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Apple's Missed Opportunity With Leopard Delay

CowboyNeal posted about 7 years ago | from the timing-is-everything dept.

OS X 641

An anonymous reader writes "According to an article on OSWeekly.com, Apple missed a big opportunity by not releasing Leopard soon. They could've taken advantage of Vista's losing streak and one upped Microsoft, the author suggests. 'It's not uncommon for Windows users and technology consumers in general to say that Microsoft missed out on making the most of Vista both before and after its launch. Longtime fans of Windows have changed their tone due to Vista's inadequacies, and regular users are in many cases stuck with trying to figure out why they still can't get certain things to work within the operating system. Granted, it's not a completely horrific OS, but is that even a compliment worth accepting?'"

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Hardly... (5, Insightful)

gilesjuk (604902) | about 7 years ago | (#21055355)

Windows users will stick with XP, there's no evidence to say that they would give up on Windows and get a Mac. Firstly they would need to buy new hardware, the obvious choice is to go to Linux since you can keep your hardware.

Re:Hardly... (5, Informative)

alfredo (18243) | about 7 years ago | (#21055401)

Apple's market share is over 8% now. Those customers are coming from somewhere.

With Parallels you can run Linux on the Mac, and if you don't want to do that but still want Nix software, you can do it. I'm using GIMP, Scribus, Inkscape, Xephem, and other titles I was used to in the Nix world. I've even ran Gnome on top of OSX.

Re:Hardly... (4, Insightful)

sarathmenon (751376) | about 7 years ago | (#21055513)

It used to be 6%. Not that the increase isn't insignificant, but all those vista haters aren't moving there. I got a mac recently, but it was more to do with the fact that I've been trying to build something like the macmini for 2 years but haven't come close to getting a cabinet and motherboard of the form factor.

I am guessing that most of the switchers are from the ipod/iphone users, who are curious about apple. Its a shame that their advertisement campaigns do not target this audience - I thought that someone smart would be working in that department.

Re:Hardly... (1)

webmaster404 (1148909) | about 7 years ago | (#21055727)

Their advertisements are working, they don't target XP though, everyone knows that Vista is a OS no one wants to use, but that still isn't' going to push them to get a Mac rather then staying with XP or switching to Linux.

Re:Hardly... (5, Insightful)

sarathmenon (751376) | about 7 years ago | (#21055853)

And that's more to do with human nature. People will rather live with a familiar piece of crap, rather than switch to something totally new that may (not) be better. I don't see any sudden shifts in computing, windows is going to be at the helm for a long time, atleast a decade or two more. No, there will not be a year of the linux desktop, there may be a year of the mac desktop.

That said, awareness of apple as a good hardware vendor is increasing. In the end, a very less part of apple's bottom line will be affected by vista. Leopard's timing will not affect this much, in fact I think they made the wise move by releasing it near the holiday season.

Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (5, Insightful)

AHumbleOpinion (546848) | about 7 years ago | (#21055569)

Macs are not replacing Windows PCs, they have become Windows PCs. Buyers no longer have to choose Mac OS X or Windows, they can have both. That is the catalyst that is driving the increased sales.

There is little point in running Linux on the Mac. Mac OS X is a capable *nix box, most FOSS software is not Linux specific and targets Mac OS X as well. Plus Mac OS X has a superior user interface. If someone is running Parallels they are doing so to use Windows XP. Exceptions are rarities such as a developer who needs to do compatibility testing under Linux.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (0, Offtopic)

wanderingknight (1103573) | about 7 years ago | (#21055627)

most FOSS software is not Linux specific and targets Mac OS X as well.
Except the fact that OS X is not FOSS. At any rate, until they get something like the Debian repositories, forget about me going for something else than a Linux system. Seriously, the magic of apt (and, on a lesser extent, of yum/yast/pacman/etc) and the repositories is something almost impossible to duplicate in a closed OS.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (4, Informative)

c_forq (924234) | about 7 years ago | (#21055693)

Google "Darwin ports".

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (3, Informative)

sarathmenon (751376) | about 7 years ago | (#21055867)

Also fink. Its got apt-get and dpkg as its standard binary format, so its time the GP switched to a mac :)

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (1)

0123456789 (467085) | about 7 years ago | (#21055715)

You might want to try fink [finkproject.org] . A Mac with Linux installed in VMWare Fusion (or Parallels) is another solution. When I bought a Mac, I partitioned the HD with the intention of installing Linux on it. I never got around to installing Linux on that partition, fink and VMWare were sufficient for my needs.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (-1, Troll)

aichpvee (631243) | about 7 years ago | (#21055757)

The mac interface sucks. Now that we've got that out of the way, mac osx is a poor man's Linux with a rich man's price tag and wider commercial software support in a few areas.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055803)

You are a pompous idiot. With that out of the way, the rest of your posting is completely useless as well.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (1)

justin12345 (846440) | about 7 years ago | (#21055875)

The mac interface sucks, compared to what?

Certainly there are flaws, but please point to something better if you are going to make that assertion.

Re:Macs are not replacing Windows PCs (1)

David Gerard (12369) | about 7 years ago | (#21055811)

I've actually found it vastly useful to have an Ubuntu partition on my Mac G4. One, for burning DVDs - Mac OS X's "burn folders" are completely unreliable rubbish and a coaster factory. Two, for recovering data from the hard disks of dead Linux laptops. Three, for hardware Mac OS X doesn't support but Linux does.

Linux can read and write HFS+ disks fine. So if you reserve a gig or two for Linux, it's good to keep on hand.

Re:Hardly... (4, Interesting)

Paradise Pete (33184) | about 7 years ago | (#21055725)

Apple's market share is over 8% now. Those customers are coming from somewhere.

My anecdotal evidence: In the last several years of all my friends who use Windows only one had switched to a Mac, despite me being the "computer guy." And now in just the last couple of months seven more have switched. It's been almost spooky.

One had even recently purchased a computer with Vista installed and got so frustrated that he gave it to his son in law and bought an iMac.

Re:Hardly... (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 7 years ago | (#21055881)

And now in just the last couple of months seven more have switched.

It's almost like they've discovered Ferrari are selling a model with an optional Yugo mode at a Yugo price.

(Sorry, just trying to validate your sig).

