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Windows XP SP3 Build 3205 Released w/ New Features

Zonk posted about 7 years ago | from the new-tricks-for-an-old-dog dept.

Windows 286

jBubba writes "Windows XP SP3 build 3205 is the first official & authorized release of the next Windows XP service pack; and has been made available to testers as a part of the Windows Server 2008/Windows Vista SP1 beta program. NeoSmart Technologies has the run-down on the included 1,073 patches/hotfixes including security updates. Contrary to popular belief, Windows XP SP3 does ship with new features/components, most of which have been backported from Windows Vista. Some included features: 'New Windows Product Activation model: no need to enter product key during setup. Network Access Protection modules and policies have been brought to XP after being one of the more-well-received features in Windows Vista. New Microsoft Kernel Mode Cryptographic Module - the Windows XP SP3 kernel now includes an entire module that provides easy access to multiple cryptographic algorithms and is available for use in kernel-mode drivers and services. New "Black Hole Router" detection - Windows XP SP3 can detect and protect against rogue routers that are discarding data.'"

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is IE7 included? (2, Interesting)

A little Frenchie (715758) | about 7 years ago | (#20890397)

all in the subject

I hate new features. (2, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | about 7 years ago | (#20890479)

I was a service pack to only fix the bugs.

If there are new features, release them as a separate "upgrade".

Having both mixed together makes testing a real pain.

Re:I hate new features. (0, Troll)

cindysthongs (1168367) | about 7 years ago | (#20890519)

Totally agree - service pack = bug fix dot release = new features major release = tons of new features

Re:I hate new features. (-1, Offtopic)

Lennie (16154) | about 7 years ago | (#20890911)

If you want that, I suggest running Debian, they do this.

Re:I hate new features. (5, Insightful)

tacocat (527354) | about 7 years ago | (#20891043)

You're missing the real significance to this. They are back porting features from Vista!!! That's removing the incentive for migration from XP to VISTA on features alone. Considering the historic business model they have used, this is reason for further thought.

Dell and others have pushed Microsoft into a position where they (OEM) are allowed to continue selling XP software beyond the originally intended dates set by Microsoft. This is the first time anyone ever successfully told Microsoft what to do, including the US Government (interestingly enough).

Now that there is a continuance of XP in the market, the best thing that Microsoft can provide that customer base with secure products. If they fail to then it gives credence to the competition laying claims on security. If I remember, one of the points Microsoft was selling XP on was the security it provided above the Windows 2000/98/95 platforms. So there is something of a commitment they have made to keep it secure.

If there's a diminished reason to migrate to Vista, as already demonstrated, then what?

Re:I hate new features. (4, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | about 7 years ago | (#20891221)

You're missing the real significance to this. They are back porting features from Vista!!! That's removing the incentive for migration from XP to VISTA on features alone. Considering the historic business model they have used, this is reason for further thought.

That's one way of looking at it. Another way is that if they backport a few features it might make less technically inclined people a bit less apprehensive about getting a new computer with Vista on it.

I suspect that the features aren't going to be any of the most important ones, and will probably be ignored by XP users, but I doubt that it will really hold people back from upgrading. The main reasons people are not upgrading have little to do with the new features, and much more with things like the lack of driver support.

Re:I hate new features. (1)

the_fat_kid (1094399) | about 7 years ago | (#20891285)

but is back porting features from vista a good thing?
or is it just another way to migrate all the Windows users over to an operating system that they have rejected?
how long untill they "back port" the whole DRM suite that seems to cause the most hand wringing and tooth gnashing?

now keep in mind that I'm an Mac user and don't feel that it effects me. I just wonder.

Re:I hate new features. (3, Informative)

suv4x4 (956391) | about 7 years ago | (#20891409)

You're missing the real significance to this. They are back porting features from Vista!!! That's removing the incentive for migration from XP to VISTA on features alone. Considering the historic business model they have used, this is reason for further thought.

I've been thinking the same thing, and still, I don't know if pressure alone made them backport Vista features. People just want the patches rolled up in a SP. Vista security features was unexpected move.

Put this next to the toned down Vista campaign.

I have the feeling Microsoft are fully aware of the problems of Vista, and I wouldn't be too surprised to see them gradually backporting the better accepted core/security Vista features to XP until they arrive at a slimmer Vista, and throwing away or redoing the ill mouthed Vista features (such as the current allow/deny security model which often asks the wrong questions and doesn't learn, or clarify the source of the action).

If only they realized this, they wouldn't waste 5 years on grand vision ideas and arriving at an OS that's basically worse than the sum of its parts.

Vista: the spare parts OS. Backport and reuse as needed.

