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107 comments

global warming (5, Funny)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037889)

i don't know how, but somehow, this is global warmings fault.

Re:global warming (2, Funny)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037935)

Yes, like all climate change discussions, it's indeed undular boring.

Re:global warming (1)

bergonom (1040428) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037939)

Is there a part of Iowa that isn't a giant bore?

Re:global warming (0, Redundant)

dchamp (89216) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042871)

YOUR MOM.

Re:global warming (1)

corifornia2 (1158503) | more than 6 years ago | (#21044197)

True that... Iowa is one of those places I forget is a state.

Re:global warming (1)

Martian_Kyo (1161137) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038251)

Al is that you?

Re:global warming (-1, Troll)

fredrated (639554) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040151)

What idiot moderated this funny?
Global climate change must cause stupidity.

Re:global warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21043539)

It causes lack of sense of humor too.

Bore waves? (5, Funny)

mstahl (701501) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037921)

Bore waves . . . in Iowa? *yawn* That sounds about right.

Re:Bore waves? (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | more than 6 years ago | (#21039301)

Yeah...hard to believe some people go there on vacation...to ride bikes [teambadmonkey.com] , no less.

Re:Bore waves? (1)

ashitaka (27544) | more than 6 years ago | (#21046829)

Nice easy flat roads. Buncha good people to eat, drink and be merry with.

Sounds fun to me.

As you can see by the gallery, the cycling is secondary to the partying.

Re:Bore waves? (1)

mstahl (701501) | more than 6 years ago | (#21049011)

Lol are you from Iowa? Far be it from me to disparage our neighbours, the Tall Corn State (bearing in mind that Chicago alone is all that saves us here in Illinois from basically being lumped in with Iowa as a flyover state).

Cheers! — max

Well I knew there were a lot of them in Iowa.. (5, Funny)

bombastinator (812664) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037929)

I thought undular bores are those guys at parties who tell loud political jokes then try to sell you insurance or something.

Re:Well I knew there were a lot of them in Iowa.. (1)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042881)

No, they're the people who hear a word like 'bore' and have a knee jerk reaction to make a really lame joke that's a poor variation of a joke you've heard a thousand times before and is normally just the sort of thing someone would say when they have absolutely definitely run out of things to say at a party and they're trying really desperately hard to say something, anything, so as not to look completely and utterly lame.

Re:Well I knew there were a lot of them in Iowa.. (1)

bombastinator (812664) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043181)

You're from Iowa aren't you.

Re:Well I knew there were a lot of them in Iowa.. (1)

bombastinator (812664) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043253)

By the way, how are you set up for a home life equity policy? We've got some great new products...

on a map (5, Informative)

Paktu (1103861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037931)

Here's [wisc.edu] a pretty good example of what this looks like on a weather map

Storms also "breath". (5, Interesting)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038631)

I've been a casual cloud/storm nerd for decades and if you watch the sky long enough you can't help but notice "waves" and "drainpipes" at a more localized scale (particularly when a strong cold front is approaching).

I currently live a 100M or so from the beach in Melbourne Australia. Small intense storms come in over the bay heading directly toward the beach so you get the front "ledge" of the storm cloud coming over while behind you is clear and the drama is still out in the bay. If you stay still and face toward one of these storms roughly when the cloud/sky boundry is directly over the beach you will feel the wind do a 180deg flip as if the storm is enhaling warm air and exhaling cold with a slight pause in between. It is more pronounced with slow moving storms and can last for 15 minutes or so with a regular inhale/exhale cycle of about a minute. The first exhale of an intense summer storm can feel like someone opened a fridge door if you have been sitting with your back turned and not seen it approaching.

If rain/hail is heavy enough in the center of the storm you might also see prominent ridges running up the underside of the ledge similar to those in TFA but curved to fit the squashed drainpipe shape of the storm. When the rain/hail gets closer the wind will turn steady and cold (time to go inside).

Disclaimer: Don't try observing it standing on the beach, and escpecially not with an umbrella!

