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KDE Readies KOffice 2.0 As OpenOffice Competitor

kdawson posted about 7 years ago | from the another-country-heard-from dept.

KDE 337

Da Massive writes in with a link to a story on KOffice 2.0, the next generation of the KDE office suite due sometime next year. In an interview with KDE spokesman Sebastian Kugler, Computerworld reports that KOffice 2.0 will be leaner, faster, and enjoy a cleaner code base than OpenOffice. It will also feature more applications, including an Access-like database creator, a flowcharter, and an image manipulation tool. KOffice is not yet fully compatible with ODF but the claim is that 2.0 will be.

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Who uses KrapOffice anyway? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919397)

I don't, so I guess that means no one does.

Re:Who uses KrapOffice anyway? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919453)

A couple of weeks ago we decided to cruise out to Ryan's Steakhouse for dinner. It was a Wednesday night which means that macaroni and beef was on the hot bar, indeed the only night of the week that it is served. Wednesday night is also kid's night at Ryan's, complete with Dizzy the Clown wandering from table to table entertaining the little bastards. It may seem that the events about to be told have little connection to those two circumstances, but all will be clear in a moment.

We went through the line and placed our orders for the all-you-can-eat hot bar then sat down as far away from the front of the restaurant as possible in order to keep the density of kids down a bit. Then I started my move to the hot bar. Plate after plate of macaroni and beef were consumed that evening, I tell you-in all, four heaping plates of the pseudo-Italian ambrosia were shoved into my belly. I was sated. Perhaps a bit too much, however.

I had not really been feeling well all day, what with a bit of gas and such. By the time I had eaten four overwhelmed plates of food, I was in real trouble. There was so much pressure on my diaphragm that I was having trouble breathing. At the same time, the downward pressure was building. At first, I thought it was only gas which could have been passed in batches right at the table without to much concern. Unfortunately, that was not to be. After a minute or so it was clear that I was dealing with explosive diarrhea. It's amazing how grease can make its way through your intestines far faster than the food which spawned the grease to begin with, but I digress...

I got up from the table and made my way to the bathroom. Upon entering, I saw two sinks immediately inside the door, two urinals just to the right of the sinks, and two toilet stalls against the back wall. One of them was a handicapped bathroom. Now, normally I would have gone to the handicapped stall since I like to stretch out a bit when I take a good shit, but in this case, the door lock was broken and the only thing I hate worse than my wife telling me to stop cutting my toenails with a pair of diagonal wirecutters is having someone walk in on me while I am taking a shit. I went to the normal stall.

In retrospect, I probably should have gone to the large, handicapped stall even though the door would not lock because that bit of time lost in making the stall switch proved to be a bit too long under the circumstances. By the time I had walked into the regular stall, the pressure on my ass was reaching Biblical proportions.

I began "The Move."

For those women who may be reading this, let me take a moment to explain "The Move." Men know exactly what their bowels are up to at any given second. And when the time comes to empty the cache, a sequence of physiological events occur that can not be stopped under any circumstances. There is a move men make that involves simultaneously approaching the toilet, beginning the body turn to position ones ass toward said toilet, hooking ones fingers into ones waistline, and pulling down the pants while beginning the squat at the same time. It is a very fluid motion that, when performed properly, results in the flawless expulsion of shit at the exact same second that ones ass is properly placed on the toilet seat. Done properly, it even assures that the choad is properly inserted into the front rim of the toilet in the event that the piss stream lets loose at the same time; it is truly a picture of coordination rivaling that of a skilled ballet dancer.

I was about half-way into "The Move" when I looked down at the floor and saw a pile of vomit that had been previously expelled by one of those little bastards attending kids night; it was mounded up in the corner so I did not notice it when I had first walked into the stall. Normally, I would not have been bothered by such a thing, but I had eaten so much and the pressure upward was so intense, that I hit a rarely experienced gag reflex. And once that reflex started, combined with the intense pressure upward caused by the bloated stomach, four plates of macaroni and beef started coming up for a rematch. What happened next was so quick that the exact sequence of events are a bit fuzzy, but I will try to reconstruct them as best I can.

In that moment of impending projectile vomiting, my attention was diverted from the goings-on at the other end. To put a freeze frame on the situation, I was half crouched down to the toilet, pants pulled down to my knees, with a load of vomit coming up my esophagus. Now, most of you know that vomiting takes precedence over shit no matter what is about to come slamming out of your ass. It is apparently an evolutionary thing since shitting will not kill you, but vomiting takes a presence of mind to accomplish so that you do not aspirate any food into the bronchial tubes and perhaps choke to death. My attention was thus diverted.

At that very split second, my ass exploded in what can only be described as a wake...you know, as in a newspaper headline along the lines of "30,000 Killed In Wake of Typhoon Fifi" or something similar. In what seemed to be most suitably measured in cubic feet, an enormous plug of shit the consistency of thick mud with embedded pockets of greasy liquid came flying out of my ass. But remember, I was only half-way down on the toilet at that moment. The shit wave was of such force and of just such an angle in relation to the back curve of the toilet seat that it ricocheted off the back of the seat and slammed into the wall at an angle of incidence equal to the angle at which it initially hit the toilet seat. Then I sat down.

Recall that when that event occurred, I was already half-way to sitting anyway and had actually reached the point of no return. I have always considered myself as relatively stable gravitationally, but when you get beyond a certain point, you're going down no matter how limber you may be. Needless to say, the shit wave, though of considerable force, was not so sufficient so as to completely glance off the toilet seat and deposit itself on the walls, unlike what you would see when hitting a puddle with a high-pressure water hose; even though you throw water at the puddle, the puddle gets moved and no water is left to re-form a puddle. There was a significant amount of shit remaining on about one-third of the seat rim which I had now just collapsed upon.

Now, back to the vomit...

While all the shitting was going on, the vomit was still on its way up. By the time I had actually collapsed on the toilet, my mouth had filled up with a goodly portion of the macaroni and beef I had just consumed. OK, so what does the human body instinctively do when vomiting? One bends over. So I bent over. I was still sitting on the toilet, though. Therefore, bending over resulted in me placing my head above my now slightly-opened legs, positioned in between my knees and waist. Also directly above my pants which were now pulled down to a point just midway between my knees and my ankles. Oh, did I mention that I was wearing not just pants, but sweat pants with elastic on the ankles.

