Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Aqua Teen Art 'Terrorist' Describes His Ordeal

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the funny-is-in-the-eye-of-the-beholder dept.

212

destinyland writes "Boston police arrested artist 'Zebbler' for installing L.E.D. devices that promoted Aqua Teen Hunger Force (after police mistook them for bombs). He's finally shared the real behind-the-scenes story about his arrest and release. He describes his interrogation ('My interrogator gave me nothing but carrots to eat') and remembers a surreal exchange with a police officer. ('My daughter is a huge fan of you ... So, did you really mean to blow up Boston?') Now his latest project is a cool high-definition/surround sound installation for an event called RIP.MIX.BURN.BAM.PFA."

cancel ×

212 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Hmm... (5, Funny)

FF8Jake (929704) | more than 6 years ago | (#21387989)

Considering the amount of explosions in ATHF, I consider the threat to be completely valid. Remember everyone, terrorists clearly mark the bombs with flashing lights, to be widely apparent to everyone, so that they have a chance to observe the bomb before it explodes.

Re:Hmm... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388145)

Please fucking tell me you are joking...

Re:Hmm... (1)

stonedcat (80201) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388261)

Right because we all know that just went right over your head...
I mean if you were completely for cereal you would have posted on that 3 digit UID that you bought on ebay last month.

Uncle Sam wants you! (4, Insightful)

alienmole (15522) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388365)

With your incredible mental acuity, you have a promising career ahead of you in the Boston Police Department, or perhaps the Department of Homeland Security.

Re:Uncle Sam wants you! (3, Funny)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388989)

terrorists clearly mark the bombs with flashing lights

With your incredible mental acuity, you have a promising career ahead of you in the Boston Police Department, or perhaps the Department of Homeland Security.

I'm sorry, but this thread is going completely wrong. Everybody knows terrorists put a countdown clock on a bomb. In order to disable it you have to cut any of the colored wires at T minus 1 second.

Now do you still trust him to protect and serve in Boston? Duh!

Re:Hmm... (5, Insightful)

FredFredrickson (1177871) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388201)

Just because it alarmed the public, didn't mean he knew it'd happen. I think intent should have a lot to do with things. Anyway, people are just retarded. I was in Boston that day. I wish I had seen it!

Re:Hmm... (4, Funny)

FF8Jake (929704) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388289)

I am saddened, my sarcasm has been lost upon you.
 
Perhaps I should cover my sarcasm in lights in the shape of ATHF characters.

Re:Hmm... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388341)

I bet you'd use circuit boards and wires while constructing your ATHF character shaped light construct. Burn in hell, terrorist bastard!

Alarming the public is a poor standard... (0)

Xenographic (557057) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389345)

As we can see from this case and others, alarming the public is a pretty poor standard. Thanks to media fearmongering, they can apparently be alarmed by almost anything.

TFA mentioned something about a project of his where he took news clips to show how the nightly news is constantly doing it. I wish that would get more attention than ATHF which is, as that comment under TFA put it, "the intellectual equivalent of TV static."

I don't know about anyone else, but these days, I'm more worried by media panics than actual terrorists.

Re:Alarming the public is a poor standard... (0)

Nephilium (684559) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389855)

Hells... look at the fact you can get science teachers to sign bans on di-hydrogen monoxide. I think we need to get back to beating people until they learn how to think rationally...

Nephilium

Re:Hmm... (1)

nxsty (942984) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388295)

Re:Hmm... (1)

0xygen (595606) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388357)

Mislabelled, the larger green one is Ignignokt, Err is the smaller pink one!
But still, a great image - thanks!

Re:Hmm... (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388361)

Any ideas what the writing says?

Re:Hmm... (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388455)

"Foolish Infidels, this is actually a bomb disguised as a hip PR stunt"

Re:Hmm... (4, Interesting)

pcgabe (712924) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388965)

It's funny you mention that. We had a similar incident not too long ago at my university.

The cleaning staff for the computer/engineering building saw some creepy guy going through the building at 5:30am, way earlier than people normally show up in the morning. They didn't really think anything of it, until they got to the third floor.

On the third floor, displayed in the window of one of the offices, was a timer. And it was counting. Up.

Wires could be seen coming off of it, but nobody could tell where they went.

Campus security was called, the police were called, bomb-sniffing dogs were called in, the building was shut down.

It turned out (of course) to be just a diagnostic display. The "wires" leading away from the device went up to a curtain rod. They were holding it up.

The funny thing was, it had been there for weeks. The cleaning crew must have seen it, but they didn't remember it being there. And why was it counting UP and not DOWN? We've all seen 24, we know which way timers are supposed to go.

