overlord" political philosophy, including using the intarweb.

    They are rapidly nearing (or have crossed, I think they have) the point where they won't need US or western europe as customers. Think on the ramifications of that one for a bit. They have their own billion + plus people (an internal market larger than the US and the EU combined) and the entire developing world (some more billions) as customers or soon to be customers now,and that's a LOT of people, all of whom are hell bent for leather on becoming "consumers". China now needs raw materials now, energy and raw materials and that's it, they are slowing down on collecting pretty pictures of dead presidents and kings and bureaucrats that drop in value daily, they are converting them to real stuff of value as fast as possible now.

  China spent the last two decades buying up all the advanced machine tools and garnering the expertise to use them that they need to become fully self supporting, as you can see they are in most manufacturing now from the simplest doo dads to the largest ships and planes. They bought entire factories, had them disassembled, and shipped over there. Stuff like that, that and "allowing" western business leaders to voluntarily pay to move high tech over there. Who wouldn't have taken buhzillions in free stuff, and get a check for taking it? That's what they were after, short term trade back trinkets as they built up their major infrastructure, and now..they have. That's part of what they have been doing with all their surplus cash, buying the juicy high tech stuff that was difficult/expensive to develop in house (country) for them, and with the rest, they are buying up very long range and huge contracts for raw resources, all over the planet. Now that they got to that point and are expanding....well....business as we know it will be rapidly changing.

    They, and our snakeoil salesmen business leaders, suckered everyone. They get a century's worth of advancement in 20 years,and less than 1% of the western populations got stinking freekin ridiculously rich on the con, and everyone else (the dumb natives who swallowed that fairy tale) got some cheap beads and trinkets and wound up holding all these debt IOUs. Sweet deal for the fatcats all over! And the natives think all the debt is wonderful!

In other words, and to get to the point and here I will disagree if I am reading your post correctly, they have already "chosen", there's nothing more for them to "choose" how they will run their net and access and media and so forth, what you see is what you get, and it seems to be working for them for the most part. They nailed the west hard by walking off with the important work, so now there's no lever to use against them, because we never insisted on any credible quid pro quo towards freedom and democracy (still no alternative political parties allowed for instance) as this huge transference of wealth and technology was happening.

Re:There is a huge future for China .... (1)

GnarlyDoug (1109205) | more than 6 years ago | (#20874403)

Good post. You're getting into some of the more interesting aspects of the whole problem.

Their own population can only be customers if their population has expendable wealth. You could have a googleplex of destitute dirt farmers and not sell one iPod. The only economic system that has ever produced a large wealthy middle class is capitalism. So long as China continues to allow capitalism to be the dominant mode of production and so long as they are competitive they can use their population as customers. If this changes then it collapses.

The reason the world's capital is flowing into China instead of the USA is because the USA has become a weak place to invest your money. High tax burdens, complex tax and business codes and laws, a broken tort system, and an ever-growing socialist mentality and welfare state. Big money that knows no country goes to where it can grow the fastest. China, for all of it's problems, is a better place to grow your money.

And that, IMO, is the real reason China's economy is growing. Not because they stole our technology. It was pretty free for the taking anyway. You don't see other 3rd world nations being able to run with our technology to modernize themselves. It's because China changed it's mode of production to capitalism, and for all of it's problems is in many ways more capitalist than the USA is.

What I'm saying is that the USA finally has competition in the global market place. It's not that they stole our tech. You'll never be able to prevent that anyway. If you have a free society then the information will flow. If you do not then innovation will never happen. Catch-22. So forget regulating information. It'll never work. The only solution is to out-compete them. You can only do that allowing capital to grow faster in your economy than theirs. We are losing our status as economic super-power more due to our own decisions than China.

Giving this away? (1)

treyTTU (931851) | more than 6 years ago | (#20870763)

I'm sure we're doing the Chinese a great service by discussing the various ways they might circumvent the great firewall. Not that anybody would go report harmful information to the Ministry of Internet

The ministry has also established a system of online reporting centers that encourage citizens to report "harmful" information
http://www.cfr.org/publication/9856/us_internet_providers_and_the_great_firewall_of_china.html [cfr.org]

Use Google or Yahoo to display RSS (1)

mprindle (198799) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871125)

Now a days there are plenty of sites that allow you to add your own RSS feeds on the site. Find one that's not blocked and setup the RSS feeds on it.

Re:Use Google or Yahoo to display RSS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20877185)

This works just fine. I was just on vacation in Beijing and this is what I did to get around it. Ironically, I had no problem posting to my blog. I just could not see the postings once they were published.

It is pretty funny, though. I hunted around Wikipedia to see what pages they blocked. Anything related to the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre as well as the Gang of Four resulted in a "Connection Reset" error in my browser. As someone nearby said, the Commies did buy their Great Firewall from US!

Ever wonder... (2, Insightful)

kemushi88 (1156073) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871367)

...if there are people in other countries talking about the "great US firewall" that we aren't even aware of?