Re:is IE7 included? (2, Informative)

Bacon Bits (926911) | about 7 years ago | (#20890483)

I doubt it. Windows 2000 SP4 was still shipped with IE 5.01 (the version that shipped originally), and, indeed, it is the only way to apply the last service pack for IE 5.01.

Re:is IE7 included? YES (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890531)

yes it's included. as is Windows Media Player 11

Re:is IE7 included? YES (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891241)

IE7 is a piece of crap and so WMP11. Since I will not allow either of them on my hard drive it doesn't look like I'll be upgrading to SP3 anytime soon.

Does the SP Install After The Hidden Update? (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | about 7 years ago | (#20890793)

Microsoft recently pushed out a stealth update to XP that reportedly breaks repairing the OS. Does anyone know if SP3 will install after Microsoft pushed out that last non-optional and hidden update?

And I'm with the other folks - service packs are supposed to fix things. Not that I don't mind new features, but where I run XP, I'd like to have it be a two step process.

It looks like Microsoft has finally owned up to the Vista fiasco. I can't help but think this would not be hitting the streets if Vista wasn't the dog it has turned out to be.

No. (1)

Jon.Laslow (809215) | about 7 years ago | (#20891233)

Just like other replies, SP3 will still contain IE 6, although with a new tag of "SP3" as opposed to "SP2" as one would expect.

I for one (1)

daedalusblond (1037302) | about 7 years ago | (#20890401)

Welcome our new feature-enhanced overlord. Beats the crap out of the glossy bug-ridden one!

Re:I for one (0, Troll)

ChrisMP1 (1130781) | about 7 years ago | (#20891105)

Think French Revolution, Reign of Terror. Throw out the old, crappy one; replace with new, crappy one. Or have service packs ever produced a good Microsoft product?

But... (0)

Azuma Hazuki (955769) | about 7 years ago | (#20890415)

...does it run Lin...oh, never *mind*

Re:But... (3, Interesting)

Bacon Bits (926911) | about 7 years ago | (#20890521)

Yes [vmware.com] it does [microsoft.com] .

question (-1, Redundant)

bioglaze (767105) | about 7 years ago | (#20890417)

...but does it run on Linux?

Re:question (2, Funny)

ahaning (108463) | about 7 years ago | (#20890505)

Please take a hint from your buddy [slashdot.org] .

yeah (4, Insightful)

Almir (1096395) | about 7 years ago | (#20890421)

i can't help thinking sp3 will make xp so much like vista, that you might as well go the whole way. sure hope i'm wrong though.

Re:yeah (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | about 7 years ago | (#20890477)

And ... wouldn't that be the point? I sure hope you're wrong too.

Re:yeah (1)

Almir (1096395) | about 7 years ago | (#20890761)

it would, from microsoft's point of view. unless you think that vista is actually good and are using it, unlike most of us here, in which case it would be pretty bad. mind you, i'm not saying they will take all the horrible new 'features' from vista and load them onto xp, i'm just saying it might make business sense for them to put some pressure on xp users. it'd certainly get people to move on to vista sooner.

Re:yeah (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891007)

They wont bother adding Vista features to XP as it'll stop even more users from upgrading.

The list of new XP features includes...

  . More annoying DRM so Vista seems less crippled in comparison.
  . New product activation that requires you to authenticate XP every 19 minutes.
  . Totally new bugs & incompatibilities. They can't make Vista stable so they're making XP less stable.
  . Slow-down code. Makes XP feel as sluggish as Vista would on a 486.
  . Auto Rabbit Removal. Balmer still hates them.
  . Uber-bloat. Better than previous bloat releases (except for Vista's) and now larger.
  . Incompatability Modules. This automatically corrupts/encrypts every 9th ODF file.

Hooray (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890427)

FIRST POST!

Re:Hooray (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890453)

uh no, you fucking idiot. Now go kill yourself

Re:Hooray (0, Offtopic)

heffrey (229704) | about 7 years ago | (#20890459)

Not quite loser!

Re:Hooray (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890571)

You are attempting to First Post. Cancel or Fail miserably?

Windows Product Activation? (1)

Paktu (1103861) | about 7 years ago | (#20890455)

New Windows Product Activation model: no need to enter product key during setup.
I'm confused. When have you ever had to enter a product key when installing a service pack?

Re:Windows Product Activation? (5, Informative)

HaloZero (610207) | about 7 years ago | (#20890487)

2K SP3 & SP4, and XP SP1 and SP2 provided the ability to merge the service pack into the base install for the operating system. The final product is usually referred to as a 'slipstream' install - it allows you to install Windows XP without having to patch to the absolute gills, just the muck from after the latest slipstreamed service pack.

