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Sun to Create Underground Japanese Datacenter

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the only-problem-is-the-view dept.

Sun Microsystems 131

Kurtz'sKompund writes with word of a Sun project in Japan, one that's taking a somewhat non-standard approach to data center construction. To save on power, heating, and water costs, the consortium is going to be building their center in an abandoned coal mine. The outpost will be created by lowering Blackbox systems into the ground; estimates on savings run to $9 million annually in electricity alone.

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But... (1, Funny)

tubapro12 (896596) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393427)

...does it run Linux?

Re:But... (1)

JeremyBanks (1036532) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393451)

Yes.

Re:But... (0)

tubapro12 (896596) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393453)

Yes, I know and foresee the moaning. But after RTFA I still have no legitimate comment. Not even another meme. I got nothing on this one.

No....it doesn't (1)

SolidSnake1298 (952495) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395293)

No, it runs Unix, aka Solaris 10.

Title should read: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393439)

Sun to Create Japanese Datacenter where the Sun don't shine.

Re:Title should read: (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393749)

Pretty interesting that Sun is building a sinking datacenter in the Land of the Rising Sun.

Re:Title should read: (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395677)

How is the comment below modded 5 funny, when this one predated it with the exact same joke? Mod redundant people. (not me)

No...the title should read: (5, Funny)

Paul_Hindt (1129979) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393819)

Sun to create datacenter in the land of the rising Sun.

Re:No...the title should read: (1, Redundant)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393879)

Sun to create sunless datacentre in land of the rising sun.

Re:No...the title should read: (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394633)

sunless


In Japan did Scott McNealy
A stately data-centre decree?

Re:No...the title should maybe read: (0, Redundant)

switcha (551514) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394775)

Sun to shine where the sun don't shine in the land of the rising sun.

What do you mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21395043)

You are in a twisty maze of passages all alike.

Re:Title should read: (3, Funny)

wik (10258) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394081)

Next: the Japan In-Earth Simulator

Re:Title should read: (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394119)

hmm, that would be one hell of a engineering feat given the limited space that area have in your average japanese citizen. now, using a average US citizen on the other hand...

Re:Title should read: (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21395979)

This is real "Data mining".

from Score 5 at slashdot.jp [slashdot.jp]

Thermal fun (2, Interesting)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393449)

This could be an interesting use of the Earth's tendency to be a thermal sink. Caves are always about 55 F, as I recall. Maybe they can use this to their advantage.

Re:Thermal fun (0, Offtopic)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393469)

Again hating ads in the middle of articles. Tanks to a wonderful error in rendering, the text discussing EXACTLY THAT was covered. Ignore me now.

Re:Thermal fun (0)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393589)

You must not be using Adblock.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393607)

You must not be using Adblock.

Thank you, Captain Obvious.

Re:Thermal fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394035)

Your welcome,Major Asshole.

Re:Thermal fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394115)

You're.

Re:Thermal fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394737)

all hail General Error!

Re:Thermal fun (0)

Columcille (88542) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394167)

What ads?

Re:Thermal fun (5, Insightful)

RallyNick (577728) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393617)

The temperature in a cave means nothing, unless you take into account the cave's ability to dissipate heat somewhere (water or air moving through the cave). If you go inside a cave that's been at constant 55F for a thousand years and you suddenly heat it with 50 kilowatts of power from your data center the temperature will settle at 255F in a hurry. About the only advantage you get from a cave is a constant supply of really cold water (if sufficient rain that year). Ambient air temperature is irrelevant since usually you don't have a strong draft in a deep cave and static air will heat up pretty quickly.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393677)

If you go inside a cave that's been at constant 55F for a thousand years and you suddenly heat it with 50 kilowatts of power from your data center the temperature will settle at 255F in a hurry.

But why 255F particularly?

Re:Thermal fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393701)

But why 255F particularly?

255 + 1 = 256
256 = 2^8

255 is also the largest unsigned 8-bit integer

Re:Thermal fun (5, Funny)

theskipper (461997) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394237)

Whoa. Coincidentally, that's the optimum incubation temperature for Mothra larvae.

For the sake of humanity, let's hope that Sun is factoring this into their cooling calculations.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

The -e**(i*pi) (1150927) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394673)

because thats what the one byte memory in your temperature sensor maxes out at.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

coinreturn (617535) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393681)

Ever hear of conduction cooling?