But in an outbreak of common sense, nobody was charged with a "hoax", nobody was arrested, and nobody is in jail. The cleaning crew made a mistake (and apologized later!), and that was the end of that.

And thank goodness, because that creepy guy was ME!

Re:Hmm... (1, Funny)

Dr. Cody (554864) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389251)

So, did you really mean to blow up your university?

A story worthy of Franz Kafka. (5, Insightful)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 6 years ago | (#21387991)

It is so bizarre and still indicates the rigidness of the public service to go so over the edge that it can only be fully described as a work of surrealistic art.

let me be the frost to sya (0, Troll)

Rotund Prickpull (818980) | more than 6 years ago | (#21387995)

Let me be the first to say: what a silly, pretentions little cockend this guy is.

i voted for this in the firehose (offtopic) (-1, Offtopic)

d34thm0nk3y (653414) | more than 6 years ago | (#21387997)

I found this article interesting in the firehose and voted it up. The thing is, since they have to give the subscribers their head-start, I have already lost interest...

I might have had a non-offtopic comment a couple of hours ago.

Re:i voted for this in the firehose (offtopic) (-1, Redundant)

d34thm0nk3y (653414) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388147)

I agree that it is offtopic, it is in the subject and body. But, it has been almost an hour since the story was posted and there are 11 comments. Maybe we can get into the meta discussion a bit since nobody is interested this late??

ACS NEVER SLEEP! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388207)

W3 C4N TR0LL 4LL N1GHT, B4BY!!!

Oh, by the way, Gimp is superior to Photoshop.

Yeah Gimp is better .... who needs stinking CYMK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388691)

Yeah... except anybody who is serious about graphic art for print use.

PS: You were joking right? Please tel me.

Re:ACS NEVER SLEEP! (0, Offtopic)

peter318200 (812109) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389249)

Perhaps its worth saying that the Gimp is superior to Photoshop if you have no money!

Why does ... (0, Redundant)

Carpe PM (754778) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388001)

this whole story remind me of my favorite line from ATHF - "Welcome to this horse's anus!"

What are the police really like? (5, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388011)

Over the past few years, I have come to consider the police as not-too-intelligent bullies. Actions reported can only be explained by a lack of rational thought (in favor of blindly following rules, or blind over-reaction), yet this extract from the article makes one rethink that assessment:

I cooperated fully -- since I had nothing to hide -- but at times it was uncanny as to how convincing he was. He made me want to tell him my deepest secrets -- a genuinely weird feeling. I had to snap out of it a few times.
It is required in the UK for recordings to be made of all interrogations. Why is this not the case in the US? If the police are following the rules, they would have nothing to hide, would they?

Re:What are the police really like? (1, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388077)

hehe, the recordings are for use against you. If the recording records a police officer beating you or insulting your heritage such that you consider beating on him, that tape will just disappear. If the police ask you where you were at the time of the murder and you tell them a perfect alibi that tape will disappear and when you get to court they will say "if he had an alibi, why didn't he tell us during interrogation?" and imply that you got someone to lie for you.

Re:What are the police really like? (5, Informative)

UltimateRobotLover (806059) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388183)

Not sure if you were joking, but in the UK two tapes are recorded and you are given the opportunity to take one at random, thus avoiding this problem.

Re:What are the police really like? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388279)

In the USA, whether you are tape recorded or not depends on the jurisdiction.

In some states, all interrogations are to be video recorded. In the past, this has protected the innocent who were psychologically tormented into giving up their rights and making false statements to state and local law enforcement.

Usually, in the USA, someone undergoing an interrogation can ask to speak to a lawyer. An accused terrorist, on the other hand, should tell the truth because a terrorist might not have much legal protection at times.

Re:What are the police really like? (2, Funny)

Sique (173459) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388445)

An accused terrorist, on the other hand, should tell the truth because a terrorist might not have much legal protection at times.
... which in turn gives the interrogator the right to torture^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hspecially interrogate the accused terrorist or hand him over to a government that has more experience at this, because the fucking terrorist refuses to acknowledge that he in fact is one.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388625)

OTOH: It is not your average cop that is doing that sort of thing, for the most part terrorist (such as Hicks) are political prisoners being used by exjudicial forces to "send a message". Your average cop recives a "bomb threat", he calls the bomb squad and clears the area, seems like (inconvienient) common sense to me.

The rest of the bullshit is simply paper-work and politics to cover the fact that "dob in a terrorist" schemes do nothing except scare the shit out the general population, granted there may be good reason to be scared of the spooks living in legal shadows but IMHO it's recognised by the general population as the politics of fear, meaning the western world is a long way from becoming a police state.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388481)

Sure these things happen from time to time but cops and judges are simply paid control freaks that are obstensibly hired to stop us from living in anarchy, worst case senario is something like Blackwater or the SS (best case is a fantasy world where we are all just nice to each other).