Re:Ever wonder... (5, Insightful)

cryfreedomlove (929828) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871845)

No, I don't. Creating such a thing would require a large effort involving the collusion of thousands of people. Given that broad set of implementors, and the US traditions of freedom of the press, something like you describe would be impossible to keep secret. I don't doubt that there are probably several neo-fascist law makers in the US that would advocate for this. However, given what I have laid out, they would have to do it in the open rather than in secret.

Re:Ever wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20873307)

that's the thing though. nobody has to keep it secret because any reference to T** G**** US F******* is automatically censored from any and all communications in real time.

Re:Ever wonder... (1)

cryfreedomlove (929828) | more than 6 years ago | (#20879363)

Really? And they also censor newspapers, magazines, etc? How do they pull that off? Which government agency handles that?

Re:Ever wonder... (1)

g-san (93038) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877163)

But you have to admit it would be much easier if you put all the at&telcos under the same roof. :)

I imagine all we hear outside about China and the "firewall" is similar to what "an outsider" might hear about file sharing networks. People are getting sued, omg, and ISPs are throttling torrent traffic, and movie studios are poisoning downloads and tracking and guess what... you can still get anything you want. You can still get movies the night they are released. You can find the latest CD. You can find it on the internet, that's what it does.

Re:Ever wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#20873909)

If you cannot read the reply I just posted, you are in USA! BEWARE PEOPLE!!!

Re:Ever wonder... (1)

Echnin (607099) | more than 6 years ago | (#20876717)

Chinese people who use the internet often know about the firewall. Well, at least they know how to bypass it to watch porn.

Slashdot isn't blocked (1)

Danse (1026) | more than 6 years ago | (#20871995)

I was in China for the last couple of weeks and was actually rather surprised that I was able to access Slashdot there. With all the stories here about the Great Firewall and Chinese censorship, along with ways to circumvent them, I figured Slashdot would be blocked. Now I'm starting to wonder how widespread and effective their censorship efforts actually are. I did see a news report there about the plan to have little cartoon characters popping up on users' screens if they are found to be searching for naughty things. I remembered hearing about that on /. a while back as well.

Re:Slashdot isn't blocked (1)

penteren (793643) | more than 6 years ago | (#20875505)

I'm in China and can get Slashdot's RSS feeds via Google Reader. Now I know why Slashdot always fails to connect if I attempt to go to the original article by clicking on the feed header! If I use the "read the original article" link, which is a direct http URL, I don't have any problems. The topic of blogs seems to make the censors a bit schizophrenic. One day a whole domain such as Typepad.com will be blocked. The next day it won't. Or it may be blocked for two-three months and then suddenly accessible again. It probably all depends on a post someone did somewhere and then how deeply it became buried in their blog archives.

rss feed websites (1)

psyph3r (785014) | more than 6 years ago | (#20872915)

They could always set up websites that work like http://www.siliconnews.net/ [siliconnews.net] they integrate many rss feeds into one web page. I also believe http://naviwire.com/ [naviwire.com] is launching soon providing the same service but over a broad spectrum of topics other than technology

Wrong Fact (1)

adah (941522) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877503)

I think the fact is wrong. China is not blocking all RSS feeds. Some are blocked, though, including the Slashdot RSS. However, the CNET RSS is still accessible.

Also, the phenomenon I observed seems to indicate the IP address of a related site is completely blocked. It is not like keyword filtering at all, which will involve RESET packets and some obvious browser actions.

I have also found that rss.slashdot.org and feeds.arstechnica.com share the same IP address, whose name is feeds.feedburner.com. I would rather think the problem is that this site also hosts some anti-Chinese Government information, and is the home of many RSS feeds.

So, while I regret that many RSS feeds are not accessible, it seems not true that China is blocking all rss URIs.

Re:Wrong Fact (1)

jamar0303 (896820) | more than 6 years ago | (#20877985)

Nope- Slashdot RSS works fine for me. Just have to pass it through another site (I personally use Livedoor Reader [livedoor.com] , but any other web-based RSS reader works, as does Opera Mini on my cellphone).

Re:Wrong Fact (1)

adah (941522) | more than 6 years ago | (#20878591)

Nope- Slashdot RSS works fine for me. Just have to pass it through another site (I personally use Livedoor Reader, but any other web-based RSS reader works, as does Opera Mini on my cellphone).

I do not see anything in your post contradict with mine. What I said was that the IP of the site rss.slashdot.org is blocked from China, and there did not seem to be keyword filtering on "rss". Your report only confirmed this.

Mod Parent UP! On "even banning" (1)

NekoYasha (1040568) | more than 6 years ago | (#20879633)

The Party has never favored self-serve information aggregate sites like FeedBurner or LiveJournal, or Wikipedia...

One bad page and the whole server (physical server, not a single virtual site) got censored.

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