Re:Storms also "breath". (0, Redundant)

Algorithmnast (1105517) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038741)

I currently live a 100M or so from the beach in Melbourne Australia. Small intense storms come in over the bay heading directly toward the beach so you get the front "ledge" of the storm cloud coming over while behind you is clear and the drama is still out in the bay. If you stay still and face toward one of these storms roughly when the cloud/sky boundry is directly over the beach you will feel the wind do a 180deg flip as if the storm is enhaling warm air and exhaling cold with a slight pause in between. It is more pronounced with slow moving storms and can last for 15 minutes or so with a regular inhale/exhale cycle of about a minute. The first exhale of an intense summer storm can feel like someone opened a fridge door if you have been sitting with your back turned and not seen it approaching.

If I had mod points left, I'd be modding your post Interesting.

Re:Storms also "breath". (1)

Cragen (697038) | more than 6 years ago | (#21039145)

When flying above the clouds on commercial flights, looking down on the clouds 10K+ feet below, it all certainly looks like the clouds have a "terrain" (cloud-ain?) with streams, rivers, hills, etc. Probably just seems that way, but it has always seemed like a "land of clouds" to me. (Maybe I am reading too much fantasy stuff...)

Re:Storms also "breath". (3, Informative)

mikael (484) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040153)

If you stay still and face toward one of these storms roughly when the cloud/sky boundry is directly over the beach you will feel the wind do a 180deg flip as if the storm is enhaling warm air and exhaling cold with a slight pause in between.

From some of the research on such phenomena (cloud dynamics), a small thunderstorm consists of a number of cells in which air is either moving upwards or downwards. This explains this visually [aol.com]

Re:Storms also "breath". (1)

miller701 (525024) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040657)

One time I drove my through a cold front from the cool dry side to the humid side it felt like someone just took a steaming hot washcloth and smothered me with it.

Re:Storms also "breath". (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#21046349)

Nice post, what's it doing here? ;-)

When I was about 13 a friend and I rode our bicycles (the big old heavy steel ones of yor) about a mile away from home to purchase some candy and likely the latest issue of MAD. It was a typical hot and humid Summer day. On the way home we felt the wind pick up, kicking up dust and leaves and looked northward. Like a great steam locomotive out of the north a massive grey bank of thunderheads (large nimbus clouds with flared and flattened tops) was sweeping down. As it bore down, the front appeared to be ploughing smaller cumulous clouds before it like waves of pondscum. The face of the front was concave and decidedly dark and voluminous as it approached. The wind was practically a roar by the time I reached my parents house, struck by large early drops of rain as I sprinted across the lawn and up to the porch. It turned out to be one of the more violent in my memory.

Re:Storms also "breath". (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21052857)

...wind changes during storm, film at 11.

Re:on a map (1)

fatphil (181876) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038729)

That's not pretty good - that's fantastic, compared to the one in TFI.
I was going to just say "pffft! that's nothing, look at these instead" and point people to
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Wave_cloud.jpg
instead, but actually it appears bores (why's it called that? It's not contrained, not self-supporting.) can be quite impressive too.

Re:on a map (1)

mikael (484) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040903)

The Cloud Appreciation Society [cloudappre...ociety.org] have an interesting gallery on unusual cloud formations.

Re:on a map (1)

fatphil (181876) | more than 6 years ago | (#21047295)

http://www.cloudappreciationsociety.org/gallery/index.php?showimage=3264

Wow. A huge thank you for that. My g/f's mother is a meteorologist, I've already passed that URL on to her, I'm sure she'll love the site too.

Woohoo, let's go gliding! (2, Interesting)

6Yankee (597075) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037961)

TFA was pretty light on detail, but these look like a completely different animal from the (warning: gratuitous Wikipedia link) mountain waves [wikipedia.org] so beloved of glider pilots. Wonder if they're soarable?

Re:Woohoo, let's go gliding! (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037993)

You mean "surfable".. now that would be cool...

Re:Woohoo, let's go gliding! (5, Interesting)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 6 years ago | (#21039061)

I would imagine if you could get up there you could surf them.
There is a really interesting article about people surfing one such wave (called morning glory!) in Australia:

http://www.williamolive.com/soliton/al-giles-original-morning-glory-article.html [williamolive.com]

One of the images inside is particularly striking:

http://www.williamolive.com/soliton/PK%20on%20roll%20cloud.jpg [williamolive.com]

Never count physics out (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037963)

Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real. There are some things so serious you have to laugh at them.