Re:Hardly... (5, Insightful)

electroniceric (468976) | about 7 years ago | (#21055441)

If people other than tinkerers and enthusiasts are going to change OS, they're going to do so either because they bought a new computer, or because there's something they want to do that they can't now or something that really made them unhappy. That process takes longer than a couple months.

What's really changed with Vista is that people are not willing to be shepherded along from release to release by Microsoft. This is partly due to the Mac's resurgence and more due to a much broader understanding that there are choices. I'd love to attribute that understanding of choices to Linux and open source, but I think that's only had an much of an effect within the developer community. But users more broadly no longer see Microsoft as a miracle-worker for producing these computers that do all sorts of things, because they just expect computers to do the things they do. And many more of them have seen the forced upgrade phenomenon firsthand, and are waiting for a little more bang for their $400. That's reflected in the press with far more writers adopting critical tone towards Microsoft than ever before.

All of the articles we've seen about Apple and missed opportunities (after all this TFA is just some dude at a small website pontificating for an evenings' entertainment) are generally people expressing their desire for David to knock off Goliath and have very little to do with any insights about the market or business opportunities for Apple or Microsoft. To the extent that Apple keeps producing computers that people like and are relevant to what people want to do with them, on terms that are favorable to Apple, their market opportunities are still enormous. And that's almost totally independent of market share - the desktop OS market is simply not an unexploited area in the way it was 15 years ago.

Re:Hardly... (1)

MacTO (1161105) | about 7 years ago | (#21055747)

What's really changed with Vista is that people are not willing to be shepherded along from release to release by Microsoft.
Has anything really changed? I seem to recall plenty of people saying that they would never touch ME (and they didn't), and I seem to recall a lot of people saying that they would never switch to XP (but they did).

Besides, making the transition is more than hardware and software. It is skills. There are plenty of people who went from Windows to Mac OS X who are having trouble with Mac OS X. Often it is because Mac OS X does things in different ways. Other times it is because there are certain quirks in Mac OS X that Apple simply isn't fixing.

Re:Hardly... (1)

e4tmyl33t (900294) | about 7 years ago | (#21055471)

While that's true, and yes, some people are deciding to switch to Mac, I'd think the more pressing time for a switch to anything will be when MS cuts XP off from sale completely. This will eventually happen, and I had heard that it was pushed back to May or June 08 to satisfy some customers, but you're right. A mass migration to Macs just isn't likely to happen. Linux may be right out as well, due to its (admittedly, simplifying) complexity. I imagine that most people will just suck it up and migrate to Vista, more or less against their will, just because of the mentality of "It's windows, it's what I know, and I can't or won't be bothered to learn anything else."

Re:Hardly... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055537)

I am a diehard Apple fanboy. Fan-Man, since I got my first Mac in 1986. I have owned a Plus, SE, SE/30, IIci, Quadra 800, TiBook 550, PPC Mini and G5.

I am heading off to a remote foreign land for a one-year work contract. Though I really wanted a MacBook Pro with the NVidia 8600m for gaming, entertainment and communication, the price was super high for something that might get destroyed by extreme environments. My TiBook didn't do well at being schlepped around Europe for four months this summer, and has crush marks and battle scars, plus a nonfunctional optical drive.

So, I got a Dell (ugh) with the same specs as the MacBook Pro, for less than 1/2 the price. Running XP and Linux, it will be what I need, plus I can easily blow it away and start again, where the Mac might be a bit harder to maintain (but perhaps need lots less janitorial service).

My heart is in the right place with Apple and the Mac. But, for something you don't care about and might trash, PeeCees can get the job done for less. The user experience is generally craptastic, however.

Re:Hardly... (1)

llamaphonics (398357) | about 7 years ago | (#21055805)

I've been using OSX on my old XP hardware for a year now and couldn't be happier. Try google for osx86.

Users are not leaving Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055827)

Two points, both of which are extremely real-world true, and both of which will get me modded down.

1. I've been helping people with their computers for over a decade. I have yet to see one problem with Vista: driver problems aren't Microsoft's fault, since they don't make the hardware. Application problems aren't Microsoft's fault, since their applications run perfectly under Vista, and so do the applications of people who know how to program. For example, both Norton and MacAfee (aren't both owned by Symantec now?) where whining and crying about how their Vista versions weren't Vista compatible... and trying to blame it on Microsoft, whining about how they didn't have access to the Vista source code, boo hoo blah blah wah wah. Well, Kaspersky works perfectly with Vista, and has since when Vista was in beta.

So claiming there is anything wrong with Vista is just Apple and Teh Lunix spreading anti-MS FUD... which is of course gobbled up by all the Slashdotters. This place is the technological equivalent of the FOX Noise Channel.

2. I know people who are STILL using Windows 98. Are you honestly sitting there, telling me consumers are so chomping at the bit to get their hands on a shiny new operating system, that they are going to ditch an operating they actually know how to use in order to go with the arcane garbage that is teh Lunix? Another thing: your average consumer wants to know they can walk into the local computer store, and the software they purchase will run. That's not going to happen with Teh Lunix... and that's the reason consumers avoid both Apple and Teh Lunix.

Re:Hardly... (1)

westlake (615356) | about 7 years ago | (#21055865)

the obvious choice is to go to Linux since you can keep your hardware.

The obvious choice is to stay with Windows and keep your hardware and software.

Migration to the alternative OS has much appeal to the average user as root canal. That is why Apple needs Boot Camp.

That depends. (1)

WK2 (1072560) | about 7 years ago | (#21055363)

Define "completely horrific."

Re:That depends. (5, Funny)

wootest (694923) | about 7 years ago | (#21055443)

horrific adjective
see Windows Me

Re:That depends. (1)

nicolastheadept (930317) | about 7 years ago | (#21055591)

Completely horiffic: Windows ME with Bliss as its wallpaper.

I like Vista because Bliss is gone.

A Little Early ... (5, Insightful)

thornomad (1095985) | about 7 years ago | (#21055369)

I'm not sure how you can say they missed an opportunity until after some initial sales figures and responses come out. It took a while before the non-desire for Vista became apparent. It will take some time before people have a chance to respond (with their wallets) to Leopard.

Right, they should have followed Microsoft's lead. (4, Insightful)

rthille (8526) | about 7 years ago | (#21055385)

The should have released it 'on time' regardless if that made it feature-poor and buggy.
These comentators don't understand Apple customers. Apple customers value quality. You try to sell them crap and they will eat you alive.

