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Amazon and Hardware As a Service

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the metering-it dept.

Data Storage 53

sioux_chance writes to recommend an article up on ReadWriteWeb comparing Amazon's S3 and EC2 services with Google AdSense. (They are not the first to coin the term "HaaS" for hardware as a service.) The analogy is that Google increased the granularity of (the article invents the term "fragmentized") the revenue side of the Web business, whereas Amazon's HaaS does the same for the cost side. A comment to the blog posting points out that NearlyFreeSpeech.net has been selling fine-grained hardware capacity for years, but Amazon does bring a greater scale to the business.

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I'm sick of niggers. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167057)

God damn I hate when I have to walk by a big group of niggers, or even worse a bunch of smaller groups of niggers.

It's like, which one of these fucking niggers is going to try to rob me?

Re:I'm sick of niggers. (-1, Flamebait)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168551)

Go get a job, fucktard

Re:I'm sick of niggers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21171309)

The biggest and mostly white one of them all, the US government

and stop trolling :P

A Service (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167067)


GNAA Announces OneNigger Suite of Collaborative Trolling Utilities

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"OneNigger is a hosted collaboration groupware for taking a more proactive approach to trolling. By leveraging OneNigger services with industry trolling best-pratices, the lone gay nigger, or small gay nigger organization is empowered to think outside the box." stated timecop.
Added jesuitx, "Furthermore, in our focus group testing we were able to increase LastMeasure coverage by 36.4% among bloggers participating in large blogrolls. Using modules like the OneNigger Date shared calendaring system allows groups to pick times to touch base on important trolling issues of the day."
Other modules in the OneNigger Enterprise version include OneNigger Chizzat running on patented extensions to IRC, OneNigger Phone, which offers VoIP technologies with free toll-free access to the USA and Japan, and Gay Porn Avalanche Enterprise 2.0 (GPAE2), now newly integrated into the OneNigger platform. OneNigger requires Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 running on an Intel processor. AMD is not supported, as OneNigger is an enterprise-level software suite, and requires a powerful computer.
Later on at the after-party, GNAA member Depakote jacked off with this Microsoft OneCare CD, and consumed his seed, much to the squealing delight of Jaime Foxx.

About AMD:

Slow.

About GNAA:
GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the first organization which gathers GAY NIGGERS from all over America and abroad for one common goal - being GAY NIGGERS.

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* Third, you need to join the official GNAA irc channel #GNAA on irc.gnaa.us, and apply for membership.


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If you have mod points and would like to support GNAA, please moderate this post up.

IBM introduced "Hardware as a service" around 1920 (4, Informative)

Animats (122034) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167161)

For many decades, IBM only rented machines; they didn't sell them. Not until they lost an antitrust case did they sell hardware. Rented machines came with IBM service, which was excellent. Now that was "hardware as a service".

What Amazon is offering is called "time-sharing".

Remember Sun's "grid computing" [alibaba.com] ? Big dud. The number of people who want to pay to run huge batch jobs but don't want to buy their own hardware just isn't that big.

There are two players in this space who are known to make money: Akamai and ResPower Render Farm. [respower.com]

Re:IBM introduced "Hardware as a service" around 1 (5, Informative)

dacut (243842) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167347)

Akamai is a different beast altogether -- they're not a generic computing center, but a finely-tuned cache that gets your (mostly static) data as close to the user as possible. In fact, Amazon uses Akamai [akamai.com] (PDF press release) to host some of their content.

The difference between Sun's Grid Computing and EC2 is that EC2 is connected to the net. This doesn't mean you can't run huge batch jobs on EC2; however, there's a lot more you can put on there (read: hosting for the Web 2.0 company you've founded in your garage, mom's basement, ...). However, EC2 doesn't give you a load balancer (yet); getting the traffic from www.your-spiffy-domain.com to the EC2 instances is still your problem.

S3 is, IMHO, the more interesting of the technologies today. Buying storage capacity these days is cheap; maintaining it, however, is as expensive as ever (perhaps moreso as clients expect higher availability, geographic distribution to minimize risk, etc.). And, if I'm too small for Akamai yet need to host some static content over a fatter pipe than I have, I can even expose it to the rest of the world through the REST interface./p.

Re:IBM introduced "Hardware as a service" around 1 (4, Insightful)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167529)

There are two players in this space who are known to make money: Akamai and ResPower Render Farm.

