Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Hidden Music Claimed In Da Vinci Painting

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the tinfoil-palletes dept.

Music 220

snib sends us to CNN for coverage of an Italian musician and computer technician who claims to have uncovered a hidden musical score in Leonardo Da Vinci's "Last Supper." Giovanni Maria Pala published this and other findings about the 'Last Supper' painting in his book The Hidden Music, released in Italy Friday. "[This raises] the possibility that the Renaissance genius might have left behind a somber composition to accompany the scene depicted in the 15th-century wall painting. 'It sounds like a requiem,' Giovanni Maria Pala said. 'It's like a soundtrack that emphasizes the passion of Jesus.'"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I found Jar Jar Binks... (4, Funny)

Vampyre_Dark (630787) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311647)

I'm sure if you look hard enough, you can find anything you want in that painting. Anyways, RMS wants this story to be called HIDDEN MUSIC CLAIMED IN GNU/LAST SUPPER.

Re:I found Jar Jar Binks... (5, Funny)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311749)

Exactly. I just found the words "vote Romney" in ascii values in the value of Pi. My hands are tied...

You must be confused (5, Funny)

Plutonite (999141) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312029)

Mormons don't use ASCII. Or Pi for that matter. Mormons got Unicode on the continent before it was invented - they found it on buried golden plates, and they gave them back.

Re:You must be confused (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312323)

> Mormons got Unicode

And the niggers got coonicode.

Re:I found Jar Jar Binks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311933)

Vampyre_Dark of Shadowrealm and Hollow Earth?

Re:I found Jar Jar Binks... (1)

tacocat (527354) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312563)

This is nothing new. We all know that the real answer is a Rabbit. Hippitus Hoppitus domini

Re:I found Jar Jar Binks... (1)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312599)

I am interested in your comments and would like to sign up to your newspaper. Or rather, as I just read from your post, "the cow is in the fourth slipper" - could you elaborate?

Re:I found Jar Jar Binks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312669)

the spoon shall dance with the hats of zeus!

In other news...minuet found in hamburglar's lunch (5, Interesting)

mveloso (325617) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311649)

This has to be one of the most creative promotional stunts ever. It's difficult enough to get anyone to listen to new music, but tying your piece to the last supper is truly a work of genius.

Who'll be the first to find XML in there too? (2, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311815)

nuf sed

Re:Who'll be the first to find XML in there too? (4, Insightful)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311943)

[sarcasm]xml can be semantic, that's like asking if there's "objects" in the painting [/sarcasm]. Personally, I would let the artist's peers judge him, this is after all a field of professionals and if the music is a good it may simply prove that there is a rhythm to the painting.

after searching google [google.com] I found this:

"There's always a risk of seeing something that is not there," Pala admits, "but it's certain that the spaces are divided harmonically."

http://www.newser.com/story/11396.html [newser.com]

Which apparently can be proven mathematically [google.com] .

My theory: we can say that Leonardo Da Vinci was smart like Einstein with lots of wide ranging problems rather than a few concentrated ones, and his work will have both breadth AND depth by any typical genius' standards. We're talking people like Einstein, Beethoven, Shakespeare and few others. Now Da Vinci wasn't like any of them, he was a "typical" genius in several fields of study and is known "for" using math in his work http://www.google.com/search?&q=leonardo+da+vinci+math [google.com] .

Heres an interesting quote:

Leonardo invented some of his own mathematical symbols and terms. Many scientists of his time did this because number notation was not standardized until after the invention of the printing press. This made it difficult for scientists and mathematicians to communicate their ideas to each other. The symbols used today for the numbers one through ten come down to us from ancient India by way of Greece, Rome, and the Moors in medieval Spain.

http://www.hypatiamaze.org/leonardo/leo_vinci.html [hypatiamaze.org]

Actually, if he was fond of creating his own symbolism you might find something quite "like" xml in his work somewhere... far smarter than you or I. I wrote a phonetic substitution cipher [wikipedia.org] in fourth grade. It was unique in that you could "speak" encrypted English by most laws of the English language. "Peds oue" means "fuck you" that's all I remember, anyways I'm not far above average intelligence. Da Vinci and the others I mentioned are generally considered to be OFF the charts.

