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The Value of Your Saved Game

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the gaah-no-my-oblivion-adventures dept.

Games 161

N'Gai and the LevelUp blog take on an interesting thought experiment: which is more valuable, the $60 game you bought at the store, or the save-game file sitting on your console's hard drive? The article explores the various ways save-games can be backed up, and calculates how much the average saved game is worth based on your age and income. "Our back of the envelope calculations clearly demonstrate that in all but one of the categories, the save file is more valuable than the game itself, and ought to be backed up regularly in recognition of that value. And that's without even attempting to figure out the worth of any intangibles: the frustration of having to replay familiar levels and challenges just to get back to the halfway mark; the attachment that you may have built up to the character; any customization and personalization you did the first time through; the loss of unlocks, user-generated content and other valuable elements." I have a massive save-game file for Oblivion that I would be very distraught to lose. Any saved-games you've been carting around or protecting over the months/years?

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Wolf3D (1)

Shadow_139 (707786) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295283)

I still have saved games from Wolf3D......

Used to back up savegames (3, Insightful)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295345)

But I no longer see the point. I usually complete the game. When I don't complete a game it's probably because the game annoyed the hell out of me. And what use is a savegame of a game I already completed. Next time I play the game I would probably start a new game.
For games that don't really end (like sim city or elder scroll games), why would I continue with the same instance, there was a reason I stopped playing that instance.

Re:Used to back up savegames (4, Interesting)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295449)

I think most of the value is in a game that you're currently playing. Say you have played 23 hours into a 28 hour game, and you go back to play it again the next day and your hard drive crashes. You can reload the game from original media, but the save files are gone. Personally, there aren't many games that I would pick up and start over with after that kind of loss. The majority of games are the "beat it once and never play it again" variety.

With games like SimCity, I don't think the loss would be all that horrible, because replayability tends to be fairly high. I tend to get bored with any one city after a few days with that game anyway.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

Altus (1034) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295629)


even with games I do replay, old saved game files arent that interesting. Sure, I would hate to loose the saved game file for my current game of Civ IV but once Ive won I dont need the huge pile of files on my hard drive anymore. I might keep the last one so I can run though the "you've won" bit again and see the replay of the game but it wouldn't be the end of the world if I lost it.

Re:Used to back up savegames (4, Funny)

dintech (998802) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296205)

it wouldn't be the end of the world if I lost it

In a way, with civ you created your own little world. To loose the save game would in fact be the end of the world. :P

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

killercentipedes (782350) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295869)

Don't forget about games that have extra content to unlock. You are most likely to have to complete the game once, like most players will, but then you may have the option for extra levels/difficulties, alternate characters/paths or something completely different. Even though you may not play the original again perhaps on a rainy day in the future you may be included to revisit the story. Without you save game it will be that same old story.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296451)

I don't like unlockable, they suck. Games shouldn't hide features, just easter eggs.
The only thing a game should unlock is the next level/area in the story.
I play games for entertainment, not to achieve something.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296873)

For some people achieving something 'is' the entertainment.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

amuro98 (461673) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297395)

Most of the unlockables in those games are pretty much only for the real hardcore fans of the game.

For instance, unlocking an extra 100 floor dungeon in Rogue Galaxy. Who cares? I already beat the game without all the extra items and leveling up that would result from that dungeon, but I'm sure plenty of players did go through it again.

Then again, I was already annoyed at the combat system, and the character quips had gotten old long, before that.

Re:Used to back up savegames (2, Interesting)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296233)

I think most of the value is in a game that you're currently playing. Say you have played 23 hours into a 28 hour game, and you go back to play it again the next day and your hard drive crashes. You can reload the game from original media, but the save files are gone. Personally, there aren't many games that I would pick up and start over with after that kind of loss. The majority of games are the "beat it once and never play it again" variety.


Take a more likely scenario - the game crashes on you that corrupts the savegame file. (Some games keep the savegame file open and save everything continuously.) I had that happen when I was playing with a friend in Diablo 2 (made it to the second to last level), when it crashed (hardware fault, it turns out - motherboard underpowered the CPU - you say to give it 1.4V, it really only delivers 1.35 or less - Funny how 50mV separates rock-solid stability from "crashes every now and again").

The crash corrupted my savegame as I was messing around in my inventory juggling stuff. Diablo2 reopened the file, and determined it corrupt, and only offered me to start over again. Luckily I found a simple character editor, opened it, and found what caused the problem. The corruption resulted in the inventory having multiple items occupy the same spot. Remove the offending item, and it worked great again.

Another reason to keep the save game is often, well, you might want to see the endgame again. Sometimes they're quite amazing and you want to show your friend, etc. (I really hate games that don't let you save just after you defeat the final boss).

Re:Used to back up savegames (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21295579)

If we follow the reasoning of the article, the half-empty bucket of stale popcorn that I'll take home from the movie theatre tonight will be worth $50, simply because I've been eating out of it for 90 minutes.

Re:Used to back up savegames (3, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295711)

I don't think you can really overvalue the simple joy of eating half a bucket of movie theatre popcorn for breakfast on a Saturday morning.

Although, at the local theatre they've recently started dumping about twice as much salt as they used to into the popcorn, rendering it nearly inedible, so it's not worth as much as it used to be.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

mackil (668039) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295871)

I agree with you for the most part. There was only one instance where I guarded my saved game and that was for Morrowind [wikipedia.org] . I was rather late in coming to that game, so when I had started, the two expansions had already been released. So once I completed the main game, I guarded my saved game so that I could use the same character in the later expansions (which I would purchase at a later date). Other than that, once the game is beaten I generally remove them along with the game.

Re:Used to back up savegames (3, Interesting)

2nd Post! (213333) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295929)

You're playing the wrong games then.

My completed save games allow me to start new games with the stats or equipment from the previous incarnation, which usually unlocks a whole new series of areas I was previously unable to enter due to low stats or poor equipment.