Oh, come now. That's just silly.

When you host a website, you pay for NNN Megabytes of website, and maybe YYY GB of network transfer. These are terms of hardware, not software, not service. Yet, it's sold as a service.

Even the free Hotmail has, as one if it's key features, XX GB of space. It's a free service sold in terms of hardware consumption. Then there are backup providers, weblication providers, Yahoo stores, etc.

There aren't two, there are something like 5 million [google.com] of them.

Re:IBM introduced "Hardware as a service" around 1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167747)

Your Sun's "grid computing" link has nothing to with Sun or grid computing.

Re:IBM introduced "Hardware as a service" around 1 (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 6 years ago | (#21173235)

Your Sun's "grid computing" link has nothing to with Sun or grid computing.

Oops, sorry. Pasted in a link from something I was doing in another window.

they now own everything (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167163)

the hardware isn't yours, the software isn't yours and if the censoring is any indication your data isn't yours either.

Re:they now own everything (4, Insightful)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168043)

Parent is not flame bait possibly off topic a bit but still it is true in the point they are making. If you don't own the hardware or the software how can you honestly say the data is yours and is secure? I mean really, think about it... These are big companies, what if one of the competitors slips them a few thousand grand under the table for a peek at your customer database which is conveniently hosted on the website. Companies did this in the old days between each other to compile junk mailing lists and telemarketer calling numbers.

Business is a dirty and underhanded as the underbelly of the spy scene. There are those who are willing to get ahead by any means necessary (look at recent complaints about Target and BestBuy). These are the exact same companies that you are typically entrusting your private information such as credit cards and mailing info to on a daily basis.

Re:they now own everything (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21168315)

Yeah, hope the mods correct this. This is a critical issue and I would expect any THINKING slashdotter to see this. Wish I were metamoderating right now.

Re:they now own everything (1)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 6 years ago | (#21169307)

These are big companies, what if one of the competitors slips them a few thousand grand under the table for a peek at your customer database which is conveniently hosted on the website. Companies did this in the old days between each other to compile junk mailing lists and telemarketer calling numbers.

I understand the point, but today most companies openly sell their data to each other.

I had some people visiting from another country living in my house, and they did something wrong when they lived with me, because years later they still get offers for credit cards. They worked at the same place and had the same bank, but one gets 2x the mail that the other one does, so he must have done something different.

Hardware, Kernel & Security (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167207)

There is probably much speculation about this as it applies to hardware as a service, especially the security of said hardware.
However, I found this to be more interesting.

GNAA Announces responsibility for kernel backdoor
GNAA Announces responsibility for kernel backdoor
By Tim Copperfield

Raleigh, NC - GNAA (Gay Nigger Association of America) this afternoon announced one of their loyal members was responsible for planting the "backdoor" [slashdot.org] inside the popular opensores operating system, Lunix [redhat.com] (Stocks [yahoo.com] , Websites [google.com] ).

In a shocking announcement this afternoon, GNAA representative goat-see revealed that the mistery hacker who penetrated high-security defenses of the Lunix "source code" repository and injected viral gay nigger seed deep inside the kernel was indeed a full-time GNAA member.

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Insertion of the GNAA backdoor came right between the consideration of Novell [novell.com] to buy out the entire Lunix Kernel programming team, and will most likely positively affect the decision. By adding all the gay niggers working for Novell with the gay niggers developing Lunix kernel source, GNAA will be all-powerful and will begin plotting our next plans to add "backdoors" into the next favorite operating system, BeOS [microsoft.com] .



About GNAA:
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.________________________________________________.
| ______________________________________._a,____ | Press contact:
| _______a_._______a_______aj#0s_____aWY!400.___ | Gary Niger
| __ad#7!!*P____a.d#0a____#!-_#0i___.#!__W#0#___ | gary_niger@gnaa.us [mailto]
| _j#'_.00#,___4#dP_"#,__j#,__0#Wi___*00P!_"#L,_ | GNAA Corporate Headquarters
| _"#ga#9!01___"#01__40,_"4Lj#!_4#g_________"01_ | 143 Rolloffle Avenue
| ________"#,___*@`__-N#____`___-!^_____________ | Tarzana, California 91356
| _________#1__________?________________________ |
| _________j1___________________________________ | All other inquiries:
| ____a,___jk_GAY_NIGGER_ASSOCIATION_OF_AMERICA_ | Enid Al-Punjabi
| ____!4yaa#l___________________________________ | enid_indian@gnaa.us [mailto]
| ______-"!^____________________________________ | GNAA World Headquarters
` _______________________________________________' 160-0023 Japan Tokyo-to Shinjuku-ku Nishi-Shinjuku 3-20-2

