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Police swoop on 'Hacker of the Year'

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the according-to-who-exactly dept.

Security 223

AcidAUS writes "The Swedish hacker, Dan Egerstad, who perpetrated the so-called hack of the year, has been arrested in a dramatic raid on his apartment, during which he was taken in for questioning and several of his computers confiscated. Egerstad broke into the global communications network used by embassies around the world in August and gained access to 1000 sensitive email accounts."

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"Broke in?" (5, Insightful)

Evangelion (2145) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364071)


I thought he just listened in on Tor traffic.

Re:"Broke in?" (5, Insightful)

hsdpa (1049926) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364465)

He did, and that's what's so stupid about this police-raid.

Re:"Broke in?" (-1, Flamebait)

aminorex (141494) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364809)

It's also what's so stupid about the slashdot article.
 

Re:"Broke in?" (5, Funny)

TigerTime (626140) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365039)

There's a guy down the street from where I work that had a bullhorn talking about the end of the world. I completely hacked into his message this morning.

Well, that's what you get (5, Funny)

Lally Singh (3427) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364075)

90% of what makes a really good hack hard is STFU'ing about it.

Re:Well, that's what you get (5, Insightful)

luvirini (753157) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364145)

That is the point authohorities all over the world seem to be making... Do not report Security flaws.

If you notice a security flaw and are quiet about it nothing happens.

If you notice a securoty flaw and report it you get charged for hacking.

Guess what happens in future...

Re:Well, that's what you get (5, Interesting)

Praedon (707326) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364219)

There was an article a while back on slashdot, that mentioned about this guy who found a way to duplicate boarding passes for an airline... before he published the information to the internet, he contacted his congressman, which did nothing about it.. but then published how to do it, and the template to the internet. He was then considered a "terrorist" and I have heard nothing more about him.

Re:Well, that's what you get (2, Insightful)

olddotter (638430) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364325)

So your saying his government is made up of morons?

Re:Well, that's what you get (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364411)

No, but of people with a one track mind. He who knows how to break the law breaks the law, since if he didn't mean to break the law, he wouldn't know how to do it. He who finds a security hole must have been looking for a security hole, and the only reason to look for a security hole is to use it.

Another train of thought follows the logic that what is forbidden does not exist. And if it exists, simply crack down with utmost force on it, and it ceases to exist.

The core fallacy about it is that this doesn't mean crimes don't happen, it just means you won't hear about them. Which is, for the statistic, identical. It's a bit like closing your eyes and pretending that since you can't see the problem it doesn't exist.

Re:Well, that's what you get (2, Funny)

Jarjarthejedi (996957) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364463)

*Sticks fingers in ears and closes eyes*

LALALALALA I can't hear you!

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

tucuxi (1146347) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364775)

The core fallacy about it is that this doesn't mean crimes don't happen, it just means you won't hear about them. Which is, for the statistic, identical. It's a bit like closing your eyes and pretending that since you can't see the problem it doesn't exist.

It's not only used by children and politicians; there you have "don't shoot the messenger" (royalty and military), "the ostrich algorithm" (100% effective for technical woes), and "Gandalf Stormcrow" (LOTR version of the above).

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364805)

that's why police can quite easily get away with beating people at free parties, because free parties don't exist, they don't even make the news.

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

olddotter (638430) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365023)

I call that the ostrich syndrome. Although even ostriches are not really that stupid.

Re:Well, that's what you get (3, Insightful)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364449)

No more than anybody else's... listen, the guy just exposed a major security flaw that has an impact on diplomatic communications all over the world. On the one hand, the guy's doing a job no one else thought to do, and to let governments know that their secrets are easily tapped. Governments should be funding his work, to see if he can come up with a solution to the problem. But being governments, they're a bit paranoid (even the Swedes) and heavy-handed. This guys knows about a security vulnerability -- what else does he know? So they drag him in and give him the "treatment".