Then there is the value of playing a game without having to grind.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

amuro98 (461673) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297507)

The only time this could be useful would be for tracing the story tree to get the different endings. Otherwise, if I've already seen the one ending the game has, I find little reason to replay the game just to get into certain areas that weren't available on my first play-thru. After all, if the goal of the game is to "win", and I already did that without those bonus areas, what more is there to do really?

I'd rather the game make the bonus areas available while playing. That way you can decide if you still want to go through the challenge of trying them or not, with the reward being an easier final boss fight.

Re:Used to back up savegames (1)

SethraLavode (910814) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298677)

It's also useful for games where the sequels reward you for having a completed save game from the previous one (such as Suikoden or Golden Sun). If I want to play through Suikoden 2 and get the full story line (as well as some nice bumps to some character stats), it's a good thing that I was able to use my DexDrive to make sure I didn't lose my Suikoden 1 savefile.

(As a bonus, you can pull the Suikoden 2 save file off the MC and hexedit it to fix the "McDohl" name bug.)

Re:Used to back up savegames (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295969)

For games that don't really end (like sim city or elder scroll games), why would I continue with the same instance, there was a reason I stopped playing that instance.
Even if it's that you got more responsibilities in your life? A new job was the big reason that I quit Animal Crossing, though I still have the town of Chadonn on a GameCube memory card and the town of Picken on the DS game card. Not all simulators are intended to run for a few real-world days like SimCity; in particular, an AC town is supposed to last for at least a year. But then the GameCube version of AC used an uncommon feature of the GameCube OS that allows the file to be moved but not copied.

Re:Used to back up savegames (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21296635)

If it is an action/adventure or RPG that you've completed, and don't intend to play again, then yes, perhaps a saved file is worthless.

But for racing games, where you've unlocked courses and cars for example, it is quite important. Who wants to start Gran Turismo with a driver's license test every time? Or Guitar Hero. Sorry, you can't play 80% of the song list because you lost your saved game file and have to start over! My son's Super Smash Bros. file got deleted...with all the stages and characters he had unlocked (fortunately, I had a back-up card). Saved games are also quite important in sports, especially if you are playing a season.

So, it definitely depends upon the genre of game you are playing. I've still got dozens of PS One and PS2 memory cards with save files on them for when I fancy a trip down memory lane.

On the one hand, I'm glad that hard drives have made memory cards largely obsolete in the current hardware generation. On the other hand, for many Xbox 360 and PS3 games, if you take the game disc to a friend's house, you are out of luck because the save files are on your console (and most cannot be transferred to a memory card).

Inter-Act Dex Drive (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21295395)

When I first started playing RPGs on the PSX, one of the first things I bought after a memory card was a Dex Drive [wikipedia.org] [wikipedia.org] to backup my saved games. After my memory card got stolen by my druggie roommate my freshman year in college, that thing paid for itself.

Re:Inter-Act Dex Drive (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295659)

Yes we all know what they say about drugs and memory cards...

Re:Inter-Act Dex Drive (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296181)

I just bought an Action Replay for my Sega Saturn so I don't have to worry about the dinky lithium battery dying and losing my Panzer Dragoon Saga save. But what I really need is one of these [gamingenterprisesinc.com] so I can dump the saves to my hard disc and use them with emulators if I want. It's a real shame they're windows only.

Depends on where you are in the game. (5, Interesting)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295405)

Games are about the journey, and the ending. Your save file increases in value until just before complete it... After that, the file is nearly worthless.

The exception to this is open-ended games, of course... There is no end to those. Even Oblivion never 'ends' because you can continue doing minor quests after you beat the game. The Sims is another obvious sandbox game that had savefiles that only increase in value... Until a new version of the game (not expansion) is released. At that point, the saves are just as worthless as the ones from games that end.

Any game that you quit before the end, for whatever reason, has no little or no value as well. The effort to get back into the game after a 2 month break is better spent re-playing the beginning and getting better at the game before you get to the stopping point.

And one last remark: Games are entertainment, not work. Playing them produces nothing of value and is only useful for relieving stress or boredom.

BTW, I'm an avid gamer with a couple decades experience.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Kamots (321174) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295669)

"Playing them produces nothing of value and is only useful for relieving stress or boredom"

One of the people I know in FFXI made around $3000 this past summer by selling off excess gil (in-game currency) he had.

I think he's now amassed a similar amount of gil and is thinking of selling it off as well.

He's not playing to amass gil to sell, rather he plays to try to figure out the crafting system... and just happens to make a lot of gil while doing so.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296187)

So does he backup his game save? Oh wait, he has no control over it.

The discussion was the value of your gamesave, not the value of your account on an MMO.

Yes, perisitant multiplayer worlds are different than offline games. That just isn't the discussion at hand.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Kamots (321174) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296355)

Well, the point you were making was that playing a game produced nothing of value. If you're wanting to focus solely on offline games...

I got extra when selling my SNES cartridge of chrono cross because it had a saved game with maxed level characters.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Arcane_Rhino (769339) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296727)

Dude, that is a brilliant sig.

Thanks for making me think that I am thinking. ^o^

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297601)

That actually makes his point. The value of the game is the stress or boredom it relieves. A major failing of MMOs is that they have boring time sinks which are required to alleviate the stress of not having good enough equipment. People paid your friend to get solve a problem with getting what they actually wanted from the game: relief of stress and boredom.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

sandmaninator (884661) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295923)


"Playing them produces nothing of value and is only useful for relieving stress or boredom."

Same could be said of Art, Music, etc.
Personally, I found inspiration in StarCraft and I suspect it was a strong influence in building my economy worldview.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21297199)

Seriously. We don't have NEARLY enough pylons to fix Africa's problems.