Copyright (c) 2003-2004 Gay Nigger Association of America [www.gnaa.us]

the article invents the term "fragmentized"? what? (2, Insightful)

webplay (903555) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167235)

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fragmentized [thefreedictionary.com]
fragmentize (frgmn-tz)
tr. & intr.v. fragmentized, fragmentizing, fragmentizes
To break or become broken into fragments.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000

Re:the article invents the term "fragmentized"? wh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167375)

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fragmentized
fragmentize (frgmn-tz)
tr. & intr.v. fragmentized, fragmentizing, fragmentizes
To break or become broken into fragments.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000

you really couldn't find a better way to contribute to the discussion?

Re:the article invents the term "fragmentized"? wh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167411)

your better way is to bitch about his lack of a better way?

Re:the article invents the term "fragmentized"? wh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21173619)

and is your way ... oh fuck it! Let's get BACK on topic, shall we?
I, for one, get on topic and welcome our word-reinventing overlords.
Now, can we discuss the article? This goes for gramer nasies 2! LOL!

Will you (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21167293)

mod me down too? I'll say the magic words! nigger nigger nigger There, now you can waste your mod points on me too! Do not disappoint me!

For real applications? (1)

brajesh (847246) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167333)

s3 is primarily geared towards file storage, so probably a good choice for hosting static files, images and CSSs. but what about relational data - hosting real databases. There is no persistent storage in ec2, making any virtual server setup extremely unreliable.
That said, s3 makes sense for dumping things like tier-3 data backups.

Persistent storage? (1)

aharth (412459) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167503)

I've heard this before and didn't understand it.

What does "no persistent storage in ec2" mean?

Re:Persistent storage? (3, Informative)

Unknown Relic (544714) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167547)

It means that if the instance is shut down for whatever reason, any and all data stored on that instance is lost. While in theory it's possible to keep the instance running indefinitely, there have been cases where people's instances have been restarted resulting in data loss. http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2007/Oct/02/amazon_ec2_outage_wipes_out_data.html [datacenterknowledge.com]

Re:Persistent storage? (4, Informative)

dacut (243842) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167615)

Basically, your server can go down at any time and any data on it will be unrecoverable. Precious data must be stored off the EC2 instance (e.g., on S3).

The implication is that you need to architect your application with this in mind. It has to be deployable and bootstrappable from a master image (typically the EC2 machine image). It either has to be stateless (generally preferred) or be able to recreate its state upon startup and periodically checkpoint its state while running. This is generally true whenever you're working on a large, distributed application and are properly treating your application servers as substitutable commodity machines. However, many people take shortcuts and depend on the reliability of the running hardware; EC2 is can be very unforgiving if you do this.

Re:Persistent storage? (1)

adawgnow (793565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167685)

The idea is that all of your ec2 instances (virtual hosts) should be stateless, or lack any business state (they will have the state of the applications running on them though). The E in ec2 is elastic and the primary motivation behind being elastic is quickly scaling up AND down as your business needs change (minute by minute, hourly, daily, etc...) and keeping your business state on each of those instances wouldn't work for most cases.

So you need to keep it somewhere else, which is where S3 comes in, which is basically keeping your business state in the cloud of the internet, writable and readable from anywhere. It's true, relational and contentious data doesn't work well in S3, technically and the pricing model works against lots of little data with lots of reads-writes (its better for static and larger files). All this doesn't mean that you can't use s3 for some relational data though, a mysql driver was written for s3.

The fact is, you can still keep your business data outside of ec2, but it has the potential to now be the bottleneck and single point-of-failure for your online applications. You could even set up a set of ec2 instances to be your db hosts replicating between primary and secondaries, which probably wouldn't be any worse than most db replication solutions. Most db's can be designed to work around the bottleneck problem, and in tandem with s3 this might be quite a reasonable solution.