Re:Well, that's what you get (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364689)

Or the security flaw was intended to provide misinformation and mislead those listening in, and exposing it means they have to do something about it and coming up with another that isn't as easy to find but still gets the same information out to the same people hacking into their systems is going to be a lot harder...

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364879)

You're probably giving them wayyyy too much credit ;)

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365031)

Not the "treatment"?!!!? :o Hopefully thats a sauna, then a government security job offer with a company Volvo?

Re:Well, that's what you get (4, Interesting)

bytesex (112972) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364489)

A bit too paranoid. He was told to shut up about it, but nothing happened to him. It was a journalist who'd found out that if you made two boarding passes at home, one in his own name (not conspicuous) and one in the name of Osama Bin Laden, and you switched bottom barcodes on them, you could get Osama on the plane. Or something. Apparently, the two barcodes are read at different stations, and only the first one checks for identity (but not the no fly list), and the second one checks for the no fly list (but not the identity). Or something.

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364671)

That's because he printed himself up a boarding pass to a non extradition country before publishing to the net.

Re:Well, that's what you get (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364309)

Guess what happens in future...
Oooh ooh! I know! A sentient robot named Bender gets jettisoned into space and learns a lesson about unintended consequences while acting as god to a bunch of wee people living in a colony on his abdomen?

Oh... I thought you said "Guess what happens in Futurama". Never mind.

Re:Well, that's what you get (4, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364361)

And what did we learn today? Don't report a security hole, sell it to Russia.

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

kihbord (724079) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364757)

The Moral of the Story: Ask permission first!

Re:Well, that's what you get (2, Insightful)

Praedon (707326) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364177)

I completely agree... some of the best hacks in the world happened without anyone ever even knowing except the person who did it... He just had the balls to take credit for it... I don't know if in Sweden they brand hackers terrorists or not, like in the U.S., but if they do, he could be in a lot of trouble.

I have a prediction about this guy... what's going to happen in about 5-10 years, is he will end up writing articles like other hacker sellouts that we know.

Re:Well, that's what you get (5, Interesting)

_14k4 (5085) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364275)

I think the "sellout" part of those hackers is actually the part that grew up and realized (real - as mentioned above)hacking is not a way to support a family - and it will always be a hobby. As it should be, no?

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

NDPTAL85 (260093) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364951)

So wanting to eat and pay bills is selling out?

Is the only way to "keep it real" is to starve out on the streets because you're homeless?

Re:Well, that's what you get (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364499)

First rule of true hacking... You don't talk about Hacking! Second rule of Hacking... YOU DON'T TALK ABOUT HACKING!

That's why people just assume Crackers are Hackers... Crackers talk, Hackers know better...

dear finance.yahoo.com (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364077)

why is it you do not show the volume of the indices anymore. not very impressive is it?

Bragger? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364093)

Can we now safely call this guy the #1 Bragger?

is hacker appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364101)

I thought this was the type of group that was all upset if someone misused the term hacker.

how soon/easily we forget (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364843)

robbIE is likely just another victim of the whoreabull corepirate nazi pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphucking mass hypenosys.

Good. (1, Interesting)

MSFanBoi2 (930319) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364103)

Break the law, go to jail. You don't have to like the laws, but breaking them ain't going to do you a bit of good. And then to go as far as start messing with the cops? Good going there Dan! Enjoy your time in prison!

Re:Good. (4, Insightful)

spleen_blender (949762) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364185)

And my faith in humanity drops to yet another record low.

I'm getting sick of a society that has ZERO room for exceptions. Make exceptions for the exceptional... that is why they are exceptional.

Although listening to TOR traffic is hardly exceptional, but the point he proved without malicious intent was.

Re:Good. (5, Insightful)

Nos. (179609) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364251)

"Egerstad published 100 of the email accounts, including login details and passwords, on his website for anyone curious enough to have a look"
Publishing login credentials of 100 accounts isn't what I'd call without malicious intent. Okay, he was trying to force them to react, but there are better ways of doing it.