If ACPG > ACWW then keep playing ACPG (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296061)

The Sims is another obvious sandbox game that had savefiles that only increase in value... Until a new version of the game (not expansion) is released. At that point, the saves are just as worthless as the ones from games that end.
There are plenty of people who still play Animal Crossing (2002) on GameCube because they find it superior to the DS version from 2005. Search for Captain Jim's posts on AXA Forum to find why.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (2, Insightful)

LithiumX (717017) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296419)

"Even Oblivion never 'ends' because you can continue doing minor quests after you beat the game."

I enjoyed Oblivion. I didn't think I would, but I derived a few weeks of significant enjoyment from that game. It was the first and only full RPG I have actually considered worthy since the Ultima series. The dialogue scripting came out far better than the usual anime soap opera styles that have taken over RPG's (Lucien in particularly had some memorable lines). It was a fairly flexible system, and a truly open game world that managed to wrangle you into the story.

But... the continued gameplay after the "end" ended up backfiring, at least on me. I love side-quests, and I love having enough warning before committing to the end-game to be able to finish my exploring. However... there is something to be said for a definitive end to a game. It's more satisfying - you feel you have now "completed" the game, rather than having simply seen the main plot through to the end. In the case of Oblivion, I tell people I finished it, but I never really felt that the game was completed - I just got tired of it after a while - which simply isn't fair for a game of that caliber.

Imagine how you would perceive the end of 1984 if the book had continued after Winston's story was done? If it had gone on for another 50 pages, rambling on with what's happening to others in the story, or the continued strengthening of the Party? It went into quite a bit more, over the course of the story, than Winston's own situation, but it started with him, and it had a clear and definitive end with the moment of his total defeat - which gave a satisfying ending.

To underscore my point - I can remember the end of most of the games I have played - especially my favorites. Oblivion was definitely a favorite of mine, but I honestly cannot remember how it ended. I remember how the Brotherhood missions ended, as well as the Thieves missions, but the actual end of the main game eludes me completely. I can remember the final events of Thief, Generals, Warcraft 1/2/3, Starcraft, etc... but I don't remember how the main story of Oblivion ended - and I think that is in part due to the fact that the game did not end with the story.

The only game that's worse is Pac Man. I have played that game, in total, for hundreds of hours, but I never managed to reach the end. I've talked to others, and no one has reached the end of Pac Man. What's the point in making a game so difficult that no one can beat it? It drives me nuts, keeps me up at night, and has kept me in a state of frustration for the past 27 years. *sob*

Re: There is always an End. (4, Insightful)

trdrstv (986999) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296841)

The only game that's worse is Pac Man. I have played that game, in total, for hundreds of hours, but I never managed to reach the end. I've talked to others, and no one has reached the end of Pac Man. What's the point in making a game so difficult that no one can beat it?

You did reach the end. You died. Many games simply get progressively harder until you simply can't continue and die. In that regard, it's a lot like life.

Re: There is always an End. (1)

LithiumX (717017) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297249)

Death was never the end when you had an elementary school that let out early, a nearby arcade, and 8 quarters (that was given to you as "lunch money" that morning)...

The hardest thing about getting older is that your reflexes are never as good as they were when you were younger. I love to torment teenagers with that one, because it's one of the problems with age that they can clearly understand. hehe.

Re: There is always an End. (2, Insightful)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298519)

You did reach the end. You died. Many games simply get progressively harder until you simply can't continue and die. In that regard, it's a lot like life.
Fuck. That. Shit. Gimme the cheat codes.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (4, Informative)

pla (258480) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296973)

The only game that's worse is Pac Man. I have played that game, in total, for hundreds of hours, but I never managed to reach the end.

You want to talk about unmemorable "endings"? Pac-Man has none. It just crashes after 255 levels [mameworld.net] (scroll down to the end of the page).

Then again, if that had happened to me back in the prime of Pac-Man, I'd have thought it a random crash rather than "the end", and probably blown an aneurysm. So I guess you could call that memorable, in its own way...

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

homer_ca (144738) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297185)

Imagine how you would perceive the end of 1984 if the book had continued after Winston's story was done? If it had gone on for another 50 pages, rambling on with what's happening to others in the story, or the continued strengthening of the Party?

Did you see the Lord of the Rings movies? The finale of the trilogy did exactly that. After Frodo was done, they spent a good 15-20 minutes on everybody going home, celebrating, saying goodbye. I was expecting the credits to roll, but it just went on and on.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (2, Insightful)

Joe Mucchiello (1030) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297513)

Did you see the Lord of the Rings movies? The finale of the trilogy did exactly that. After Frodo was done, they spent a good 15-20 minutes on everybody going home, celebrating, saying goodbye. I was expecting the credits to roll, but it just went on and on.

How is that worse than the book which went on for (100+ pages) hundreds of years after Frodo's departure to tell you various mini-tales of the various kings who follow Aragon?

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298543)

All those appendices at the of LoTR mostly concern stuff that happened *before* the main story in the books.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297203)

I'm the opposite on Oblivion... I remember how the main quest ends, but not the side quests... Probably because I finished them (both times I played through) long before I finished the main quest, and I -did- put it down after the main quest. But when I said neverending, I also meant the add-ons... I played them with my 'endgame' character.

I loved Oblivion. I'm hoping for another big expansion and another major sequel. (I think the sequel is a given, though.) I spent upwards of 160 hours playing it... Probably more than 200. That's amazing for me, since I usually play a game less than 20 hours, with many games being less than 10.

But back to the point: My Oblivion saves are nearly worthless to me, despite it being one of my favorite games. If I play again, I'll do so from the beginning. I'm actually planning on this... I've got Oblivion GOTY/CE/whatever for PS3 in my GameFly queue, and I plan to replay it again on the third system. (PC and 360, previously.)

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

LithiumX (717017) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297869)

Out of curiosity, how many people still play Oblivion for the user mods?