Re:Thermal fun (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393739)

The whole freaking point is that caves are well insulated. As the GP says, caves aren't cooled (or heated), they're just insulated from surface temps.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

quanticle (843097) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394291)

Its not a cave, though. Its an abandoned coal mine. That means that there's ventilation infrastructure of some sort. And Sun's datacenter will hardly fill up the entire mine. That means that they can use the unused portions of the mine as a heat exchanger: bring in air from the empty portion to cool the datacenter, and dump the hot air back out to that same area to allow for cooling.

The issue I see is humidity. Mines, caves and other underground passages are usually more humid than open areas, simply because there isn't enough air exchange with the outside world for them to vent the water vapor that accumulates.

Re:Thermal fun (3, Interesting)

BosstonesOwn (794949) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394839)

Does not the air conditioning cycle in these black boxes also remove humidity ? I worked at Sun and got to play with these containers. They remove the humidity from in coming air and are cooled with water.

It seems like the idea is to use the mines water to cool the containers and dump it back into the mine to be cooled and reused. They also have dehumidifiers built into the Black box to prevent condensating moisture inside.

I worked on wiring one with a couple cohorts and even sweating in these things is a joke , it's pretty much sucked up in about 5 minutes of being sediment in the box.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

bendodge (998616) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394575)

I'm pretty sure there are some flaws in your thinking. I was in a coal mine recently (Iron Mt.), and the tour center there used air from the cave to keep the place cool in the summer. They said that the temperature is very very stable.

But I guess it does have air moving at a respectable clip from the air hole at one end of the mine.

(It was amazing that men with hand tools dug a hole big enough to put the entire Empire State building in with only the antenna sticking out! And in the dark too.)

NORAD (2, Informative)

jamrock (863246) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395705)

You raise an interesting point about heat dissipation in an underground datacenter. I remember seeing something on NORAD years ago about the construction of the command center inside Cheyenne Mountain. One of the things that stuck with me was the fact that there was no dedicated heating system: they merely ducted the waste heat from their 150+ mainframes throughout the entire installation. Kept 'em all nice and toasty warm, even in a Colorado winter.

Re:Thermal fun (1)

snsh (968808) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393835)

Wait, I thought the humans built Zion underground because it's warm?

Savings run to $9 million annually in electricity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393465)

Because you don't have to pump the electrons all the way up to the surface.

doesn't make much sense... (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393501)

If you dig a hole in the ground, water gets in. You need to pump it out all the time. Most datacenters don't need to worry about floods. The article claims they will be 100m below ground. Where is the water table?

the site's temperature is a constant 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit) all year

That is below the recommended temperature for some gear.

The Blackbox containers are robust enough to withstand earthquakes, being capable of withstanding a quake of magnitude 6.7 on the Richter scale.

I'm sure the box will survive an earthquakes, but what about the contents? Most servers don't like to be shaken very hard. You also need to worry about the roof caving in.

Water used as coolant - Computers will be on top (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393579)

From TFA:

The coolant will be ground water and the site's temperature is a constant 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit) all year, meaning no air-conditioning will be needed outside the containers. This reduces the energy required for the water chillers, used with surface-level Blackbox containers.

The containers will be lowered 100m into the mine and linked to power, water cooling and network lines via external connectors.
They are going to use the mine as a heat-sink, computers are going only 100m under ground.

Re:Water used as coolant - Computers will be on to (1)

Jonesy69 (904924) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393823)

The outpost will be created by lowering Blackbox systems into the ground;
Sun Microsystems is to lower Sun Blackbox systems into caves in the land of the rising sun. Whats next, goatse based data centers. ;) A horrifically bad pun on 'where the sun dont shine'. Sue me.

Re:Water used as coolant - Computers will be on to (1)

Jimmy King (828214) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394263)

Whats next, goatse based data centers. ;) A horrifically bad pun on 'where the sun dont shine'. Sue me.

But in the case of goatse is "where the sun don't shine" really valid?

Re:Water used as coolant - Computers will be on to (1)

MsGeek (162936) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395145)

And a constant temperature of 98.6F would not be a great environment for servers.

Savings in Electricity... (2, Informative)

darthflo (1095225) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393507)

According to TFA, $9M could be saved on electricity when using 30'000 server cores. Also according to TFA, 10'000 cores are planned with a $405M budget. If power demand scales directly with the number of cores, this would equate savings of $3M annually. Based only on these savings (which of course won't be the only factor, but since TFS and TFA single them out so clearly), this project breaks even after a measly 135 years or about five and a half times Sun's current age.