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

spleen_blender (949762) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364371)

Agreed, but these kind of cases should not ever be treated in the same way terrorism suspects are, or any other significant crime. It is ridiculous when I think back on the things I could be arrested for in the eyes of these people and the kind of suffering I would endure, and then compare that to the suffering I have forced on others. It is obscene to treat them like common criminals, because they are obviously not common.

Re:Good. (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364567)

So publishing the login credentials which could provide access to very sensitive information should be treated as what? Shoplifting? This guy new what he was doing and was trying to make a name for himself. It was the wrong way to do it, and he should have known better.

Re:Good. (1)

spleen_blender (949762) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364847)

And that warrants this kind of reaction still? Of course he should be punished and informed as to the PROPER way to have handled this situation, but he should spend ZERO time in prison. All that does is build resentment of the system and increase recidivism.

Your good natured intent is clouding your thinking (5, Insightful)

NDPTAL85 (260093) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365025)

Diplomats are often dealing with people seeking asylum for humanitarian reasons. They also deal with local and international law enforcement and sometimes the military. In any one of those cases leaked information could have gotten someone killed. This guy didn't expose the logins and passwords of MySpace accounts. Then there's the consideration that he very well may have violated several privacy/confidentiality laws as well.

I don't think you realize just how serious what this guy did is.

Re:Good. (1)

caluml (551744) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364981)

Perhaps just publishing the usernames, and not the passwords. Or just the passwords, and not the usernames.

Re:Good. (1)

aminorex (141494) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364987)

> there are better ways of doing it.

I've heard that before. Such as? Name a "better way" that (1) he didn't already try and (2) wouldn't involve turning over sensitive data of another nation to spooks of a potentially adversarial power.
     

Re:Good. (1)

GNUman (155139) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364195)

"Egerstad was released and no charges have been laid against him, but the police are in the process of investigating the matter and nothing has been ruled out."

RTFA

Re:Good. (1)

Elemenope (905108) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364197)

Is sniffing tor packets illegal? Clue me in.

Yes it's illegal (1)

emj (15659) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364397)

I would think so, of course as long as no one can probe you are doing it, it should be fine. If you lend you computer to someone and sniff his traffic, that's going to be illegal, same thing. The question is if your intent is to inform people, does that make it less illegal. Of course it does, now being called a hacker certainly doesn't help.

Information wants to be free.

Re:Good. (1)

rasjani (97395) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364523)

Depends.. Whats in the package?

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364215)

You're a good little fall-in-line MS fanboi, aren't ya? You like george bush, too?

You're a tool.

Re:Good. (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364469)

A law is not to be observed blindly. A law is to be questioned to test it against real life requirements. If people would not question laws, people would still be enslaved because of the color of their skin and the US would still be a colony of Britain.

Re:Good. (1)

cycler (31440) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364991)

Wrong!

He didn' break any laws.

And second, the embassytraffic could be from crackers wanting to be anonymous when they accessed stolen embassyaccounts.

And yes, I'm from Sweden /C

Re:Good. (5, Informative)

celtic_hackr (579828) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365161)

I won't delineate all the reasons why what you said is a stupid troll.

But here's a few gems for you.

1) He became a tor node.
2) All the data he examined was on his own computers.
3) Everything on the computers belonged to him.
4) As a responsible tor node person, he examined the contents of it.
5) Refer to number 3. Also in the US, he could be found responsible for
      people using his tor node to traffic in say copyrighted works or child
      abuse. So he would really pretty much HAVE to inspect the contrents of
      his traffic to make sure that no illegal activity was taking place.
6) What law is it you think he broke?

It was just tor eavesdropping! (5, Insightful)

sanermind (512885) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364113)

All he did was run a tor exit node, and observe the outgoing traffic, a known possibility when using tor. Not only is there the disclaimer "This is experimental software. Do not rely on it for strong anonymity" evertime you run tor, but this vector of potential attack is so bloody obvious that anyone not aware of would be a bloody idiot not to use additional encryption for accessing sensitive information on the other end, and rely on tor only for obfuscation of the fact that the route originates from them.