In one mighty push, some three pounds of macaroni and beef, two or three Cokes, and a couple of Big, Fat Yeast Rolls were deposited in my pants...on the inside...with no ready exit at the bottom down by my feet.

In the next several seconds, there were a handful of farts, a couple of turds, and the event ended, yet I was now sitting there with my pants full of vomit, my back covered in shit that had bounced off the toilet, spattered on three ceramic-tiled walls to a height of about five feet, and still had enough force to come back at me, covering the back of my shirt with droplets of liquid shit. All while thick shit was spread all over my ass in a ring curiously in the shape of a toilet seat.

And there was no fucking toilet paper.

What could I do but laugh. I must have sounded like a complete maniac to the guy who then wandered into the bathroom. He actually asked if I was OK since I was laughing so hard I must have sounded like I was crying hysterically. I calmed down just enough to ask him if he would get the manager. And told him to have the manager bring some toilet paper. When the manager walked in, he brought the toilet paper with him, but in no way was prepared for what happened next. I simply told him that there was no way I was going to explain what was happening in the stall, but that I needed several wet towels and I needed him to go ask my wife to come help me. I told him where we were sitting and he left. At that point, I think he was probably assuming that I had pissed just a bit in my pants or something similarly benign.

About two minutes later, my wife came into the bathroom not knowing what was wrong and with a certain amount of worry in her voice. I explained to her (still laughing and having trouble getting out words) that I had a slight accident and needed her help. Knowing that I had experienced some close calls in the past, she probably assumed that I had laid down a small turd or something and just needed to bring the car around so we could bolt immediately. Until I asked her, I'm sure she had no idea that she was about to go across the street and purchase me new underwear, new socks, new pants, a new shirt, and (by that time due to considerable leakage around the elastic ankles thingies) new sneakers. And she then started to laugh herself since I was still laughing. She began to ask for an explanation as to what had happened when I promised her that I would tell her later, but that I just needed to handle damage control for the time being. She left.

The manager then came back in with a half-dozen wet towels and a few dry ones. I asked him to also bring a mop and bucket upon which he assured me that they would clean up anything that needed to be cleaned. Without giving him specific details, I explained that what was going on in that stall that night was far in excess of what I would expect anyone to deal with, what with most of the folks working at Ryan's making minimum wage or just slightly above. At that moment, I think it dawned on him exactly the gravity of the situation. Then that manager went so far above the call of duty that I will be eternally grateful for his actions. He hooked up a hose.

Fortunately, commercial bathrooms are constructed with tile walls and tile floors and have a drain in the middle of the room in order to make clean up easy. Fortunately, I was in a commercial bathroom. He hooked up the hose to the spigot located under the sink as I began cleaning myself up with the wet towels. Just as I was finishing, my wife got back with the new clothes and passed them into the stall, whereupon I stuffed the previously worn clothing into the plastic bag that came from the store, handing the bag to my wife. I finished cleaning myself off and carefully put on my new clothes, still stuck in the stall since I figured that it would be in bad taste to go out of the stall to get redressed in the event I happened to be standing there naked and some little bastard kid walked in. At that point, I had only made a mess; I had not yet committed a felony and intended to keep it that way.

When I finished getting dressed, I picked up the hose and cleaned up the entire stall, washing down the remains toward the drain in the center of the room. I put down the hose and walked out of the bathroom. I had intended to go to the manager and thank him for all he had done, but when I walked out, three of the management staff were there to greet me with a standing ovation. I started laughing so hard that I thought I was going to throw up again, but managed to scurry out to the car where my wife was now waiting to pick me up by the front door.

The upshot of all this is that I strongly recommend eating dinner at Ryan's Steak House. They have, by far, the nicest management staff of any restaurant in which I have eaten.

That's sure to become a classic! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919771)

My gawd! Your post will surely become a classic. It's rare that we read the works of an author who can bring together simultaneous vomit and explosive diarrhea, yet still write a story that's showcases honor, compassion and respect. Good show, chap!

Re:That's sure to become a classic! (-1, Offtopic)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 7 years ago | (#20919913)

It already is. The worst part is that it's a true story and I know the guy who wrote that. It made the rounds of our friend circle a few times.

Re:That's sure to become a classic! (0, Offtopic)

empaler (130732) | about 7 years ago | (#20920077)

I sort of know the feeling he's describing. I was just so lucky to find that the bathroom I had access to was clean and had the sink placed right next to the toilet seat, thus making it easy to purge out of both ends without soiling myself, though getting the godsdamned chunks out of the sinks took some time, using the paper towels available.

"Competitor" my ass... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919413)

If it doesn't work in Windows, it will only see a fraction of the OO.o market.

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (4, Informative)

zsouthboy (1136757) | about 7 years ago | (#20919437)

RTFA:
KDE 4's framework is cross-platform.
They plan to release this on Windows as well.

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (1)

teh moges (875080) | about 7 years ago | (#20919549)

This is good news. I've been looking for a word processor with a good set of features without the bloat. I've been trying KOffice for a little while now, not quite used to it yet, but it is looking to take over, at least for myself. Reading on the features that will be available soon, I'm really looking forward to this release.

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (5, Informative)

japhmi (225606) | about 7 years ago | (#20919449)

From the fine article, first paragraph.

While the industry is distracted by the ongoing tussle between Microsoft and OpenOffice.org over document formats, the KDE project is quietly preparing the next generation of its own office suite, KOffice, for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919553)

Here's an even more +5 Informative version:

"While the industry is focused on the ongoing tussle between Microsoft and OpenOffice.org over document formats, the KDE project is quietly being ignored by the computing world as they work on the next generation of its own office suite, KOffice, for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X"

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (5, Informative)

Kjella (173770) | about 7 years ago | (#20920387)

And just to expand on that, there are really several different things going on:
1) Qt 4, the underlying system library is now dual licensed GPL/commercial on the Windows platform by Trolltech, before only commercial on Windows.
2) As a result, the kdelibs (the core KDE libraries) for KDE4 has been made cross-platform. Like KDE4, they're still unreleased (at beta 2 still I think) but I did manage to get a KApplication compiled and running on Windows.
3) Since the KDE libraries are going cross-platform, so is all KDE applications that doesn't have additional *nix-specific dependencies. Note that KDE is trying to be a complete application framework not just an UI library, so this should be true for most.
4) Since the move from KDE3 to KDE4 is major, most applications like KOffice are also doing major rewrites not only because of the framework changes but also "if you want to change and break something, now's the time".

