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A New Map of the Internet

Zonk posted about 7 years ago | from the can-see-my-work-from-here dept.

The Internet 147

An anonymous reader writes "The Chris Harrison project has created a series of maps that show the geographical structure and distribution of the Internet. At the site you can view a global, geo-spatial map of the global internet. The visualizations were put together using data from the Dimes project. One visualization shows the density of Internet connections worldwide while the other displays how international cities are connected. Detailed Maps of Europe and North America are included as well. It's amazing how skewed the distribution is — beyond Australia, New Zealand, and parts of South-East Asia, the southern hemisphere has only a peppering of connectivity."

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Shocking (5, Funny)

kmac06 (608921) | about 7 years ago | (#20876301)

So the parts of the world that are developed and wealthy have a larger internet presence than the third world countries? I am shocked, shocked I say.

Map of Tubes (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876333)

RE: Map of Tubes

Hello, Ted Stevens here.
I find this map of tubes very intriguing. As you may know, I have been a proponent of protecting the Internet's tubes from clogging up. I think this new geo-spatial map will show how the tubes are distributed. It shows that I was right all along! The Internet is like a truck! You can't just throw stuff on it or it slows it down. As a matter of fact, my secretary is sending an Internet right now and NO CARRIER

Very Truly Yours,
Ted Stevens
U.S. Senator
--
Write in the man! George W. Bush in 2008.

Re:Map of Tubes (0)

eneville (745111) | about 7 years ago | (#20878069)

in soviet russia, siberia connects you!

Re:Map of Tubes (0)

trib4lmaniac (962599) | about 7 years ago | (#20879317)

The internet is not a big truck. It's a series of tubes.

Re:Shocking (2)

Bluesy21 (840772) | about 7 years ago | (#20876357)

Shocking that its Slashdotted already!

Re:Shocking (2, Funny)

corsec67 (627446) | about 7 years ago | (#20876613)

The tubes must be clogged.

*Paging plumber to tube 23562 by 43566 by 23466*

map visual appeal (3, Interesting)

siddesu (698447) | about 7 years ago | (#20876421)

well, in a few years, when the one laptop per child project succeeds, and the world has successfully moved to ipv6 and most computers have real IP addresses, there may be some really interesting pictures in the developing world as well. in fact, since by that time the West will probably be saturated with networked devices, the only maps that are interesting visually may be those in the poorer countries.

Other things that will happen "in a few years" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876903)

well, in a few years ...
we will have flying cars, and robot house servants, and pills instead of food. ... in a few years

Re:Other things that will happen "in a few years" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876913)

i have a robot house servant already, and i am building a flying car.
as for the pills, thanks, but no thanks. you keep em ;)

Re:Other things that will happen "in a few years" (2, Funny)

8ball629 (963244) | about 7 years ago | (#20877983)

How can one forget Duke Nukem Forever?

Re:map visual appeal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877121)

...and at what point to monkeys fly out of your orifices?

Re:map visual appeal (2, Funny)

Plutonite (999141) | about 7 years ago | (#20877799)

I hate to tell you this, but there are these huge stretches of land in the US called the "fly-over" states..perhaps you've heard of them. I doubt they will be ever saturated with anything, much less IPv6 networks. Maybe cows, I dunno. Whenever you get the impulse to imagine a technologically saturated western world where everything is so advanced that it doesn't matter to look anymore, always remember

IDAHO: FAMOUS POTATOES!

For further info:
http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=idaho_blows [thebestpag...iverse.net]

Re:map visual appeal (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | about 7 years ago | (#20878517)

I doubt [the "fly-over" states] will be ever saturated with anything, much less IPv6 networks.
It's unlikely that they'll ever have fibre/wire connectivity to any massive extent, but what about WiMax and other wireless Internet technologies?

You may think that Idaho will still never approach urban areas in terms of relative connectivity. However, if wireless technology gets closer to wired/fibre in terms of performance, it may be decided that it's simply easier to connect even urban areas with wireless (makes the infrastructure easier to build). In which case, unwired Idaho is at much less of a disadvantage, and may even benefit from the development of wireless technologies for rich urban areas.

I suspect that long-range wireless technologies will also be given a boost by its use in developing countries; it's already the case that some are going straight from having little or no telecoms infrastructure to mobile phone technology, bypassing the construction of wired networks.

And why not? Sure, wired may be faster just now, but it's probably not practical for such countries. I can't see them spending vast amounts of money wiring large areas of poor countries, but long-range wireless Internet *is* plausible. Developments there may encourage its use in more isolated parts of first world countries like the US.