Re:In other news...minuet found in hamburglar's lu (1)

TBerben (1061176) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312201)

Don't dismiss this so quickly as 'another pr stunt'.. DaVinci was a genius and it wouldn't surprise me if it turns out this really is his music. Then again, it won't really surprise me if this is just one extravagant ad either.. We'll just have to wait and see whether this is authentic or a hoax.

Why are slashdotters (4, Insightful)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311657)

So quick to dismiss this? I understand that most of you probably have no particular religious beliefs, or none at all, but what's to say that DaVinci wasn't the kind of man to try to disguise something inside one of his paintings? I still like to think it takes a truly open mind to discover the places technology can truly take us.

Re:Why are slashdotters (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311665)

I still like to think it takes a truly open mind to discover the places technology can truly take us.

But as Richard Dawkins likes to say, not so open your brains fall out. I'm wondering how long it takes for people to find secret "music" in other paintings and photographs... parodists, start your engines...

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311671)

Did I say anything about having to believe in any religion? No. I only made the comment because religion is brought up in TFA.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311687)

Did *he* say anything about religion? No, he made a statement that is general skepticism... skeptical, in this case, about a dubious claim of a song. The fact that you generalized it to religion says something about *you,* not *him.*

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311709)

So I am a religious person. But what was the original context for the quote he used? Arthur Sulzberger made the comment, but about what? It can be applied to anything. And why the anonymous comments?

Re:Why are slashdotters (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311729)

I'm not actually entirely sure that it was Dawkins who originally used the quote. Certainly I'm not the same as the AC who attributed the quote to him above, and I'm posting AC because I chose not to sign in, and I'll stand by that.

The quote, however it was originally made, applies to everything. It is the general mindset of a skeptic, intended to make you question outlandish claims... you should be open to new ideas, but question them all the same.

Re:Why are slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311991)

Why should we question new ideas?

Re:Why are slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312159)

Question everything, except this. Question again if you don't like the answer.

(You might like Theodore Dalrymple's "In Praise of Prejudice.")

Re:Why are slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311733)

Stop trolling. You asked why Slashdotters are so quick to dismiss this on the THIRD POST.

Why the insistence on being offended and starting a "woe is me" religious debate?

Re:Why are slashdotters (5, Funny)

niktemadur (793971) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311783)

I'm wondering how long it takes for people to find secret "music" in other paintings and photographs...

Absolutely. Da Vinci executed his paintings (actually, everything he did) with mathematical precision, and what is music but a mathematical language, Bach being the example that stands out in my mind right now? With sophisticated enough technology, we'll be finding musical notes in Jackson Pollock's paintings - scandinavian death metal, perhaps?

So Da Vinci was also a composer, yet hid it so well that only five centuries later it comes to light. He really kept that secret close to his breast! Typical MSM fodder, this bit of "news", in line with stories from a couple of years ago: "Coming up, ten ways you and your children are in danger of being killed tomorrow in a terrorist attack, but first, the Da Vinci Code - sinister cover-up or fiction?" All of it light years away from Occam's Razor.

As one of the members of The Society For Putting Things On Top Of Other Things said: The whole thing's rather silly, innit?

Re:Why are slashdotters (4, Funny)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311955)

Absolutely. Da Vinci executed his paintings (actually, everything he did) with mathematical precision, and what is music but a mathematical language, Bach being the example that stands out in my mind right now? With sophisticated enough technology, we'll be finding musical notes in Jackson Pollock's paintings
Yes; I'm kind of sceptical of claims such as

"There's always a risk of seeing something that is not there, but it's certain that the spaces [in the painting] are divided harmonically," he told the AP. "Where you have harmonic proportions, you can find music."
Where compositions are methodically laid out in an aesthetically pleasing way, chances are that will lend itself to non-random patterns that sound nice. (And that's on top of everything everyone else said). This really doesn't prove anything in itself.

Anyway, I've used technology to determine what the lyrics to this piece of music are:-

Last Supper I Gave You My Heart,
But the very next day, you betrayed me and had me crucified.
This year, to save me from tears,
I'll give it to someone who's special.

