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Single Nanotube Becomes World's Smallest Radio

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the play-misty-for-me dept.

Toys 152

Invisible Pink Unicorn writes "Researchers at the National Science Foundation have utilized a single carbon nanotube to perform all the functions of a standard radio, acting as an antenna, tunable filter, amplifier, and demodulator. They were then able to tune in a radio signal generated in the room and play it back through an attached speaker. The device is functional across a bandwidth widely used for commercial radio. From the NSF: 'The source content for the first laboratory test of the radio was "Layla," by Derek and the Dominos, followed soon after by "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys.'"

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Apple Product Announcement (2, Funny)

TheDrewbert (914334) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199039)

The Apple iTube. Don't buy just one, buy the whole series.

Re:Apple Product Announcement (2, Funny)

Soko (17987) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199267)

The Apple iTube. Don't buy just one, buy the whole series.

Quick - someone call Ted Series of Tubes [wikipedia.org] Stevens - we found what he's looking for.

Soko

Great new CowboyNeal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21200931)

You can now listen to the radio out your dick!

It's bullshit, of course (2)

originalnih (709470) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199407)

Goddamn Horton Hears A Who viral marketing!

Apple products... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199899)

Apple would still charge $299 for the device and claim its all in the development.

Apple's stock would then jump 800% and people might finally realize that they are getting charged for nothing but bit shifting.

And it would still only have one button.

Commercials (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199049)

When a single nanotube can cut out the commercials on my FM radio- THATS when I will get excited.

Re:Commercials (2, Insightful)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199113)

Yes, you not only want the entertainment for free, you want the distributer to pay for the privilege of getting it to your ears. That's a wonderful business idea, I'm sure someone will take that up immediately.

Re:Commercials (3, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199549)

Yes, you not only want the entertainment for free, you want the distributer to pay for the privilege of getting it to your ears
Please excuse me if I have a little trouble working up any sympathy for those poor, downtrodden advertisers.

I don't mind hearing advertising with my music, but nearly 20 minutes per hour (as during drive time) is a little excessive, don't you think? I'm not prepared to start having bake sales for industries that got so greedy that it has driven them to near extinction.

I'm pretty sick of corporations, whole industries, that believed they could treat their customers badly while attempting to drive every possible penny into their pockets, then start crying and whining when something better comes along and those customers turn their backs. It does seem, though, that killing the golden goose through greed is a defining characteristic of all corporations in this age of slash and burn profitism.

Re:Commercials (1)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199689)

Who said anything about the advertisers? There are costs associated with running a radio station, and they are typically paid through commercials.

Everything else you've said amounts to a rant in the grand Slashdot tradition - you waited for something vaguely related to come up and you spewed forth.

Re:Commercials (2, Insightful)

sedman (210394) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199949)

I hope you don't think you are the customer. The customer of a radio station is the advertiser. You are simply the product.

Now get back on the shelf, like a good product, and try to look good for the customers.

Re:Commercials (1)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200415)

Yes, those radio stations treat you so badly, forcing you to listen to them, forcing you to listen to the commercials, never letting you turn the radio off or change stations... it's awful, simply awful how poorly you're treated.

We're doing them a service by complaining (2, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200783)

Think about it, if we just turned the channel, they'd have no idea why. By publicly complaining about their service, we give them an opportunity to change their business model to one that more people find valuable. That's the way a free market democracy is supposed to work.

It sounds like you want a fascist system where we all have to take what we are given by our corporate masters, and no one has a right to complain about poor service. Tell you what, you go live in a system like that, I'll stay here in America where I still have some shred of rights to free speech.

Love your hypocritical double standard, by the way. We can't complain about corporate radio, but you get to complain about our complaints. Hey, no one is forcing you to read Slashdot, why don't you just leave if you don't like the opinions here?

Re:Commercials (1)

Nullav (1053766) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201157)

How did the GP say anything like that? In the case of radio, the listeners are the product. The advertisers pay the stations so that people will hear their ads and potentially buy what they're selling. The stations are (potentially) selling your time.

Re:Commercials (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21200703)

The catch for the radio station is that although the advertisers do seem to view us as the product, the radio station can't afford to think of us as anything but a customer (albeit one dealing in a custom other than cash.) The reason being, of course, that a product can't simply up and walk away...

Re:Commercials (1)

Dirtside (91468) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201283)

It does seem, though, that killing the golden goose through greed is a defining characteristic of all corporations in this age of slash and burn profitism.

I hate to break it to you, but short-sightedness is basically the defining characteristic of all of human history.