Re:It was just tor eavesdropping! (1)

reabbotted (871820) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364207)

I have no idea what the laws are in Sweden, but I suspect he is in trouble for posting the information to his website. But this brings up a dilemma I've always had with hacking. Is it possible to do it legally? I've always thought it would be fun to do, but I'm also opposed to breaking any laws. I value the law over getting some satisfaction over hacking into someone else's computer. So the question is, is it possible to practice without breaking laws?

Re:It was just tor eavesdropping! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364265)

"It was just for eavesdropping!" I will remind you of that when you catch me outside you bedroom listening to you banging your wife.

Re:It was just tor eavesdropping! (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364761)

I disagree. Listening outside your bedroom requires physical presence on your property. He committed no such act. In fact, what he did was no more incriminating than you putting a packet analyzer on your Internet connection in your living room. If you happen to hear some music on a radio station that was played without royalty payments, are you guilty of copyright infringement?

Had he only claimed to have the login credentials, it might not seem so bad, but he has made his point in spectacular fashion. The recovery is rather simple, and no permanent damage exists, other than what information became public as a result.

It might also be easy to argue that anyone who used the logins to see what was there knowingly violated computer security laws.

In either case, shooting the messenger is never a workable solution.

MOD PARENT UP (1)

MadMidnightBomber (894759) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364535)

The guy did not 'break into' anything - he dumped passwords as they flowed through HIS tor exit node. Tor obfuscates the origin, it does not encrypt the traffic for you. The summary is very, very wrong.

Re:It was just tor eavesdropping! (4, Insightful)

KokorHekkus (986906) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364841)

All he did was run a tor exit node, and observe the outgoing traffic...
And that could very likely be construed as eavesdropping on electronic communications. The Swedish penal code, 4th chapter, 8th paragraph, says:

8 Den som olovligen bereder sig tillgång till ett meddelande, som ett post- eller telebefordringsföretag förmedlar som postförsändelse eller telemeddelande, döms för brytande av post- eller telehemlighet till böter eller fängelse i högst två år.
Which translates to approximatly:

The person who gains access to a message, that a postal or telecommunications company transmits, as a postal or telecommuncations message, is to be sentened for exposure of postal or telecommuncations secret to fines or a maximum of two years prison.
Swedish laws are a bit laconic so that's the full text. I'm not really surprised that the police decide to start an investigation since what he did could be legal - it's not a clear cut case. Obviously the message were not ment for him and he didn't come by them by accident. Word to the wise: better read up on the laws where are if you're going to pull something like this. If it's in the gray area be prepared to investigated.

Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (1)

liquiddark (719647) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364115)

I mean, I'm not up on all that. But for a little while the effort was made to distinguish them. Has that effort been abandoned by white-hats?

Re:Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (2, Informative)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364281)

Crackers break the copyright protection on computer software. Hackers use their skills to find weaknesses in the security of software, hardware, and networks. Those that exploit them for malicious purposes are black hat hackers and those that report them to the proper people so the vulnerabilities can be fixed are white hat hackers. Script kiddies are ones that take programs written by bad hackers and just run them without actually comprehending what they're doing other than the fact that they've owned another box.

Those have been the definitions for at least the past 20 years now and the only people who would argue that are old fat hippie open source programmers who think they are hackers when in fact they are just geeks.

Re:Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (1)

liquiddark (719647) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364437)

Does this [berkeley.edu] confirm your theory, or refute it? It's a Berkeley link, and an MIT Press dictionary. So maybe it confirms your "only people who'd argue it" stereotype?

Re:Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (1)

gazbo (517111) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365355)

Both. Note how the main reference cited is Eric Raymond's jargon file? Well if you go back to the versions before that massive twat took over (oh, find it yourself - it'd take me just as long), you'll notice that hacker used to be in there referring to people who break into systems. It was only when that self-aggrandising revisionist managed to gain control that it became "strongly deprecated".

So not only does it show that indeed it did always have a negative meaning, but it also proves the GP's point about what sort of tool argues against that usage.