North-South Divide, nothing new. (1)

Shag (3737) | about 7 years ago | (#20876303)

Beyond Australia, New Zealand, and parts of South-East Asia, the southern hemisphere is largely less developed in all kinds of ways than the north. This plays out in lots of areas international organizations like the UN deal with. It's nifty that the 'net reflects it, but not particularly surprising.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (1)

cindysthongs (1168367) | about 7 years ago | (#20876723)

Maybe internet maps would be good feedback to the UN if progress is being made

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (1)

digitig (1056110) | about 7 years ago | (#20877507)

I suspect the internet maps will tend to lag behind the indicators that matter at the moment. A lot of developing countries are held back by the poor transportation infrastructures. Although data movement can be important for an economy, it's probably always going to lag movement of physical goods -- you can't eat bits.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20878563)

UN peeps look at internet maps: Hmmmmm, looks like progress is being made, when will we be able to start taking bribes or injecting corruption???

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (2, Insightful)

iminplaya (723125) | about 7 years ago | (#20876869)

...the southern hemisphere is largely less developed in all kinds of ways than the north.

Well, beyond those and Antarctica (Imagine... a whole continent without a Walmart!), much of the southern hemisphere is still under water.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (3, Funny)

miro f (944325) | about 7 years ago | (#20877007)

nooo! South America is sinking!

*glug glug glug...*

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (1)

z3d4r (598419) | about 7 years ago | (#20877173)

Australia doesnt have a walmart store anywhere either

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (1)

novakreo (598689) | about 7 years ago | (#20879375)

...the southern hemisphere is largely less developed in all kinds of ways than the north.

Well, beyond those and Antarctica (Imagine... a whole continent without a Walmart!), much of the southern hemisphere is still under water.
Australia and Africa don't have Walmarts either.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877583)

Beyond Australia, New Zealand, and parts of South-East Asia, The southern hemisphere also only has a peppering of the Earth's landmass and population as well.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877727)

Beyond Australia, New Zealand, and parts of South-East Asia, the southern hemisphere is largely less developed in all kinds of ways than the north.
That's probably because it's full of dumbass niggers.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20878009)

That simply isn't true. Nearly all of the known dumbass niggers live in the USA, land of confused fat people and drive-in burgers.

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (2, Informative)

potnis (793698) | about 7 years ago | (#20879149)

Just for the record, South East Asia is NOT in the Southern hemisphere.

Unless i didnt get the memo!

Re:North-South Divide, nothing new. (2, Interesting)

tverbeek (457094) | about 7 years ago | (#20879229)

I find the exceptions to the general patterns interesting. For example, on the map of connections, there's a cluster going to somewhere around the Gulf of Guinea... are those lines there to transport all the scam-spam from deposed Nigerian millionaires? And what's with the links to... northern Manitoba?

Why such a map doesn't mean much (4, Interesting)

ajs (35943) | about 7 years ago | (#20876305)

I've worked on trying to identify geographical locations based on IP, reverse mapping, and a number of other measures. Trust me when I say that it's near impossible to get even a passable degree of accuracy. DIMES does the best they can with what they have, but I would not put too much stock in it.

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876649)

So what? You're the man.

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (2)

Trogre (513942) | about 7 years ago | (#20876857)

I know what you mean. Xtraceroute hasn't worked properly for years now.

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (4, Interesting)

Alomex (148003) | about 7 years ago | (#20876885)

Trust me when I say that it's near impossible to get even a passable degree of accuracy.

This is assuming you try to ID the location from a single place. If you probe the IP from ten different geographic locations you can get within 100 miles of the actual destination and quite often a lot closer than that. Quite often the address we guessed was within 10 miles of that listed in the DNS records (which is not always the right one due to corporations collocating their servers at a different address than the DNS record).

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (1, Offtopic)

Broken scope (973885) | about 7 years ago | (#20877147)

Offtopic, mod me so quickly.

So what your signature is telling me is that I'm going to have a job when I graduate? Fuck yes.

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (4, Funny)

spectrokid (660550) | about 7 years ago | (#20877483)

Well somebody is getting it right... I am living in a shitty little village in Denmark and and the "Meet interesting girls in..." adverts from Adult Friend Finder have zeroed in. A year ago they gave towns 60 km away from here, now they are always within 10 km.