Apple's prime value is in the intangible goodwill of it's customers. Destroying that by releasing buggy crap wouldn't be a good idea.

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055415)

Uh, most Apple users are pretentious drooling fan boys.

Apple could release Windows 95 rebadged as Leopard and they would rave about how revolutionary it is.

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (1)

Revotron (1115029) | about 7 years ago | (#21055469)

Uh, you probably use Windows. Moreover, you've most likely *never* used Mac OS X. I'll give you a run for your money - most Windows users are pretentious drooling fan boys who think they're so 1337 because of their "pwnage" and think that messing with school computers makes them a "1337 haxx0r".

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (3, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 years ago | (#21055509)

These comentators don't understand Apple customers. Apple customers value quality. You try to sell them crap and they will eat you alive.

The reality distortion field is strong in this one....

But even stronger in the article. Come on... Joe Average hears about problems in Vista - he's going to look at the Mac, perhaps. Will he understand the differences between Tiger and Leopord - or Jaguar or Krazy Kitten (oops, that's the next Ubuntu release, sorry)?

And who is really not moving towards Vista? It's large corporate systems with millions of dollars invested in a stable XP and little desire to mess with that. That move will be slow but steady. But really slow - probably slower than the 98 to XP move. Witness all of the systems still on 2000.

I may be more of a poster child for a switcher - having used Windows in all flavors and sizes since 3.0. I finally got fed up with the cheapass hardware that laptop manufacturers have tossed out on the market and looked to find something that might, perhaps, get hardware support for more than a year. I've also used Unix since the 1980's and have two Linux boxes at home (well, Ubuntu anyway) - so I'm not adverse to learning another OS. It's still a royal pain to switch if you do anything more complicated than Letters / Browsing / Music.

(Start flames about Apple using cheapass hardware - they do - I just hope they use the SAME cheapass hardware so I can replace it down the line).

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (4, Funny)

speaker of the truth (1112181) | about 7 years ago | (#21055611)

Krazy Kitten (oops, that's the next Ubuntu release, sorry)
No, no. Its horny horses. Ubuntu still has to get through Indecent Iguana's and Jolly Jackrabbits before it gets to Krazy Kittens.

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (1)

false_cause (1013577) | about 7 years ago | (#21055645)

MS didn't release Vista on-time but feature-poor and buggy. It was late as hell!

Re:Right, they should have followed Microsoft's le (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 7 years ago | (#21055771)

Apple's prime value is in the intangible goodwill of it's customers. Destroying that by releasing buggy crap wouldn't be a good idea.
Right, but it wouldn't have been crap if they had put proper resources into it instead of rushing the iphone to market. With the iphone the only rush was that it was announced prematurely, if they hadn't been hinting about it, they could have easily had an additional 6 months to a year to release it without any real difference. They could even have waited to hype it until now.

At least half right, anyway (2, Insightful)

abb3w (696381) | about 7 years ago | (#21055783)

The should have released it 'on time' regardless if that made it feature-poor and buggy. These comentators don't understand Apple customers. Apple customers value quality. You try to sell them crap and they will eat you alive.

I'll join in with the chorus of "Bullshit" as to the position on Apple Customers. Apple Customers value Shiny, and will continue to swarm accordingly. Steve Jobs would have to release at least two and probably three gold-plated turds in a row before this would change noticably.

On the other hand, I'll agree with your assessment that Apple made the right call to keep to their development timetable. In the long run, I believe the continued evolutionary approach Apple is using, where users can be confident that the new features will still be bolted to solid and reliable underpinnings, will net them more customers. Reliability issues don't affect short term sales as much as long-term. If your OS is unreliable, unstable, buggy, and riddled with usability and security nuisances, it is more likely to get a reputation that way and users are more likely to look at something without such a reputation.

The discussion on the local Mac mailing list isn't about whether to switch from Mac to PC, but whether users of X.4 really want to pay for X.5, or see what comes out in X.6. A minority of starving budget-strained starving students with X.3 are waiting for X.6 also, but remaining users of X.2 through X.3 versions seem to be generally for upgrading. In contrast, if even half of current Windows 2000 users had switched to Vista when it came out, Vista would have almost double its present market share.

It's not that Apple makes such wonderful products; it's that the dominant alternative is so bad, it's market position is threatened by a collective of hobbyists. All Apple needs to do to win is try and continue making sure their products contain as little obvious SUCK as possible. Solid, certain, evolutionary baby steps. Even when making the giant leap from OS 9 to OS X, Steve sold dual-boot systems for about three years. If Bill required every Vista system include a license to dual boot to XP, he'd have much happier users. (Not happy, perhaps, but not rioting.)

Re:At least half right, anyway (1)

BlowChunx (168122) | about 7 years ago | (#21055849)

Apple Customers value Shiny.

You may want to strike the word "Apple" from that. After looking at Compiz Fusion, and the latest KDE beta, I think linux users value shiny as well.

They didn't miss anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055391)

Vista came out after last Christmas, and Leopard is coming out before this Christmas, so they didn't miss the big pre-Christmas cycle. My next computer will be a Mac Pro once they refresh them.

Missed Opportunity? (4, Insightful)

Mr. Flibble (12943) | about 7 years ago | (#21055397)

Apple had a choice, release the new OS X later, and the iPhone when they did, or, delay the iPhone.

I think it should be obvious with the hype that still surrounds that device that Apple made the right choice. Yes, they could have gained some more marketshare, but probably not by much. After all, OS X is already here, just not the latest version.

Apple is entering a market (handhelds) that is likely to be a much larger market than laptops/desktops over the next few years. The iPhone stands a good chance of becoming the market leader in a particular segment. OS X will still be (mostly) a niche player. I hope to see adoption of mac's increase - after all, I own one.

But given the choice, I would opt for the iPhone over OS X just like they did.

Re:Missed Opportunity? (4, Insightful)

macurmudgeon (900466) | about 7 years ago | (#21055585)

It's not like the current version of OS X, Tiger isn't already winning converts. After the pain of buying a new PC with Vista then going through the hassle of getting the reseller to supply a copy of XP and all the time spent installing the older OS, I'd honestly be a bit leery of a following that experience up by buying a Mac with a brand new version of OS X. If people are going to like the Mac experience they will like the current version just fine, if not they'll go back to XP. A new OS isn't going the change the differences in design philosophy between Apple and Microsoft.