From 50yrs of life experience I know that cops make all sorts of threats but the actions you describe are not a routine occurence [google.com.au] here in Australia. If you want to to be treated with respect then be as polite and firm with them about your rights as you expect them to be when doing their job. Of course this assumes you know your rights and are smart enough to have a lawyer back you up.

So what police state are you living in?

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388675)

He's in the United States of America. What you said doesn't apply there. :)

(From another Aussie)

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388971)

He's in the United States of America.
Who? Me? I'm not in the USA. Not this week, at any rate.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

Nephilium (684559) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389833)

And for those in the U.S.... You should know what your rights are [flexyourrights.org] ...

Nephilium

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388083)

For many interrogations they do record in the US, but not for anything that falls under the broad blanket of "terrorism".

But what I found really interesting about this particular event is how no one on the police force seemed to realize that they weren't bombs. I don't even watch the show and I could tell they were a cartoon.

Re:What are the police really like? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388151)

Watch Law & Order. It's an American crime drama that follows the police through the investigation to interrogation.

Now, realize that this is a TV show and that they're putting the best possible spin on the way the cops behave. Watch the tactics they use. Realize that these are fictional tactics, spun in the best way possible.

It's really quite scary. Americans EXPECT their police to act that way! They glorify it in their media!

Another fun, more recent example was some video I saw of a bunch of Boston police officers. It was night, and there was a large line of police officers in riot gear. Some were on horses. I was trying to figure out what was happening in Boston that would justify such a police response.

The answer? The local baseball team had won the baseball championship. The police response was against fans, celebrating the victory in the streets. The Boston response to people celebrating a sporting victory is to call out the riot police. According to the reporter, the last time something like this happened, the Boston police actually killed a fan, using a "less than lethal" weapon that proved not to live up to its name.

This was just after the incident where the Boston police were asking to be praised for their restraint in not immediately killing the MIT student with the LEDs on her shirt. Seriously, they held press conferences where they were saying what a great thing it was that they didn't just shoot her immediately.

The more I learn about Boston, the more I learn I never want to go anywhere near it.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388703)

Another fun, more recent example was some video I saw of a bunch of Boston police officers. It was night, and there was a large line of police officers in riot gear. Some were on horses. I was trying to figure out what was happening in Boston that would justify such a police response. The answer? The local baseball team had won the baseball championship. The police response was against fans, celebrating the victory in the streets. The Boston response to people celebrating a sporting victory is to call out the riot police.

I don't know what American baseball fans are like, but in the UK, well... go to any Premiership football match and there are mounted police everywhere. Riot gear is unusual; they're mostly there for crowd control. Mostly. Go to a major game - let's say, oh... Liverpool vs Manchester United - and there'll be a serious police presence. Wherever you have tens of thousands of people in one place where emotions run high and a great deal of beer has been drunk, there's a danger of violence. And that's today; back in the eighties, football violence was almost expected.

Re:What are the police really like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389111)

Yeah but football hooliganism, for some reason, is mostly an English/European phenomenon, American baseball or other sports don't seem to be affected by it that much. There have the odd fist fights but not the organized group hooliganism. It makes me ashamed of being European.

Re:What are the police really like? (2, Insightful)

Nephilium (684559) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389875)

The answer? The local baseball team had won the baseball championship. The police response was against fans, celebrating the victory in the streets. The Boston response to people celebrating a sporting victory is to call out the riot police. According to the reporter, the last time something like this happened, the Boston police actually killed a fan, using a "less than lethal" weapon that proved not to live up to its name.

You mean to prevent stuff like the riots in Detroit when the Pistons won the championship? Or the flaming mattresses in Columbus when OSU won?

Nephilium

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388211)

Why in the world would the police want that? I'm sure the good cops might not mind it, but that police as a whole.... I don't see that getting through.

Re:What are the police really like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388811)

Good thing it's not the police making the laws, eh?

Re:What are the police really like? (5, Interesting)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388227)

Over the past few years, I have come to consider the police as not-too-intelligent bullies.


I used to have a lot of respect for the police. Then I actually had to try to reason with one. Now, I share that exact same assessment.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

khchung (462899) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388253)

It is required in the UK for recordings to be made of all interrogations. Why is this not the case in the US? If the police are following the rules, they would have nothing to hide, would they?
Two words: National security

No matter if it actually has any real or imagined security impact.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

KlaymenDK (713149) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388269)

If the police are following the rules, they would have nothing to hide, would they?
That is a very interesting point -- not least in light of the popularity of the government's "if you have nothing to hide, we're sure you won't mind us monitoring your every move" argumentation. Tit for tat, one might say.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

renoX (11677) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388547)

Hmm, remind me how long can the police hold someone in UK?