After slipstreaming SP2 into my base XP install disk, a flat-format install did take a bit longer, but device propagation was FAR, FAR IMPROVED. There were a few other niceties, but they go beyond the scope of this post. I wouldn't be surprised if they're referring to changes made in the slipstream of the base install.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (4, Informative)

corychristison (951993) | about 7 years ago | (#20890605)

It should be noted that Slipstreaming is not as daunting as most people expect... nLite [nliteos.com] can help that problem and adds a lot of 'hacks' for the install as well. These hacks I speak of are more like features, such as adding Vendor information, as well as including the Serial # right in the install. You can setup an Unattended Setup... that is, you can pre-set all of the questions Windows Setup usually asks during installation.

:-)

Re:Windows Product Activation? (4, Informative)

nmb3000 (741169) | about 7 years ago | (#20890851)

nLite can help that problem and adds a lot of 'hacks' for the install as well.

nLite can also completely frak up an XP install. One specific instance that we encountered when someone in our office used nLite was the inability for anyone who was not an administrator to use USB devices. None. The only way Windows would recognize and install the drivers for things like mice, keyboards, and flash drives was if you were an administrator. I've seen others, but this was one of the most problematic.

I very strongly recommend that nobody use it in a business setting or anywhere else you care about stability. If you want to customize an aspect of the Windows install process, do your homework and learn about it. Don't trust a black box to do it all for you.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 7 years ago | (#20891039)

the DriverPacks is a good thing to add to your windows cd
http://driverpacks.net/ [driverpacks.net]

Re:Windows Product Activation? (5, Informative)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 7 years ago | (#20891119)

I've never used nLite, but I have slipstreamed manually before. It's not hard at all! You can find a nice walk-through on performing your own slipstreaming and ISO building (bootable) here [winsupersite.com] . The instructions are practically spoon-fed. =)

Re:Windows Product Activation? (1)

anonobomber (889925) | about 7 years ago | (#20891267)

If they're using windows I don't think they'll be worried about stability very much to begin with.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (2, Interesting)

mrsmiggs (1013037) | about 7 years ago | (#20891305)

Technical problems are not the half of it, it is actually against the license to use nlite for commercial purposes. Which smacks of please don't sue us, so doesn't really inspire confidence if anyone were considering using the software in any situation.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (1)

empaler (130732) | about 7 years ago | (#20891343)

I use it for the XP boxes we have. That's about 40 boxes. Testing is the key.
The USB problem you mention is AFAIR a setting choice when making the disc - that is, it was clearly used in a wrong manner, and clearly not thorough-tested.

I very strongly recommend that anybody in a business setting or anywhere else you care about stability thoroughly test anything and everything before deploying anything. I've made something like 30 iterations of the discs, almost every time having screwed with something that I shouldn't have - resulting in something not working properly. Rinse, repeat, etc., and you'll be a happier man because when you need to zero out an XP box, these things will, in the end, have saved you countless hours in driver installs, program installs, code typing, etc.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (3, Informative)

schnikies79 (788746) | about 7 years ago | (#20890909)

If you just want to slipsteam, don't mess with nlite as it can really screw up an install if you don't know what you are doing, instead try autostreamer. [softpedia.com]

Re:Windows Product Activation? (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 7 years ago | (#20891049)

As the other two have said, nLite can really fuck up a Windows install. In my case, an nLite'd XP SP2 install would sometimes say it needed the XP install CD when installing Windows updates. Obviously that's Not Acceptable on an end-user's desktop.

Re:Windows Product Activation? (4, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | about 7 years ago | (#20890657)

Why would I need to enter the product key? After all, it comes in a .txt file called "serial" on the installation CD...oops

Elegant MS, really elegant (5, Funny)

rueger (210566) | about 7 years ago | (#20890461)

"Windows XP SP3 build 3205 ... has been made available to testers as a part of the ...Windows Vista SP1 beta program."

God, I love this company!

Re:Elegant MS, really elegant (5, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | about 7 years ago | (#20890527)

God, I love this company!

Well, between you and Steve Ballmer, that's two.

Re:Elegant MS, really elegant (1)

Jugalator (259273) | about 7 years ago | (#20890547)

I think it's really just what you choose to call it.

Obviously, since SP3 is included as part of it, it is really a Vista SP1 / Server 2008 / XP SP3 beta program.

Re:Elegant MS, really elegant (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890565)

"Windows XP SP3 build 3205 ... has been made available to testers as a part of the ...Windows Vista SP1 beta program."

God, I love this company!


Yeah, it's so much less confusing to
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade

and get

http://security.debian.org/pool/updates/main/q/quagga/quagga_0.98.3-7.5_i386.deb [debian.org]
        Size/MD5 checksum: 1192432 e3057ed965a580381e7c15dc430df295


which should fit nicely with

Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 alias sarge


These product names are so much clearer. I can't see why Microsoft keeps naming things "vista" or "xp". That just confuses users.