I say nay to the haterz :) ec2 allows you to put anything you want on your vhosts, so no persistent storage means its not an encouraged pattern.

Re:For real applications? (2, Interesting)

Admiral Lazzurs (96382) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168115)

Now first of all big disclaimer, I am the Chief Systems Architect for Flexiscale.

While EC2 might not offer you persistent storage or static IP addresses the product the company I work for sells does and it still has the same per hour billing model of Amazon EC2. Have a look at http://www.flexiscale.com/ [flexiscale.com] for more information.

Re:For real applications? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21168731)

It appears from a brief look at your offering that it's essentially a VPS and although priced similarly doesn't stand direct comparison with globally distributed systems like S3 or Akaimai. For me this isn't a problem since most of my traffic is from the UK but please do correct me if I have misunderstood.

> FlexiScale gives you the ability to import any virtual server image.

What about Qemu COW images?

Do you have a URL for your API documentation?

Re:For real applications? (1)

tobiasly (524456) | more than 6 years ago | (#21169663)

I might be interested in kicking the tires on your service if it didn't require me to fill out a contact form to have someone get back to me later. I don't think I could put much trust in a company that wants to manage my infrastructure but hasn't gotten around to building an online order system.

Re:For real applications? (1)

Admiral Lazzurs (96382) | more than 6 years ago | (#21175283)

Hello,

I can understand your frustration at the lack of the on-line order (and I would suggest there should be provisioning as well) system however the reason for this is nothing more than we have more requests for capacity than we could deal with after our launch at the Future of Web Apps expo here in London. We have an on-line ordering system for all of our other products at http://www.xcalibre.co.uk/ [xcalibre.co.uk] and we will have a fully automated on-line ordering and provisioning system for Flexiscale as soon as we can assure the capacity will be there to match the demand. Some what similar to Amazon and their launch ;)

If you would like to contact me on the email address in my /. profile I am sure I can answer any further queries you have.

Re:For real applications? (1)

tobiasly (524456) | more than 6 years ago | (#21176729)

Thanks for the info, I will be launching a webapp early next year and am looking for a service that I could scale quickly if demand takes off as I hope. I'll keep you on my list and look back when that time comes. Amazon EC2 is rather interesting but its "roll your own" approach to load balancing is not very reassuring!

Re:For real applications? (1)

jrexilius (520067) | more than 6 years ago | (#21170599)

The Amazon offerings are definitely not ready for applications where money is on the line. But they are a great way for a start-up to throw something out there and get through the initial growth period on the cheap.

Once an app/business hits maturity a lot of critical things are missing (SSL, transactional scaling support, SLA's, high performance etc.).

The big deal in my mind is that it doesn't really solve the underlying problems an application faces in scaling, performance or availability. It just makes it quicker to throw hardware at it, which anyone who has done this before knows only gets you the first 25% of the way there.

Use SDB or SQS (1)

MushMouth (5650) | more than 6 years ago | (#21174771)

Amazon has other services to help keep state with EC2

SDB -> Simple Data Base
SQS -> Simple Queue Service
 

Re:Use SDB or SQS (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21176979)

What's SDB? I can't find anything about it on the AWS website... Are you think of the Simple Storage Service (S3)?

Human Beings as a Service (2, Interesting)

Draco_es (628422) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167557)

Amazon S3 & EC2 are revolutionary, but at some point, it's a reasonable next step. The only big drawback of EC2 is the lack of persistence so it's hard to host a dataserver on there.

But the truly revolutionary service is Mturk [mturk.com] . It's about packetizing tasks for humans! not for computers.

Needs more transparency for real uses (1)

putaro (235078) | more than 6 years ago | (#21167805)

I looked at S3 with an eye towards using it as a backend for a hosted backup system (one of their recommended uses, in fact). The problem that I had with using it is that there is no transparency about their operations, no service level guarantees and really no information about just where things will work and where things will start to break down.

For example, the talk about S3's scalability as being "unlimited". In reality, nothing is unlimited. They might have an architecture that theoretically scales up indefinitely but the implementation could be quite lacking. I could see two ways to use S3 as backup storage - you could make a tar file or equivalent and put it into S3 or you could assign each individual file an S3 ID and put it in. The difference between the two approaches is huge in terms of the number of unique objects stored (I have over 1.5M files on my laptop. Now multiply that out by 10's of 1000's of users). Designing a system that can stores 100's of billions of unique objects is different from designing a system that can store millions of unique objects. Not knowing what S3's intended workload is, it's hard to design for using it.