Sky == CRT? (3, Funny)

jfim (1167051) | more than 6 years ago | (#21037983)

Wow, now I know that the sky refreshes like a CRT now! :)

Re:Sky == CRT? (1)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038683)

can you degauss the sky though? Would that make everyone just barf?

Really nice images! (4, Interesting)

muecksteiner (102093) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038009)

Atmosperic wave phenomena have been known for ages, and are hardly inconspicious in those places where they regularly form.

The main "customers" for them are probably glider pilots; as far as I remember, all recent altitude records for soaring have been made using waves formed in mountain regions (14+km), and the current distance record by Klaus Ohlmann (insane 3000+km in one day) was also flown in the waves over the Andes. Thermal updrafts are toys by comparison.

The one thing that you have to hand to the NASA guys is that they indeed caught some very fine specimens there, and in an unusual place, too. Normally, waves are induced by the flow of wind over a given, usually hilly, terrain. Gravity waves from thunderstorm activity are certainly a lot more esoteric, and what they are saying about them being catalysts for storms sounds really intriguing.

A.

Re:Really nice images! (2, Informative)

LadyLucky (546115) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038253)

That's right. The other extraordinary thing you can do in a wave in a glider is get altitude. Like 20, 30 thousand feet of altitude.

I blame global warming & George W. Bush (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21038399)

As a Democrat and loyal Slashdot user, I blame Global Warming and the Jew puppet Bu$Hitler Chimpy McHaliburtin
If only the Jew puppet Bu$Hitler Chimpy McHaliburtin hadn't repealed Kyoto this and Katrina wouldn't be happening.

Instead he kills children for his amusement.
Oh well, every dead soldier is one less Republican vote and one more victory for us Democrats

Re:Really nice images! (1)

trewornan (608722) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038797)

Most famous one is the "Morning Glory" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_glory_cloud) in Australia.

These aren't wave clouds though (1)

wsanders (114993) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043819)

The clouds in TFA are at a much lower altitude, and caused by the "sloshing" of a static inversion layer, and they move forward like ripples in a pond.

Wave clouds near mountains are caused by the venturi effect as the jet stream passes over the terrain, and they tend to be static - you can watch them form up on the leading edge of the wave and dissipate at the trailing edge.

Re:Really nice images! (1)

jojowombl (1159267) | more than 6 years ago | (#21050449)

for filmed sequences of wave patterns/shapes see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YV5Mdn11Q8 [youtube.com] from 1:38 onwards. there are also interesting images to be found when searching google images for terms "water spout".

Surf's up (1)

threaded (89367) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038035)

I wonder if aeroplanes could surf these waves and thereby save fuel?

Re:Surf's up (4, Informative)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038131)

They already ride the jetstream and save fuel/time on Transatlantic crossings. I forget which direction, but it's around half an hour saving on flight time. That's a /lot/ of fuel.

Re:Surf's up (3, Informative)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038355)

London -> New York 7.5 hrs
New York -> London 6.5 hrs

Given how much I hate long flights I love coming home.

Re:Surf's up (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21041779)

London -> New York 7.5 hrs
New York -> London 6.5 hrs


That's due to all that red tape.

Re:Surf's up (1)

g1zmo (315166) | more than 6 years ago | (#21045867)

This is what I've always heard, but some years ago I experienced just the opposite. I was on a flight from Philly to Barcelona which took about 11 hours, but the return flight from Paris to Dallas was closer to 9 hours. I never did find an explanation.

Re:Surf's up (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 6 years ago | (#21049503)

I was on a flight from Philly to Barcelona which took about 11 hours,

It probably wasn't because of the jetstream - more likely they didn't have a gate at Barcelona until 11 hours in the future. That's a really long time for that flight.

Re:Surf's up (1)

OnyxLilninja (1126557) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038305)

I wonder if I could surf these waves and thereby generate adrenaline.

Re:Surf's up (1)

tygerstripes (832644) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038439)

No. The waves move far too slowly to be useful in this regard, and given that they're immense gravity-waves some 5 miles apart, the plane would probably feel like a paper-boat caught in the wake of a super-tanker.