Re:Why such a map doesn't mean much (1)

boarsai (698361) | about 7 years ago | (#20878319)

You have to start worrying (or counting your blessings) when the adverts are accurate enough to start informing you that the hot girls are actually next door! Hang on... you'd probably already know that. Get away from the window.

prior art (5, Funny)

arbitraryaardvark (845916) | about 7 years ago | (#20876319)

Re:prior art (1)

mjrosenb (1168393) | about 7 years ago | (#20876463)

There used to be an amazing site called peacock maps that had posters of the net back in 2002. The posters were amazing, but they still stopped making them

Re:prior art (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20878145)

>(xkcd map of the internet)

Not short on IPv4 addresses at all.

While we're at it, xtraceroute already seems to know [hopto.org] about Japans's secret future plans [nature.com] .

Kinda looks like this (4, Interesting)

lecithin (745575) | about 7 years ago | (#20876327)

Re:Kinda looks like this (1)

diegocn (1109503) | about 7 years ago | (#20876379)

Wow I thought China's density would be a lot more than Indea's. Also it's shocking how North Korea compares to South Korea.

Re:Kinda looks like this (1)

Climate Shill (1039098) | about 7 years ago | (#20876599)

Now that is odd. Do they really not have artificial lighting in Canada ?

And why the horizontal line across asia ?

Re:Kinda looks like this (3, Insightful)

PaintyThePirate (682047) | about 7 years ago | (#20876677)

I wondered the same about the line when I first saw that map. I could be mistaken, but I think its the result of towns springing up around the Trans-Siberian Railway [wikipedia.org] . It had the same type of effect on Russia that the Transcontinental Railroad did for the US.

Re:Kinda looks like this (2, Informative)

mr_mischief (456295) | about 7 years ago | (#20876691)

They have lots of artificial lighting in Canada. It's plain on the picture. The farthest north reaches just don't have that many inhabitants. Much of Canada's population lives just north of the US border.

As for the horizontal line across Asia, I'm going to guess that's Russia's Trans-Siberian Railroad and all the settlements along it. Even in the more heavily lit region around the Caucasus, one can pick out a line. It appears to run directly from the Baltic near St. Petersburg to the east then south a bit around th Chinese border to Vladivostok on the Sea of Japan. That's about the route of the TSR [ego.net] .

Re:Kinda looks like this (1)

belmolis (702863) | about 7 years ago | (#20876967)

Indeed, more than "much". 90% of our population lives within 160km (100 miles) of the US border. That's 3.5% of the greatest north-south extent of the country. We've got electric lights, computers, cellphones, even broadband here in the north, but it doesn't light up like the far south.

Re:Kinda looks like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877101)

lucky bastards ... you have clear skies and aurora ;)
my only consolation is that it is prolly freezing.

Re:Kinda looks like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20878661)

P R O B A B L Y you ignorant fuck.

Re:Kinda looks like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877721)

Now that is odd. Do they really not have artificial lighting in Canada ?
Not where nobody lives. I'd think of it as: each faintest point of light represents the candela-power of about 500 people. Saskatchewan alone has just under a million people in more area than California. And you can clearly see the dark patches in California. They're called mountains and deserts.

And why the horizontal line across asia ?
See answer above. Also, you found

And you're welcome for the Grade 10 geography lesson. And here I was going to post something funny about NASA waiting for just the right moment when the sun was dark to take the picture... :-p

Re:Kinda looks like this (2, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 7 years ago | (#20877771)

That's the great firewall [wikipedia.org] of China. It's like a filter, in the tubes.

Oops, broke my tubes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877829)

And why the horizontal line across asia ?
Also, you found Siberia's Railway. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Kinda looks like this (2, Funny)

tverbeek (457094) | about 7 years ago | (#20879283)

As any paranoid US nationalist knows, nearly the entire Canadian population is massed on the US/Canada border, in preparation for an invasion. They've turned off all the lights in the rest of the country to protect it from retaliatory air raids.

Biggest question facing most readers (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876349)

Who cares? Seriously. Map out the MUH-DICK genome rather than wasting your time with this tomfoolery and this site.

no match (3, Funny)

albeit unknown (136964) | about 7 years ago | (#20876365)

The Chris Harrison project will prove to be no match for.... The Alan Parsons Project.

Re:no match (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | about 7 years ago | (#20876437)

More likely he'll run afoul of the previous generation of global computing: The Forbin Project.

Re:no match (1)

haakondahl (893488) | about 7 years ago | (#20878851)

No doubt they used the Eye in the Sky.

Obligatory (5, Funny)

evanbd (210358) | about 7 years ago | (#20876383)

Re:Obligatory (2, Informative)

witte (681163) | about 7 years ago | (#20879365)

It even has Qwghlm on it. /geekgasm

Let there be dots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876397)

Right now at Chris Harrision's hosting site, the light is brighter than it ever has been. /.'ed

Obligatory..? (1)

PhasmatisApparatus (1086395) | about 7 years ago | (#20876411)

Because everyone knows that the internet is, as the post says, a "series of maps".