Re:Why are slashdotters (4, Funny)

niktemadur (793971) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312101)

Last Supper I Gave You My Achy Breaky Heart
But the very next day, you cheated on me and had me crucified

There, fixed that for you :)

Re:Why are slashdotters (4, Interesting)

Bastard of Subhumani (827601) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312151)

I have an idea in my head, whenever I see birds on telegraph wires (it's on the Lotus Notes splash screen), that some composer saw the notes he wanted from the pattern they made, but I cannot find a reference for it. Google, of course, just brings up loads of Leonard Cohen hits. Anyone know the piece in question or am I just a crackpot?

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

doormat9 (519612) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312627)

It was in a PBS ad. I saw it on KLRU in Austin TX, but don't recall if it was local or national.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312687)

I vote crackpot... but getting back to the topic, can anyone answer this question: was the musical notation we're familiar with invented back then?

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312155)

But ultimately leonardo's last supper has included tunes .

DaVinci and Music (1)

6foothobbit (935337) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312275)

I seem to remember hearing that DaVinci made a lute shaped like a horses skull and that he was an excellent musician.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

ThirdPrize (938147) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312337)

Turns out Chales Manson was a big Da Vinci Fan.

Re:Why are slashdotters (-1, Troll)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312145)

But as Richard Dawkins likes to say,

But Richard Dawkins is a cretin. Look at his shrill whining when he spots something that doesn't fit in with his particular flavour of crazy religious freakery.

Re:Why are slashdotters (5, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312209)

You must be a real genius if you can call an Oxford professor who's written several bestselling books a cretin. I bow to your giant intellect.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

MOBE2001 (263700) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311669)

So quick to dismiss this?

Uh... They're a bunch of stupid geeks? ahahaha...

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311685)

I think I just discovered a new oxymoron: Stupid Geeks. LOL

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311997)

I think I just discovered a new oxymoron: Stupid Geeks. LOL

How is that an oxymoron?

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311697)

How can stupid and geek belong together? I urge you to return to English class 101.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

untaken_name (660789) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311737)

Well, it really isn't smart to bite the heads off chickens and such. So I see no logical contradiction.
From Dictionary.com:
Geek:
a carnival performer who performs sensationally morbid or disgusting acts, as biting off the head of a live chicken.


I urge you to stop urging people to do things.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

bladesjester (774793) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311741)

One of the definitions is "Pointless; worthless"

It is indeed possible for someone to be intelligent and still be stupid or idiotic for that matter.

Re:Why are slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311679)

This is CNN. Why do we need a reason to dismiss it?

Re:Why are slashdotters (5, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311681)

So quick to dismiss this?

It can't be music.

The RIAA hasn't tried to extort money for it.

Re:Why are slashdotters (3, Funny)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311701)

I think that DaVinci was the kind of man to lead a secret society that hides the Holy Grail and the truth behind the sacred feminine. Anyway, I don't dismiss things like this completely out of hand as it's certainly within the realm of possibility. I read the article and they didn't provide a link to the song and I hope that they're not trying to get some kind of copyright on it as there is most certainly prior art(heh heh) here. Also a musician that truely loves his work can find music in just about anything hence songs like Flight of the Bumblebee, Blue Danube, and that one where the whole song tries to sound like a Typewriter.

Re:Why are slashdotters (5, Informative)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311715)

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311723)

Thank you.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

wfberg (24378) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311805)

Apart from the organs, it sounds suspiciously like the score to the SHO series Dexter [sho.com] . (Not the music on the website, the main title music..)

The one about that serial killer?

Re:Why are slashdotters (4, Funny)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311823)

Now I see why he hid it.

Re:Why are slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312003)

+10 insightful.

But seriously. The fact that it sounds so crappy reduces the probability that it was put there intentionally.

Not convincing (1)

SuurMyy (1003853) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312231)

Such a simple pattern can be gotten from like anywhere. That's not a song at all.

Re:Not convincing (2, Insightful)

trewornan (608722) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312331)

I think it's a mistake to think this is just a simple pattern. DaVinci knew a lot about what's pleasing to the eye in terms of proportion, color tone, etc. Lot's of things in nature are based on fractals or the golden ratio (amongst other things) and for some reason we find these patterns pleasant. The human body itself has a fractal pattern to some extent so the last supper must be full of this stuff. If when you take these patterns from a visual medium and convert them to an auditory medium people find them harmonious that's not especially surprising. Why people find these sorts of patterns attractive is however a very interesting question.