Re:Commercials (1)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200947)

So here's a business opportunity: Sell digital radio sets that require a smart card, something like a telephone SIM, to decrypt scrambled programmes. Broadcast advert-free scrambled programmes, funded by the purchase of said decoder cards. You'll need a lot of capital, but advert-free is a novelty that doesn't wear off -- check out the BBC sometime.

Awesome! (4, Funny)

butterwise (862336) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199085)

At that scale, you can actually see the radio waves [nsf.gov] ...

Re:Awesome! (3, Funny)

pwnies (1034518) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199201)

It is somewhat saddening that they have to put that disclaimer there that "The waves shown in this image were added for visual effect, and are not part of the original microscope image".

Re:Awesome! (2, Insightful)

butterwise (862336) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199421)

It is almost more saddening that the waves are not going in the correct direction given the nanotube is a receiver, not a transmitter...

It's 1950's technology, and it's NOT a radio! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21201209)

Reading more closely, we discover that:

It's not really a complete radio...It's just a tiny tuning fork.
Demos like these make me ask: what the hell happened to research in America?

They left out the fact that they were using a specially tuned PWM transmitter... and a high powered one at that... to vibrate the .6 cm nanotube structure.

They left out (as well) the fact that they were using another specially tuned receiver to detect the movement and turn it back into audio.

They could have done the same thing with almost any material, including a grain of salt, a slice of stale pizza or a drop of water. This is essentially the same as attaching an earphone to a crystal, and then tuning the transmitter to the crystal and making it vibrate by hitting it with a high powered modulated wave. I guess it's cool that they got a huge nsf grant to recreate an incomplete crystal radio.

Using an external process to convert the vibration back into audio is cool and all, but I wish I could win big grants for such elementary application of well-known processes. Hey, maybe I could bounce a laser-beam off the carbon nano-tube and call it a "secure" nano-communications device! Who wants to help me write the NSF research request?

A rerun of the hype surrounding MIT's shocking rediscovery of tesla's magic coil trick.
I predict an NSF funded rebirth of spark gap transmitters.

Public Perfromance (2, Funny)

josephtd (817237) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199089)

We're they paying royalties to the RIAA? RIAA vs. NSF coming soon to a Federal Court near you.

a Walkman for dust mites? (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199095)

What's next?

Re:a Walkman for dust mites? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199433)

Dust mice. Those little guys get everything >:(

a "Mr. Watson. Come Here. I need you." moment (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199097)

the day mankind gave the gift of Howard Stern and American Top 40 and the traffic report to bacteria

Re:a "Mr. Watson. Come Here. I need you." moment (1, Funny)

Soko (17987) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199207)

the day mankind gave the gift of Howard Stern and American Top 40 and the traffic report to bacteria

*blink*

Gift? That list sounds like we're trying to find a new way to kill them.

Soko

Re:a "Mr. Watson. Come Here. I need you." moment (1)

homer_ca (144738) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199343)

Yeah, first you have the femtosecond laser pulse to destroy viruses and now this.

Re:a "Mr. Watson. Come Here. I need you." moment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21200025)

Isn't that redundant?

Re:a "Mr. Watson. Come Here. I need you." moment (1)

Spokehedz (599285) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200293)

Nonono... Howard left terrestrial radio a looong time ago.

I know you don't get Sirius in Your Mom's Basement(TM) but just toss it out the window, k?

We're gonna need (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199101)

We're gonna need a bigger tin-foil hat.

Re:We're gonna need (1)

richlv (778496) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199565)

nah, riaa will get them

Re:We're gonna need (1)

lordofthechia (598872) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199709)

Nah don't bother, they could put MILLIONS of these radios per square foot of tinfoil and you wouldn't even notice. Heck they could put these in your food, water, etc... Sorry, didn't mean to add to the paranoia.

Voices in My Head (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199771)

Spooks playing God/Allah/Jehovah/*.

Re:We're gonna need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21200979)

Nah, what you need is a tin-foil hat covered in carbon nanotubes.

They're going to make a fortune... (5, Funny)

pwnies (1034518) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199103)

...on people losing these things. "Damnit, where's my radio? Did I lose it again!? Oh wait here it is... no... that's pocket lint."

The bright side of nanotech: (1)

megaditto (982598) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200171)

I will finally be able to tune into Air America with my penis.

Re:They're going to make a fortune... (1)

Larry_The_Canary (1084565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200865)

I can already hear the late night infomercials

- ...if you buy a brand new carbon nanotube radio for the low, low, cost of only $1337.69 in the next 15 minutes we'll throw in a powerful electron microscope for the amazing price of only ten thousand dollars! With this puppy you'll never again mistake a spec on the floor for your radio. This one of a kind deal won't last for long so buy..............right now!!!!!!11!!!!!one!!!one!!!eleven!!!