End result? Well it's always though to say with unreleased software but the general idea is that it'll be a three-pronged attack:
1. It's now cross-platform, so new markets
2. All applications should see a 20-30% speed improvement because of library improvements
3. Major new version with new features

Only downside is that it's taking quite long - Qt 4.0 was released in June 2005, though in personal experience it was a poor release but none the less it's taken a few years and KDE4 is still in development. The release of KDE4 is scheduled for December 11th, and I'm very much looking forward to it. It should bring the Gnome vs KDE flamefest to new heights :D.

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (1)

HeathWater (968340) | about 7 years ago | (#20919519)

OO.o also opens MS docs and MS Office is able to open saved OO.o documents allowing you to more easily share documents with those using MS.

Re:"Competitor" my ass... (1)

AJWM (19027) | about 7 years ago | (#20919631)

KOffice also opens MS docs and spreadsheets, and can save in .doc or .xls format. I don't know how well that is supported in terms of very elaborate stuff, but the docs and spreadsheets readily accessible to me here worked fine.

It's about time (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919435)

Even the 1.x versions are noticeably better (at least from a UI perspective). I've really been looking forward to KOffice 2.0 also because with KDE 4.0 it should eventually be available for Windows too...something that's still a requirement if you need to share stuff with other people.

Re:It's about time (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 7 years ago | (#20919529)

Fortunately, that's a good attribute for koffice to have over OO. Most operating systems can boot faster than OO can open.

Re: It's about time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919661)

I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I realised you were right.

Re:It's about time (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | about 7 years ago | (#20919957)

Less than 15 seconds!?!?!? (I timed it) What distro are you using that gets such phenomenal boot times?

Re:It's about time (2, Interesting)

EvilRyry (1025309) | about 7 years ago | (#20920085)

15 seconds? My 4 year old laptop running gusty can get a cold start on OOo in about 5 seconds. Subsequent startups take about 2-3 seconds. Of course this is still an eternity compared to the near-instant starts of MS Office though.

Re:It's about time (2, Interesting)

socsoc (1116769) | about 7 years ago | (#20920255)

near-instant starts of MS Office though.
This must be a new version I never heard of. My userbase has installs of 2k, 2k2, 2k3 and 2k7 and constantly bitch about the speed it takes to open a file. Maybe we should revert back to 97 in an effort to find the version you are speaking about. My OOo boots faster than MS office.

Re:It's about time (1)

kyofunikushimi (769712) | about 7 years ago | (#20919651)

I'm really far more thrilled with getting the REST of KDE over to Windows than KOffice. I mean, it's really great that we'll have that option available to us and I will surely use it as often as possible on this work laptop, but without supporting the MS "open" xml doc format, chances are I'm going to need to use MS Office a whole lot more than I'd like... But thank GOD I'll finally have knetattach without firing up vmware!

Anyways, I have a question. I can't think of a single good reason to use Access (or Access-like databases). Can somebody tell me what sort of applications would actually call for a wretchedly limited application like that?

Re:It's about time (2, Informative)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 7 years ago | (#20920401)

I use access all the time when people send me CSV files that have more than 65,000 rows in them, and therefore won't open in most spreadsheets. It's nice for one-time-use databases or just doing simple queries on csv files that clients have sent you. I wouldn't use it for any kind of permanent database, but that's usually how access applications get started, Somebody needs a quick and dirty database to use for a week to analyze some data, and 3 years later, it's still running, because somebody thought it would be easier to keep on using access than to upgrade to a real database.

Access (2, Informative)

rduke15 (721841) | about 7 years ago | (#20920475)

I can't think of a single good reason to use Access (or Access-like databases). Can somebody tell me what sort of applications would actually call for a wretchedly limited application like that?


I cannot quite understand how you cannot see what Access is used for. When you need a databse application with a GUI, what do you build the GUI with? HTML? That's fine for many tings, as the web demonstrates. But for a real desktop GUI application, what do you suggest instead of Access? Perl/Tk? C++? Visual Basic?

Despite it's horrible VBA scripting, Access is a great tool to build GUI frontend applications. In fact, I think Access is the main reason why many people cannot move from Windows to Mac or Linux. They have a vital Access application, and there is no easy way to replace it. I have several clients with such applications. In some instances, I moved the data to PostgreSQL on a Linux server, but the forms are still in Access.

I'm very much looking forward to an Access alternative.

It doesnt compete with anything (-1, Redundant)

shitzu (931108) | about 7 years ago | (#20919457)

Until it runs on Windows and OSX as well as Linuxes, it does not compete with anything.

Re:It doesnt compete with anything (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919541)

You are wrong. It competes with OpenOffice.org for the title for the best office suite on Linux. Which in itself must be about 0,0001% of an office productivity software market...

Re:It doesnt compete with anything (4, Funny)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 7 years ago | (#20919615)

You know if you took a few seconds to research something you're writing - or even speaking - about, it may help others think you're not such a dumbass. You might even up your intelligence. Alas, this is slashdot. The barrier of entry for intelligence here is so low, you don't even need to remember your username to post.

Here, check this out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qt_(toolkit) [wikipedia.org]

(That's a link, you can click it and it will take you to another place on the internet). As you can see, QT4 is ported to Windows, and other non-x11 OSs. In an amazing twist of coincidences, Koffice is written in QT4.

Re:It doesnt compete with anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919739)

While QT might be cross-platform, show me a download of a decent binary build of KOffice for Windows or for OSX/Cocoa. Ok, move along, nothing to see here.

That's so cute! It starts with a 'K' (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919461)

no, wait, I meant 'That's so retarded!'

why don't they think of a catchy name (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919475)

The "K-" line of apps has all the cachet of Sam's Club or President's Choice. Why plant the presumption of value product mediocrity in people's minds before they even try it?

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919697)

> all the cachet of Sam's Club or President's Choice.

The obvious choice of K mart really didn't occur to you?

as well as (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920237)

katchy name?

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (2, Insightful)

kyofunikushimi (769712) | about 7 years ago | (#20919707)

Because once they realized they'd need a name MORE CLEVER than "Microsoft Office" and "Open Office dot Org", they threw in the towel. Seriously, it's an office suite. Its name doesn't need to elicit feelings of euphoria or anything.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 7 years ago | (#20920083)

Because once they realized they'd need a name MORE CLEVER than ..