Furthermore there are no guarantees about bandwidth, availability. There aren't even guidelines for how much they think is reasonable. If I were to design a service using them as a backend and then have big success, what happens? Even if they're willing to add capacity at a rapid rate, how rapidly can they add? If a customer calls and says "I can't access my data" - how does that get resolved? How global is S3? If I start picking up customers in Europe or Japan or China, what will happen?

So, I think S3 is a great service for small uses. It's not possible to build a larger business around it until they start being more transparent about how it works, what are reasonable uses for it and how it is being used currently.

As a developer, customers have asked me why I don't add S3 as a backend to my backup app. That would be reasonable, but what's in it for me? S3 doesn't have any kind of referral fee so I'm just handing them money and adding headaches for myself. If they want people to add it their apps they should set up a way that the developers can get a little piece of the action.

Re:Needs more transparency for real uses (1)

cperciva (102828) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168271)

Amazon recently announced that S3 had more than 10 billion objects stored, and a transaction rate which suggests that S3 is doing many Gbps of traffic. Unless you have very deep pockets, odds are that S3 can handle more requests than you can pay for.

Re:Needs more transparency for real uses (1)

putaro (235078) | more than 6 years ago | (#21180647)

Well, as I said, I was looking at it as a possible back-end for a hosted backup service. So, it's not my pockets that would need to be deep, it's how many customers I could scrounge up. Taking my laptop (a little unusual) as a baseline with 1.5M files, 10,000 customers would blow right past what S3 is storing right now.

So, that was my point. For small uses (like a small-medium size business' data) it's probably just fine but if you are trying to build a business on top of it you might find it inadequate.

Re:Needs more transparency for real uses (3, Informative)

emj (15659) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168727)

no service level guarantees and really no information about just where things will work and where things will start to break down.


Not much but there is a SLA [amazon.com]

I hope they are secure (1)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168085)

I hope they set up some kind of system preventing the data used in the service from falling into the wrong hands, and by that I mean something above par. It will only take one successful hack of the system to make their business model come crashing down. Most of their potential business clients will only be willing to pay if they can assume that their data will remain secure with them as the only ones who can use it. Don't get me wrong I love the idea(although it is nothing new) but I hope they think this through.Just like windows is a prime target because of the potential loot this will likely be targeted.

I can see it now:
"Breaking News Hackers have Secured Top Secret Files Proving [Conspiracy Theory]! [Government Organization] Denys All Claims"
"Amazon Bankrupt After Lawsuit when Hackers Steal Client's Valuable Confidential Files"
"Slashdot Users' wetdream- Source Code for next Windows Operating System stolen off of Amazon's HaaS after Microsoft Budget Cuts due to the Well Known Vista Blunder"

"fragmentized" (1)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168387)

The word is SPLIT, it's much clearer and aesthetically pleasing then "Fragmentized"

Re:"fragmentized" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21168879)

..or even 'fragmented'..

Why we went inhouse (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21168421)

We looked at using Amazons storage thing for our start up. There are no technical reasons we didn't use it, we decided against purely because Amazon have been such assholes with patents. Why add to their profits if there's a chance you'll be sued for some obvious technique 5-10 years from now?

NFS (1)

daeg (828071) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168625)

Just have to put in my two cents (which would buy you 2 MB/month storage or 21 MB of outbound traffic) in professing my love for NFS. I don't think I've had a bill over 50 since I went with them.

Re:NFS (1)

Slashdot Parent (995749) | more than 6 years ago | (#21175045)

It took me a while to try to figure out why you were paying for NFS [wikipedia.org] , which is free software. Might want to expand that acronym to be more clear. ;)

Some day we will all be... (2, Funny)

UnixUnix (1149659) | more than 6 years ago | (#21168663)

...thin clients of fat cats :-)

Welcome Back to The Future! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21169019)

Welcome back to the future (c) 1970-1980. HaaS or SaaS is just a re-invention of time-sharing. Don't need to configure your computer, we will do it FOR you. Don't need to buy software, we will do it FOR you. Don't OWN your software/hardware, WE do. Now comes the slow push of Don't store your data, let us do it FOR you. Catch is, you no longer OWN anything, not even your data.