In Apple's place I would have delayed a new OS and concentrated on the iPhone too.

Re:Missed Opportunity? (1)

LinuxInDallas (73952) | about 7 years ago | (#21055897)

Although your points are correct the article is still total bullshit since Vista was released in January, 6 months prior to iPhone sale date. I doubt Apple could have had Leopard ready by the Vista release date if they wanted to. Well, at least if they wanted to release something that wasn't crap.

Soon? (5, Insightful)

Ophion (58479) | about 7 years ago | (#21055405)

According to an article on OSWeekly.com, Apple missed a big opportunity by not releasing Leopard soon.

Apple is releasing Leopard soon, unless six days now qualifies as a long wait. Perhaps the author of the summary meant "earlier."

I sort of agree (2, Insightful)

InlawBiker (1124825) | about 7 years ago | (#21055407)

But it wasn't Vista who won, it was Ubuntu. While I was waiting for Leopard to come out to make my first Mac purchase in 10 years, I tried Ubuntu and stuck with it. Ubuntu somehow became a buzzword at exactly the right time.

However, I did get my wife a Macbook this summer and honestly Tiger is still a big upgrade from XP. It works great! I'm going to upgrade to Leopard just to see the new goodies, even though she might not even notice I did it.

Linux/Ubuntu's Opporunity (2)

AttillaTheNun (618721) | about 7 years ago | (#21055681)

I've been running dual boot XP and Ubutnu (Edgy) on my ADM64. One of these has a future, the other does not. I'm giving the newly released Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon a run through and I'm impressed. I'm weening myself off Microsoft and have no intention of looking back. The freedom is refreshing.

Author is clueless (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055417)

People that buy apple products aren't technical enough to know if leopard is better than any past build revision of FreeBSD that apple leeched. They buy apple because it looks cute and they can remain oblivious to technology. The author is a clueless monkey if he thinks people suddenly want to buy apple crap because it's build 10.3.1.

Re:Author is clueless MOD PARENT UP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055493)

I completely agree. You kinda have to unless you're clueless.

Re:Author is clueless (5, Insightful)

Shadowmist (57488) | about 7 years ago | (#21055557)

People that buy apple products aren't technical enough to know if leopard is better than any past build revision of FreeBSD that apple leeched. They buy apple because it looks cute and they can remain oblivious to technology. The author is a clueless monkey if he thinks people suddenly want to buy apple crap because it's build 10.3.1.
That's a comment that makes sense only to someone who's entire OS life is spent underneath a command prompt. FreeBSD while an important part of X is only part of the foundation. It's everything else that's on top and underneath that makes the OS something other than a gearhead toy. And since when is making use of Open Source some sort of moral crime? Apple makes it's acknowledgements and last time I checked it's changes are open sourced back in the form of Darwin. Have you tried Darwin and made any real comparison? Or are you just some Linux Nazi who is lashing out with unsubstantive bile for the simple reason that it's not Linux. If so, you're no different than Mac Nazis, or Windows Nazis, or Amiga Zombies that still think there's a future for that last platform, you're acting from unreason.

Answer (-1, Offtopic)

christurkel (520220) | about 7 years ago | (#21055419)

Apple releases solid, tested upgrades reguarly. MS shoves half baked crap out the door. That's the difference.

Re:Answer (-1, Flamebait)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 years ago | (#21055555)

Apple releases solid, tested upgrades reguarly. MS shoves half baked crap out the door. That's the difference.

Apple fanbois are so much fun.

Maybe you should look at the various forums in the weeks after this new upgrade. You will see exactly the same angst and anger, the same gnashing of teeth and rending of garments that you see in every OS upgrade forum. Or any computer forum for that matter.

And perhaps you can tell me how Apple managed to screw up (and deny) the Mac Book Pro magsafe power adapter problem for so long. Just go and try to order one (I just did). Just try to figure out why they aren't available. They are scrambling out of the hole of shoddy design and manufacturing, not to mention plain old denial. Semi-kudos to Apple for finally figuring it out, but certainly no gold star.

Re:Answer (1)

tsa (15680) | about 7 years ago | (#21055749)

I'm not sure about that. Apple recently released an upgrade that shoud work against the regular crashing of new Al iMacs when doing graphics-intensive tasks. From the forums I gather that that upgrade caused MORE crashing...

OSWeekly is wrong (4, Insightful)

brass1 (30288) | about 7 years ago | (#21055421)

The lesson from Vista is that releasing a broken and incomplete OS so you can fix it in the field is no longer acceptable. Ignoring your testers complaints on usability and performance issues will no longer get it done. I suspect that the disaster that was Vista's release is one of the things that caused Apple to reassess their Leopard release date.

With that said, it's obvious that the Vista release cycle was a death march from the get go. There's little chance you can jettison that many major features during the development cycle and still end up with a quality release in the end. Killing cool features also kills developer morale and poor morale causes poor quality.

Agreed. (2, Insightful)

argent (18001) | about 7 years ago | (#21055449)

IF Apple could have gotten Leopard out six months sooner it would have been a coup, but it's better that they miss that target than they release the system in the state that beta-testers were reporting it would likely be in if they released on time.

Re:OSWeekly is wrong (1)

electroniceric (468976) | about 7 years ago | (#21055605)

With that said, it's obvious that the Vista release cycle was a death march from the get go. There's little chance you can jettison that many major features during the development cycle and still end up with a quality release in the end. Killing cool features also kills developer morale and poor morale causes poor quality.
I do think it was a death much, but I don't think it was due to the features. There were the usual vaporware features like WinFS, but the bigger problem was migrating that massive a codebase (Windows, Office and everything else that's tied to the craziness of the Win32 API) and then trying to get people to pay full (and then some) price for what was basically an under-the-hood rebuild that hasn't really been shaken out. And on top of that, most Microsofties I know agree that the company has gotten much more bureaucratic and stagnant since the heady WindowsYYYY days when they thought they were inventing the future.