This isn't about clever.

Its name doesn't need to elicit feelings of euphoria or anything.

No, but its name shouldn't elicit feelings of mediocre, lower quality, and bargain basement cheap.

In Canada and much of the US at least, the store "K-mart" is a widely known 'walmart-like' store that's known for being a 'cheap/bargain department store'.

And he's suggesting a K-"product" like KOffice picks up on that K association. Sort of like naming it McOffice might resonate with the lower quality cheap McDonald's food (or McFood).

At least that's where I think he's going, I don't personally have that much of an association with the letter K. But then, I didn't live near a k-mart most of my life either.

Why don't we think of a catchy name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919731)

FreeOffice. OtherOffice. CuteOffice.

Re:Why don't we think of a catchy name? (5, Funny)

holloway (46404) | about 7 years ago | (#20919753)

OfficeSweet.

Re:Why don't we think of a catchy name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920207)

Less than 500 results on Google too [google.com] , so KOffice could take it as their own easily :)

Re:Why don't we think of a catchy name? (1)

cmacb (547347) | about 7 years ago | (#20920239)

Because if it doesn't start with a "K" us KDE folk won't recognize it as oK to use.

Re:Why don't we think of a catchy name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920247)

Yeah, but does it run on Windows?

/ducks

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (5, Funny)

westlake (615356) | about 7 years ago | (#20919867)

The "K-" line of apps has all the cachet of Sam's Club or President's Choice. Why plant the presumption of value product mediocrity in people's minds before they even try it?

At least you have been spared the pain of trying to bring credibility in marketing to The Gimp.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (1)

halycon404 (1101109) | about 7 years ago | (#20919891)

because I was already taken. Can't name it I-office. or I-apps.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920031)

I actually like the "K-" and "G-" naming. It immediately tells me which library the application is built upon, so just by looking at the name I can already make some assumptions about how well it integrates with my desktop environment of choise, which just happens to be KDE. I only see it as a useful thing. I think it's nice if the application name is also descriptive telling you what the application is supposed to do, but I really couldn't care less what the applications are named. I find it hard to understand why the "K-" and "G-" naming style annoys some people, for me it's a great help.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920375)

Ok, no offence intended but assuming that KOffice wants to be mainstream then that wouldn't be a mainstream reason for names. Microsoft Office uses its own toolkit on Windows but no one cares because it behaves much like the rest of the desktop, and similarly KDE can be configured to act like other desktops.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (1)

couchslug (175151) | about 7 years ago | (#20920105)

"K-" IS a Katchy Komputer Konvention.
Now if you'll excuse me, the Kleagle has kalled me to the Klavern.

Re:why don't they think of a catchy name (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 7 years ago | (#20920297)

iOffice!

Seriously, anyone remember those krappy khrysler k-cars?

KOffice 2.0 is FAST! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919501)

The main benefit KOffice 2.0 brings is that it's sleek and fast. Unlike OpenOffice.org, KOffice has a very sensible architecture. Now, part of that is because KOffice is a far newer application. It builds directly on top of Qt, rather than implementing its own UI layer (like OpenOffice.org does). It also has a far more sensible component model, that suffers from only a small fraction of the bloat of the OO.o model.

While OpenOffice.org may have a larger feature set at this point, it just won't be able to compete with KOffice when it comes to being responsive and memory-efficient. Having built the KOffice source code from SVN just last week, I can tell you that you'll notice the difference immediately. OpenOffice.org just feels really damn sluggish, while KOffice is quick.

Re:KOffice 2.0 is FAST! (3, Insightful)

Taxman415a (863020) | about 7 years ago | (#20919983)

You're not kidding. This article made me think to go install v 1.6. On a 1.8 Ghz processor running Gnome, Kword for ex opens extremely quickly and opens files quickly as well. This gives me hope that the rest of the codebase is that lean and clean and that it can eventually outdo oo.org. Hopefully it can start to hit critical mass to achieve greater developer mindshare. It's already got oo.org beat in code quality it seems, so hopefully soon in features.

I can certainly say the formula editor is miles ahead of oo.org's in terms of ease of use. I get a font error right away though in starting the formula editor, so I guess I'm off to file a bug report.

Re:KOffice 2.0 is FAST! (2, Interesting)

Aladrin (926209) | about 7 years ago | (#20920081)

I installed it when I learned of Krita because I wanted to try it out. I had some issues with opening a file (forget what kind now) and tried KOffice and was very surprised to learn it not only opened it, but did it fast.

It has been my office app of choice since then.

Re:KOffice 2.0 is FAST! (3, Insightful)

BRSloth (578824) | about 7 years ago | (#20920153)

As long as you run KDE, I guess. Otherwise, it will take a much longer startup just to put every single daemon KDE uses and load all other libraries.

In the end, I guess it is fast for KDE users; people using other desktop environments will see no difference.

[Just guessing here, from my experience with older KOffice parts running inside GNOME. Yes, they run and will still run.]

Re:KOffice 2.0 is FAST! (4, Interesting)

theguyfromsaturn (802938) | about 7 years ago | (#20920331)

And KOffice can open PDFs for editing. Awesome. Sure, the layout rendering is not always exact, but it does a tremendous job of converting the PDF to paragraphs, with the occasional embedded images. Scribus is also nice to import PostScript (why not PDFs?...) and respect the layout, but the text is usually broken down into individual characters. KWord does a great job with it. All in all, they each do their own job. It has allowed me to save some documents whose original editable copies got lost somehow... and for which I only had the PDF left. It's not as good as OOo at opening MS Office documents though, and the equations from ODF files aren't imported yet, but it's awesoooome.

Go for the gold (5, Funny)

jpfed (1095443) | about 7 years ago | (#20919507)

Computerworld reports that KOffice 2.0 will be leaner, faster, and enjoy a cleaner code base than OpenOffice.
I'm glad they're setting the bar high for themselves.

freedom not numbers (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | about 7 years ago | (#20919517)

If it doesn't work in Windows, it will only see a fraction of the OO.o market.
The point of the open source movement was to ensure people have a choice. make software better and open and hopefully that will make it common. If Koffice can do better than Openoffice then they'll have the attention of at least the /.ers here :)

Re:freedom not numbers (4, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | about 7 years ago | (#20919591)

The point of the open source movement was to ensure people have a choice.
False.