Re:Elegant MS, really elegant (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890625)

Way to miss the point, dumbass.

Yes, yes (1)

Jon.Laslow (809215) | about 7 years ago | (#20891251)

Very funny, we never would have thought of it, etc....

Actually, it is pretty amusing, but the joke is spoiled by the fact that Microsoft recent merged all of the Windows beta programs (since there are three at the moment) in to a single site/program. Much easier to keep track of, especially because most if not all of the testers belong to the Vista SP1 and Server 2008 betas anyways.

Slashdotted (1)

jmpeax (936370) | about 7 years ago | (#20890491)

A link to microsoft.com would have been better - less likely to suffer the slashdot effect!

Never mind. I should get on with work I suppose.

Re:Slashdotted (4, Funny)

thsths (31372) | about 7 years ago | (#20890595)

> Never mind. I should get on with work I suppose.

Work? Didn't you get the memo that Sunday is off?

Re:Slashdotted (1, Offtopic)

Ynot_82 (1023749) | about 7 years ago | (#20890629)

Link to MS KB page for XP SP3

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=832671 [microsoft.com]

Re:Slashdotted (1, Offtopic)

Ynot_82 (1023749) | about 7 years ago | (#20890645)

oops,
I'm a retard and deserve modding down....

I would like to note something (4, Funny)

Daimanta (1140543) | about 7 years ago | (#20890515)

The Windows Server 2008/Windows Vista SP1 beta program is not in charge of Gundam.

Re:I would like to note something (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890769)

In soviet russia meme start you!

Re:I would like to note something (1)

zerojoker (812874) | about 7 years ago | (#20891127)

--verbose please... I don't get this one...

Vista Sound (1)

QBasicer (781745) | about 7 years ago | (#20890533)

My favourite feature of Vista is it's sound system. The ability to change the volume quickly and easily per program is probably the best (and perhaps only) good feature of Vista. Does Linux even have anything like that? I can't check the link because it appears to be down, and the Coral Cache link doesn't want to load :\.

Full text (5, Informative)

sr243 (944609) | about 7 years ago | (#20890593)


Following our coverage of the Windows XP SP3 beta leak almost a month ago in August, here's some more info on the official beta, which just had its first authorized distributable released earlier today. Say hello to Windows XP SP3, build 3205!

While the newly-released build and the one leaked a month ago (Build 3180) may share the same name, we can exclusively reveal that they are not identical releases. This release, also shipped as windowsxp-kb936929-sp3-x86-enu.exe, is 334.2 megabytes and has been made available to tier-one Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista SP1 beta testers. Hashes are as follows:

CRC: 56e08837
MD5: c8c24ec004332198c47b9ac2b3d400f7

Along with the standalone installer redistributables (in English, Japanese, and German), Microsoft also provided the usual release notes and a list of all the hotfixes included in this release. Contrary to popular belief, Windows XP SP3 does ship with all-new features - not just patches and hotfixes, most of them backported from Windows Vista:

        * New Windows Product Activation model: no need to enter product key during setup. Thank God for that!
        * Network Access Protection modules and policies have been brought to XP after being one of the more-well-received features in Windows Vista. You can read more about NAP here.
        * New Microsoft Kernel Mode Cryptographic Module - the Windows XP SP3 kernel now includes an entire module that provides easy access to multiple cryptographic algorithms and is available for use in kernel-mode drivers and services.
        * New "Black Hole Router" detection - Windows XP SP3 can detect and protect against rogue routers that are discarding data.

Windows XP SP3 is compatible with all versions of Windows x86, included Embedded, Fundamentals, Start, Professional, Media Center, and Home Editions.

Windows XP SP3 now contains 1,073 patches/hotfixes, not including those in previous service packs. Of the 1,073 included updates, 114 are for security-related issues. The remainder are updates to performance & reliability, bugfixes, improvements to kernel-mode driver modules, and many BSOD fixes.

As with Service Pack 2, these include both previously publicly-available updates (whether through support.microsoft.com or via Windows Update) as well as any and all privately-redistributed updates for select customers or partners with specific problems/scenarios.

The first included update: KB123456 (April 7, 2006). The last: KB942367 (September 29, 2007).

We're checking with our MS contacts if we can provide you with the actual comprehensive list of updates included in Windows XP SP3, along with their descriptions and KB article links.

Re:Vista Sound (1)

pizzach (1011925) | about 7 years ago | (#20890641)

I'm sorry, but knowing nothing about Windows Vista that sounds like an extremely stupid feature. If I actually saw the implementation, I would probably thinking along the same lines as you. But until then, your words made me question the interface design of general windows programs that should have their own volume sliders anyway. 9_6

Re:Vista Sound (1)

Aladrin (926209) | about 7 years ago | (#20890675)

I haven't used Vista yet, but that is the only compelling feature I've heard so far. I would -love- to control sound per-program. As a gamer, I'm used to having to adjust my sound levels for each game, and that's great. But for non-games, this features doesn't exist. Winamp (and other media players) has its own control, but quite often that control is just a shortcut to the main volume control, messing up the volume for other apps. If I want to classical music softly in the background, it can be a pain to get it all going.