If memory serves, it was something like two weeks if they suspect you of terrorism, two weeks is a very long time, I wouldn't be surprised that in two weeks the police can make you sign whatever they like..

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

purple_cobra (848685) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388661)

It's 28 days, and the bloody fools want to double it; that's right 56 days in jail for being a *suspect*, during which time you can't - to my knowledge - contact anyone except, perhaps, a legal representative. And that representative cannot tell anyone where you are or why you're not around.
I feel safer already!

Re:What are the police really like? (2, Informative)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388713)

Hmm, remind me how long can the police hold someone in UK? If memory serves, it was something like two weeks if they suspect you of terrorism, two weeks is a very long time, I wouldn't be surprised that in two weeks the police can make you sign whatever they like...

It used to be that in England they'd keep you for seven long days; God help you if ever you're caught on these shores, though, because it's been extended to 28 days. Apparently they can't always extract a confession in this time, though, because they want to extend the period of internment to three months.

Re:What are the police really like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389311)

Every single police officer in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts falls into one of two categories:

1.> Playground bullies who never grew up and became police officers in order to retain the control they had on the playground in elementary school.

2.> Victims of playground bullies who became police officers to gain the control they never had on the playground and exact revenge on society for allowing them to be victims.

I'm not sure which type is worse, but there are ZERO police officers in Massachusetts who are fit to hold the power given to the police.

They constantly lie to, and use horrible psychological attacks on, people they are questioning. Often, this horrific behavior on their part extends to innocent bystanders who witnessed events, and even victims.

The worst terrorists in the US are the police.

Re:What are the police really like? (1)

Lunarsight (1053230) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389527)

Over the past few years, I have come to consider the police as not-too-intelligent bullies. Actions reported can only be explained by a lack of rational thought (in favor of blindly following rules, or blind over-reaction), yet this extract from the article makes one rethink that assessment:
I don't think it was the Boston police being moronic, in this case. I think it was the Boston and/or MA government that pushed this along. If I remember correctly, the police and bomb squad people considered it a waste of time, especially after seeing that the first device was little more than some elaborate lite-brite-inspired gizmo.

Re:What are the police really like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389689)

It is required in the UK for recordings to be made of all interrogations. Why is this not the case in the US? If the police are following the rules, they would have nothing to hide, would they?

In the U.S., the police are rarely, if ever, following the rules. We tolerate it because, frankly, we have no choice. And it actually was this way well before 9/11.

Re:What are the police really like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389725)

It is required in the UK for recordings to be made of all interrogations. Why is this not the case in the US? If the police are following the rules, they would have nothing to hide, would they?

In the USA, before being interrogated, a person must be informed of their "Miranda" rights. The police must recite an precisely worded phrase informing the individual they have a right to a lawyer being present before answering any questions, other than their name and address.

If that individual asks for a lawyer, all questioning stops until legal counsel is present.

You may not like the police, but when you are assaulted, mugged, or your home is broken into and your stuff stolen or your family terrorized, tell me: who will you call?

seriously? (1)

n3r0.m4dski11z (447312) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388017)

Ive never got most peoples reaction to this...

fact1: its a mess of wires, batteries and other things stapped to multiple bridges and other choke points in your city. youve recieved multiple calls in the last 20 minutes, from all reaches of the city, its rush hour and youve just had your first coffee.

fact2: YOU DONT KNOW THAT ITS A STUPID FUCKING MARKETTING STUNT. YOU OBVIOUSLY ARE NOT AWARE HOW PR AGENCIES WILL RECKLESSLY TRY AND "BREAK BOUNDRIES"

fact3: you make the call

result: you blow the fucking piece of shit ad farts toy to fucking glass, round up the "masterminds" for interrogation, and try and learn WHY THE FUCK they though strapping fake bombs to bridges was a cool idea...

aparently people see some problem with this order of events and find it funny. Like this is what we pay government officials to do. This is perhaps the one instance that I have heard of a genuine terrorist hoax being played out PERFECTLY by local government.

yet every fuckign blog rewards and respects these fucking tools. please explain why

Re:seriously? (1)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388157)

Because we do whatever we want, to whomever we want, at all times.

Re:seriously? (5, Insightful)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388291)

Because a bomb squad, who should have handled the dismantling of these devices, should have known in 5 minutes it wasn't a fucking bomb. Now either: 1) they weren't called in so the police are incompetent. 2) they were called in and ignored so the police are incompetent. 3) they were called in and thought it was a bomb so they were incompetent. In any event, someone was incompetent in reacting to these LED sticky thingies. It certainly wasn't the PR company.