The point of the "open source" movement is to improve the way software is developed by opening it up and distributing it.

The point of the "free software" movement is to ensure that software is freely redistributable, and modifiable by the users of the software.

As for this "choice" thing you're talking about. That's the function of the market isn't it? Wouldn't just proprietary software give people "choice"?

Uh...he's right (3, Insightful)

tjstork (137384) | about 7 years ago | (#20919621)

As for this "choice" thing you're talking about. That's the function of the market isn't it? Wouldn't just proprietary software give people "choice"?

If open source didn't give people more choices, would there really be any point to it?

Freedom is not the most important criterion (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | about 7 years ago | (#20919831)

Choice between two or three broken apps is not as important as having at least one very good app that works well.

Multi-platform is vital for helping a transition off MS and onto Linux or whatever. I use OO to edit docs and it just does not matter to me whether I use Windows or Linux. In essence all I care about is that it is an OO-capable machine.

i hope the database app delivers (2, Informative)

siddesu (698447) | about 7 years ago | (#20919563)

i tried 1.6 some time ago -- mostly because i needed something access-like on Linux. the database app on the surface looks a lot better than the horror the ooo thingy, except that it didn't work with pre-existing sql databases. one has to create a database from scratch, and there wasn't an easy (UI) way to even hookup an existing database after one creates a custom one. since my needs were really simple, i gave up, and instead used knoda (http://www.knoda.org/) which is similar, and works nicely for the kind of thing I needed.

the rest of the office implemenation seemed to almost work. of course, it wasn't completely compatible with OO, but i liked the interface better and would have used it if it had a useful PDF output. However the PDF i got out of it was really jagged (the letters jumping up and down around the line), and the opinion on the mailing list was at the time 'it isn't our problem', so I switched back to OO in the end.

I hope 2.0 delivers. I'll give it a try anyway :)

Re:i hope the database app delivers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919629)

So...in other words...KOffice is your standard piece of crap open source project.

Big plans - check!
Buggy as hell - check!
Unfit for normal user operation - check!
Next version is rumored to be killer - check!

Not really surprising since most of the KOffice/KDE devs appear to be spending most of their time posting as ACs here on Slashdot ripping on OpenOffice...

Please try my database libraries / app (3, Interesting)

vandan (151516) | about 7 years ago | (#20920039)

I've been working on my own Access-killer for a couple of years now. It's a suite of open-source, cross-platform Perl libraries, using Gtk2 for the GUI. The old website ( complete ) is at: http://entropy.homelinux.org/axis/ [homelinux.org] . I'm right now working on a revamped website ( incomplete, but with up-to-date download links and new screenshots ) is at: http://entropy.homelinux.org/axis_new/ [homelinux.org] .

There are 3 main components: a form object, a datasheet object, and a reporting module ( which exports to PDF via PDF::API2 ). I'm also working on a GUI object builder that exports XML for all 3 objects. Click on the 'future' link to see some screenshots of it in action. Note that I'm also looking for developers to help out, and maybe create a commercial project out of it ( I'm as-yet undecided whether to do this or not ).

I've had a number of large, complex production systems built on these libraries in use for about 2 years now. Please try it out, comment, report bugs, help out ... :)

Re:Please try my database libraries / app (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 7 years ago | (#20920437)

yay perl. if it has DBIx::Class support (or one can be rigged easily) i'm sold. i'll look it over the weekend, thanks for the plug :-D

I, for one, welcome more ODF-based office suites (2)

greenguy (162630) | about 7 years ago | (#20919593)

I'm a Gnome user (after road-testing KDE for a good six months), but I've been infected with the hype about KDE 4, and in particular, Koffice. If it's really as good as they say, there's a good chance I'll switch over. My job uses Macs, and I've found NeoOffice too unstable to use (four crashes in two hours). Supposedly, there will be a Mac OS X-native version of Koffice, which would fit the bill to replace friggin' MS Office.

My fallback -- and I'd just like to take this opportunity to veer off-topic, here -- is to put Ubuntu on a used CPU and run LTSP, with the Macs as thick clients. One way or another, I can't stand to see my office sink any more money into proprietary software.

Re:I, for one, welcome more ODF-based office suite (0, Offtopic)

stinerman (812158) | about 7 years ago | (#20919911)

I'd drop OO.o for "GNOME Office" (if a general collection of programs can be called an office suite), but the functionality is lacking. The PDF output plugin for Abiword created docs that were readable only by Abiword. I'm sure I missed out on a few job opportunities there.

OO.o does what I need for now. Until KOffice is released with GTK+ widgets, then I'm afraid that I'm going to keep away from it. I simply can't stand KDE anything.

Re:I, for one, welcome more ODF-based office suite (1)

JanneM (7445) | about 7 years ago | (#20920045)

Just run KOffice under Gnome. It's not like either the KDE nor Gnome libraries are particularly large or anything by today's standards; the resource requirements of a large app (or just the Java vm) is totally dominant by comparison.

That said, for wp I much prefer Abiword; it's not nearly as full-featured, of course, but apart from the lack of real handling of Japanese fonts and input (it works but is a hassle since you need to switch to a capable font manually) it does everything I ever use. Gnumeric is the best spreadsheet of the ones I've tried, and Inkscape is also plenty good enough (though not without its problems of course).

The one thing I'm missing is a presentation app. And no, Impress is not, well, impressive. You breathe at the wrong time and the thing drops your formatting, or destroys half your slides, or just refuses to work in several dozen unintuitive, frustrating ways. Seriously, drop the thing. Start over. It's hideous. That is one area were I actually prefer the hassle of using Powerpoint on my secondary machine at work rather than doing it on my main computer.

The presentation issue is really frustrating actually. No solution is really there yet. If, for instance, Inkscape had more solid text tools (so the association between text and a frame was actually stable for instance, and so you could flow text from one frame to another) you could make slides there for instance, but as it is, it's not good enough.