Re:Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364335)

A cracker is a derogatory term for persons of Caucasian decent.

Re:Wouldn't this technically be a cracker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21365225)

Sure he a cracker yo! He a pasty-ass white boy, jus like you!

What happend? (1)

Fri13 (963421) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364139)

What happend to word "Cracker" and "Hacker"? Is he now a Hacker or Cracker? Few days ago was again news that how one hacker found thousands of servers without updates and firewall and he was hacker because he is security advisor and works for one company. So why this man is called as hacker too if he stoled information?

Re:What happend? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364565)

You don't read news and media altogether too often. Let me clue you in:

Hacker is someone who does illegal stuff with a computer. People have seen sneakers and swordfish, so they know the term and know it's some computer guy that does illegal stuff. So hacker is it.

Re:What happend? (1)

The Anarchist Avenge (1004563) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365043)

Honestly, I'm not sure I'm going to trust some guy with a soviet russia quote in his .sig. I jest, I jest.

Re:What happend? (1)

BPPG (1181851) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364619)

He is definitely a cracker. Although he didn't do any real damage and may not have had any malicious intent, he basically went somewhere he wasn't supposed to go. Although what he really did wasn't incredibly impressive, it was who he did it to that has people calling it Hack Of The Year. The traditional usage of hacker is just any computer hardware/network hobbyist. Cracker was invented to differentiate the ones using their skills for "evil". I expect everyone reading this to already know this, but I didn't expect to see an article summary ignore it. Which is fine with me, the way mainstream media sees hacker subculture as being so mystical and difficult to understand makes it more interesting.

Re:What happend? (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365411)

He didn't really hack anything: just take advantage of others' stupidity. He's not a cracker because he wasn't being malicious.

They went in with all guns blazing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364147)

'Dramatic raid' sort of conjures up the image of police kicking in the doors and going in with their guns blazing and shooting anyone in sight. I kinda imagine that didn't happen. :(

I don't know why is he surprised (2, Insightful)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364149)

He fucked the police states, so the police bit back.
He is lucky not to be in russia or china or cold war US so he got no bullet in his head.

Hackers, gang crime and bare breasts (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364203)

Meanwhile, Swedish police stands by watching an outbreak of gang shootings in the city of Gothenburg, in which even police stations and police helicopter hangars have been destroyed by drive by shootings. The chief of police is quoted as saying "We know who they are but we can't arrest them because we have no proof".

Isn't it amazing that it's easier in Sweden to raid and arrest a white collar hacker than a hard-core gang of criminals with machine guns?

In other news, Swedish feminists were heard crying out for the right to display their breasts in public - "we too [want to] pull off our shirts at football matches". [thelocal.se]

God, what a country.

Re:Hackers, gang crime and bare breasts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364337)

Any article involving Swedish women and the right to display their breasts in public is worthless without pictures.

What's Swedish for 'hypocrite'? (0, Flamebait)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364235)

From TFA:
""They broke my wardrobe, short cutted my electricity, pulled out my speakers, phone and other cables having nothing to do with this and been touching my bookkeeping, which they have no right to do," he said."

Oh, they have no RIGHT to do it? As opposed to hacking email accounts, which you DID have a right to do? What if they just said that they were 'hacking' your physical life, would that make it ok?

"While questioning Egerstad at the station, the police "played every trick in the book, good cop, bad cop and crazy mysterious guy in the corner not wanting to tell his name and just staring at me". "Well, if they want to try to manipulate, I can play that game too. [I] gave every known body signal there is telling of lies ... covered my mouth, scratched my elbow, looked away and so on.""

Personally, Egerstad sounds like the kind of a sanctimonious dick that SHOULD get the beatdown. They should give him "every known signal" that the police don't like it when when someone is lying to them...tasers, nightstick, whatever.

"Egerstad said the police also accused him of theft because he had eight PlayStation 2 consoles in his apartment. He said he owns a company that "handles consoles"."

Um, yeah, his company 'handles' them. What, like, you polish them or something? SMBS...perhaps you should check your own windows before you start casting stones, Mr. Egerstad.