Re:Obligatory..? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876643)

What I thought it was a series of tubes!

Re:Obligatory..? (1)

saskboy (600063) | about 7 years ago | (#20876843)

If the Internet is a series of maps, does that make spammers the people who put push-pins into random places that make no sense?

What can we call this "New Map"? (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | about 7 years ago | (#20876453)

Let's see, it's a new way to map the network, a new map ... I've got it! We'll call it "NMAP"!

not 100% right. (5, Interesting)

hjf (703092) | about 7 years ago | (#20876455)

this map needs a lot of interpretation: the southern hemisphere looks dark compared to the north, but that's because of the way population is distributed. In the US, there's town after town, and that's why mid-to-north US looks so bright, and we know that in the left, it isn't so. Europe is the same. Lots of people crammed in relatively small territories. But then you see Brazil and Argentina, and we look dim. Too dim. Well, that's because we have vast extensions of nothing. Wild rainforest, the wonderful pampas... sure, these places are "disconnected". But then again, nobody lives there (keep in mind, for example, Argentina is 2/3 the size of the US and 1/10 the population). But look closely: central america is bright. Why? Easy: small countries, many cities together. They look brighter in the map. I mean, south america isn't "disconnected", it's just not so densely connected, and I guess there's an important factor too:

This map was, I guess, made with some sort of "geolocation" database. I happen to be a customer of a large ISP, they don't assign a whole netblock to my city, so it's registered as part of Buenos Aires . So the data may lie a little (I know that hundreds, if not thousands of Latin American small towns have -paid- wi-fi. Some of them through satellite links, others, the luckier, through leased lines. I happen to be in the industry and have set up 4 wi-fi ISPs, and I know of at least another 10 in my province alone). I think the "world at night" ( http://www.atimes.com/atimes/images/earth_night.jpg [atimes.com] ) map represents what I'm trying to mean. I bet that if the data was completely precise, it would look a lot like this map.

Re:not 100% right. (1)

flyingsquid (813711) | about 7 years ago | (#20877029)

,i>this map needs a lot of interpretation: the southern hemisphere looks dark compared to the north, but that's because of the way population is distributed.

I don't think so. If you ignore brightness, and compare the number of connections coming out of a large American city like Seattle, San Franciso, or LA to any South American city, it simply has more connections.

Re:not 100% right. (1)

Strange Ranger (454494) | about 7 years ago | (#20877127)

That map of the night is crazy.
I mean most of it looks spot on to me.
Except for the part where most of Canada is using night goggles instead of lamps.

Re:not 100% right. (2, Interesting)

jd (1658) | about 7 years ago | (#20877847)

If you scaled each region by population, scaled the thickness of each line by bandwidth scaled the brightness of each line by reliability, and used the three primary colours to indicate whether the line supported IPv6, MPLS or multicasting in addition to the mainstream Internet protocols, you would produce a more representative map that would better reflect actual Internet service and coverage but would also be totally unreadable and would also likely destroy the credibility of most of the major Internet-enabled nations.

Re:not 100% right. (1)

jonadab (583620) | about 7 years ago | (#20877993)

There may be more going on than that. Nigeria is more densely populated than Ohio, but Nigeria is mostly black, with little grey dots at Lagos, Port Harcourt, and a couple of other places (cities, presumably). Ohio is pure white, even in rural areas like Morrow County. One could just about believe that's accurate.

On the other hand, clearly there ARE some problems with the data. For instance, there are a significant number of dots are in the Pacific Ocean, a hundred miles off the coast of Chili, which is clearly not right, and Canada is almost totally black, which strikes me as very unlikely.

Thanks! (1)

nacredata (761540) | about 7 years ago | (#20876457)

The general message is a good one to be reminded of. The precision is not too high I suppose as noted. But damn, that looks way cool as a visual.

i thought that was here? (2, Funny)

deander2 (26173) | about 7 years ago | (#20876473)

http://xkcd.com/256/ [xkcd.com] =p

I just ask the locals.. (2, Funny)

brxndxn (461473) | about 7 years ago | (#20876479)

okay.. so ya take a right at ol' Goog's,
then, veer left and avoid goats.ex,
take a pitt stop at fark.com - but don't chat with the locals unless ya' wanna get made fun of,
drive straight past slashdot, it's just a tourist trap
take a right at myspace.com.. and be sure to leave them alone. they don't tolerate much
and there ya are.. PORN!