Re:I, for one, welcome more ODF-based office suite (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 years ago | (#20920131)

What a lot of people miss is that you can run the kde apps on gnome and vice versa. You can run Koffice without changing anything else. Both gnome and KDE have good and bad points. I have a few people stuck on base RHEL3 at the insistance of the vendor of a commercial app that needs a lot of support and with that release gnome is very unstable so those users are on KDE. More recent versions of gnome are a lot better and people run a variety of kde applications on their gnome desktops.

good plotting and graphics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919601)

I'll be happy if it:
  1. Has slightly more advanced plotting abilities, such as boxplots
  2. Can embed PDF images (rather than rasterized PDFs, EPS or EMF/WMF formats)

I'm personally fine with PDFLaTeX and R, but I need to integrate with people that don't uses these low-level yet functional tools. Sadly, the general population needs to be able to have WYSIWYG technology, which is often overrated to true geeks.

That's all good. Except... (1)

mpapet (761907) | about 7 years ago | (#20919623)

There's still no "print selection" option in the printer gui interface. This leads me to believe that there will be more of the same gotchas littered all over koffice. Noble effort though. Keep up the good work.

And while you are at it, please work on the print selection thingy sometime eh?

Re:That's all good. Except... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919851)

Print selection? That's the stupidest fucking thing I've heard since I've been at Microsoft.

You can't live without this?

Re:That's all good. Except... (1)

oyenstikker (536040) | about 7 years ago | (#20920099)

I print selection more often than I print [the whole document].

Slightly off topic, but related, Kontact (2, Interesting)

Zombie Ryushu (803103) | about 7 years ago | (#20919635)

Why is it that Kontact does not have KOffice integration and Kerberos support. Kontact+eGroupware would be an Exchange Killer IF Kontact and eGroupware supported Kerberos so that I don't have to setup kwallet with Domain login and passwords for remote Calendars/Tasks/Address Book with XML-RPC.

Why no love of Kerberos!

Re:Slightly off topic, but related, Kontact (3, Funny)

nine-times (778537) | about 7 years ago | (#20919837)

Why no love of Kerberos!

Especially since it already starts with a "K"!

Windows? (0, Redundant)

jo7hs2 (884069) | about 7 years ago | (#20919657)

Yeah, but will/does it run on Windows? I know TONS of people who have started using OpenOffice as a replacement for MS-Office. Why? Not because they support OSS. Not because they hate MS. Because they can't afford Office, but their computer DID come with Windows, and they have no desire to change. Unless it works in Windows, opens Word documents, and conforms to a look/feel that most Windows users can comprehend, it will only be a blip.

Re:Windows? (1)

kyofunikushimi (769712) | about 7 years ago | (#20919747)

Please read the article. First paragraph mentions Windows, Mac OS, and Linux (thanks to QT4)

GNOME or other wms (1)

owlman17 (871857) | about 7 years ago | (#20919769)

Will it work on GNOME or Xfce? I'm currently using Icewm. Do you have to install KDE for this one? Or just the KDE libs? (Would still be a large dl even if just the latter.)

Re:GNOME or other wms (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | about 7 years ago | (#20920061)

You're not kidding:

sudo apt-get install koffice
Password:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
The following extra packages will be installed:
    karbon kchart kdelibs-data kdelibs4c2a kexi kformula kivio kivio-data
    koffice-data koffice-libs koshell kplato kpresenter kpresenter-data krita
    krita-data kspread kthesaurus kugar kword kword-data libarts1c2a
    libavahi-qt3-1 libopenexr2c2a libpoppler1 libpoppler1-glib libpoppler1-qt
    libruby1.8 libwv2-1c2
Suggested packages:
    khelpcenter koffice-doc-html fam koffice-i18n koffice-dev koffice-doc
    wordnet tetex-extra
Recommended packages:
    perl-suid openoffice.org-mimelnk kghostview latex-xft-fonts ruby libkscan1
    libarts1-akode
The following NEW packages will be installed:
    karbon kchart kdelibs-data kdelibs4c2a kexi kformula kivio kivio-data
    koffice koffice-data koffice-libs koshell kplato kpresenter kpresenter-data
    krita krita-data kspread kthesaurus kugar kword kword-data libarts1c2a
    libavahi-qt3-1 libopenexr2c2a libpoppler1-qt libruby1.8 libwv2-1c2
The following packages will be upgraded:
    libpoppler1 libpoppler1-glib
2 upgraded, 28 newly installed, 0 to remove and 112 not upgraded.
Need to get 76.7MB of archives.
After unpacking 187MB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue [Y/n]? n
Abort.

Re:GNOME or other wms (1)

dlgeek (1065796) | about 7 years ago | (#20920411)

Yes, but OpenOffice depends on java. It also is *the* largest package in the Debian archive. I forget the exact size, but just the OO.o packages are several hundred megs.

Re:Windows? (1)

Lumenary7204 (706407) | about 7 years ago | (#20919795)

Yeah, but will/does it run on Windows?
Not yet, but give it a while; KDE is being ported to run natively on Windows:

KDE4 Windows Port [kde.org]

Re:Windows? (1)

Lumenary7204 (706407) | about 7 years ago | (#20919861)

Oops, meant to say

Not yet, but give it a while; KDE is also being ported to run natively on Windows

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919799)

Yeah, but will/does it run on Windows?
I know no one RFTA, but the first sentence of TFA [computerworld.com.au] :
  • While the industry is distracted by the ongoing tussle between Microsoft and OpenOffice.org over document formats, the KDE project is quietly preparing the next generation of its own office suite, KOffice, for Linux, Windows , and Mac OS X.
So yes, it will (version 2.0) run on Windows. No, it does not currently (version 1.x) run on Windows.

Re:Windows? (1)

Secrity (742221) | about 7 years ago | (#20919857)

A native port of KDE on windows was started about two years ago; I don't recall seeing anything come of it. Personally, I see no reason for it to be ported to Windows.

Re:Windows? (1)

nine-times (778537) | about 7 years ago | (#20919895)

Or how about OSX? I've heard something about QT offering easy porting to OSX... any truth there?

Honestly, I think having good ports on Linux, OSX, and Windows is a big deal. I believe it's part of the reason Firefox has been successful. Users can use the same app on any platform and have the same features, same rendering, same behavior, and roughly the same interface. From an IT standpoint, it's ideal since it cuts down on support/training issues. OpenOffice seems to be the only office suite with that advantage.

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919899)

Agree completely. This is the reason I put my small business on Open Office: price point. Our staff works from their home computers, and ten out of ten of those are Windows XP machines.

I'm not in love with Word and MS Office, but if you interact with businesses that use it, you need to be able to share content seamlessly. I can't imagine any professional with an office suite than can't open a Word doc.