Or perhaps I have a language tutor, and I want the volume higher than normal so I can hear it... Or maybe a phone app that I want to have higher... But everything else normal.

I can think of tons of problems that can only be solved by beating the app developer over the head with a crowbar or per-app volume control.

Again, Vista finally has a feature I want. I wonder how long until it exists in KDE now, so I can stop feeling like Vista might be the answer?

Re:Vista Sound (3, Informative)

QBasicer (781745) | about 7 years ago | (#20890843)

It works by giving in addition to the main volume slider in the mixer/taskbar, providing a slider for each individual program using sound, like this picture. [arstechnica.com] The way, you can have Gaim/Pidgin sounds quite low, while you listen to relaxing music, but are waiting urgently for that important e-mail notification. I've played games where the sound is quite low to begin with, but then I get a message on my IM client, which seems fit to play a deafingly loud sound. IMHO, it's the only thing that Vista got right. I'm not sure how it works, but sound in Linux seems to be flaky at best.

Re:Vista Sound (4, Insightful)

nuzak (959558) | about 7 years ago | (#20890847)

> knowing nothing about Windows Vista that sounds like an extremely stupid feature.

Sounds like you've distilled the standard slashdot response to any Vista article.

Of course as soon as Linux copies the feature, then it's a great idea.

Re:Vista Sound (1)

JustNiz (692889) | about 7 years ago | (#20890649)

Actually its one of the changes for Vista that I hate. I just want one overall volume control, not on a per-app basis.

Re:Vista Sound (1)

musikit (716987) | about 7 years ago | (#20890731)

i understand why some users would prefer one over the other however until someone standardizes on a file format besides WAV that includes some form of decibal rating in it this feature is a necessity. there is no constant level of sound between wav files (and CDs and DVDs) that will allow me to say that i want sound played at 60 db. it is completely frustrating to have 1 application have a wav file that deafens you at the volume you like for other application's wav files.

i'm not that big a sound engineer to even be able to build such a wave file system however i would very much like to set in my operating system that i want wav files played at no louder then XX db and if the wav file is above that the sound is auto reduced in volume to that db rating. at the same time i would very much enjoy a minimum sound level as well to say the minimum sound of my system is 20 db and if a sound is too soft it is auto increased to play at that db rating.

im actually surprised the hearing impaired havent asked for this as a handicap accessible feature.

Re:Vista Sound (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891025)

One issue though with using a real world unit like dB SPL or similar is that the computer doesn't actually know what signal level translates into what SPL. A laptop outputting everything its got may only producing only 50dB max on the built in speakers meanwhile plug the same system into a stadium sound system and suddently its 120dB or more, yet the computer has no way of knowing this.

Also, look to CD's for another reason as to why this wouldn't work; The dynamic range of a CD is over 90dB, quite capable of carrying a huge range of sound. Yet the loudness of music recordings is pushed so high that even with this dynamic range the signal is forced to clip. http://www.mindspring.com/~mrichter/dynamics/dynamics.htm [mindspring.com]

Re:Vista Sound (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 years ago | (#20891121)

One issue though with using a real world unit like dB SPL or similar is that the computer doesn't actually know what signal level translates into what SPL.
Nor does your computer know what RGB value translates into what intensity of each primary on your PC's display. That's what colorimeters are for.

The dynamic range of a CD is over 90dB, quite capable of carrying a huge range of sound. Yet the loudness of music recordings is pushed so high that even with this dynamic range the signal is forced to clip.
The loudness war is partly the fault of underpowered op-amps driving the headphone connector in portable CD players.

Re:Vista Sound (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about 7 years ago | (#20891449)

One issue though with using a real world unit like dB SPL or similar is that the computer doesn't actually know what signal level translates into what SPL. A laptop outputting everything its got may only producing only 50dB max on the built in speakers meanwhile plug the same system into a stadium sound system and suddently its 120dB or more, yet the computer has no way of knowing this.
True but that doesn't really matter, his main point was to allow the user to define a minimum and maximum intensity and have any sounds that fell outside of those bounds adjusted. Using DB relative to peak output would work just as well.

However for general apps it is not very practical because you can't know how loud a sound will be until after it has finished so per app volume control is a reasonable compromise (basically working on the assumption that all the sounds output by one app will be output at a similar level)

But shutting AIM up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890785)

would be sweet. I don't know why AOL has to have the default sounds so damn loud. You're watching TV on the PC, or listening to music, whatever, and you get an AIM message and *BRINGGG* loud as shit... I hate it... I hate AIM..