Re:What's Swedish for 'hypocrite'? (1)

Deanalator (806515) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364359)

He hacked NOTHING. He sat on a tor exit node with dsniff. You can do that setup in minutes (I used to run driftnet-gtk on my tor exit node for kicks). He noticed a large amount of dumbasses using email with no encryption, and wanted it to stop ASAP, so he released the info.

Re:What's Swedish for 'hypocrite'? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364617)

Does this mean that the police have the right to break the law if the suspect might have done it ?

Re:What's Swedish for 'hypocrite'? (1)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364691)

Personally, Egerstad sounds like the kind of a sanctimonious dick that SHOULD get the beatdown. They should give him "every known signal" that the police don't like it when when someone is lying to them...tasers, nightstick, whatever.

Personally, you sound like the kind of guy the police should protect us from. Too bad that they don't seem to get people with better morals for their own ranks.

Troll or idiot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364755)

I think both. There are already too many like you at the police. Bah.

Re:What's Swedish for 'hypocrite'? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364989)

"sanctimonious dick"? I guess it takes one to know one. Instead of making silly claims that Egerstad was "hacking email accounts", why don't you actually learn what Egerstad did before showing the world what a fool you are.

Access credentials were sent through his node! (5, Informative)

JackHoffman (1033824) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364245)

broke into the global communications network used by embassies around the world in August and gained access to 1000 sensitive email accounts

He acquired access credentials to 1000 email accounts used by embassies. He did so by becoming an exit node of the TOR anonymizing network and reading the unencrypted exit traffic. That may have been in violation of the law, but does not constitute "breaking into the global communications network used by embassies".

What a moron! (5, Insightful)

Pedrito (94783) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364255)

Look, I don't know if the guy actually broke any laws. It sounds like he might have, but maybe not. On the other hand, intentionally trying to fuck with the police after they arrested him is plain stupid. It doesn't buy you anything except bad will. It's not like the people interrogating him are the ones that made the decision to arrest him. You get pulled in by the police, if you're really not guilty, the only smart thing to do is cooperate. Creating that kind of bad will and then complaining that you might not get your computer equipment back for years, well what do you expect? Shit on people and expect them to shit on you back.

Re:What a moron! (2, Informative)

nfractal (1039722) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364399)

Well, its already been discussed here pretty much at length and as for taking credit and messing with the police.. i believe he's being plain stupid. Taking credit for a hack and reporting it does NOT mean publishing the entire list of access credentials online. Could have just reported and left to fend for themselves. Dramatic is it ? well he was the one looking for drama in the first place. nf

Re:What a moron! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364471)

You get pulled in by the police, if you're really not guilty, the only smart thing to do is cooperate.

I disagree with that. Get an independent lawyer FIRST! They could be just looking for a goat, and you were fingered. Police generally know so little about computers, and would only look at a geek as a sub-species. The more you talk, the more it can be twisted.

RIAA for example. Your PC could have been hijacked. No mater what you say you will be viewed as guilty unless you're lucky enough there is enough evidence left to show you were setup and they bother to look for it.

I have no idea if he is a criminal, but criminal or not, get a good lawyer ASAP. Then cooperate with your lawyers guidance.

Re:What a moron! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364609)

uhh the best thing you can do is shut your mouth if you are hauled in by police. You have no obligation to say anything except your identity. Police will try and manipulate information from you from the second you enter their "interrogation facility". #2 on the list is getting a good lawyer to do the talking, guilty or innocent.

Re:What a moron! (1)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364629)

On the other hand, intentionally trying to fuck with the police after they arrested him is plain stupid. It doesn't buy you anything except bad will. It's not like the people interrogating him are the ones that made the decision to arrest him. You get pulled in by the police, if you're really not guilty, the only smart thing to do is cooperate.