Re:OSWeekly is wrong (1, Flamebait)

TheNetAvenger (624455) | about 7 years ago | (#21055879)

no longer acceptable. Ignoring your testers complaints on usability and performance issues will no longer get it done

But the people that 'actually' used Vista for a significant amount of time (i.e. the testers) don't see Vista as the horrible OS that others looking in that haven't used it extensively do.

Vista added a lot of architectural changes and paved the road for many new things the industry will just start seeing and using in the next couple of years. From hot dock Video to the revised audio and video subsystems that 'DO' increase application and even gaming performance in addition to pulling video out of the kernel for stability. (Latest tests now show Vista 5-10% faster than XP in 99% of the games on the market, it was NVidia and ATI that didn't put enough effort into performance optimizing the Vista drivers for games as they did with XP where they had 6 years to add tweaks.)

The other big shove Vista has going for it is the migration for development to not only a new set of APIs, but a new concept of development that is as revolutionary as Drag and Drop event based programming made popular with Visual Basic back in 1993. Vista's XAML and core WPF technologies are a graphic designer/developers wet dream in terms of abilities, performance and moving from basic UI constructs. This can also be witnessed with Silverlight, another technology based on Vista technology. People can say XAML or WPF or Silverlight is like Display PDF or Flash or SVG, but when they actually take a look at what it does, it is quite apparent XAML and WPF go further than the current technology hardware even supports. And this isn't even talking about its inherent 3D support and 3D UI hit testing and other features that have to be faked to appear 3D on OS X(Display PDF) or Flash.

Vista also added enough new features to the user side of the OS that it still offer more than XP, and yes still even offers more than Leopard, which makes Leopard look like a catch up OS - especially considering many of the Leopard and even Tiger ideas that were so coveted by Apple users first appeared in alpha versions of Vista.

Pick almost any Leopard feature and Vista has the feature, and architecturally there is no 'killer' feature of OS X that Vista cannot implement via 3rd part support. On the other hand Vista has technologies that OS X, Linux, etc don't have yet and won't have for several years.

Until OS X or Linux can handle and pre-emptively multi-task GPU operations, non-double buffer writes from system RAM to VRAM, or process sound with virtually infinite channels and bit discrepancies, there is a LOT of architectural work to be done to compete with Vista. On Vista you can run several CAD/High End graphical applications under the Aero interface and not lose performance in any of the applications, even with them performing side by side. (This is the same paradigm shift that pre-emptive CPU operations offered applications, and Vista has extended this concept to the GPU subsystem.)

And Vista as for the claim that Vista is buggy or broken or performs slowly, think about it in these terms instead. It is more stable than XP, OS X, and Linux and for an v1 OS release has shown that MS can get security on industry par and even best what is out there, as Vista has had fewer security flaws or bugs than OS X has in the last year and Tiger has been around a while where these issues should have been fixed a long time ago.

And as for Vista having 'poor performance' remember than using boot camp and using native versions of any Adobe CS3 product, it runs faster under Vista than it does on OSX on the EXACT same hardware. And this is with non-optimized Apple drivers for Vista, and a sad note to loss of performance OS X inherently has.

Another area of performance you can look at is the gaming, with the latest drivers OpenGL and DX9/DX8/DX7 games run 5-10% faster than they do on XP now. And DX10 games run faster on Vista than the same games running in DX9 mode on XP, and have better visuals.

So Vista has a lot of a 'fud' and market myth, but the people that are truly using it, wouldn't switch back to XP and definately wouldn't switch to OS X because of any shortcomings in Vista unless they buy into the FUD/Myths...

(Sorry for the long post, as it actually applies to several posts, not just yours.)

as usual (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055423)

Well, the one half will complain about delays when a new version is about to be released and the other half will complain afterwards if it was to soon... business as usual.

Apple has been known to dissemble... (3, Interesting)

argent (18001) | about 7 years ago | (#21055425)

Instead, Leopard wasn't set to be released right near the time of Vista's release, and Apple wasn't going to hurry the process along more than they had to. In fact, we're all now waiting for Leopard's release in October, and this is largely due in part to the need for key members of the OS X team to finish up work on the iPhone so that it could hit store shelves on June 29th.

That's what Apple said, but people who were on the beta were saying that Leopard wasn't likely to be ready on time already, that it was way less stable and mature than Tiger and Panther had been at a similar point. And Apple has been known to dissemble, perhaps not outright fibbing but certainly exaggerating minor issues and not even mentioning major ones... so I still think this explanation should be taken with a pinch of salt.

Re:Apple has been known to dissemble... (2, Interesting)

filterban (916724) | about 7 years ago | (#21055527)

That's what Apple said, but people who were on the beta were saying that Leopard wasn't likely to be ready on time already, that it was way less stable and mature than Tiger and Panther had been at a similar point.

Good point. Although, one other point is that the iPhone was already in development for a long time before Apple made that announcement. They very well could already have taken many developers and testers from 10.5 and moved them to iPhone long before. My guess is that Apple, at all costs, wanted to avoid doing what Microsoft did and completely disenchanting their user base by releasing a half-finished OS.

I'd say there were two factors at play - first, Apple took staff from 10.5 and moved them to iPhone in mid-to-late 2006. Apple figures it will impact Leopard but they weren't sure how much. Second, Vista was released in November 2006 and flops. Apple then learns from this and realizes they need to improve Leopard dramatically before release.

It takes Apple until January, and Apple announces the iPhone release date and the Leopard release date as everything solidifies.

Apple was doing something completely new for them - a touch screen and a phone - and they didn't plan for enough resources, so they re-appropriated resources from a project that could afford a delay.

But they were already slipping... (2, Interesting)

argent (18001) | about 7 years ago | (#21055653)

My guess is that Apple, at all costs, wanted to avoid doing what Microsoft did and completely disenchanting their user base by releasing a half-finished OS.

That's what I think the real reason was. If Leopard had been on track for the expected 18-month release cycle in mid-2006 it would have been pretty solid by the time they started on the iPhone, with a late 2006 or early 2007 release. The mid-2007 "non-slipped" date was already 2 years after Tiger.

Maybe the iPhone made the slip worse, but if it wasn't already slipping it wouldn't have needed the resources they pulled out for the iPhone.

And I don't think this slip cost them much of an "opportunity". If they'd had it out around the same time as Vista, 18 months after Tiger, then sure... but I don't think they could have pulled that off no matter what resources they threw into the pot. Brooks' Law always trumps Moore's Law.