I downloaded the various editors and got fairly good with them. I was just constructing test quests (focusing on technical matters rather than entertainment value), and got to the point where I could insert new structures into the cities without interfering with anything (as long as no one else used the same spot for another mod). I even wrote up my own index of different model types so I could build intricate buildings more easily. NPC control was more difficult, but I got it down well enough to do a good bit with it.

Problem is, once I quit playing Oblivion I lost a lot of interest in modifying it. If I did fire it back up and made something fun, is there much of an audience?

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298929)

I haven't a clue. I tried some of the mods made in the first couple months, and while they did make the game more fun initially, they didn't make it enough more fun to keep playing. Now, as with Morrowind, most of the mods are completely amateur and don't fit well with the rest of the game. The few that ARE great are too hard to find in the mess.

Re:Depends on where you are in the game. (1)

Sark666 (756464) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297579)

"BTW, I'm an avid gamer with a couple decades experience."

Well.... usually I really like to know a little more before making these decisions but what the heck. You're Hired!!

My Content Vendor Software (4, Insightful)

EXTomar (78739) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295437)

Like other software, the data I create is more valuable (to me) than the software I bought from the store. During the days I played Disgaea religiously, at the point where I had more than 20 hours of play, lots of bills/areas passed, many characters at least transmigrated once, the amount of time and energy put into that game alone was far more valuable than the disk itself. Far more valuable. The disk could be stolen (or exploded) by Prinnies at that point and I could go out and find a new disk. If the memory card the save game was stolen (or exploded), there is not much I could do because the only way to "replace" it would be to play the game from the start.

You see this all over technology though. The 10 million piece model is more valuable than the CAD tool program that created it. The 500 million row database with years of collected data is more valuable than the software used to serve it up. This is why backups are so important to any IT infrastructure. You want to capture and safe guard the created content, not necessarily the software that runs it.

LEGO Star Wars (2, Interesting)

AccUser (191555) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295441)

I have a completed LEGO Star Wars game on one of my hard drives that has been there for a while now. It has survived countless operating system re-installs (it is on a PowerMac, so Archive and Install is your friend), whilst the game itself hasn't been installed for what must be over a year. What surprises me is that I cannot bring myself to delete it - and yet I have no plans to install LEGO Star Wars and play it again. I guess one day I might...

RPGs (1)

Bender0x7D1 (536254) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295453)

I have saved games from Baldur's Gate (I and II) and Neverwinter Nights I. I would have them for NWN 2, but they dramatically increased the size of the save file - around 100MB if I remember right.

I like having saves for multiple points throughout the game so I can replay certain sections or quests if I really enjoyed them and I like to have the option to skip the annoyance of being a low level wizard with almost no hit points.

I don't know how much of a value I would put on the saved games - probably $20 or something. I see it more as a fun thing to have when I want it and not a real need or desire.

Re:RPGs (1)

GiMP (10923) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296033)

Neverwinter Nights I. I would have them for NWN 2, but they dramatically increased the size of the save file - around 100MB if I remember right.


Neverwinter Nights I would easily create save files over 100MB for me, and I didn't get through more than probably 10-20% of that game. In fact, I have two DVDs of "saves" for that game.

This is where Valve could shine (5, Interesting)

AccUser (191555) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295487)

Or, at least the Steam service.

I have just re-installed all of my Steam powered games, but what is missing are all my saved games. Wouldn't it be great if I could add those to my Steam account, so that not only do I always have access to my games, but also my saved games? I guess it would only be necessary to store the last saved game, but this could really be a useful feature.

Valve? Anyone?

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

vita10gy (932040) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295619)

This would make a lot of sense, especially since half the point of steam is that you can sign in from different locations and get/play the games you've paid for. (Maybe I shouldn't say "half the point," but it's a cool feature.) There would be some issues to workout, because you can play in "offline" mode, but it seems to me they could fix that by an automatic or user prompted "hot sync".

Re:This is where Valve could shine (4, Interesting)

AmaDaden (794446) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295757)

I was just thinking that. I'm gonna guess they plan on doing that soon. With the Orange Box they just added achievements for the PC. I remember that I noticed a change in the achievement system a few days ofter the games came out too. For those of you that are unaware your achievements are stored online. The change that I noticed was that Portal and HL2 achievements became visible from your Steam page http://steamcommunity.com/ [steamcommunity.com] . An issue with this is that if you complete an achievement while off line it's not counted. The problem is that saved games are far bigger and used for more frequently. They might just make a "back up this save" option from the save menu.

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296799)

Even if you beat an achievement online it's sometimes not counted.

I beat all six Portal advanced maps. According to my online achievements I haven't beaten any. Every time I start up Portal my achievements ingame show I beat them, but they never get saved to the server!

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

Scipius (31261) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297693)

According to Steam I managed 4 out of 6 advanced maps, as well as 6 out 6 advanced maps, but I haven't yet completed 2 out of 6 advanced maps ;)

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

DarkArctic (894260) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295941)

I was actually thinking this exact same thing a few days ago. I've had to restart Half-Life 2 a few times because I've been too lazy to look for the save files. It would definitely be something that'd be would sell me on Steam a bit more.

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

Explodicle (818405) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296531)

That's one of the main reasons I play realm characters in Diablo II. Transfers effortlessly between my computers.

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

Ixthus2001 (905691) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296875)

Mmm... I'm not sure I'd trust Valve. When I uninstalled Half Life it took everything in the same directory tree (C:\Games) with it. Sadly this was a known bug, but I didn't know about it until after it happened. Although I had my Baldur's Gate save games backed up at some point previously, I lost 10-12 hours of game play. I never was able to get back into Baldur's Gate to finish it, which is a great shame.

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

kc2keo (694222) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297019)

Just like many other posters said before... Saved games are the most important part of the game or user generated content like maps and mods you created for that game. The games are easily replaceable but the user-generated content is not as easy to replace. For the most part I like to keep my savegames after I beat the game. Sometimes I may use it but most of the time I never go back and replay the game.