Actually, no. There must be limits to the criminal acts of the police one should feel compelled to show good will with. He may be a fool because he feels confident that his country will protect him from malicious acts even of the police force, but you have to stand up for your rights. If those people who are interrogating him are in the least interested in acting lawfully, then they will not harm him for refusing to cooperate with obviously illegal practices. If they are not, then he's screwed anyway...

Re:What a moron! (2, Interesting)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365003)

Creating that kind of bad will and then complaining that you might not get your computer equipment back for years, well what do you expect?

He might not get the PC back working at ALL.

A client of mine had to give a medical server over for discovery in an insurance case. After much "analysis" {which turned out to be a bunch of guessing} they returned the box 6 months later... minus hard drive. To this day, neither the insurance company nor "expert witness" will admit that they lost 10 years of patient info and charting.

Stories like this kill me. If we had a better-informed society, the call wouldn't be "get the hacker!"... It'd be "get the idiot that thought non-encrypted communications between embassies was a good idea"...

Re:What a moron! (1)

aminorex (141494) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365077)

> You get pulled in by the police, if you're really not guilty, the only smart thing to do is cooperate.

That's the dumbest fucking thing I've heard this week, and I've been watching youtube links from reddit since Tuesday.

You get pulled in by the police, it doesn't matter if you're "guilty" or not. Their job is to bust your ass, or use you as a tool to bust someone else's ass. They live to fuck people up. That's all there is to it. If you think fucking people up is smart, cooperate. I'll enjoy the smell of your burning flesh in hell. Actually, since they'll probably just use your "cooperation" as a means of putting you in prison (a bird in the hand being worth two in the bush, after all), I doubt you'll ever merit the intervention of divine retribution. Your cellmate Bubba will do the job of Satan very nicely.

"Broke into" (5, Insightful)

dr_d_19 (206418) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364323)

Dan didn't break into anything. He simply set up a Tor node and watches the traffic passing. Most likely the passwords he sniffed out were not used by Embassy officials but by criminal elements who were using Tor to avoid being caught when using stolen credentials.

Also, he notified the involved embassies weeks before publishing the material.

I not saying it was a stupid move (I think it was) but the summary makes him look like a criminal which he is most certainly not. The Swedish police does not understand IT and obviously does whatever foreign countries tell them to do since our political leaders lacks spines.

The first geek to ever be called.... (1)

GodsBlood (1143061) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364333)

a HOTY

Just what is he? (4, Interesting)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364353)

From the article, paragraph 1:

The Swedish hacker who perpetrated the so-called hack of the year...

From the article, paragraph 2:

Dan Egerstad, a security consultant, intercepted data carried over a global communications network...

Emphasis mine. So what is he? If he's a hacker, the raid is just desserts. If he's a security consultant, and he's exposed this flaw, he's being persecuted. Frankly, I don't know what he really is, but it seems like the press is schizophrenic on this issue. It just goes to show that when it comes to technology, the mainstream press is a bit low on clarity and high on sensationalism.

Re:Just what is he? (1)

nfractal (1039722) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364531)

About the Mainstream media you're bang on, but Hacking per se isn't a crime. Security consultant or something else, you can attach whatever euphemisms to it -

Re:Just what is he? (5, Insightful)

bcattwoo (737354) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364579)

Emphasis mine. So what is he? If he's a hacker, the raid is just desserts. If he's a security consultant, and he's exposed this flaw, he's being persecuted. Frankly, I don't know what he really is, but it seems like the press is schizophrenic on this issue. It just goes to show that when it comes to technology, the mainstream press is a bit low on clarity and high on sensationalism.

If a locksmith breaks into your home by picking your locks, he is still a burglar.

Re:Just what is he? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21365437)

No, he's a burglar if he steals something.

He might pick the locks to kill you, making him happy to accept your imaginary charge of burglary if he's caught.

Thus proving the OPs point - you decided the crime before knowing what the crime was.

Re:Just what is he? (1)

Jizzbug (101250) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365081)

Security consultant and hacker are not mutually exclusive. As a matter of fact, why would you pay for a security consultant that wasn't a hacker? What good can he do? Hacker is to security consultant as programmer is to developer.