Re:Surf's up (1)

sizzzzlerz (714878) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040113)

Catch a wave and you're sitting on top of Des Moines

Air & Water are both fluids... (4, Informative)

Zymergy (803632) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038043)

...and thus they will both have fluid dynamic behaviors when vibrating (waves) at the interface of another fluid.
Wave action happens at the disturbance interface (involving the propagation of and/or transfer of energy) between fluids of different densities.
The Air/Water fluid interface where one observes common "waves" are observed as water waves because the air is transparent (but it too has waves).
The difference here, is that we have two air masses of different temperatures and humidities (thus having differing densities) interfacing as fluids AND one of them happens to be an air mass that contains visible moisture in the form of clouds.
It is likely that this type of air/air fluid "wave action" happens frequently at the interface between differing atmospheric air masses (AKA fronts), but in this example the clouds made it easily visible.
Nice Image too: http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/images/undularbore/redgreen_big.gif [nasa.gov]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave [wikipedia.org]

Surface Tension? (1)

Dragon By Proxy (1063904) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038359)

So, does that mean that air has surface tension, like water does?

Re:Surface Tension? (2, Funny)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038557)

Yes, thats why it's so hard to get rockets into space. A common misconception is that gravity is the limiting factor but in fact it's getting enough speed in a sufficiently sharply pointed rocket to break the airs surface tension which is the major challenge.

Re:Surface Tension? (4, Informative)

Bentov (993323) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038957)

I was going to just what you wrote was a complete piece of crap, but I did search before I rashly typed that:

http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae158.cfm [physlink.com]

*Snipet*
The value evaluates to be approximately:

11100 m/s
40200 km/h
25000 mi/h

So, an object which has this velocity at the surface of the earth, will totally escape the earth's gravitational field (ignoring the losses due to the atmosphere.) It is all there is to it.
*/Snipet*(Bold is mine)

So while I guess you are theoretically correct, I'm guessing it's only really an issue if you are trying to launch a barn or other non aerodynamic object into space.

Re:Surface Tension? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21039781)

This is the first I've heard of that. And it seems to be false. The main issue with getting rockets away from Earth is Earths gravity.
You are modded as insightful, but you give no reference link or any other source of your information.
I don't blame you, I blame the moderators.

Re:Surface Tension? (1)

brown-eyed slug (913910) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040235)

Could you please provide a reference to back up your assertions, Mister Pot?

Re:Surface Tension? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21041087)

The burden of proof for incredible claims generally lies on the claimer, not the disclaimer.

Re:Surface Tension? (1)

lahvak (69490) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042167)

Congrats on getting this moded as insightful! Sharply pointed rocket indeed.

Re:Surface Tension? (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 6 years ago | (#21045967)

Thankyou, I was amazed this wasn't immediately spotted for the nonsense it was intended to be !

Re:Surface Tension? (1)

iknowcss (937215) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040537)

I was alway under the impression that something had surface tension when the intermolecular forces between the molecules in the fluid were strong enough to attract each other and create said "surface tension." Remember in elementary school when we had droplets of water on wax paper? They kept together as beads because of surface tension. However, when we introduced dish detergent, the bubbles of water flattened right out. The molecules of detergent got in between the molecules of water and kept them from interacting with each other, effectively "breaking" the surface tension.

If what you're referring to is the ability for liquids to "stick" together, I'd have to say that's probably not equally true for gas even though both are a liquid. Gases tend to expand to fill their containers. As far as I understand, that's the definition of a gas, so anything that didn't act like a gas in that way would not be a gas.

Re:Surface Tension? (1)

iknowcss (937215) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040603)

I'd have to say that's probably not equally true for gas even though both are a liquid.
That should be fluid, of course.

atmospheric waves (1)

ChemE (1070458) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038065)

For all those of you that thought waves only existed in the ocean


FYI, atmospheric waves are very common and have very similar structure. In fact, the study of both atmospheric and ocean waves is called Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. It is a fascinating field - my favorites are atmospheric waves in which the wavelength is such that two or three waves encircle the entire Earth.

Re:atmospheric waves (2, Interesting)

tygerstripes (832644) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038465)

More interesting are the waves set up by the harmonics of the Atlantic Ocean. There's a particular length (I forget exactly, but it's something close to 100 metres) that nautical engineers will never, ever build their ships to be, because they would get torn apart in the middle of the Atlantic by the simple harmonic motion of these waves.