As for the Steam service it would be nice if your steam Account stored your save games. With Steam I have a habit of burning the content, mods, and savegames to DVD or backing it up elsewhere. I know Steam saves lots of things but I never like to trust that the server will be up 24/7 and I can download the content any time without problems. Also, downloading game content takes a long time even with broadband/Fiber. Also, I use the delicious bookmark service to save bookmarks through FireFox. Its real convenient when the bookmarks are available and have had no problems with the On-line bookmark service so far (knock on wood) but I occasionally export my favourites to my local machine and it goes onto my DVD backups. I do the same for my Gmail contacts and more. Today I notice a trend with newer computer users who use these On-Line services never backup their data. Then when that nice service screws up and loses their data they are screwed!

Yes I know what I said may be redundant. I just wanted to throw in my comment. Lost some points before to my karma. Putting my karma on the line again.... fucking Karma... :-D

Re:This is where Valve could shine (1)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298579)

Or, at least the Steam service.

I have just re-installed all of my Steam powered games, but what is missing are all my saved games. Wouldn't it be great if I could add those to my Steam account, so that not only do I always have access to my games, but also my saved games? I guess it would only be necessary to store the last saved game, but this could really be a useful feature.

Valve? Anyone?
Hell, how about the 360? Persistent internet access, PLUS a hard drive so the failure rate should be much higher than on flash-based cards that we used in the past... You'd think it'd be a no-brainer. "Hey, backup your saved games on our server, just another Xbox Live Gold feature!"

Hardcore (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295493)

Interesting enough, some games have 'hardcore' options : dying is dying. What about them? I imagine having a very-high level save of a living character is worth even more ...

Re:Hardcore (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296129)

Interesting enough, some games have 'hardcore' options : dying is dying. What about them?
How do PC versions of these games prevent the single player from ghosting [wikipedia.org] back to an old savegame?

Re:Hardcore (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297503)

I'm doing Diablo2 hardcore myself, and you can just re-copy an old version over your dead character, but i don't find that gratifying.

Depends (1)

tsanth (619234) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298647)

Some games, like Nethack [nethack.org] , don't. They work on the honor system.

Why place a price on it? (4, Insightful)

TheGreatHegemon (956058) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295495)

Did we forget games are for fun, not for work? You can equate the "value" of your time as if it was work to playing games. If you lose a saved game, then the game should still be fun if you play it again. If not, you stop playing. Not like you're being forced to.

Black market? (1)

ThirdPrize (938147) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295621)

I am sure there is probably a site out there somewhere where you can buy saved games to save you having to actually play them yourselves. Let someone else unlock all the extras for you. Same as 360 saves get passed around for their GamerPoint value.

Re:Why place a price on it? (0, Troll)

ukpyr (53793) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295627)

It's our job as consumers to support the war on terror through aggressive purchasing. If we don't 'play to win' - we're really losing. One to grow on.

You're right though of course. Some people really enjoy saving every aspect of their life "just in case". Like people who get depressed for weeks when they lose 10 years of email. It would suck I guess, but that's why we have memories.

There is something to be said for the "happy filter" human brains have.

Re:Why place a price on it? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296303)

If you lose a saved game, then the game should still be fun if you play it again. If not, you stop playing.

There are plenty of games where the fun value is in the novelty. Look at any RPG for instance. The enjoyment is so tied to the advancement of the story that if you lose your place half way through it's really not any fun to go back and replay the beginning. That leaves you stuck, you can either miss out on half the game, or you can go through 40 hours of tedium just to get back to the fun part. When looked at this way, I'd say these saved games definitely have value.

Re:Why place a price on it? (1)

Peter Cooper (660482) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296485)

Precisely. It's not as if before having sex, a mug of beer, or call your mom you think.. damn, I'm going to lose $5.69 of potential income in those 3 minutes!

Yes and no (1)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296735)

Let me rephrase that right back at you, using "novel" instead of "game", and maybe you'll realize just how silly it sounds: "Did we forget novels are for fun, not for work? [...] If you lose the bookmark, then the novel should still be fun if you read it again. If not, you stop reading. Not like you're being forced to.

Seriously. If you've read half a novel, would you rather read the next part, or go back to reading the first half again?

Yes, a good novel should be fun to re-read, eventually, but at some point you just want to see how it ends, not to read the first chapter again.

Way I see it, the same applies to games.

Also, what if a sequel or expansion pack came out, and I want to take my old characters to the new world? Do I have to re-play the first game just for that, before even unpacking the _new_ game I just bought? That's a bit like saying that if you've bought "Life, the Universe and Everything", you should first have to re-read "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe" before even opening it. Sure, they're fun books to re-read, but which would you rather do first?

Now some games allow you to re-create an almost exact copy of your old char. E.g., unless you were playing a Neverwinter Nine or Shadow Thief Of Amn, you can re-create your old NWN2 character almost verbatim in Mask Of The Betrayer. Although, even there, what if you _did_ play a NW9 or Shadow Thief?

But other stuff isn't half as easy to reproduce.

For example, take Paradox's series of grand strategy games. It think that at least theoretically, you could play Crusader Kings (medieval strategy) to the end date, then export that map and continue playing that country in Europa Universalis 2 (late medieval / renaissance strategy) until the 19'th century, then export it and continue playing it in Victoria Revolutions (19'th to 20'th century strategy), then export it and continue playing it in Hearts Of Iron Doomsday (WW2 strategy.) That's stuff that would take weeks to reproduce if you wanted to start all over again from Hastings without a saved game.

Now I'm not saying you _should_ do that, because honestly, history will be severely off the track in that case. But what if you do want to do just that? There are people who've achieved highly improbably states, like rebuilding the Byzantine empire starting from Byzantium surrounded by the turks. If I had a saved game like that, I'd _definitely_ want to see how it does in another era. E.g., who would the Byzantines ally with in WW1? Would they fare any better than the Ottomans at the end of it? It's just, you know, curiosity.