Re:seriously? (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388339)

Because a bomb squad, who should have handled the dismantling of these devices, should have known in 5 minutes it wasn't a fucking bomb.
Bomb squads don't dismantle suspected bombs in 5 minutes because they are afraid of booby traps, or terrorists setting them off by radio when they arrive, or just setting off the bomb accidentally.

Re:seriously? (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388623)

Bomb squads don't dismantle suspected bombs in 5 minutes because they are afraid of booby traps, or terrorists setting them off by radio when they arrive, or just setting off the bomb accidentally.
Depends on the definition of "suspected bomb" -- there were plenty of pictures and live footage [bradleysalmanac.com] in the press of a cop holding up one of the "suspected bombs" from nearly the very start of that day.

Re:seriously? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388849)

Welcome to the USA my dear friend. They keep you terrorized with the fear that the (FAKE!!!!!!!!LIE!!!!!BS!!!!!!OUR VERY OWN CIA BLEW THE AIRPLANES!!!!!) 9/11 is going to happen again, so you cooperate being meek and not complaining when they torture immigrants, force you to carry and show an ID, or when the NSA invades your privacy by chasing the logs of your ISP and knowing each and every site you visited on the last two months. Kinda like the USA became a caricature of the Soviet Union they so proudly destroyed...
The constitution and the forefathers' ideals got all killed by the GOP-NAZI Fox News tyranny.

Re:seriously? (2, Interesting)

dbIII (701233) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388893)

One thing that is important to remember now is that as soon as the "terror" word is used you get people that see themselves as James Bond without the benefit of training or experience coming out of the woodwork and overwhelming the professional law enforcement. You then see a big fuss kicked and attempts to blame the victim because rules and procedures have been broken so admitting a mistake could result in some dismissals.

I doubt that a bomb squad was involved for more than a couple of minutes and it is likely that their opinions were ignored.

Re:seriously? (1)

shbazjinkens (776313) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389787)

Because a bomb squad, who should have handled the dismantling of these devices, should have known in 5 minutes it wasn't a fucking bomb.

You don't remember? The bomb squad actually detonated a charge over one of the devices.

One wise slashdotter pointed out that all of his electronic devices in conspicuous public places had a tag on it describing what the device was and who to contact for questions. In the future, that's pretty much the only way to avoid this kind of bullcrap because my intuition tells me that law enforcement at large does not think the Boston PD reacted strangely.

Re:seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389691)

Actually, it was a lite-brite knockoff with some batteries. Feel free to panic the next time you visit KB toys.

Meatwad Sux (-1, Offtopic)

davek (18465) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388021)

Listening to Danger Doom right now....

for the on topic comment: best.... promo.... ever.

Lightweights.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388027)

I would have squeezed his nuts and punched him in the face till he talked. What was the real plot?

I really want to know. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388029)

What happened to that chick from MIT that was arrested because her vest had "electronic stuff" on it? While her tech-hack-vest said "Socket To Me" and has some breadboards [funny stuff too] or whatever, what actually happened to her in terms of charges and such?

The mainstream media never followed up.

avoiding admitting their exaggerations (3, Informative)

SethJohnson (112166) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388065)



I am also curious about the MIT girl. The broadcast media hugely exaggerated the story from the beginning then slowly throughout the day they backpeddelled their original descriptions of how it went down. I can only assume the lack of follow-up is because they don't want to have to say, "Well, we originally said she had a circuit board with wires and putty on it, but in fact it was just some flashing leds and wires."

Seth

Re:avoiding admitting their exaggerations (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388435)

Probably some Jack Bauer wannabe is still waterboarding her to make her TELL HIM the LOCATION of the NUCLEAR DEVICE.

Re:avoiding admitting their exaggerations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389777)

+1 Funny

Star Simpson (1)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388871)

http://news.bostonherald.com/news/regional/general/view.bg?articleid=1042838 [bostonherald.com]

Catch the part about the nametag in the original stories? Probably not... we'll probably find out later on that it was a nametag with 3 LEDS and a battery, maybe a wire was showing ... then all hell broke loose at Logan airport!

I'm torn. (3, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388035)

On the one hand, the police went overboard. On the other, I'm not going to shed a tear for an advertiser.

Re:I'm torn. (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388171)

What other hand? It's irrelevant who's on the tail end of this, What is relevant is how it was handled by the authoritative figures and in this case it was handled poorly.

Re:I'm torn. (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388235)

"What is relevant is how it was handled by the authoritative figures and in this case it was handled poorly."