The media is actually using a few terms correctly in this story, even if they got it wrong as to what Dan really did. It is you that is confusing terminologies and has bought into schizophrenic re-definition of words by the press.

Re:Just what is he? (1)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365291)

I am not confusing anything. In fact, the tech community in general cannot agree on a solid definition of hacking [wikipedia.org] . After all, he did not "hack" anything -- e.g. brute force his way into any system. He set up a Tor node and sniffed some packets, information that was already released into the wild via network. He was able to take this data and pull out pertinent information -- which might be part of the more popular definition of a "hack". The fact is, the word "hack", "hacker", or "hacking" should not be used at all. If he is a security consultant, then he explored a network vulnerability, published his results, and apparently drew the ire of foreign governments for showing them that using Tor for secret communications was not a good idea. A "hacker" as I define it, would have taken that data and used it for nefarious purposes, which he clearly did not.

Dramatic Raid indeed (4, Informative)

Zedrick (764028) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364509)

I live a few hundred meters from his home, and was woken up that day, not by my useless alarm clock, but by sirens from 7 or 8 police cars heading in the direction of his apartment. From the TFA it seems like the were a bit more discreet when moving in on him, so I guess this was some kind of show of force to intimidate him, and his neighbours. Wouldn't surprise me, considering how the TPB-raid was done.

Re:Dramatic Raid indeed (1)

KimmoV (1062430) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364821)

Oh give the Swedish police a break. This is the first time they got to use sirens in a potential spy-case since the russian sub beached in Sweden http://compunews.com/s139/sp2.htm [compunews.com]

Where's the fun in policing if you can't run your sirens obscenely early in the morning at least once during your career!!

Re:Dramatic Raid indeed (1)

KimmoV (1062430) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364915)

well of course there was the Palme thingy...but still

so... the criminal cops in sweden want to hack too (1)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364541)

looks like those illegally acting cops just wanted a cheap way of getting their sweaty hands on Egerstad's code. It would be so cool to be able to spy on all those foreign guys, eh?

Zero Cool would understand. (1)

CleverScreenName (1176231) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364549)

HACK THE PLANET!!!

Yes, I still love that movie.
Yes, I know it was horrible.

... not a hacker ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21364651)

breaking into shit that you don't own isn't a hacker. he might be a hacker, but breaking the law isn't a "hacker" activity.

Just like killing someone with a meat clever doesn't represent the chef'ing kind of activity.

A dramatic raid... (5, Funny)

east coast (590680) | more than 6 years ago | (#21364803)

[knock at the door]

Police: Open this door! Thou art a felon wanted for many counts of villainy against the citizenry of this fair nation!

Dan: How now!? Am I to be jailed? What can I do but beg for the mercy of The Crown?!?!

[Dan weeps loudly]
[Viola music plays a sad song in the background]
[Dan slumps over a b0x3n]

Dan: I am ruined. Farewell, my tools of crime, for you are sure to meet a worse fate than I in our common traitorous endeavors.

[The door breaks in, an officer enters the room and grabs Dan by the shoulder with nightstick in hand]
[Fades to black]


Oh, you mean a different kind of dramatic. Sorry, sorry.

Re:A dramatic raid... (1)

BlueParrot (965239) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365269)

[Viola music plays a sad song in the background]

Man, I had Secret Garden playing when I read that... the combined effect was quite awesome. Thanks...

Government raids (2, Interesting)

killerkalamari (528180) | more than 6 years ago | (#21365155)

People are always looking to the government to protect them. Who protects you from the government? My biggest fear in my home isn't some criminal breaking in, it's a stupid government raid that possibly gets me or one of my family members killed, or all the programs I've written in my entire life being confiscated. Perhaps some would say I shouldn't be afraid because I'm not hacking or doing anything (that I know of) that's illegal, but I am a programmer, so nevertheless it hangs over my head. I hate those who favor strong and intrusive government and want to "send a message"; it is you who should die, all of you! I won't miss you.

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."o7
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