Re:I just ask the locals.. (2, Funny)

Aehgts (972561) | about 7 years ago | (#20876921)

There's something wrong with your tubes if you have to sail that far to reach the ocean of pr0n... :P

It is already out of date... (2, Funny)

Ironix (165274) | about 7 years ago | (#20876483)

Already he needs to remove his own burning ruin of a server from the list.

Hmmm... (1)

Psychor (603391) | about 7 years ago | (#20876497)

I guess the maps would show that the density of Internet connections near Chris Harrison's server was very low, if I could load them.

This part of the map is black... (1)

Z80xxc! (1111479) | about 7 years ago | (#20876505)

The part of the map for the server for the page linked to appears to be black. Yep, slashdotted.

How about for Google Earth? (2, Interesting)

Lord_Breetai (66113) | about 7 years ago | (#20876507)

It would be nice if this could be viewed via Google Earth. And if it has been done, sorry, the article is slashdotted.

Mirror link (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876583)

I have mirrored the maps temporarily at http://www.clearchaos.com/worldBlack.jpg [clearchaos.com] and http://www.clearchaos.com/worlddotblack.jpg [clearchaos.com] at least until my server turns into a smoking ruin.

Re:Mirror link (1)

leenks (906881) | about 7 years ago | (#20878075)

I'm quite surprised this is considered news - this work was published months ago, and has been on http://visualcomplexity.com/ [visualcomplexity.com] for months aswell.

Not so shocking... (4, Insightful)

NerveGas (168686) | about 7 years ago | (#20876673)

"beyond Australia, New Zealand, and parts of South-East Asia, the southern hemisphere has only a peppering of connectivity."

That's because beyond those countries, the Southern hemisphere only has a peppering of prosperity. If you want to know why, read "The Wealth and Poverty of Nations".

Penguins (2, Funny)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 7 years ago | (#20877189)

Well, most of the southern hemisphere is water and although there are penguins in Antarctica they are not really all that into this internet thing...

Re:Penguins (1)

jd (1658) | about 7 years ago | (#20877823)

But... but... but... Linux was written by penguins, right?

This is obvious (1)

bl8n8r (649187) | about 7 years ago | (#20876753)

Look at all the US botnets slamming russia.

Re:This is obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876915)

In free market Russia, botnets slam US.

hmmm (0, Redundant)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | about 7 years ago | (#20876819)

Server is down. It seems they caved to the Slashdot Effect.

Woot 7p (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20876847)

The mighty slashdot (0, Redundant)

Monkeyknifightz (1074206) | about 7 years ago | (#20876917)

Another website a victim of slash dotting.

Looks like the Internet....... (1)

LoneGNUman (882696) | about 7 years ago | (#20876923)

Looks like the Internet.......It's down!!!!

Is it classified like Sean Gorman map yet? (4, Interesting)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 years ago | (#20876929)

Sean Gorman mapped out the US fiber-optic telco fiefdoms.
Parts of his dissertation where "removed".
He showed the choke points and critical links.

Re:Is it classified like Sean Gorman map yet? (2, Informative)

MK_CSGuy (953563) | about 7 years ago | (#20878637)

More on Gorman's dissertation here [washingtonpost.com] for those interested in the story.

Maps reminds me of... (1)

antdude (79039) | about 7 years ago | (#20877015)

Wargames [imdb.com] movie and DEFCON [everybody-dies.com] game.

Oddly enough (3, Funny)

j3w (860785) | about 7 years ago | (#20877211)

Every road leads to porn...

Mirrors for High Resolution PNGs (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20877255)

useless map (5, Interesting)

marafa (745042) | about 7 years ago | (#20877673)

in my opinion, this map is useless UNLESS it is overlaying a map of the world. i for one, cannot find the capital city, cairo, of my country, egypt in these maps, only vaguely, but then again, it could also be tel aviv

rendering problem? (1)

andr0meda (167375) | about 7 years ago | (#20877853)


Is it just me or do the city-2-city connections look a little bit grid-like? I suppose it's a drawing artifact, but it certainly makes the graph look more wrong then right, as compared to small arched lines.

TransAtlantic (1)

Adeptus_Luminati (634274) | about 7 years ago | (#20878455)

Man, that is a hella lot of trans Atlantic fiber... makes me wonder how much of it is just really different OC192+ Wavelengths down the same fiber/conduit.

Pretty pointless (1)

Goaway (82658) | about 7 years ago | (#20878971)

These maps are neither very useful, nor very pretty. The data visualization methods are a total joke.

Now, this is a map of the internet:

http://www.telegeography.com/products/map_internet/index.php [telegeography.com]

Too bad it costs an arm and a leg.
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