The column itself says it wasn't a mistake (4, Insightful)

Eternal Vigilance (573501) | about 7 years ago | (#21055427)

"With all things considered, did Apple make a serious mistake by delaying Leopard's release until October? I don't think so."

This seems mostly a case of a poorly punctuated column headline. Given the author himself concludes Apple made the right choice in the face of limited resources, a more clear headline would have been "Leopard's Release Date a Serious Mistake?"

Apple couldn't have known (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055431)

I'm sure Apple knew that Microsoft execs were passing around the developer preview of tiger. Realistically, how could Apple have possibly known how bad W i n tiger was going to be? And after previous Windows releases, how could they know that Microsoft could fail so spectacularly in marketing their latest turd?

Will Leopard run on my PC? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055435)

I only have to ditch my PC and get a MAC when my XP/2003 is working just fine. I doubt it.

The problem with Vista is it offers no compelling features for Windows users. XP/2003 run reliably and offer the widest range of applications. The ONLY thing MS has with Vista is exclusive DX10 games. And there are no compelling upgrade reasons even for most gamers.

Freakish article (4, Interesting)

lancejjj (924211) | about 7 years ago | (#21055437)

What a bizarre article.

His piece is titled:

"Leopard's Release Date a Serious Mistake"
But it closes with the line:

"did Apple make a serious mistake by delaying Leopard's release until October? I don't think so."
So what does it all mean? To me, it means that "OS Weakly" has nothing of substance to say.

Re:Freakish article (1)

pikine (771084) | about 7 years ago | (#21055817)

This article is definitely poorly written. However, it's title is the worst. Without reading the title, it says pretty much everyone agrees and has known:

  • Someone thinks that Apple should use Leopard to undermine Vista's market share, but that's not what Apple wants.
  • Apple delayed Leopard for iPhone, which is a better strategy for Apple.
  • The delay does not cause consumers to become disinterested in Leopard.
  • There is nothing wrong with the delayed Leopard release.

I think the author probably meant "Debunking Whether Leopard's Delay is a Serious Mistake" for title. Even so, this is hardly any news.

Re:Freakish article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055845)

Apparently, the lamed editor removed the question mark in the origin title to make it more sensational.

Hows' that? (1)

edxwelch (600979) | about 7 years ago | (#21055447)

Most windows users have never even used a Mac and have no idea why it's ment to be better.
So if you say Leopard has dashboard, Quarts Extreme and Quarts Extreme, that's just totally meanless to a Windows user

Re:Hows' that? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 7 years ago | (#21055929)

Quarts Extreme

Wait, Quarts? Is this an unannounced feature? Will my Mac now dispense refreshing beverages?

This article is a Troll (3, Insightful)

EddydaSquige (552178) | about 7 years ago | (#21055461)

The author poses a hypothetical question that he knows will get the fanboys riled up: "Did make a mistake?". And the disputes his own question saying "No they didn't". This whole "article" is a troll and should be ignored.

But is there really a Win VS Mac article that... (0, Troll)

denzacar (181829) | about 7 years ago | (#21055709)

...isn't a troll?

Until Apple opens up its OS to be at least on the level that Windows is (you don't get much more closed source then hardware pre-requisite) it is not a competition.
Or even a valid comparison.

Apple fanboys will buy and use Apple if it required them to install a rectal probe so it would work. For them there is no choice.

And most of the "switchers" will not switch to Macs - they will switch to Linux. Unless they are rich, arrogant and stupid enough to throw away a working computer because they are not satisfied with the OS installed.
Or if we are talking just about dissatisfaction with Vista - they will switch back to XP.

Saying something-something about the new OSX influences Windows users in any way is like saying that the increasing number of sharks in the oceans influences the world's mice population.
Two completely different ecosystems with no direct influence from one to another.

Just the same ol' story... (5, Insightful)

DreadfulGrape (398188) | about 7 years ago | (#21055465)

...which has been re-written ad nauseum for the past six months.

The average mac enthusiast doesn't give a rat's ass about strategic timing of OS releases. If OS 10.5 wasn't ready until now, that's certainly good enough for me.

Re:Just the same ol' story... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055657)

Nerds are obsessed with seeing Microsoft fail and not learning from their success(working GUI and some organization).

Boy I remember when people said around here that XP was a failure bug ridden piece of crap software that would bankrupt MS because of exploits/viruses/bluescreen.

Vista is here and it will replace XP although a little bit slower. The day is coming when the majority will be using Vista and the minority will be left behind whining on Slashdot who have no effect on the computer industry. People are in denial around here who like to turn a blind eye to reality and they can look back at this comment as a credible source.

Apple needs to come out with 10.5 of all systems.. (2, Interesting)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 7 years ago | (#21055475)

Apple needs to come out with 10.5 of all systems or at least have a MID-RANGE mac with DESKTOP PARTS.

Re:Apple needs to come out with 10.5 of all system (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055639)

What does that mean? They need to come out with 10.5 OF all systems?

Re:Apple needs to come out with 10.5 of all system (3, Insightful)

caseih (160668) | about 7 years ago | (#21055775)

I agree completely, at least with the last part of your comment. Right now Apple has a product for every part of the market *except* the market that most home consumers are in. Consider that Dell sells a number of machines aimed at a home market that run for between $400 and $1000 for a complete system. Apple has absolutely nothing in that price rance except the Mac Mini, which is hardly a capable machine with its slow hard drive. Apple badly needs a small tour unit that can come to between $800 and $1000 with a monitor! Until then they are missing out on a huge market that thinks the iMac is too expensive for them, and the Mac Mini isn't enough computer. And actually the Mac Mini is really expensive too, for what it is. No keybard, no mouse, no monitor, all for about $500-$600. I'm the first to say that when you compare laptops, or even iMacs to business workstations, Apple is the same price or cheaper. But not so for the home market, one dominated by cheap whitebox PCs and Dells. I'm not going to suggest that Apple sell OS X for non-Apple harware. Just that Apple needs to start addressing the needs of this market in terms of hardware. I know of half a dozen close friends and relatives who would have bought Apple had Apple actually had something available.

Re:Apple needs to come out with 10.5 of all system (1)

ArAgost (853804) | about 7 years ago | (#21055859)

Why *needs*? Looks like they're doing quite well even without it.