I know, they released them back onto the street where they can continue to buy my personal information, jam my telephone, clog my mailbox, and harass me with dancing aliens to try to sell me life insurance/mortgages/penis pills I don't want. A pity.

Re:I'm torn. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21388305)

You're right... They should put the advertiser into real ass pounding federal prison so he can get anally raped a couple times.

Re:I'm torn. (3, Insightful)

alienmole (15522) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388387)

Are you serious? He's an artist and a VJ who was doing an advertising gig. Assuming you actually work for a living, what kind of morally superior day job do *you* have?

Well... ATHF colon the movie WAS a bomb... (1)

the_skywise (189793) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388095)

So Boston was kinda, sort of, right to be... worried...

On the flip side, the guy comes out after his "interrogation" and was so traumatized and in shock by it, that he does an improv on "hairstyles". I wonder how Orson Welles would've faired...

(and ditto the above posters... what's up with the MIT chick? That was far more dangerous)

Carrots? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388137)

My interrogator gave me nothing but carrots to eat

I've heard that eating too many carrots turns one's skin orange. (Ever tested on Mythbusters?) I suppose that would make an interesting interrogation technique: turn the suspect a bright orange to scare the pants off of them.
       

Re:Carrots? (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388203)

If you eat too much carrot you may actually damage your liver, so it's not a good idea.

Re:Carrots? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388247)

If you eat too much carrot you may actually damage your liver, so it's not a good idea.

Hmmm. The interrogator may have then violated the Geneva convention.
     

Re:Carrots? (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388827)

I don't think the concentration of vitamin A is really all that high - nothing like the dog livers that poisoned three antarctic explorers (two fatally) many years ago.

Re:Carrots? (1)

The Iso (1088207) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388303)

The condition is known as carotenodermia. It takes much longer than a single interrogation session to develop and will go away after several months if carotene consumption is reduced.

Re:Carrots? (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388521)

If we could educate people to discriminate against orange people and police to feed suspects carrots it would be an interesting punishment. An alternative to imprisonment or fines. Force feeding with concentrated carrot juice would cause liver damage and a permanent color change, a carrot only diet should be temporary.

More generally thieves could be colored orange by exploding dye packs, rapists could be sprayed with portable aerosols and so on, so that police would be unnecessary. Perhaps orange people would naturally acquire a reputation for untrustworthiness like branded people did in the Middle Ages.

Re:Carrots? (1)

Ross D Anderson (1020653) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389225)

You mean Carotene, which can lead to a yellowing of the skin, it is not just found in carrots, but also many other vegetables.
Unfortunately Carotene gets converted into Vitamin A, too much of which is indeed toxic, so I don't recommend you try this...

If it's not an American flag... (5, Insightful)

mikesum (840054) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388217)

it must be a bomb.

Re:If it's not an American flag... (1)

zaydana (729943) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388421)

Great, now the terrorists are going to disguise their bombs as American Flags.

Re:If it's not an American flag... (1)

Fission86 (1070784) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388473)

yay... now i have bombs disguised as american flags to add to my list of paranoias...

i already look at planes suspiciously... so really, thanks a lot, dick...

Re:If it's not an American flag... (1)

tietokone-olmi (26595) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389609)

That gives me an idea...

Re:If it's not an American flag... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389717)

So wrap your bomb in an American flag.

Good to see.. (4, Interesting)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388265)

I liked this guy's hair comments to the press way back and normally I'd see someone like him as a pretentious "artsy" douche.. you know, typical dreadlocked pothead graphic design/art major trying to look cool, but the fact is his "bomb threats" were blown out of proportion by the media. Do I think it makes sense it was investigated? Yes. Do I think it makes sense he was treated like crap when he was basically a adman (albeit an adman who resembles oldfashioned adman the way a Facebook engineer resembles an IBM engineer) that was hired to place ads for a well known product/company? No. I think it makes sense the lights were investigated and the men questioned but I think it's ridiculous that interrogation continued after they found out that their superiors were Viacom (okay not superiors per se but the people who outsourced to them). Viacom should have been the "target" of the authorities after this simple bit of information was found out.