Re:atmospheric waves (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21041393)

Some told you that in a bar, and you should not have believed them. Spectral fatigue analysis is a bit more complex than that. Just trying to simulate the random seaway is difficult, search "pierson and moskowitz" for a good start. People get there PhDs just trying to develop ways to get design loads from wave spectrum. Generally these spectrum focus on the North Atlantic wave climate as it is the worst case environment that most boats would ever operate in.

Re:atmospheric waves (1)

Bob_Geldof (887321) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043097)

These waves are called Rossby or planetary waves, in case anybody here wants to look into it further.

I flew my hang glider on one. (5, Interesting)

scorpio_boy (694099) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038151)

Seriously, go see the photos and video on my blog if you don't believe me at http://rolf.id.au/ [rolf.id.au] We call the resulting visual cloud a morning glory in Australia....

Re:I flew my hang glider on one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21042375)


Nice pics. Thanks for sharing.

Re:I flew my hang glider on one. (1)

mcpkaaos (449561) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043141)

I have to agree with the AC. You have some great flying pics up on your site. They make me realize I need to get my ass down to Torrey Pines and finally try para-gliding (I'm a wimp; I gotta start simple). Thanks! :D

Oh...*those* bore waves (1, Funny)

davmoo (63521) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038193)

I saw the term "bore waves", and suddenly I had a vision of a story about a George Bush press conference...

Re:Oh...*those* bore waves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21043061)

That would be "a bore raves".

The obvious question (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21038197)

Which presidential candidate does this benefit?

Re:The obvious question (1)

Pearson (953531) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038319)

No, the obvious question is "How can this benefit ME!" ;)

Cute (3, Funny)

tygerstripes (832644) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038415)

The little yacht dithering about in the water under the impact of these waves is, somehow, very endearing. I keep wanting to give it a saucer of milk.

Seriously!! (-1, Troll)

luvtheedragon (1175245) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038423)

This was an attack by Iran and korea's nuclear program........
we will smoke them out!!
we will bring these miscreants to justice
and we will not allow these gas bag weapons of mass destruction to be left in these unstable places.......
action must be taken.......lets deploy the army to these countries imediately.......

The Quicktime Movie (0)

Wingsy (761354) | more than 6 years ago | (#21038531)

Nice to see this presented as a Quicktime movie. What other format could this be in where I can grab the play marker and drag it back-n-forth to scrub through the movie?

Re:The Quicktime Movie (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21038987)

I'll never know. I refuse to install that crap on my laptop. Quicktime and Realplayer are Malware.

Re:The Quicktime Movie (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 6 years ago | (#21041279)

K-Lite Mega Codec Pack. Can play Quicktime directly in WMP or MPC and includes RealAlternative. Never be annoyed by QT or RA players again!

Re:The Quicktime Movie (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042045)

Yeah, that doesn't sound sketchy at all!

Re:The Quicktime Movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21042481)

Never install K-Lite if you want your media players at all stable. Get the QT/Real Alternative players separately, and get ffdshow, and you're set for the vast majority of formats without completely fucking up playback on everything else.

Re:The Quicktime Movie (1)

argent (18001) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042433)

Realplayer, maybe, because it uses Microsoft's HTML control like Windows Media Player does. Makes them really nice portable trojan-horse front ends on Windows.

Quicktime doesn't support that security "feature".

Photoshopped (1)

Eudial (590661) | more than 6 years ago | (#21039091)

That film was obviously photoshopped! I mean, come ON! [/today's xkcd]

It has to be caused by (1)

certain death (947081) | more than 6 years ago | (#21039723)

All of the presidential candidates who have been frequenting the area. I hear everything undulates after having that much asshole that close all at once!!!!

Same video on Youtube (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21040019)

Since the NASA site download seems slow right now:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=aako5siSTgM [youtube.com]

Re:Same video on Youtube (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21041333)

Desert dust storms (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 6 years ago | (#21040395)

You can see these waves clearly in deserts and then a few minutes later you wish you hadn't.