Need something that can still be re-used for a few years? buy a computer.

Want to throw away money to a corporation and make them richer, buy into this bullshit model.

NearlyFreeSpeech.net (1)

ribuck (943217) | more than 6 years ago | (#21169211)

The summary mentions NearlyFreeSpeech.net which we use to host paid research/Q&A site http://uclue.com/ [uclue.com]

What we like about them is that we pay for what we use. No more, no less. Why is this concept so rare in the industry, which seems to be built around "pay for promises, get what the arbitrary fair usage policy gives you"?

The downside of NearlyFreeSpeech.net is that they don't offer https due to some ideological problem with IP Addresses. The upside is that, apart from that, they make money by enabling you to do more, not by restricting you from doing so much.

Re:NearlyFreeSpeech.net (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21169285)

The HTTPS problem is a technical issue due to the way the SSL tunnel and certificates are constructed. The server certificate used while SSL handshaking contains the hostname, and there is no method of providing the requested hostname before the SSL handshaking is initiated (thus allowing the web server to send the corresponding certificate).

So, HTTPS names are always tied to a particular IP address.

Re:NearlyFreeSpeech.net (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21175851)

So, HTTPS names are always tied to a particular IP address.

That said, there are ways around this though they may reduce certain aspects of security. For instance, they offer foo.nfshost.net sites, that could be covered with a *.nfshost.net SSL certificate. Or they could load the server up with a * self-signed cert, and let people use it if they want to explain to the reader that they have to accept the certificate.

These would not be useful for identifying a specific site on their system though, which could become a problem if someone was running https://bank.nfshost.net/ [nfshost.net] and someone else registered baank.

Re:NearlyFreeSpeech.net (1)

dch24 (904899) | more than 6 years ago | (#21179285)

For instance, they offer foo.nfshost.net sites, that could be covered with a *.nfshost.com [sic] SSL certificate.
Obligatory: I am a satisfied NearlyFreeSpeech.net customer.

They could offer that, and probably will in the near future (within a year, is my best guess). But e-commerce websites will want the brand recognition of http s://www.mysite.com. Such businesses aren't satisfied with sending all their customers to mysite.nfshost.com, in my experience. They want their customers to feel secure, and to be able to see the website's "real name" in the address bar when entering credit card info.

There is a way for NearlyFreeSpeech.net to serve up all those SSL certificates: use RFC 3546. In brief, the SSL library needs to support "Server Name Indication," which sends the server name to the server. That allows the server to do "virtual hosts," which is a big part of what NearlyFreeSpeech.net to sell "at cost."

Anyway, keep an eye on this bug [apache.org] in Apache for when support will be added to Apache's mod_ssl.

Is not a slam-dunk yet (1)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 6 years ago | (#21169929)

Google's Adsense makes something accessible to small players that is hard to do otherwise - soliciting and managing business relationships with advertisers and web sites, and integrating an apparently fair revenue model into it too. Amazon's HaaS isn't that radical/new. For one thing, fragmented computing/networking resources were already available as Virtual Private Server or Virtualized Environments. Perhaps not as fine-grained but cheaper than Amazon.

Given Amazon's linear pricing, their granularizing everything makes me nervous... how often do I have to watch my meter as I run my apps? A VPS with fixed limits on everything except total bandwidth used, at its price point, is something I'm more comfortable with at this point.

Amazon doesn't seem like a good deal. (1)

Organic Brain Damage (863655) | more than 6 years ago | (#21172237)

I'm getting an entire server (not virtual), with hardware RAID mirror and other reasonably decent low-end server hardware (2 GB RAM, Core 2 Duo). I can do whatever I want with it, and the provider supplies the hardware, the O/S and the bandwidth (4 MBytes / second, up and down) for $260 / month. If the hardware breaks, the provider fixes it within 4 hrs. For extra money, I can get more fetuares, like mirrored servers, etc... For an extra $300 / month, I can have 10 M Bytes / second symmetric. They set it up for me within 48 hrs of order. It's been great so far.

Re:Amazon doesn't seem like a good deal. (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 6 years ago | (#21172367)

Amazon's service isn't really meant to replace servers. It's meant to replace number-crunching boxes.

Caan the Berkeley Haas school (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21172407)

of business puut and end to thaat name?
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