Extra apps already exist, just converge... (1)

Lumenary7204 (706407) | about 7 years ago | (#20919717)

It will also feature more applications, including an Access-like database creator, a flowcharter, and an image manipulation tool.
Shouldn't be too hard; most of this capability exists as individual apps already. For example, the could probably implement code from the following fairly well-regarded entries listed on the KDE Apps site:

-- QCad [kde-apps.org]
-- -- for flowcharting (if supplied with pre-defined shapes)

-- Pixel [kde-apps.org]
-- -- for painting/photo manipulation

-- Kexi [kde-apps.org]
-- -- for Access-style database management

(Items for illustration purposes only; not an endorsement of any particular package.)

Re:Extra apps already exist, just converge... (1)

empaler (130732) | about 7 years ago | (#20919939)

-- Kexi [kde-apps.org]
-- -- for Access-style database management
That's the one they're using according to koffice.org [koffice.org] . :)

Re:Extra apps already exist, just converge... (2, Informative)

Bob The Cowboy (308954) | about 7 years ago | (#20920151)

The link you pointed to shows Pixel is proprietary... I imagine this might be a problem for its inclusion into KOffice (which already includes the much-loved Krita)

Kexi is already the Access-like db-app, and I believe they already use Kivio for their flowcharting app. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I just wanted to point out that they (the KOffice folk) aren't building their own KOffice apps when other KDE apps already exist.

Bill

I wish them luck ... (-1, Troll)

golodh (893453) | about 7 years ago | (#20919755)

... but I'm not in the least interested in KOffice.

I got used to Microsoft Office, have switched (with some gripes) to Open Office, and am getting up to speed with it. Works OK under Linux *and* under Windows. The very last thing I need is yet another (half-baked) piece of software reinventing the wheel.

Oh well ... if they really want to, they can develop their KOffice of course. Just don't expect me (or others who just want their office software to "just work" and look the way they are used to) to pay any attention or to respond with anything but mild irritation (can't they think of anything more productive to do?). I'm not even installing it. Not until and unless I see mainstream-press reviews (and no, really no Linux enthousiast reviews: I have seen reviews touting Emacs as a text processor instead of MS Office or Open Office. *sigh*)

Why not focus on really perfecting Open Office? And who knows ... perhaps even adding new worthwhile features to it (the "extensions" come to mind).

Re:I wish them luck ... (1)

taniwha (70410) | about 7 years ago | (#20919859)

because competition is good - not the 'lets be like' windows sort of competition - the 'ooh look those guys over there are doing something neat, lets see if we can do better' sort - MS is so big they move like a snail on valium these days - a couple of hotshots trying to out do each other is a great thing for all of us

remember that Koffice is not new - here they are announcing their goals for their 2.0 release - I run my company on their spread sheet and the occasional times I need to use a word processor it does what I need

But reinventing the wheel is pointless ... (1)

golodh (893453) | about 7 years ago | (#20919991)

This mantra about "competition is good" misses the point that (a) you need lots of (working) features before you get a decent Office software package and (b) the task to be done is well-known and hasn't changed for years.

And if the task to be done, spreadsheeting and writing documents, letters, and reports is known, then where is the percentage of redoing the whole thing from scratch?

There is a very good reason why MS Office has such a high marketshare: it does the job, without too much fuss, and people are comfortable with it. What job? Well ... day-to-day office jobs. In about 20 year nobody has really identified any additional core functionality they needed over spreadsheet, text-processor, presentation maker, personal database, simple drawing package. Open Office is competitive, KOffice (in my opinion) is (in my view at least) redundant.

Err and when you say you "run your company" on the KOffice spreadsheet, how big an application are you talking about? Anything beyond a straightforward 1-page spreadsheet? Any scripting? Any pulling in of external datafiles? Any graphing? Any database access?

Re:But reinventing the wheel is pointless ... (1)

lahvak (69490) | about 7 years ago | (#20920341)

This mantra about "competition is good" misses the point that (a) you need lots of (working) features before you get a decent Office software package and (b) the task to be done is well-known and hasn't changed for years.

True, the task is well known and it hasn't changed much, but it has never been solved well. With every new release of every office suit in existence, I hear that their new version does things "the right way". I get my hopes up, give it a try, and so far I have been always completely disappointed. Now I am hearing that the new Office is supposed to be good, I didn't have chance to try it yet, but my experience tells me it is probably not going to be what they claim it to be.

Re:I wish them luck ... (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 7 years ago | (#20920013)

While I'm sure you enjoy being able to prepare and cook your favorite Peking Duck variation while opening OpenOffice, Koffice will provide competition and hopefully some innovation on the code side which is next to impossible to get into openoffice using your standard submit patches procedures. It can be the coolest and tightest integration/innovation in the entire niche and Sun won't accept it unless you kiss their ass. This, and they accept shitty, buggy internal patches from half assed coders from their own staff (but I repeat myself) all the time. You would welcome this change if you had any idea that OO was just a semi-shiny turd.

A nice idea but every time I tried a KDE GUI (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919763)

I experience it as a slow, buggy interface. I'm not talking about 5 years ago (though back then it was really bad. The kcompiler or whatever it was wouldn't even boot up without showstopping errors in a mainstream distro release!), but on something like Mepis or Sabayon from 3 months back.

The computer I have is not the newest, but a P4 2.6 Ghz HT with 2.5GB ram and a good video card should still be responsive. People complain about Gnome, but I'm glad that is Ubuntu's primary desktop - it doesn't feel like it's lagging to show me useless eyecandy, which the KDE desktop seems to be obsessed with, to the point of sacrificing usability.

I think their primary "product" should be polished up first before they boast about making a "faster and leaner" codebase than an established competitor. Don't get me wrong, I like some K software, like Digikam, but it seems too much like MS boasting about their upcoming Zune phone and sneering at the competition.

Would rather it be GTK or Qt based. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919809)

GNOME API is GTK plus bloat.
KDE API is Qt plus bloat.
I would rather not have apps that are tied to KDE or GNOME.
I would rather Qt use real C++, rather than the moc+C++ stuff.
What's wrong with GTK and C?

Can someone port Koffice to GTK?

Or why not start with AbiWord?

Re:Would rather it be GTK or Qt based. (4, Informative)

Pr0xY (526811) | about 7 years ago | (#20920203)

While I can't speak volumes about Gnome and GTK. I can say that you views of KDE and QT do not appear to be based on facts, but more assumptions and preconceived notions.