Re:Vista Sound (1)

drawfour (791912) | about 7 years ago | (#20891311)

Actually its one of the changes for Vista that I hate. I just want one overall volume control, not on a per-app basis.
Which you still have. Apps default to the same level as the "Device volume" unless you change them. Basically, each volume per app is a percentage of the volume level of the device. If you set an app's volume to being the same level as the device volume, as you increase/decrease the device volume, the volume for the app increases/descreases as well. If you set an app's volume to being half the level as the device volume, then it will always be half the device volume. If you never open the Mixer control, all your volumes will be the same for all your apps, which is the device level.

Re:Vista Sound (1)

FoolsGold (1139759) | about 7 years ago | (#20891333)

Actually its one of the changes for Vista that I hate. I just want one overall volume control, not on a per-app basis.

There is: the left-most slider on the mixer app is for the global speaker, which affects all other audio. Change that and you change the overall volume.

Re:Vista Sound (4, Informative)

Lennie (16154) | about 7 years ago | (#20890987)

The pulseaudio [pulseaudio.org] sound daemon does this.

screenshot [0pointer.de]

It allows for setting the volume per audio source.

WGA will doom it. (4, Insightful)

Deathlizard (115856) | about 7 years ago | (#20890549)

If it's got WGA like Windows Vista? Then no thanks.

That's the only reason we're staying away from Vista, and if this new activation is anything like that then it's SP2 until they drop support for it, and maybe something else (Linux, OSX) after that.

I've said my reasons we stay away from Vista In my Journal. [slashdot.org] I'm sure we're not the only workplaces saying the same thing. Especially if the computers are not anchored to the network and are off the network for months at a time like our systems are.

Re:WGA will doom it. (2, Interesting)

alexhs (877055) | about 7 years ago | (#20890599)

if it's got WGA like Windows Vista? Then no thanks.

That's the only reason we're staying away from Vista,
And I guess it was the same reason to keep w2k and stay away from xp ? Why are you using xp then ?
If this is your only reason, you better switch right now, as applications will soon require this sp anyway, or require vista.

Re:WGA will doom it. (2, Interesting)

Deathlizard (115856) | about 7 years ago | (#20890749)

Why are you using xp then

At the time we made the OS decision, We were running Windows 98/ME for whatever reason and XP was out for 5-6 months. Since we knew 2000 was on the way out and XP didn't have WGA or activation at the time for corporate accounts, we didn't see any reason not to switch to XP.

Eventually WGA came out, but it was still optional with corporate accounts. WSUS servers don't send out or receive the WGA updates Even if you wanted them. You would only get the updates by going directly to Windows Update or if you did not setup a WSUS server on the local PC's.

Right now, from the sound of this article, it looks like SP3 is going to try to push Volume Activation 2.0 on XP users, where previously Volume Activation 1.0 was used. and our IT depatrment does not want to deal with MAK keys or KMS servers.

Re:WGA will doom it. (1)

Paul_Hindt (1129979) | about 7 years ago | (#20890617)

That's exactly why its all Windows 98 all the time over here...none of those gosh darned security checks. Well, no security whatsoever but that's besides the point.

Re:WGA will doom it. (1)

Deathlizard (115856) | about 7 years ago | (#20890891)

Ok Whats worse then.

1) A Key Stealing virus infects all of your Windows 98 Machines, and you'll need to clean them, and at worse reimage them.

or

2) A Key Stealing virus infects all of your Windows XP Machines, and you'll need to clean them, and at worse reimage them, and to top it all off, change their XP key a few days down the road because MS thinks your a pirate.

Don't think it can't happen or can't be done since you're patched? it's easy. Send an E-mail to John Q Igoramus, which he will promply open and attempt to open an attachment in the email telling him that his daughter posted something lewd in her myspace account and to click here to see it, only that what he clicked on was a Trojan Horse, which promptly posts your corporate XP key to freexpwarez.com, which is used by 1,000,000 people to get free XP, which MS detects and promptly locks out all your corporate PC with a "You are a pirate" message.

Exploits just automates the process. Social Engenneering works just as well.

And best feature of all! (5, Funny)

Chas (5144) | about 7 years ago | (#20890555)

"Are you SURE you wouldn't like to upgrade to Windows Vista?"

[Upgrade Now] [Upgrade RIGHT NOW] [FUBAR Existing System]

Better then most Service packs... (0)

webmaster404 (1148909) | about 7 years ago | (#20890567)

At least this one adds functionality rather then just fixing bugs that would have already been fixed in the Alpha had it been an open source project.... I just hope this doesn't include more DRM, but it wouldn't affect me as I ditched Windows for Ubuntu about 4 months ago.