Science press releases: God's gift to surrealism (4, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199111)

Returning to Zettl's runner analogy, the vibrating nanotube is akin to a ditch with a constantly changing width.


I really do love the analogies we use to describe quantum-mechanical or relativistic behavior. Even the best ones start off comprehensible but rapidly morph into the deranged land of our most cheese-fuelled nightmares.

Re:Science press releases: God's gift to surrealis (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199445)

rapidly morph into the deranged land of our most cheese-fuelled nightmares

Now *that's* an interesting phobia.

Re:Science press releases: God's gift to surrealis (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200011)

Ah, where I come from it's assumed that if you eat a lot of cheese at night, you will have vivid dreams.

Re:Science press releases: God's gift to surrealis (1)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201017)

It's true. Cheese contains tyramine, which is a neurotransmitter analogue and an extremely mild hallucinogen -- so mild, in fact, that its effects are only noticeable if you are already asleep and dreaming.

In other news... (4, Funny)

EvilSpudBoy (1159091) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199133)

Perfoming rights organizations, BMI and ASCAP, want a fee for every carbon nanotube sold.

And how much of that (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199403)

will go to the figurehead artists, who put their name to some words and then drive their hybrid SUVs to their red carpet galas, leaving the poor, starving attorneys, accountants, and publicists to do the real work -- the licensing?

It's time to make a stand. We at the firm of Leech, Suxxor & Scabb are taking up the cause of starving parasuits everywhere.

We just want what's right.

We just want what's fair.

Re:And how much of that (2, Funny)

saider (177166) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200591)

I prefer the litigation services of Dewey, Cheatum, & Howe.

nyuk, nyuk

Re:And how much of that (1)

jdray (645332) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201233)

Or Hooke, Swindell and Crouch.

Journal abstract and Project page (4, Informative)

InvisblePinkUnicorn (1126837) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199137)

Their project page has videos, simulations, and audio playback samples: NSF Nanotube Radio [berkeley.edu]

Here is their journal abstract [acs.org] :

"We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception."

Re:Journal abstract and Project page (1)

kebes (861706) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200021)

Some details, from the scientific article, about how it functions:

Amazingly, all four critical radio receiver components can be simultaneously implemented with a single carbon nanotube. ... the entire radio consists of an individual carbon nanotube mounted to an electrode in close proximity to a counter electrode. A direct current (dc) voltage source, such as from a battery, is connected to the electrodes and powers the radio. Important for the radio's operation, the applied dc bias negatively charges the tip of the nanotube, sensitizing it to oscillating electric fields.
They describe how the operation of their system is quite different from conventional radios, since the nanotube become mechanically coupled (and physically vibrates) in response to the radio waves:

electromagnetic waves from an incoming radio transmission impinge upon the nanotube forcing it to physically vibrate through their action on the charged tip. These vibrations are only significant when the frequency of the incoming wave coincides with the nanotube's flexural resonance frequency.
The reception is thus due to mechanical coupling, and demodulation occurs via field emission:

Mechanical vibrations of the nanotube modulate the field-emission current,[10] which then serves as the easily detected electrical signal. Because the battery voltage source, rather than the incoming electromagnetic wave, powers the field-emission current, amplification of the radio signal is possible. Also, due to nonlinearities inherent in field-emission, demodulation of the radio signal occurs as well.
They also show that the resonant frequency of the nanotube can be altered. Coarsely, it can be tuned based on the length of the nanotube, and fine adjustments can be made by altering the bias voltage. One could imagine that in a real device, one would have an array of tubes of different lengths if one needed to cover a wide frequency range. (Other experiments on multi-wall nanotubes have actually shown that you can extend/retract the lengths of such assemblies, so perhaps one could design a device whose antenna has variable length hence variable mechanical properties.)

Although one can immediately imagine using such nano-antennas in order to send commands to nano-bots and so forth, it's worth mentioning that the present experiment required the nanotube antenna to be in a vacuum. Still, having a small evacuated (radio transparent) container for the nanotube wouldn't make it much larger.

How do I tune in to another station!! (2, Funny)

The Assistant (1162547) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199139)

The radio is a single carbon nanotube, right?

It must be real difficult reading the display (or dial) to see what station you're tuned in to!!!! ;)

Re:How do I tune in to another station!! (1)

trolltalk.com (1108067) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199319)

The REAL problem is the batteries. Bacteria found out they can get high eating them. So all they want to do now is listen to music on their iNanoNano and breed.

Up next for the NSF researchers (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199151)

A nanotube version of the worlds smallest violin.