KDE is NOT simply QT plus bloat, the goals of the KDE library are to provide a consistent API to applications to work well with the KDE desktop. In the grand scheme of things it is actually very light as far as things it adds to QTs very complete API. For example, it will provide a KPushButton which inherits from the QPushButton class to add a few small integration features. Also KDE offers many common widget combinations as a reusable widget in itself, this is good library design as a whole. Making libraries of reusable code is a GOOD THING.

Don't mis-interpret this as KDE zealotry, I imagine that Gnome provides some sort of API to help applications integrate well with the desktop as well.

And what is your general issue with using c++ and moc? I hate to break it to you, but moc IS "real c++". There is nothing wrong with having utilities to generate code, there is huge gain to doing it with moc instead of templates...runtime bindings. moc just hides these details for you, and to be honest, you usually don't even have to worry about it at all if you use the QT build system.

As for what is wrong with GTK + C? Well nothing is wrong with it but it's not the only choice. One thing to keep in mind though is that graphical displays usually consist of conceptual objects "windows", "buttons", "listboxes", "textboxes", etc. These are all "things" which to be honest, creating code to describe "things" is what object oriented programming excels at.

You will never see a port to GTK of KOffice because it would not be a port, but a litteral re-write as the whole code base is built around the KDE/QT libraries.

And why not start with AbiWord? Heh, this statement is a shinning example of a preference not based on the merits of what you want, but instead on an arbitrary dislike for the competition. You are of course entitled to your opinion, nothing is perfect. But you provide no real reason why something built on KDE libraries is inherently bad. Secondly, Abiword is a single word processor application with no integration into an "office solution". KOffice is looking to provide the whole shebang.

I imagine you are going to reply with "KDE is bloated", "KDE is slow". But these generalizations aren't really based on real facts. KDE is actually quite lean (and KDE 4.0 is going to be leaner because QT 4.0 is a vast improvement of 3.0). Its memory usage is nothing crazy, the reason for this is that there is a LOT of code reuse. Using the KDE libraries is effectively "free" as far as memory usage goes because modern operating systems do code sharing of dynamic libraries and the whole damn desktop uses these libraries! There are benchmarks that show that Gnome and KDE are actually quite comparable: http://ktown.kde.org/~seli/memory/desktop_benchmark.html [kde.org]

I'll even not go so far as to say KDE is better than Gnome in memory usage because I know that there are many factors and a single set of benchmarks by one person doesn't really prove much...but it does show that they are at least in the same ballpark.

All in all, I find your argument against using a modern library not founded in facts :(

proxy

my take on it all (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20919815)

i crap on linux. it's trash and those who are devotees to the trash are faggots and idiots.

Re:my take on it all (0, Troll)

SpaceballsTheUserNam (941138) | about 7 years ago | (#20919889)

Bill?

Re:my take on it all (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920165)

fuck. get a set of balls and use a real unix instead of being a shill. common fucking bullshit from the linux camp. what else could we expect from a bunch of faggots and wannabes?

A few thoughts... (1)

Cryophallion (1129715) | about 7 years ago | (#20919825)

From TFS:

It will also feature more applications, including an Access-like database creator, a flowcharter, and an image manipulation tool.

I know I am setting myself up for something here, but isn't BASE an access-like database creator?

I just hope that they don't feel the need to go with K based names. Such as KIM (K image manipulator), Kase (K database), Ksql (Ksicle, kind of like popsicle), etc.

On the other hand, if it has new features, I'm all for it. I, and many others I'm sure, just want something that JUST WORKS. I don't care if it KDE, GTK, so on and so forth. I will go where the features and stability is. And that is the only way to spread FOSS - by getting a true alternative to the other programs that infect corporate culture (and from there, to schools so they can prep for corporate culture, then to homes). If it takes multiple projects to stir each other along, then fine. But if one can do just as well for ease of selection, fine too. Just lose the egos and do what is best for everyone - not just your baby project.

To Koffice marketing (2, Funny)

postmortem (906676) | about 7 years ago | (#20919863)

reguster domain coffice.com and enjoy the growth.

Native Mac Version (4, Informative)

javacowboy (222023) | about 7 years ago | (#20919883)

KOffice 2.0 will run natively on OS X:

http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/01/02/1930232 [slashdot.org]

This will benefit Mac users tremendously, as NeoOffice is too bloated (although making good progress at getting more efficient) and the native version of OpenOffice is probably several months away at best.

There is no lean, simple free and/or open source spreadsheet app for Mac yet. When KOffice 2.0 comes out, cheap Mac users (like me) will have more choice. When MS Office 2007 comes out for Mac in January 2008 (sorry, had to poke fun at Microsoft :D ), and iWork 2008 out starting last month, Mac users willing to pay for a good office suite will have even more choice.

This will also benefit the KDE team, as their installed based will expand by one (and possibly two) OS's, giving them more bug reports and feature requests.

Everybody wins!

Does Koffice stand up to openoffice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#20920057)

I like Koffice because its a one stop shop for anything I might need, but I think Openoffice would perform better in a business setting (Kword vs Openoffice writer). Some of the applications not included with Openoffice, but normally installed with like GIMP and Inkscape are much more mature than Krita and Karbon14, which haven't gotten much love as of late. KDE got several projects for Koffice in Summer of code, the results look great.

My office will be even -better-. (5, Funny)

tjstork (137384) | about 7 years ago | (#20920219)

In 2009, I will ship my office suite, Stork Office. It will be fully open source, be even leaner than koffice, and not have the stupid Access-like tools. Then, if KDE isn't finished their 4.0 desktop, and fix the register view in KDevelop, I may just write my own GUI and IDE to go with it, for release in 2009. Oh, and I'll have Duke Nukem Forever as a game that ships with my system!

I can see the tag-line now (1)

L4m3rthanyou (1015323) | about 7 years ago | (#20920295)

"At least it's not OpenOffice!"

Last time I used KOffice, it messed up the letter spacing and made my paper hard to read when printed. If they fixed that, I'd probably use it. I'm still using M$ office because I just can't stand using OpenOrifice.

Blaargag! (0, Troll)

WurdBendur (887452) | about 7 years ago | (#20920379)

It may be leaner, faster and cleaner than Open Office, but KDE will still be sitting in its lap, right in the way of your productivity.
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