Conspiracy to make activiation required (0, Troll)

jihadist (1088389) | about 7 years ago | (#20890577)

It's a giant conspiracy to make activation codes required. Now that XP is more popular than Vista, the corporate drones want to get us all hooked in to their required purchasing plan, even though studies show that 97% of people running Windows stole it because it was easy.

that is true if you are a (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890929)

nigger.

Protection against black hole routers? (2, Interesting)

adam613 (449819) | about 7 years ago | (#20890607)

So that when Windows wants to secretly download an update or send your data back to Microsoft, and you prevent them from doing so at the router level, they'll be able to detect it?

Re:Protection against black hole routers? (5, Informative)

pchan- (118053) | about 7 years ago | (#20891003)

So that when Windows wants to secretly download an update or send your data back to Microsoft, and you prevent them from doing so at the router level, they'll be able to detect it?
No. A black hole router is a router that incorrectly handles MTUs that are bigger than it can pass. That is, instead of fragmenting the packets, it just silently drops them. This makes for some very unreliable connections as only the bigger packets get dropped and smaller ones get through. This is usually a problem at the ISP level and has nothing to do with Windows updates. I now return you to your regularly scheduled tin foil hat.

Re:Protection against black hole routers? (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 7 years ago | (#20891181)

Hey, wait your saying that Microsoft is not only fixing their own problems, but are also fixing crappy products other companies make? Better introduce those kinds of news gently, some of the slashbots may suffer an apoplectic shock.

The only thing that's interesting (5, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | about 7 years ago | (#20890643)

most of which have been backported from Windows Vista.

Including DirectX 10? Few things about Vista are interesting besides that.

Re:The only thing that's interesting (2, Insightful)

n dot l (1099033) | about 7 years ago | (#20890721)

Not a chance. MS has chosen to tie DX10 to their new display driver model (they completely rewrote the line between user-space DX and kernel-space DX), which is tied to changes in the kernel...which interacts with all sorts of other shit in Vista (etc, etc). It's not that it can't be implemented without the new driver model (after all, NVIDIA's already supporting DX10 equivalent OpenGL extensions on XP - and Linux), just that it has been implemented that way. There's no way MS will spend money doing a massive re-write/back-port of DX10...especially since that's one of the main selling points of Vista (now that an actual DX10 game has been released).

Re:The only thing that's interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890903)

the ties are artificial.

and would be trivial for microsoft to create an xp version of directx10.

make no mistake.

DirectX 10 support? (2, Insightful)

shawnmchorse (442605) | about 7 years ago | (#20890647)

It might actually get some traction that way, if it's not just being used to shove Windows Vista at people...:p

New features, backported from Vista ? (5, Interesting)

Hymer (856453) | about 7 years ago | (#20890671)

But didn't Microsoft say that it is impossible to backport features to XP from Vista due to major differences in the system ?
...and since it is possible, will we be getting DirectX 10 on XP too ?
...and if not, why not ?
--
btw. how can this be good for Vista ?

Re:New features, backported from Vista ? (3, Funny)

realdodgeman (1113225) | about 7 years ago | (#20890763)

It will make XP slower and it will feel more like Vista. So everybody will go "hey, now the difference is so small, I could just upgrade and get DX10 anyway".

Perhaps it's going to be soooo bad (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | about 7 years ago | (#20890939)

that Vista looks good and people will just switch.

Re:New features, backported from Vista ? (1)

Tim C (15259) | about 7 years ago | (#20891279)

since it is possible, will we be getting DirectX 10 on XP too ?

You see a few features backported from one OS to another, and immediately assume that they all can be with just as much ease. Interesting.

Network Access Protection (2, Interesting)

mugenjou (912908) | about 7 years ago | (#20890703)

Network Access Protection modules and policies have been brought to XP after being one of the more-well-received features in Windows Vista.
What exactly does that mean, is this only the client for the Non-Windows-and-old-Windows-Client-Lockout-feature of Windows Server 2008?
How can it be well received in Vista if Server 2008 is not yet out, and who well-received it? Or is there more to this feature?

adding gasoline to the fire (0, Flamebait)

v1 (525388) | about 7 years ago | (#20890725)

Microsoft Kernel Mode Cryptographic Module

so now those viruses that morph and encrypt themselves to prevent detection ... we can't search for the little bit of code at the start that decrypts them because they'll just use a nice convenient windows API.

Lovely.

Re:adding gasoline to the fire (3, Informative)

owlstead (636356) | about 7 years ago | (#20891079)

Don't be an idiot. The libraries that do this have been within Windows for ages. Besides, you can easily use XOR encryption if you just want to hide something. Not really secure, but you'll have to do crypto-analysis to get to the code anyway. Hell, you could use ROT-13. Are you going to look for assembly XOR or ADD routines? You'll probably find a few. Calls to this specific Windows API will be much easier to find.