Why golden ratio pleases (2, Insightful)

SuurMyy (1003853) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312533)

I'd say that it's because it has a biological purpose. We find symmetry beautiful in everything, but most importantly of all - in the human body - and face. So I believe that we find this sort of ratio pleasant because it's the pattern we use to choose partners to mate with.

Re:Why are slashdotters (3, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311763)

Simply because if you let someone define the pattern and then let them have a large enough sample size, they'll always find an example of it. He claims that if you were to draw horizontal lines that the bodies would for musical notes, but for paintings of the last supper, this is incredibly likely to happen, and if you get 15 or so of them together, you're going to have something that sounds decently like music. If he can take that same pattern and find it in more of Da Vinci's work, then he may be onto something. Right now it's just too likely to be a fluke.

Besides, with the number of times that it was painted over, there's no way to definitively know whether he's even viewing what Da Vinci painted.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

dfn_deux (535506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311883)

I promise you that your excessive use of commas does not make you easier to understand...

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311801)

Perhaps because slashdotters are sick of stupidity like "The Da Vinci code"?

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

magisterx (865326) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311811)

I don't see what your religious beliefs would have to do with music being hidden in the Last Supper or not. However, while the painting is a true work of genius and one of my personal favorites, it is more likely that there is no music in there. Humans are magnificently good at finding patterns, even where none exists.

Re:Why are slashdotters (4, Interesting)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311831)

So quick to dismiss this? I understand that most of you probably have no particular religious beliefs, or none at all, but what's to say that DaVinci wasn't the kind of man to try to disguise something inside one of his paintings? I still like to think it takes a truly open mind to discover the places technology can truly take us.
Da Vinci may not have been religious himself, but he was no fool. He was known to hide riddles in his paintings and painted with his audience in mind - in this case monks. Why wouldn't he have placed something a bit more subtle than just an obviously female looking John and fairly obvious perspective lines and other features which stand out at a glance? The claimed discovery contained more than music - Giovanni Maria Pala also found some ancient Hebrew text.

i don't dismiss it, but... (3, Funny)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312295)

Poor Da Vinci. With modern technology, he could have hidden a whole symphony in a picture, not just a dozen simple tunes.

Re:Why are slashdotters (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312611)

i heard a rumor there is a secret graphic hidden on the inside back cover of every mad magazine, you should run down to the store and buy one, then come back here and let us know what you found...

Sad story (4, Funny)

backslashdot (95548) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311675)

Da Vinci accidentally misplaced his car keys in the painting too, but died before he could find it.

True story.

Re:Sad story (1)

Cooldrew (1184399) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311711)

Remember Amelia Earhart? Yeah, she's in the Mona Lisa. Just gotta look hard.

Re:Sad story (4, Interesting)

Incadenza (560402) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312149)

Da Vinci accidentally misplaced his car keys in the painting too, but died before he could find it.
The Great Dutch Master forger Han van Meegeren [wikipedia.org] once hid a tiny bicycle in one of his forgeries. This was only discovered after he confessed to be a forger and pointed it out on the painting.

Hmmmm... (1)

FataL187 (1100851) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311689)

So if I were to take a photo of this painting is the RIAA going to want royalties?

-FataL

Yeah, try that algorithm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311731)

with the 6oats3 picture see what comes out of there. (heh heh)

Re:Yeah, try that algorithm (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311803)

try that algorithm...with the [Goatse] picture see what comes out of there.

Oh, please don't. If the music is as horrid as the image, our ears will bleed and I'll forever fear clicking on ANY music link.
   

Although maybe not a dupe... (2, Insightful)

DigitAl56K (805623) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311751)

.. the story sounds remarkably similar to this one:

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/05/01/2047212 [slashdot.org]

I have two comments:
1) I guess people can interpret music in anything and get some recognition from it.
2) If there really isn't music intentionally hidden in these works I bet the artists wouldn't be too happy having people alleging that there is, and changing the interpretation of the piece. Honestly, if the artist had some reason to hide a message in a painting, perhaps because of the potential consequences of his speech, wouldn't he do it in a form where the message was intelligible later? Music seems a poor choice, and there really isn't any motive I can easily think of why you'd have to hide a musical score from view. After all, it's not like the RIAA was filing lawsuits back then ;)

Re:Although maybe not a dupe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311769)

> After all, it's not like the RIAA was filing lawsuits back then ;)

Not lawsuites, and not under that name...