Not the Bore Waves!! (2, Funny)

neo-mkrey (948389) | more than 6 years ago | (#21041451)

(Think 1980s Flash Gordon)

Damn Government! (2, Funny)

DrBuzzo (913503) | more than 6 years ago | (#21041677)

This is just more evidence of the need for aluminum foil hats. That damn government with their satellites and chemtrails with the roswell, ufo, grassy knoll, glomar explorer, watergate it's all run by the damn illuminati who are with the freemasons in the center of the hallow, convex flat geocentric earth.

Things that affect severe weather (1)

lpangelrob (714473) | more than 6 years ago | (#21042971)

Things like undular bore waves are part of the reason why severe weather on a small scale will continue to be difficult (if not impossible) to predict for the foreseeable future. We have a better than ever handle on what's happening at the time, which is enough to give people 15-20 minutes warning ahead of time for severe weather and tornadoes (and has undoubtedly saved thousands of lives since the mid 1940s, when tornado warnings started to be issued).

But it is still well beyond any computer model in existence to predict specific features more than an hour in advance (the best that can be done is to issue broad-scale "there is a significant chance something will happen somewhere in this region" alerts). Which is why it will be ever more interesting to see how the National Weather Service integrates tomorrow's technology into their forecasts. :-D

Totally have seen one. (1)

Aslan72 (647654) | more than 6 years ago | (#21043277)

Great article. I saw one earlier this summer and it was the coolest thing I think I've seen in the sky. It's akin to something from ID4 (that crappy movie back in '96 with will Smith and aliens) and it's really imposing. Very cool stuff.

Slashdotted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21043645)

Oh good job, people, you BROKE NASA!

So THATs what they are called.... (1)

StressGuy (472374) | more than 6 years ago | (#21044361)

When I was a kid, one of these passed over our neighborhood. I remember how fast it was moving and how its shape was just to "uniform" to look like it belonged in nature. It was both fascinating and frightning at the same time. I recall it was darker than the one in the video shown in the parent article and had lightning coming out of it as well.

Real freaky looking, and it unnerved the grown-ups as well as the kids.

Giant Atmospheric Waves Photographed Over Houston (1)

eyrieowl (881195) | more than 6 years ago | (#21044375)

http://flickr.com/search/?w=33752399%40N00&q=clouds+storm&m=text [flickr.com] I thought they were pretty cool when I saw this as well. Had to race like hell to get my camera and get out in front of the storm far enough to get some shots.

Link to raw movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21044579)

Here is a link to the raw movie file:

http://mesonet.agron.iastate.edu/cases/071002/bore/saylorville_timelapse.mov [iastate.edu]

and the original youtube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMqhtQyYQzY [youtube.com]

This bore was also captured from two other cameras:

Tama, Iowa: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D46eNa5sjok [youtube.com]

Indianola, Iowa: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AgVYb4hGBU [youtube.com]

Similar Phenomenon? (1)

guttentag (313541) | more than 6 years ago | (#21045391)

I saw something that looks similar (but I suspect is a different, though equally cool phenomenon) last December in Cupertino, CA driving west on I-280 (facing the Santa Cruz mountains). It looked like the clouds were emerging from the mountains as fine jets that got wider as they got further into Silicon Valley. Anyone know what this is?

(At the time I thought perhaps they were clouds of flying monkeys from Microsoft's Mac Business Unit -- which is in those mountains -- descending upon Apple's main campus -- which is about a mile behind the vantage point of those pictures)

Re:Similar Phenomenon? (1)

eyrieowl (881195) | more than 6 years ago | (#21048655)

It's clear from the photos, especially the first one, what is going on here. "We don't know who struck first - us or them - but it was us who scorched the sky."

Much better video (1)

aftersoxgmail.com (1176681) | more than 6 years ago | (#21047189)

There is a much better video of atmospheric waves here [youtube.com] .

So Long and Thanks for all the Fish! (1)

Da Cheez (1069822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21047347)

I accidentally read that headline as "Giant Atmospheric Whales Filmed Over Iowa." I immediately panicked and ran off and grabbed a towel and a copy of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"...

Better video? (1)

red_flea (589243) | more than 6 years ago | (#21052317)

There was this other undulating cloud video from Iowa from a few months ago... It's at 60x normal speed or thereabouts, so I'm not sure the people standing there would notice. Nevermind that the video is titled like a tabloid... It's still impressive.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXnkzeCU3bE [youtube.com]
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