I've been trying to find out what cryptographic features have been added to the FIPS security module in SP3. I'll be very surprised if there finally is some Elliptic Curve support or anything like that. It seems that .NET has some support for them, but Windows unfortunately still seems to lack support, even though the market is starting to show clear interest in EC crypto.

Anyway, the only thing I can find using Google is some page of Microsoft that's 7 years old. For the same FIPS module - for W2K of course. Does anyone have a link to more recent information? Currently there is little to discuss (unless you mention the missing PKCS#11 support by this arrogant monopolist).

Re:adding gasoline to the fire (2, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | about 7 years ago | (#20891255)

so now those viruses that morph and encrypt themselves to prevent detection ... we can't search for the little bit of code at the start that decrypts them because they'll just use a nice convenient windows API.

The cryptographic API-s in Windows, just like the cryptographic API-s in OSX and Linux, are used for hashing and crypoting data using industry standard algorithms.

This is what IE uses for SSL sessions, for example.

Let me ask you something: why do you have to speak about things you have no clue about and make a fool of yourself in front of us? Yes, actually by spreading moronic FUD, you make people listen less to legitimate worries about the Windows OS.

Blackhole Avoidance? (4, Interesting)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | about 7 years ago | (#20890743)

Does anyone have any details on the blackhole routing avoidance feature? While the summary claims blackhole routers are "rogue" routers, blackhole routing is the most common way to stop DDoS attacks and excessive worm traffic from giant botnets of Windows machines. If the OS now offers botnet operators an easy way to bypass that rerouting of malware traffic, this could have serious detrimental affects upon the internet as a whole.

Re:Blackhole Avoidance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20890963)

Does Vista also have this "protection"?

If not then this may be a method of scaring IT manager types into "upgrading" to Vista, "because XP is ruining teh intarwebz!!!!1"

Re:Blackhole Avoidance? (3, Informative)

the unbeliever (201915) | about 7 years ago | (#20891095)

black hole routers are not null routes.

black hole routers just drop packets that are "too big"; null routes are self explanatory, and are how most ISP's stop DOS attacks.

Re:Blackhole Avoidance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891161)

Does anyone have any details on the blackhole routing avoidance feature? While the summary claims blackhole routers are "rogue" routers

Must be a MTU discovery method. The typical way to discover the MTU is to send packet of increasing size with the "don't fragment" bit set. When the packet size is too big, you get a transmission error, so you know what the MTU is.

The problem is that the error message is set by icmp, and many, many routers & firewalls block all sorts of icmp messages. You don't know if the recipient didn't receive your packet, or if the icmp error message was blocked.

Might be interesting, if microsoft is on to something new.

Microsoft Login Did Not Work (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 7 years ago | (#20890897)

Just for giggles, I followed the link in the base post, and got to the Microsoft Login page for downloading the SP. I tried to login, and my browser started going through various pages in a continuous loop. When I tried to break out of the loop it told me that "login does not work from here."

Pretty hilarious.

Now, I think I will wait until after someone documents how to install SP3 without having to install IE7 or that WGA garbage.

Mirror. (4, Informative)

antdude (79039) | about 7 years ago | (#20891001)

NeoSmart server seems to be down. Here's a mirror [networkmirror.com] .

Linus is right (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891143)

Various ways to express our agreement with our Dear Leader
Linus is right
I am with Linus on this one
Linus is right, of course
Of course, Linus is right
Linus is right, everyone knows about it.
So in a sense Linus is right
there's a sense in which linus is right
And of course Linus is right.
Nonetheless Linus is right
That's nonsense, so Linus is right
First of all: Linus is right
Linus is right, even if he is obnoxious.
So I think that Linus is right
Truth be told, Linus is right
But you know what? linus is right:

Get more from here
http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=%22Linus+is+right%22&btnG=Google+Search&meta= [google.ca] [google.ca]

New Product Activation! (1)

webview (49052) | about 7 years ago | (#20891273)

Where can I get the beta? Where can I get the beta?

How much Vista badness will we get? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20891367)

I don't care a flying fsck about Aero and other Vista crap, I'm a Unix user who is forced by a bunch of applications to keep at home one Windows machine working. I don't play games, music or movies on this machine and of course never use it to surf the web or reading emails: there's zero personal data in its disk, therefore any spyware from Microsoft backported from Vista will be no harm to my data.
What I'm concerned about is the driver and software compatibility, stability and memory/resource consumption, and, more importantly, if these updates are forced to the user or can be refused/installed selectively.

Anybody tested this SP and can comment on the subject?

Yes, tried to get TFA, but it's /.'d.
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