Missed Opportunity? (3, Insightful)

blantonl (784786) | about 7 years ago | (#21055481)

They could've taken advantage of Vista's losing streak and one upped Microsoft, the author suggests.
Isn't Apple going to one-up Microsoft next week? I don't recall Vista all the sudden fixing all it's "issues" and becoming a rock-solid everyone-loving OS since the delay was announced.

If anything, Apple scored a coup with the delay, since the amount of pissed-off discouraged Vista users has hit a critical mass.

This guy is clueless (5, Insightful)

phillymjs (234426) | about 7 years ago | (#21055487)

One of the main reasons Vista has been so maligned is because it was ridiculously late and Microsoft was desperate to save face... so they started stripping out promised features and shipped it before it was truly ready. The bad reviews were legion. Word of mouth has spread. Even non-technical people have heard of Vista's bad reputation... I've lost count of the posts I've seen on here where someone mentions their surprise that their mom or whoever remarked something on the order of, "Vista? Isn't that the bad one?"

By holding Leopard back until they were sure it was ready, Apple has laid the groundwork for an even bigger opportunity. There are a lot of people out there who flat out don't like or don't want Vista. Delayed or not, if Leopard gets good reviews in the media and the word of mouth is positive, that's going to give a nice boost to Mac sales.

~Philly

RTFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055497)

Instead of just the headline.

"With all things considered, did Apple make a serious mistake by delaying Leopard's release until October? I don't think so."

Well.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055507)

How cool would it be if they pushed back the release in order to make it an x86 wide release?

Not hat I have heard anything like that, but still!

Missed opportunities are missing features? (1)

Lord Satri (609291) | about 7 years ago | (#21055511)

I agree with most other comments, the date itself is not that important. Leopard (seems to) offers much more than visual improvements and seems like a worthy successor to Tiger.

Even if there are plenty of new features, many that I'm sure I'll love since it will help me be more efficient (Time Machine, the new Spotlight, etc), there is no "killer feature" that I can say it's groundbreaking. Am I asking for too much? Maybe. But XGrid [apple.com] has been around for a few years [wikipedia.org] and it is not yet the killer feature I hope it will become: easy grid computing for anyone. Might not be that important in home (though many homes have more than one computer, but there's not a lot of number crunching in there), but for small and medium enterprises, that really could be a significant money and time saver.

Re:Missed opportunities are missing features? (2, Interesting)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | about 7 years ago | (#21055713)

Why do you (and many others) downplay Time Machine? I'm an enterprise backup admin, and anything that pushes backup awareness to end users is golden. I'd been dreaming of something like this since before Time Machine was announced. Most computer users don't understand what backups are or how to do them properly, or what good backup software should do. I wouldn't expect anyone but backup admins to understand what most of this [wikipedia.org] means, but they should at least understand what a proper backup solution PROVIDES. For a surprising number of people, copying some of their data to another (or same) volume counts as a "backup".

Outside of developers who use version control systems, a great deal of even IT workers don't understand the concept of point-in-time recovery. Time Machine is a blessing, and all OSes should have a well built backup/recovery client integrated. Hopefully it will promote the idea that backup services shouldn't just be used in emergencies. That's the way most are used today and why nobody trusts them. Trusting a backup solution is HUGE and very underrated. You only get there by using it.

Re:Missed opportunities are missing features? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 7 years ago | (#21055733)

The apps most people run on macs don't require Leopard and don't use any of the new features, my daughter and son are cruising along just fine with Tiger and I'm not seeing reason to shell out the bucks just because something is new and shiny.

Re:Missed opportunities are missing features? (1)

Mistah Blue (519779) | about 7 years ago | (#21055837)

Personally, I like the new parental control features, especially the curfew and time limits. That was one of the reasons to get the family pack.

There are three kinds of people.... (2, Informative)

RatPh!nk (216977) | about 7 years ago | (#21055517)

  1. The people who have been waiting for Vista with baited breath, and would never switch to OS X. Who may not be 100% happy with Vista but will say it will get better with time and is still better in some ways than XP.
  2. The people who are on the fence. Long time window users who are upset with Vista. Who will simply switch to XP who you really couldn't get to switch to OS X if you paid them. I am guessing business users make up a large group of these people.
  3. The third and final group is a hodgepodge. People who just use the OS that comes with the computer, and are getting more and more fed up with Vista. In this case, the time would actually help Apple. Those people who are at wits end [abxzone.com] with Vista, demanding XP [blorge.com] . Would potentially love nothing more than to jump ship completely. Given people's general uncomfortableness with technology in general. Jumping ships to a new platform is not without great hesitation, regardless of their angst at MS. I think this is why we see market share of Linux increasing, albeit slowly.

What do you think? I know it is an oversimplification.

What Sort of Analysis Is This? (1)

GaryPatterson (852699) | about 7 years ago | (#21055549)

Aren't analysts supposed to focus on the future? Any fool can analyse past events with the benefit of hindsight, but that's pretty worthless unless the analysis is razor-sharp with the sort of brilliance that can be folded into future work.

So this article boils down to "someone thinks Apple should have done something different, but doesn't adequately explore ramifications or really prove their case." Excellent. Does this guy have a pamphlet I can subscribe to?

Vista is worse than Tiger, nowhere near Leopard (2, Insightful)

Lexor (724874) | about 7 years ago | (#21055551)

I have a Mac Mini and several PCs. The current Mac OS is better than Vista so I'm not sure why this opinion piece is notable.

Apple is in the hardware business. If a new version of the operating system is going to move boxes it will do so regardless of the software's actual release date.

Apple née Computer (5, Insightful)

fermion (181285) | about 7 years ago | (#21055565)

I think with the delay of OS X, and the change in name, and the release of the iPhone SDK, Apple has chosen where future growth will lie. They will likely keep making computers, laptop for consumers and towers for pro content creation, but small high profit consumer devices are the future.

If anything, Apple has decided that 5% of the computer market is all it will have, and little it does will displace the PC from corporate, the only way it can get much more than 10%. However, with good consumer toys, it can be the home electronics supplier for those with disposable incomes.