"the waves shown in this image were added" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199157)

"The waves shown in this image were added for visual effect, and are not part of the original microscope image"

I'm glad they finally explained that at the bottom because I started checking if it was April fools or a parody site or something like that.

I guess it wasn't dramatic enough as is for the general public to get excited.

are those sound waves... (1)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200203)

They appear to be leaving the nanotube, which, being a radio, has a tendency to absorb radio waves and make sound.

I can just wait (4, Funny)

Joseph1337 (1146047) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199181)

When the internet will be upped from normal tubes to nanotubes. Web 2.0 IS COMING!

I wonder (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199197)

...if these can be used in dentistry, as tooth fillings.

Who cares! (2, Funny)

Funkcikle (630170) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199211)

No wireless. Less space than a Nomad. Lame.

The Tubes (1)

lobStar (1103461) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199227)

Now there will be great confusion about what "listening on radio over the Tubes" mean...

Don't laugh. (1)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199229)

The transmitter is next. I can see it now. Dust the crowd with nano-tube transmitters and follow them around with the that Black Van.

You know the Black Van that I mean, the one with the black tinted windows and a vanity plate on the front that says "Fearmobile".

Re:Don't laugh. (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199317)

Isn't that the van that the a-team made out of carbon nanotubes and some duct tape?

Re:Don't laugh. (1)

P3NIS_CLEAVER (860022) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199605)

or how about the replacement of metal interconnects in microprocessors with nanotube transmitter/reciever pairs!

Re:Don't laugh. (1)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199619)

Hold on, I got a delivery at the door looks like Flowers By Irene. Be right back.

Was that content licensed? (1)

corporatemutantninja (533295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199243)

Wait...they broadcast Layla and Good Vibrations and admitted it publicly? Expect to hear from RIAA lawyers soon...

Re:Was that content licensed? (1)

crgrace (220738) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200701)

They demodulated a latent transmission. They didn't transmit anything.

Worker of the Week award goes to.... (4, Funny)

PHAEDRU5 (213667) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199249)

....Inanimate Carbon Rod!

I can't believe we've overlooked this week's winner for so very, very long.

Steve just called .... (2, Funny)

BenBoy (615230) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199285)

... I'm afraid "nano" is trademarked for audio devices ... please cease and desist in the use of this term in this connection ...

That new Britney song really got in my head (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199331)

Unfortunately, it crossed my blood-brain barrier.

Thanks for the glioblastoma, slut.

this reminds me... (3, Funny)

freg (859413) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199357)

This is actually smaller than the iPod Zepto: http://www.mcsweeneys.net/2005/11/28fitch.html [mcsweeneys.net]

Re:this reminds me... (1)

Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199607)

Sure, the receiver is small...but how big is the pickup/amplifier?

transmitter (1)

phrostie (121428) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199415)

so how big is the transmitter?

Re:transmitter (1)

crgrace (220738) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200659)

There is no nanotube transmitter. The length of the transmitting antenna must be on the order of the wavelength of the transmitted wave AND a large amount of power needs to be sent into the air.

This article, of course, is a cool stunt... but it is still a stunt.

Tubes vs. Transistors (2, Funny)

chiph (523845) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199443)

So, do nano-scale carbon tubes sound better than transistors?
Or, only if you use oxygen-free silver interconnects the size of a garden hose?

Chip H.

Re:Tubes vs. Transistors (1)

Alsee (515537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200087)

oxygen-free silver interconnects the size of a garden hose?

Only if you have a very small garden.

-

Re:Tubes vs. Transistors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21200539)

Dang, you beat me to it. And here I was going to ask if it used the standard 6.3V filament voltage and had the standard 11-second warmup time.

Sorry, but (1)

darjen (879890) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199447)

Is that a nanotube radio in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

(Sorry, just had to...)

Note: Should say "Berkeley" researchers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199467)

NSF funded the center, but the affiliation of the scientists is with Berkeley. NSF doesn't directly hire "researchers".

finally (1)

Bota (968795) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199501)

a receiver for radio that fits in my pores... you have no idea how long ive been waiting for this. Now we just have to wait to buy a thimble full of nano headphones to dump into our inner ear and we'll be set to listen to all the advertising and rush limbaugh the human mind can take.

Re:finally (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199817)

no but subdermal gps receivers would be possible. Include a small tranmitter, and you can literally get tracked by eating something.

Re:finally (1)

boyfaceddog (788041) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199923)

Apparently you've never been to a Taco Bell.

Hail! (1)

ElrondHubbard (13672) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199617)

All hail the inanimate carbon rod^H^H^Hnanotube!