Should someone have to replay everything from the 1400's just to get back to that state? Would they even get the same result again? To hammer some more on that Byzantine Empire example, that's stuff that's invariably a pretty improbable gamble. While gamer skill was most certainly involved, there were invariably a lot of other highly improbable events that made that possible, such as someone else keeping the Turks busy at exactly the right moment.

The value of FF7 save games? (4, Funny)

RingDev (879105) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295521)

When I was in MOS school a buddy in the barracks had a Play Station and FF7. He gave me the first slot on the memory stick, so when ever I wanted to save, I just hit the OK button over and over. Well, after he moved out I was hanging out with another guy who had just moved in. He also had a PS and FF7 and he let me play on it one day. As we were sitting there chatting, with out thinking about it, I went to save my game, and yup, saved my brand new game over slot one on the stick.

Right over his level 97 toons.

whoops.

I think there may have been tears. There was definitely a lot of anger. I was not invited back.

-Rick

FF2 (1)

ArcadeX (866171) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295547)

I still have it backed up from a rom reader, not even sure if i'll ever dust off my team of 99th level guys to go after the pink again, but damn that's a lot of hours invested...

Re:FF2 (1)

ThirdPrize (938147) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295961)

dust off my team of 99th level guys to go after the pink again
That must be a euphemism for something?

I used to backup, but not so much now (1)

WapoStyle (639758) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295599)

Back in the late 90s I was really into the JRPGs on the Playstation, and I wasted hundreds of hours on the Squaresoft games. A memory card died on me one time that had a save game with an 80-some hours save game file on it. After that I bought what I think was called a "Dex Drive"? I could be wrong on the name. It let you backup your Playstation memory cards to your PC over a serial port. These days I don't play those kinds of games anymore, so I don't have any backup of my console save files. I do keep a folder on my PC with copies of some of my save games from that platform on it though, but I'd hardly be devastated if I were to lose them.

Aww crap... (1)

Seakip18 (1106315) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295811)

I just forgot that I didn't grab my Oblivion save before the last reformat. Thanks for ruining my day Zonk!

OnTopic, I've got a roommate that plays SC:4 religiously. He's got CAM and the such all setup and testing out various textures for add-on modders. I can't imagine what would happen if a 6x7 map he's been working on were to suddenly disappear.

All of mine got nuked last month (1)

Amphetam1ne (1042020) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295853)

Upgraded my system last month and my RAID-0 2x80GB SATA-II array didn't get recognised when hooking it up to the controler on the new mobo. Do I miss them? No. I have a whole load of new games to play now that I couldn't run before. I am slightly annoyed about loosing some old level design stuff, but I've got no interest in that anymore. It was mostly sentiment and the fact that it represented 100's of hours in GTKRadiant. Not really missing the files makes me think that maybe I should stop hoarding all those old motherboards, drives and other crap that I think might come in usefull someday.

Did take a hell of a long time to re-download all my steam games though.

Lost game, lost interest (2, Interesting)

dazedNconfuzed (154242) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295875)

A major reason I rarely play games on my PS2 is because of its alarming frequencey of losing saved games.

Playing for hours on end, only to come back to "saved game corrupted" and the prospect of going thru all of that again, just pretty much nullifies any interest in completing any game, and thus any interest in even starting one.

Re:Lost game, lost interest (1)

pudge (3605) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296109)

Huh. I've played many games on my PS2, and never have I ever had any corrupted save file. Weird. I even have PS1 cards still around that have saves on them, that still work.

Re:Lost game, lost interest (1)

sherriw (794536) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296127)

The non-Nintendo brand memory cards for gamecube/wii have this problem too. Never by Mad-Catz anything, and stick with the Nindendo brand cards. I speak from painful experience!

Saved games can be obtained elsewhere (2, Informative)

g_adams27 (581237) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295919)

If you just don't feeling like replaying your game to get back to where you were, you can often find saved games from somewhere else. That's especially true for linear games, like FPS's. Just for example, here's a collection of Half-Life 2 [geocities.com] saved games. With some work, you could probably also find (for example) Oblivion saved games that might at least put you near where you want to be.

Re:Saved games can be obtained elsewhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21298919)

That's pretty cool... I just wanted to ask, Where are the oblivion save files on my computer? somewhere under Documents and Settings?

Losing a valued save game ... (2, Funny)

cablepokerface (718716) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295937)

... is usually the end of the game for me. Somehow I feel extremely demotivated to play for hours and eventually reaching the point I was.

Even worse though, and you ALL know this; Loading instead of Saving. Don't lie, it happened to us all. Saving and loading usually require (with exception to quick load/save) a few simular actions after each other so after a while you have them automated in your head. And one fine day you start the "Load" sequence in your head instead of the "Save".

Brutal memmories.

Re:Losing a valued save game ... (1)

basscomm (122302) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298627)

Even worse though, and you ALL know this; Loading instead of Saving.


I usually do just the opposite: save instead of load. I'll get to a particularly hairy spot in, say Half-Life, save just before, try a few times, fail horribly (but just barely managing to stay alive), reach for the quickload button and hit the quicksave button instead.

As an added bonus, I have also been known to accidentally save instead of load just after jumping/falling into some pit or other, rendering that particular save as worthless as possible.

I know exactly how much my saved games are worth (1)

LrdDimwit (1133419) | more than 6 years ago | (#21295955)

If it's a game I'm done with, then the save doesn't matter. If it is a game I'm either actively playing, or planning on finishing in the near future, the save file is worth (hourly pay rate) times the maximum of (time spent playing to get save || time to be spent replaying to get save back). Some games have rares that are almost impossible to get. The US version of FF4, for instance, had an item only dropped by an enemy 1/64 battles -- and that enemy only appeared 1/64 fights in one particular place. If I'd got lucky and got that in an hour, it might take a hundred to get it back.