Anyway, that was a bit of a rant but my point is, I liked the way this guy handled the media way back (because the media, frankly, deserves that...I appreciate what they do, but every now and then they need to be reminded that they aren't the ones in control but the ones who document and their emotional manipulation and constant spinning deserves to be checked). But on this interview two quotes in particular made me realize he is separate:

[Psychedelics] did not seem to offer a path to salvation, just a widening of perspective.
and

One doesn't need psychedelics to achieve those kinds of realizations however.
I really think it was good of him to say that, because yeah, he's clearly someone who isn't a stranger to drugs but he offers a level headed view that's not overly self serving a biased. Too many people think drugs (especially psychedelics) answer all their questions and solve everything and sound like selfserving douchebags. They talk about discovering the answer while taking LSD and it's so pretentious and dickish and done to fit an image. Here's a guy who does them (no problem with that here) and then proceeds to say they helped a bit but they aren't necessary and maybe he enjoyed them but he's clearly not going to judge someone who doesn't do them. I've never tried psychedelics and I also no longer smoke marijuana, but I am most definitely not an anti-drug type; I just am glad to see someone saying drugs can be fun but they aren't necessary. People who do drugs and say that's the only way are almost worse than people who don't do drugs and say that's the only way because people who do drugs generally take pride in their self-described "open minds". So kudos to him for basically saying "yeah I used drugs but you don't have to and you can still get to the same point regardless of your choice."

Conspicuous Hustle (2, Insightful)

dharmadove (1119645) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388345)

Maybe they made such a big deal about it to get more Government funding? Lot'$ of taxpayer buck$ out there in the Homeland $ecurity biz.

Conspicuous Hustle - A trick one of my former Chief Engineers used to make it look like he was doing something when the so called problem / issue was a no brainer. He'd make it look like a big deal, set up a "Tiger Team", expended lots of resources, got more budget, manpower, lots of visability, etc. and became the "Hero that saved the project". This was when I worked for a military contracting company in the late '80s. The Chief Engineer was later put on "Special Projects" and fired. He had lied to the customer (USAF) during a critical design review and exposed. I'll never forget when his "Dog Robber" was helping him pack up to leave.

Made my day...

Re:Conspicuous Hustle (1)

TrekkieGod (627867) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389815)

A trick one of my former Chief Engineers used to make it look like he was doing something when the so called problem / issue was a no brainer. He'd make it look like a big deal, set up a "Tiger Team", expended lots of resources, got more budget, manpower, lots of visability, etc. and became the "Hero that saved the project".

Well, how else would he maintain his reputation as a miracle worker? I assume he also multiplied his estimates to fix the problem by four.

I'll wade into the lion's mouth (3, Interesting)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388431)

Admitedly terrorists are morons, thankfully, or we'd be in a lot more trouble. The point is say if I were trying to hurt a lot of people I wouldn't hide the weapon I'd want it to draw attention. Lets say you pull a trailer up and park it on a busy street and have a large sign that says to advertise your new mobile coffee francise you were giving away iPod Nanos to the first hundred customers that buy coffee. You're guaranteed a hundred people will be waiting at the mentioned opening time and probably a whole lot more. The Russians used the technique in Afganistan and went so far as to make explosives shaped like toys trageting kids. If you want to be sure to harm people you want to draw attention but the right type of attention so it seems perfectly normal. A trailer where you seemed to be selling coffee or ice cream wouldn't attract the attention of the police unless they wanted to check your permits but they wouldn't do that until you opened for business. Hiding a bomb in a display that is designed to draw attention does make sense. If they ignored them and they did blow up then people would be screaming. The police were doing their jobs being careful but they came down hard on them afterwards out of annoyance and the fact they felt foolish but what option did they have? Yes they shouldn't have tried to throw the book at them because it's an overreaction. They meant it as kind of a gorilla advertisement and gorilla actions like placing displays without permission or permits has some risk. The police handled the aftermath poorly but they had to know there was some potential for trouble. I'm sure they were expecting a possible fine not the third degree and a possible vacation at Gitmo.

Re:I'll wade into the lion's mouth (4, Insightful)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388583)

A trailer where you seemed to be selling coffee or ice cream wouldn't attract the attention of the police unless they wanted to check your permits but they wouldn't do that until you opened for business. Hiding a bomb in a display that is designed to draw attention does make sense. If they ignored them and they did blow up then people would be screaming.

So, if I were to go into business with a fleet of ice cream vans, and one fine summer's day my vans are driving around Boston giving away promotional ice cream and drawing quite a crowd, you would say the police ought to close down the roads, bring the whole city to a standstill, and arrest me on charges of perpetrating a bomb hoax, because my vans might be bombs?

Re:I'll wade into the lion's mouth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389069)

They meant it as kind of a gorilla advertisement and gorilla actions like placing displays without permission or permits has some risk.

Damn impolite gorillas, don't even ask permission to place ads...

Wrong sort of attention. (2, Insightful)

Xenographic (557057) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389381)

You've failed to distinguish between attracting attention and attracting attention to something that looks like a bomb.