Hiding is the wrong word (2, Insightful)

mce (509) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311857)

If there really isn't music intentionally hidden in these works I bet the artists wouldn't be too happy having people alleging that there is, and changing the interpretation of the piece. Honestly, if the artist had some reason to hide a message in a painting, perhaps because of the potential consequences of his speech, wouldn't he do it in a form where the message was intelligible later? Music seems a poor choice, and there really isn't any motive I can easily think of why you'd have to hide a musical score from view.

While I agree that it's way to easy to claim hidden messages that were never there in the first place, it's wrong to say that, in case there is a message, the artist was trying - and deeded - to conceal it. People, especially those with bright minds like Leonardo, have been and still are doing this kind of thing for fun and "just because they can" (I know I have done similar things a few times myself, and I'm not a Da Vinci). On top of that, in Leonardo's days there really was a lot more to art than throwing a few buckets of paint against a wall. Weaving in multiple symbolisms that only the initiated would read was "basic painting skill number two" (the actual painting techniques being number one).

So the message is not hidden as in "concealed because it needed to be", but hidden as in "non-obvious and thus likely forgotten/lost until rediscovered".

Sim Earth (2, Interesting)

Dwedit (232252) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311753)

I remember that Sim Earth had the ability to play your planet's current statistics as a song, more like a series of notes based on the content of the Y axis. I bet it the hidden song in the painting would be just as nonsensical and unmusical as playing a scatter plot as if it were music.

In Other News... (3, Funny)

Talez (468021) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311773)

The RIAA has launched a lawsuit against the Santa Maria delle Grazie for copyright infringement...

Misleading Tags.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311777)

Encryption is changing data; stenography is hiding it.

Re:Misleading Tags.. (1)

Neeth (887729) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311891)

Thanks for the correction, AC. Now please explain what steganography means.

Old News In Roman Catholicism (4, Insightful)

nick_davison (217681) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311781)

If you go around determined to see the virgin Mary's face, you'll start seeing something kind of like it in every tree bark, every mildew, every piece of burned toast, every birthmark.

If you're determined to find hidden messages and keep trying different numerical values, you can pull spooky phrases out of the bible... or indeed the script for Animal House.

People have long been "composing" music from random number generators and fractals. If a random number generator can be forced in to a musical composition, by definition, any series of values can be.

I personally enjoy the following algorhythm: Break the image up in to inch squares. For any given inch if the dominant color is red, note the word "this", if it's green, note the word "is", and if it's blue, note the word "stupid". Amazingly, Da Vinci left a message encoded that appears to describe his views on musical analysis of his work.

Re:Old News In Roman Catholicism (4, Funny)

ciaran.mchale (1018214) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311953)

I personally enjoy the following algorhythm: Break the image up in to inch squares. For any given inch if the dominant color is red, note the word "this", if it's green, note the word "is", and if it's blue, note the word "stupid". Amazingly, Da Vinci left a message encoded that appears to describe his views on musical analysis of his work.
I tried that and I found "Stupid, stupid. This this this this this stupid stupid is is is this this is is is is is stupid stupid stupid." Wow. I never realized that Da Vinci had a stutter.

Re:Old News In Roman Catholicism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312017)

Davinci was way ahead of the rest of humanity and had already adopted the metric system.

Re:Old News In Roman Catholicism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311975)

Beethoven's music encodes ASCII pictures of Jesus. It only took one little square of paper for me to discover this.

The guy loved tricks, can you say Easter Egg? (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311829)

We know that modern creators often include Easter Eggs in their products, everything from hidden bits of programming to images etched into the silicone hardware. Why do so many of slashdot readers find it impossible to accept that Leonardo might have done the same in his work?

We know he had the skill for it, we know he did it in other works, we know he loved tricks.

Yes, human beings have got a talent for seeing patterns where there aren't any, and slashdot readers got a talent for being a bunch of smartasses who think they know better.

Personally I would first want to see a picture of the painting, the overlayed musical score (how lenient do you have to be to see the scores, is it ALWAYS the center of the hand or is the note sometimes put at the fingernails and othertimes at the wrist?) and the music itself.

I am slightly suspicious because it seems all the be explained in a book. MONEY GRABBER! If it was science it would be a in a peer reviewed paper, not in a commercial book. Then their is the claim that this shows Leonardo was a religious person. Eh why? I don't see the connection between hiding a piece of music in a painting and the painters world vision.