Wish I could have saved a backup (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21296031)

Until the cartridge started to die, I had invested an untold number of hours into the SNES version of Chrono Trigger. I wanted to get to level 99 so I could fight the Red Nu. Never got there, and I didn't have the energy to start over on the PS version with the removable memory card. If only there had been a way to back up that save-game! I always back up my memory card saves. I've heard too many horror stories of the person who invested 80+ hours into a game, only to lose the whole thing when the memory card couldn't be read.

Free time is worth MORE than work wage. (1)

sherriw (794536) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296065)

Not quite. My free time is worth more than my work-day time because it's precious to me. The rare-er it is the more it's worth. I do freelance work on the side in my spare time and I price it at twice what I make at my day job. So my free time is worth $40/h, and that will go up as my career advances. So, 5 hours into HalfLife2ep2, my saved game is worth $200. I'll say that's worth backing up alright. ... Note to self...

However, there are often cheat codes that let you jump ahead to any level you choose so you could use that. Plus, if it's a good game, then replaying it isn't TOO much of a pain in the butt. So, that brings the price down too.

Re:Free time is worth MORE than work wage. (1)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297585)

Good god, my WoW character is "worth" a house. Though what makes that really sad is that I don't consider playing WoW "me" time any more than working. (Though I do find that farming materials is strangely relaxing, much like "Heroin Hero" in the recent South Park.)

Internet has made things easier (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296203)

Since the Internet is readily available savegames have gotten a lot less important. After losing them, its not to hard to find a savegame online that is close to yours. There might be a few open ended games where that doesn't work, but for most games you shouldn't have much problems. And even when that route doesn't work, you still have youtube and friends where you can watch the endings or special things of a game that would otherwise require plenty of work to get back to, its not as good as the savegame, but in case your savegame went missing minutes before the end of the game a lot less painful.

If they could make it easier... that would help (1)

phorm (591458) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296351)

Some games are wonderful for backup of saves. There's an easy-to-find subfolder called "SaveGames" or "SaveData" or whatever. Others have it buried in a directory structure five levels deep past the game root, in an obscurely named folder and file like "C:\Program Files\Electronic Farts\Control and Overcome\gd\sd\sg0001\sg.dat", while others save in "My Documents\Leisure Suit Harry - Spoon Tang\Savedata\Save001.dat." The first is obviously really confusing and annoying. The second isn't too bad, except that in cases where I have the game installed on a particular drive (such as a USB portable) it gets irritating when the save data doesn't accompany it. So far, the best is something like "C:\Program Files\IceStorm\Planet of BattleCrap\SaveGames\Save001.dat"

All the data goes with me when I install to USB (so if I use the exact same path on two PC's, I can flip between the laptop and desktop without changes, etc).

Re:If they could make it easier... that would help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21296987)

Ever heard of Mojopac (http://www.mojopac.com/portal/content/hellomojo.jsp)? lets you have a particular windows install on a usb drive that can run from any other windows machine, pretty handy.

I don't get it (1)

Chaymus (697182) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296393)

The bottom line is we are not earning our salary wage after we go home. I don't think about how much money I'm not earning as I sleep, thinking if I went into work at night I could be a billionaire. Either they should adjust the mean salary down to a 24/7/365 distribution of dollars/hour or accept the fact that what you do on your own time is a completely subjective cost. I had similar logic in college, after some estimations of cost I came on the number of $24 for one hour of class. This is how much I was paying to be there. So the next obvious step was since my $24 was already spent to determine how much worth the hour of class actually was. Usually somewhere less than $5 unless it was a review for a test. In the end my attendance plummeted. It's hard to look at such a short-sighted metric as the degree has had far greater return than the cost. More importantly, it was a cost already spent, I mistakenly assumed that the actual time I was spending there was a hidden cost above the $24. Really unless I worked instead of going to class I could only lose more money. In terms of a saved game, unless you're planning on selling it to a friend who can't get past a level, there's limited earning potential and only a subjective worth to the player, by no means can this be salary based. I would pay loads of money for a save after beating really annoying parts of certain games that are otherwise good, but typically I have no problem restarting anything that's worth a replay (hopefully every game). My thought is that I really care about 2 saves right now, out of all the games I've ever played. If saves on the whole were even equal value to the game and we somehow had to pay for the save's worth I just couldn't see myself paying twice for all the games I've bought. The save file is important, but I look at them as temporary entities that you eventually throw away. It's like asking if a 3-Day DRM song is worth more than the stereo you bought to play it. Let me know what I'm missing or how one could justify this value across a non-subjective basis. I don't think cost value works quite like earning potential (which is an agreed cost to your employer).

It may depend on where you were in the game. (2, Interesting)

trdrstv (986999) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296549)

I think the basic value would be "how much work will it take to get back to where I was, and how motivated am I to do it?" I sold my PS2 and Guitar Hero II & I got GH2 for the 360. I put a lot of time into the PS2 version, but the value of the save file was still pretty low as I had no issue with playing the songs/ modes again. I didn't think twice about it.

However, I put countless hours into F-Zero GX (which you can't back up the save file), and I would be very distraught if it got corrupted because the game is So blissfully, delightfully, mind numbingly fucking hard at times (most of the time) that having to do it all again just to get back to where I was would be crushing. There are other games that have a definitive "Value cycle" as the game save in the beginning isn't very valuable, gets more valuable in the middle, becomes Extremely valuable as you approach the end, then goes back to little/ no value after you beat the game.

Even then the value changes based on the game length. If I lost my "almost at the end" save file in Zelda I would be much more upset about it than if I lost my save file for say... Max Payne.

Homeworld (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21296555)

I saved after stealing every single ion frigate in the sphere at the Bridge of Sighs.