The former is a perfectly evil way to draw a crowd which does not anticipate danger and hurt them. The latter is a really, really stupid tactic. Even if, for some reason, they were convinced that it would work as a means of reverse psychology, it obviously doesn't. I should also mention that the size and placement of the "devices" guaranteed that they would be useless as weapons. They were far too small to make a dent in the bridges and such they were placed on and they were to high up to be any kind of anti-personnel weapon.

The terrorists may be stupid in their own way, but alas they usually do manage to blow people up when they try to. You don't accomplish that with poor tactics and badly placed bombs. Given how prone people are to panicking these days, I'm just glad the terrorists are apparently too stupid to know how to use that to hurt lots of people. I'm sure as hell not going to tell them.

Mine is bigger than his (1)

PietjeJantje (917584) | more than 6 years ago | (#21388659)

He also has a reputation in Boston -- and increasingly around the world -- as a popular VJ, video artist, performance artist and painter. Sentenced to 80 hours community service for his crime, he made the most of it, painting a delightfully trippy mural for Spaulding (physical) Rehabilitation Center. He was also recently voted the #12 VJ in the world by London-based DJ Magazine and was named Boston's Best Artist by Improper Bostonian Magazine. Zebbler also recently appeared in Berkeley, Caliifornia where his surround sound HD projection set was part of the opening reception for RIP.MIX.BURN.BAM.PFA at the Pacific Film Archives -- an exhibit that "celebrates the cultural and artistic practice of remix."
I also have a reputation in my home town - and increasingly around the world - as a popular commenter, flame artist and commiter, and recently visited another town to participate in a cultural and artistic celebration of trolling, where my computer was used in the opening reception. Furthermore, I was recently voted #11 train spotter, and was elected best train spotter by my local newspaper, and won 5 pounds of meat, which I donated to the community. If that didn't sufficiently impress you, my toenails are very large and I frequently joke about them.

dark age (4, Insightful)

wikinerd (809585) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389041)

If you get into a time machine and get back to the dark ages and you put an image of a dragon in the middle of a mediaeval city you can laugh as you watch the crowd getting crazy and paranoid... until they catch and burn you as a witch (and if you don't look like one, they will make you look like a witch, probably by comparing your weight with that of a duck).

Now, fast forward to 2007. Modern enlightened age you think? Think again... If you install some electronic stuff in a modern US city, you can laugh as you watch the crowd getting crazy and paranoid... until they catch you. What happens next depends very much on how white your skin is, whether you have a beard, and whether your name sounds Muslim. An English name combined with white skin and no facial hair will result in you getting your freedom after some interrogation in a police station, but if you have the "wrong" demographic characteristics then you will end up in a nasty camp in Cuba (By the way I find it interesting how they chose to set up Guantanamo on the same island as a communist dictatorship).

The same can happen if you get into an airport with an electronic nametag on your chest.

Or, perhaps if you walk to enter a train with your iPod wires visible from your pocket.

Welcome to a society where everything that deviates from what is considered normal is equated with terrorism. Very soon every kind of behaviour, from what you see on your computer screen (Treacherous Computing will help with this) to what clothes you wear will be controlled by formal bureaucracies by force of violence if you don't comply. Not really because your behaviour will constitute a real threat, but only because your behaviour is inconsistent with that of a slave.

When (or if) this terrorism fear paranoia passes, future historians will discuss our post-911 age with great interest and will consider it as a prime example of how civilisations can sabotage themselves and self-destruct forgetting hundreds of years of societal and civil evolution.

context assumptions (1)

jpellino (202698) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389373)

people who watch a lot of cartoon network think everyone knows what's up with cartoon network and will laugh at athf
people who watch a lot of fox news think everyone knows knows what's up with fox news and will yell along with oreilly
people who watch a lot of letterman can't understand how new yorkers can't recognize rupert ji isn't a deranged waiter
none of these assumptions are remotely universal
misunderstandings are bound to happen
one big one did

Either ... (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389483)

Either the Boston police are totally incompetent, or the police in all the other cities where these things showed up are totally incompetent (depending on whether there really is a threat or not). My bet is on the former.

Seriously though... (1)

wicka (985217) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389523)

Carrots are delicious. If the current policy is "build fake bombs, get all you can eat carrot buffet," I am absolutely in.

Do NOT dress like a bomb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21389663)

My girlfriend keeps hinting that I might like ThinkGeek's light-up Wi-Fi Detector T-Shirt [thinkgeek.com] for Christmas. Now, I live in Washington, D.C. and work in a federal government building. If I ever step out my front door with that shirt on I'm afraid the Secret Service will spring out of the bushes and drag me off to Guantanamo.

Now that I think of it... (1)

seandiggity (992657) | more than 6 years ago | (#21389685)

...since when do terrorist explosive devices have blinkenlights on them?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>