I'd say the timing is perfect. (4, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | about 7 years ago | (#21055597)

First of all, it's impossible for Apple to time their releases to coincide with Microsoft's release, since MS was stuck in a cycle of delays that ran about six years. Secondly, Tiger is already more than a match for Vista, and finally, just by sheer luck, Leopard arrives on the scene as people are realizing just how utterly mediocre Vista really is.

-jcr

Pointless to say the least (2, Insightful)

Cannelloni (969195) | about 7 years ago | (#21055633)

I actually read TFA called "Leopard's Release Date a Serious Mistake". A few lines down the author puts it this way: "With all things considered, did Apple make a serious mistake by delaying Leopard's release until October? I don't think so." So what was the point of the article?

Well of course Apple did the right thing when they decided to release Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard when it was good and ready, and not in beta form as that other software house which will not be mentioned sometimes do with its operating systems.

I don't see why Apple should act in any other way but to keep pumping out super-solid software and hardware. (The iPhone was a particularly impressive release, but most Apple products nowadays are very carefully tested. A notable exception being the very first generation MacBook Pros some years ago which were very buggy, and in many cases treated as DOAs and promptly replaced by Apple.)

A thorougly scatterbrained and rambling article in other words.

Re:Pointless to say the least (1)

argent (18001) | about 7 years ago | (#21055703)

A notable exception being the very first generation MacBook Pros some years ago which were very buggy, and in many cases treated as DOAs and promptly replaced by Apple.

No kidding. I have to remove the battery when I'm using iMovie or other CPU-intensive programs or my MBP goes from 50C to 80C in no time at all when it starts converting.

Graph here [scarydevil.com] .

Apple didn't miss out on anything (4, Insightful)

Ragnarr (555058) | about 7 years ago | (#21055637)

Sounds like a fanboy was pissed he couldn't get Leopard back in July. Apple made the right decision by delaying the release of Leopard. Several people on boards I frequent were beta testers and were very vocal in letting everyone know that Leopard was not a "finished" product back then. They would've released something incomplete just like M$; not a good idea. I would say that the only thing Apple lost out on was orders for the new imac/macbooks since many of us were waiting until we were sure that we'd either get Leopard installed or qualify for the updater at a reduced price. I'm definitely happy I bought my new imac at the beginning of October. And yes, it really is that much better than Windows..

Same as it ever was (5, Funny)

maggard (5579) | about 7 years ago | (#21055719)

Apple missed a big opportunity by not releasing Leopard soon.

Yeah, they shoulda released it around 1989, before Windows 3.0 shipped...

Think of all the misery they'd have saved everyone!

Article Synopsis (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 7 years ago | (#21055735)

1) Did apple wait too long to release Leopard?
2) Bunch of inane B.S.
3) Conclusion: Hmmmmmm... no, never mind.

Stupid article.

RTFA (3, Informative)

Compulawyer (318018) | about 7 years ago | (#21055737)

The article actually makes the opposite conclusion than the title of this post on /.


Quoth the article:

"With all things considered, did Apple make a serious mistake by delaying Leopard's release until October? I don't think so." (emphasis added)

Am I the only one... (1)

bitfarmer (219431) | about 7 years ago | (#21055741)

...who read that as "Apple's Missed Opportunity with Leonard Nimoy"?

I'd rather they have it right (3, Insightful)

JohnnyGTO (102952) | about 7 years ago | (#21055745)

then early. That alone one ups Vista.

What mistake? (1)

fgaliegue (1137441) | about 7 years ago | (#21055793)


Vista sells in boxes, sure. Now, what percentage is that compared to bundled Vistas in computers?

The same goes for OS X. Even more so that the vast majority of people who want to delve into the Mac world of computing will do it for the first time won't care whether their OS is called Tiger, Leopard of whatever feline species they can think of...

Really, it may only be a mistake for long time Mac users out there - and they probably won't even regard it as a mistake anyway.

Author Under His Boss's Deadline (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | about 7 years ago | (#21055829)

The short article is mere speculation, and certainly not driven by any scientific polling data.

Opinion, speculation, heresay and whatever, but not much worthy of the pixels to paint on my screen.

Great at design, bad at technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 years ago | (#21055847)

Simple fact: Apple are great at design and marketing, but terrible at technology. Their engineers are, quite frankly, hopeless. They've only made great strides in the iPhone because of Chinese engineers, and these guys can't help them with an OS. Nobody in the industry would have ever expected them to release Leopord(sic!) with Vista.

I miss Steve Irwin (3, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 7 years ago | (#21055873)

Longtime fans of Windows...

The amazing thing is that such a creature still exists in the wild.

Normal users... (3, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | about 7 years ago | (#21055889)

...are not like you and me. They'll never try out an OS just to "check it out" like we might when there's a new distro that's supposedly better. The very last thing that Apple wants are Windows users that are finally convinced to switch, then find out that this sucks and has almost as many issues as Windows, only to move back. Not only have you probably lost them for the next 5-10 years, you'll probably get a lot of anti-marketing "Yeah, I tried a Mac a few years ago, it was all overhyped so don't believe them" that'll mean others won't bother at all.

IT geeks haven't got as much marketing power as we think. Oh, I can go on about the advantages of Linux all day but most of them people will think "sure, for him it might work". Vanity works much better, like "Hey Bill could do it, and I'm at *least* as good with computers as him". Same goes the other way around, if you hear someone "like you" giving something a bad review, you'll pay attention. That's just the way it works in all markets, and makes plain old sense. If you want to do print work, you don't read a webdesigner's review of GIMP you read a print worker's review. And with that perspective it makes perfect sense for Apple to wait until it's ready.

One-upped? (3, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | about 7 years ago | (#21055911)

According to an article on OSWeekly.com, Apple missed a big opportunity by not releasing Leopard soon. They could've taken advantage of Vista's losing streak and one upped Microsoft, the author suggests.

OSWeekly sounds as if Leopard is the first OS Apple is about to release. Tiger is for most practical purposes just as good OS as Leopard. Leopard is a gradual improvement.

Plus it only is starting to become obvious in the recent 2-3 months how many problems Vista (still) has. The announcement of XP SP3, the oddly early Vista SP1 in Q1 2008, the extended OEM XP support period, the Vista-to-XP downgrade new policy.

And Leopard is here right for the holidays. I'd say, timing is as good as it could be. Perfect-storm-like good.

OSWeekly is just trolling for visits, and we're suckers for it.
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