Mission: Thunderbolt (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296707)

Mission: Thunderbolt is an old Macintosh dungeon digger from the mid-90s. It's a great game, with tons of gameplay elements and randomly generated levels so each game is different. One of the interesting parts of the game is that they made a sequel, Mission: Firebolt, and if you won Mission: Thunderbolt (which was a pretty impressive task, frankly) you could save your game for use in the sequel. I saved that game for at least 5 years waiting to plug the character into the sequel, but never did.

Diablo 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21296769)

I've kept ALL of my Diablo 2 characters (non Battle.Net) since it came out, and I still play that game for a few weeks at a time annually. Recently I've been thinking about making a batch file to backup the games every time I run the program, especially reading the comment above talking about corrupted character files. One of the best games EVER, and I do mean ever, I've probably put thousands of hours into that game. worth every minute.

MMORPGs (1)

YutakaFrog (1074731) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296775)

This is exactly the realization that drives MMORPGs. Blizzard doesn't care if you distribute WoW. NCSoft also has a link to download the Guild Wars client off their website. The real money here is of course in the characters themselves. (i.e., the save file) When you buy WoW, all you really buy is a code that you then link to an account, and can use to access your save file from anywhere at any time. Can you imagine what Blizzard would have to go through if they lost a server or cluster or whatever with some players' accounts on them? Chaos! A few months ago, one of my friends quit playing WoW. He posted his 70 on eBay just to explore the possibility of selling it. In the brief period of time before his post got taken down, he got an offer on it for a few hundred dollars. He thought this was a great deal -- a couple HUNDRED dollars, just for playing a game! But then he looked his /played time (like, 70 days or so, I think) and compared that to the offer, and realized the guy was offering to compensate him at like, $0.30 / hour or something like that. He didn't sell.

savegames (1)

masticina (1001851) | more than 6 years ago | (#21296785)

having never ended any game I got a slouch of savegames so yeah in a way they are important to me. Until of course I talk about 2 year old savegames I dont even remember anymore. I mean if I don't feel still connected to the character in that safegame I might just erase them!

To bad I got a habit of not ending my games but yeah I stopped playing games on the pc so! Console all the way now! Some old games like VtM: Bloodlines draw me though, the character development. Ah I am going so damned offtopic!

What about New Game+? (1)

doctor_nation (924358) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297321)

A lot of games, including RPGs, have a New Game+ feature where you can restart with various bonuses (all your items, levels, power-ups, etc.). Examples off the top of my head: Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy X-2, Vagrant Story, Okami, Shadow of the Colossus. And most of those have stackable benefits. So I would be pretty distraught if I lost my Vagrant Story save with all Damascus Armor and multiple Rhomphaias (who remembers any of this?), or my original Chrono Trigger save (I mean ORIGINAL) with most character stats maxed out after tens of playthroughs.

I have both the DexDrive for PSX and Sharkport for PS2, and I've made use of both. To be honest, I've probably used them more as a way to hold onto old saves when I need more room on my memory card than anything, especially with the old PSX 15 slot cards. It's nice for silly things like having saves right before all of the major FMVs in FF8. Of course, there's no backing up my old SNES games, so if that battery ever dies in my Chrono Trigger cart, I'm screwed.

MMOs (1)

Sqweegee (968985) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297447)

Not really a save game, but...

All the real important relevant data is saved on the servers but there's usually a preferences file saved locally which can control numerous things and can take hours to replace if lost due to a re-install or HD crash. Most people tweek their hotbars, chat windows, etc very often. Restarting from scratch is a real pain, especially if inventories full of look-alike backpacks get shuffled.

I back mine up.

Games don't work with backup software (2)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297685)

This is one of those areas where computer game software is a pain in the neck. On Windows, I have yet to install a game that didn't put the save files in with the game files. Hence, you must run as admin and the game save files don't backup. I remember complaining about this 5 years ago when XP came-out and nothing has changed.

Corrupt Gamecube Memory Card (1)

Crock23A (1124275) | more than 6 years ago | (#21297985)

Last month I fired up Super Smash Bros. Melee on my Wii only to find out that my gamecube memory card was corrupt. For a game like that, the save file is irreplaceable. The game tracked tons of stats and has collectible trophies. Some trophies required hundreds of hours of playtime.

I also lost dozens of saved time trial records and ghosts from Mario Kart Double Dash. Compound this with the near impossibility of finding a large capacity gamecumbe memory card new and I'm in a crap situation. Every console I have will now be backed up in one way or another, whether it's via multiple memory cards or to PC.

WoW char (1)

etinin (1144011) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298361)

Reminds me of when Blizzard banned an account with a level 60 mage and a level 54 priest from WoW because a "friend" of mine did a minor stupidity (pre-expansion times, 60 was the maximum level). I didn't really care about the price of the WoW subscription or cd-keys, but I wanted my character back and never managed to recover it. I never really came back to WoW after the incident, as I refuse to level up another char after loosing 2 high-level chars, especially my mage which didn't really have high-end gear but had some cool items and was already level 60.

Diablo (1)

Artaxs (1002024) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298477)

I still have floppy discs with my (old-school) Diablo characters saved to them. I loved the hell out of that game and used to bring a 3.5" with me to play on LAN with friends. It's a shame that storing characters offline made it so easy for cheaters to dupe and hack them for online play.

What's the last online multiplayer game you played where you really "owned" your character, instead of leasing the bits stored on someone else's server?

Depends on the game... (1)

framauro13 (1148721) | more than 6 years ago | (#21298865)

Most games, I could probably care less. However, I'd probably do physical harm to myself and others if I lost my career player in MLB: The Show. I've played through 7 seasons, and gone through a lot to get a secure spot on a major league roster. Not to mention, the bragging rights I've earned playing friends in the Rivalry mode. In a game like baseball, it's nice to have electronic statistics that act as proof that I'm better at the game than my friends, and that is definitely more valuable than the cost of any game. That's the whole purpose of actually playing the game :)
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