Re:The guy loved tricks, can you say Easter Egg? (2, Funny)

DigitAl56K (805623) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311895)

Da Vinci Easter Egg: Open a copy of any Da Vinci painting in Firefox and quickly tap Ctrl+P then enter. Before you know it, it will appear in hard copy on the nearest printer!

Known issues: Unfortunately Da Vinci, although a brilliant artist, wasn't so hot at embedded coding back in the day, and occasionally the hard copies will appear in greyscale only.

Silly DaVinci (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311841)

If you're going to hide something, use truecrypt.

If we study more closely, we might find his tax returns as well.

The video is out! (1)

maciarc (1094767) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311859)

They've already released the video [youtube.com] for it!

Re:The video is out! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312483)

You are so stupid!

This is ridiculous... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311861)

...and makes absolutely no sense. You can't just find notes and say you have a piece of music, because music is more than notes. Assuming this is anything like written music as we know it, which it looks like from the picture, he's missing an awful lot of information. What key is it? What's the time signature? There's no reference point anywhere on there from which to play, and that doesn't even touch on note durations or other playing instructions. "The tempo was almost painfully slow" - how the hell did he figure out how fast he's supposed to play it?

I know people are kind of enamored with the idea of Da Vinci hiding a bunch of stuff in his works, but come on. At best this guy is completely deluded and is grasping at straws to piece together something he actually thinks is encoded in the painting, kind of like those nuts who rearrange letters in Bible passages to make predictions. At worst he's making it all up and wants to siphon off some attention from the Da Vinci Code.

Re:This is ridiculous... (1)

Datamonstar (845886) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312439)

Modern music notation is not the only musical notation. The article also states that Da Vinci was known for making musical puzzles in his writings, and that he played the lute and designed many instruments, so I really don't think it's out of line for some music to be hidden in a painting, too.

Re:This is ridiculous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312509)

You're right, but there's still no reference point. What made him look at a piece of bread or a cross or whatever and decide that it's a G or D or E flat?

From reading the article, his methodology was this. I'm going to use modern music terminology because it's easier, but it still applies to any other notation system:

1. Draw five lines on the painting.
How does he know he got them in the right position? Why is he assuming Da Vinci uses that kind of notation? Why not draw ten lines and do a treble and bass part?

2. Pick out objects of religious significance, and map them to a spot on the staff. These are notes.
Without a clef, a staff is totally meaningless and carries no information. Notes aren't just points on a clef, they have information about their duration. Is a hand a whole note, a piece of bread a half note?

3. Play it, reading it backwards. The tempo is very slow.
How many beats per measure? How many beats does each note get? What's the tempo? Why did he decided on these values? Did he guess, or did he find some coded hint in the painting telling him all of this?

The best comparison I can make is this: You find a piece of paper with a bunch of dots on it. You connect them and make a line graph, and arbitrarily assign a scale on the X and Y coordinates. Then you declare that all of the information in this graph you've created was there all along. It's completely ridiculous and baseless, just like this guy's claims.

Re:This is ridiculous... (1)

EvanED (569694) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312557)

Without a clef, a staff is totally meaningless and carries no information.

What? It still carries information -- intervals. I don't think it's complete because not all notes are a whole step apart, but it's still way more than "no information".

Re:This is ridiculous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21312643)

Yeah, you're right, but this guy started with the notes and drew in the staff, which is meaningless. Two notes could be a half-step apart, or two steps, or a million steps. If you listen to the MP3, the piece is very sparse and personally I don't think it's complex enough to make a good judgment of scale.

In other words, his notes are x steps apart because he says they are, not because that information was ever in the painting.

Too classical (1)

Caesar Tjalbo (1010523) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311871)

'It sounds like a requiem,' Giovanni Maria Pala said. 'It's like a soundtrack that emphasizes the passion of Jesus.'
With Da Vinci in da house ya can bet yo momma's wigglin' ass it wasn't about the passion of Jesus, mo' 'bout the passion of mc Leo da man himself, for real!

Wow (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311877)

Who'd have thought that you could find order in a picture showing order and transform that order into something resembling music? Mind boggling. For an encore this bozo should be searching for bible codes in Slashdot.