Much More Comfortable! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199657)

This new technology should lead to much easy and more comfortable forms of smuggling information and radios for spies everywhere. Very useful for number stations... from Good Vibrations to the Lincolnshire Poacher.

As long as they're playing Oldies on the tube... (1)

anandamide (86527) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199729)

'Tiny Dancer' would have been a more logical choice.

Going full circle (3, Informative)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199737)

In the 19th century they had pocket watches. Then watches got small enough to strap on your wrist. Then we got cell phones, threw away our wristwatches and put the phone in a pocket.

In the 19 century [wikipedia.org] we had vacuum tubes. In the mid 20th century these were replaced by semiconductors, which were smaller and less bulky. Now we're back to tubes again, and the TFA sounds like these are kind of nano vacuum tubes, only without the vacuum.

The nanotube radio is likely like these geek toys [wikipedia.org] nerds have been building since the early 1900s. All you need to build one is a diode, some wire, a piece of wood, and headphones to listen to it with. They used to call these things "catwhisker radios", the "cat whisker" being the diode.

-mcgrew [kuro5hin.org]

Re:Going full circle (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200481)

the catwhisker part comes from the pre-diode designs, like this [wikimedia.org] . the catwhisker is the wire that connects to the detector crystal, which did form a diode

i actually have such a thing at home that i made when i was 10, using a piece of iron pyrite as the detector.

Re:Going full circle (1)

Radon360 (951529) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201061)

Looking at it, I was thinking something similar. However, it's more akin to a single transistor radio than a simple crystal set. There's external power being provided, which is used for amplification. I'm willing to bet that the power leads are functioning more as the antenna than the nanotube is, especially at the frequencies they describe. They've essentially come up with a nanotube acting as a specialized transistor that resonates at specific frequencies and detects (demodulates) and amplifies the demodulated signal through its transistor-like properties.

They make it sound more exciting than it really is once you look at what is technically going on.

Why? (2, Funny)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199767)

Why are we regressing back to 'tube radios?

Now Hiring (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21199827)

Now hiring: Nano orphan children to sew nano radio covers and cases. Must have previous sweat shop experience.

Yes... (1)

Dr. Smoove (1099425) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199951)

If I only could +1 for the choice of music...

first thought... (1)

Roskolnikov (68772) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199955)

OK,

Your radio is nice, but can it transmit? imagine a world where the NSA sprinkles a little 'dust'
comprised of low wattage radios designed to link up, point to point they should cover the distance between all those
being listened to and those doing the listening.

paranoid? you bet.

the land that was free, the home of the braves.

The response from patent trolls (3, Insightful)

Prototerm (762512) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199967)

Several patent trolls have threatened to sue, claiming the work violates over 200 of their top-secret patents ("Just because the device functions on a quantum scale is not enough to avoid licensing costs" one source was quoted.) The trolls have claimed that research like this, if allowed to continue, will stifle true innovation by their exclusive licensees.

HD Nanotube? (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 6 years ago | (#21199985)

Yeah, but Sheriff John Brunell says that if you buy the HD carbon nanotube for a bit more, you can get extra stations between the stations!

Re:HD Nanotube? (1)

mapsjanhere (1130359) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200465)

Sorry, the station search button on the Inanotube is just too small to make this an attractive competitor to the Ipod nano

Home Simpson's reaction: (1)

mykepredko (40154) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200121)

"Single carbon nanotube, is there nothing that you can't do?"

myke

Interesting idea, but... (1)

jbarr (2233) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200363)

"a single carbon nanotube to perform all the functions of a standard radio, acting as an antenna, tunable filter, amplifier, and demodulator.
...the damned presets are just too darn small for me to push.

Low res picture for those using lower bandwidths. (2, Funny)

east coast (590680) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200611)

. --Radio

(Shown larger than actual size)

Good news for Apple (1)

mblase (200735) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200649)

At last, they no longer have an excuse for not including an FM radio in the iPod.

and afterwards ..... (1)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200803)

The source content for the first laboratory test of the radio was "Layla," by Derek and the Dominos, followed soon after by "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys.
A few seconds after which, a SWAT team stormed the lab demanding royalty payments .....

One step forward, two step back... (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 6 years ago | (#21200891)

From TFA: The new device works in a manner more similar to the vacuum tubes from the 1930s than the transistors found in modern radios.

Great. Radios will also now be a system of tubes. :-)

Seriously, the only problem seems to be that the radio only receives radio signals from the 1930s.

Now... (1)

dlelash (235648) | more than 6 years ago | (#21201065)

... there's NO excuse for Steve Jobs not to put a radio in the next iPods!
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