TACO (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311903)

baalots. You could And executes a driven out by the has brought upon vitality. Like an copy a 17 Meg file the last night of about 700 users Need to join the noises out of the

What I Need to Know... (1)

Sawopox (18730) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311911)

is when this track is coming out for Guitar Hero: III on Xbox 360. Also, will it include an achievement? How many Microsoft points will this cost? Seeing as it is Jesus, shouldn't this be a free download?

I look forward to giving this track a run through on my plastic guitar.

Why is there no midi? (1)

pancakegeels (673199) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311935)

Or some sample, surely this is out of copyright by now?

Re:Why is there no midi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21311995)

The music is, any recent performance ain't.

Vinyl Record (1)

Darren Foong (786375) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311965)

Maybe one day they realise that it plays a scary piece of music when the painting is put in a gramophone.

Seriously, these people think of everything!

40-second music clip (4, Funny)

ciaran.mchale (1018214) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311977)

A 40-seconds long musical score is a bit short for a "serious" piece of music. Perhaps it was an advertising jingle instead. I'm guessing the lyrics to go with the music were "Giovanni's pizza are tasty. The extra-large size is so big it's the last supper you will ever need to buy. Tell them Da Vinci sent you to qualify for the 'buy one, get one free' offer."

Slashdot Moderators Aren't Mean Enough (1)

indiejade (850391) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311979)

We're advised and told to be nice and to "promote" rather than "discourage" posts. . . this thread is making this duty especially difficult. . .

FFT (2, Interesting)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 6 years ago | (#21311983)

I remember a Matlab demo we did in one of my ECE courses. We took the fourier transform of an image of Batman--I think it was an FFT--and after some other processing played it as a wav file. Pretty awesome song, actually.

Although, to be fair, the image was made for the demo. Still, it was a fair likeness of Batman considering.

Skepticism has its place (1)

Nazlfrag (1035012) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312109)

Yet there were other abstract things hidden in that work of art, I can think of a respect for the Golden Ratio and an implied dodecahedron, but I'm sure there were others. A work of a master craftsman like Da Vinci shouldn't have Occams Razor applied, for it is not simplistic in nature but harbours deeper meaning.

THIS IS THE WORK OF THE DEVIL! (1)

therufus (677843) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312175)

Anyone else notice you have to play this picture music backwards. This may be the first ever use of backmasking [wikipedia.org] , a tool often used to hide evil messages in music.

Intriguing!

Thats wierd (1)

MortenMW (968289) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312321)

I thought that Da Vinci was smart enough to embedd some DRM into his paintings.

Re:Thats wierd (2, Funny)

EvanED (569694) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312571)

I thought that Da Vinci was smart enough to embedd some DRM into his paintings.

Oh, he clearly was; you're just backwards. The Last Supper is actually the song, and the painting is the DRM. It lasted 500 years, which is pretty darn good for a DRM scheme too.

Easter eggs? (1)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312605)

It's very easy to shoot this idea down in flames, but he was a smart guy. There's no reason he thought it'd be a laugh to stick an Easter Egg in a painting. After all programmers do it, musicians put cryptic stuff in sleeve notes, writers hide recurring themes in books. Why not a painter?

Thing is, you can read stuff into anything. So if it is supposed to be musical notes, I'm sure it'll be bloody obvious, otherwise it'll sounds like crap.

But when you watch the image in a mirror... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312633)

And superimpose it with an image of Mona Lisa.
And then, trace an image of the egg over that new image.

You can clearly see the following words:

Scanctum Peter Cottium
Deus in re unium
hippitus hoppitus reus Domine

In suus via torreum
Lepus en re sanctum
hippitus hoppitus Deus Domine


Wow! Who would have thougt that Parker and Stone were right (again).

http://www.southparkx.net/news/1105-fantastic-easter-special-just-aired-on-comedy-central [southparkx.net]

Also... when you play the new music backwards, it says who is the final Cylon, explains everything in "Lost" and who shot J.R...
This last bit is kind of a anticlimax.

and the reverse... (1)

onezan (908534) | more than 6 years ago | (#21312739)

The Aphex Twin (modern electronic musician) took a picture of himself, used audio software to convert the picture to a wav and slipped it into his last album. meaning, if you rip his album to a wav, and then run it through some filters you can get a picture of him.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?