Re:Savings in Electricity... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393619)

According to TFA, $9M could be saved on electricity when using 30'000 server cores. Also according to TFA, 10'000 cores are planned with a $405M budget. If power demand scales directly with the number of cores, this would equate savings of $3M annually. Based only on these savings (which of course won't be the only factor, but since TFS and TFA single them out so clearly), this project breaks even after a measly 135 years or about five and a half times Sun's current age.

You need to rethink your analysis - your calculation assumes the cost of a comparable conventional datacenter is zero.

You need to subtract the cost of a comparable conventional datacenter from $405M, then divide by your $3M annual savings in cooling costs to see when you break even.

(I'm sure other operating costs will vary as well)

Re:Savings in Electricity... (1)

Hunter-Killer (144296) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393635)

Your savings estimate is only correct if it costs nothing to create a datacenter. Google recently spent $600 mil on their Lenoir datacenter. To calculate value, you'd have to compare the installation and upkeep costs of other facilities.

Re:Savings in Electricity... (1)

Drenaran (1073150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393885)

Yes, that would be true if ground level facilities and the hardware itself was all freely available. Oh, and construction crews, technicians, engineers, supporting staff, *list goes on*, are also entirely willing to volunteer their time and equipment.

What you should be doing is comparing the cost of this project to a comparably equiped ground level datacenter.

Re:Savings in Electricity... (1)

Sanat (702) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394147)

You are, of course, correct in your assessment.

Your signature is strangely and eerily correct also.

"Knowledge is power. However, once you have sufficient power, knowledge is optional."

Are they crush proof? (4, Insightful)

rueger (210566) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393535)

The Blackbox containers are robust enough to withstand earthquakes, being capable of withstanding a quake of magnitude 6.7 on the Richter scale.

I don't know, but placing servers 100m underground in a place that routinely is hit by large earthquakes seems a dubious idea. The containers themselves may survive a quake, but what happens when the disused coal mine collapses onto and around them? Even if the containers and servers survive, will the power and data cables? If the tunnels collapse how will you get to and from the servers for maintenance?

Re:Are they crush proof? (0)

iRegister (1173203) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393641)

Hell, why would anyone do anything at all in Japan? It's routinely hit by earthquakes, that would be dubious.

Re:Are they crush proof? (4, Funny)

darthflo (1095225) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393675)

Two possible outcomes:
1: Mine collapses, buries everything under millions of tons of rocks and stuff, Blackboxes and cabling survives, Sun market's "the world's most secure datacenter".
2: Mine collapses, buries everything under millions of tons of rocks and stuff, Blackboxes and/or cabling gets scratched and/or really damaged, Sun hires Godzilla (this is Japan, where Godzilla's big in, remember?) to smash away them rocks and free the mine once again.

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

securityfolk (906041) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394227)

And you know what happens when Godzilla comes around - The military fires rockets and microwaves into him, just making him mad, and he wipes out Tokyo - AGAIN. That Godzilla, he's a fickle one - he's only your friend until you make him bleed profusely...

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395855)

"The military fires rockets and microwaves into him, just making him mad"

We all know that governments can't do anything right. Sun is a corporation, when they fire missles and microwaves Godzilla will pull his socks up and dig harder.

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393799)

Not to mention the fact that coal dust is extremely explosive. I wouldn't like to see a few sparks in there after a major quake. But then again I guess they know what they are doing.

Re:Are they crush proof? (4, Funny)

couchslug (175151) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393945)

"If the tunnels collapse how will you get to and from the servers for maintenance?"

Good reason to have onsite admins!

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

BrainInAJar (584756) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394397)

and they have the internet, which means they can order pizza via the internet...

flawless plan!

Re:Are they crush proof? (2, Funny)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394637)

"If the tunnels collapse how will you get to and from the servers for maintenance?"

man ssh

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

writermike (57327) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393987)

[...] what happens when the disused coal mine collapses onto and around them?
My guess is it'll be a cooler version of the story about a computer that was lost inside of a wall. "Damn! It responds to a ping, but all I see is this big hole in the ground." ;-)

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

BosstonesOwn (794949) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394909)

If it happens and you end up with damaged hardware you consider it a loss.

However Sun and most heavy iron server companies now Have ILOM enabled systems. Quite easily managed from remote locations. I have loaded firmware onto e10k's in New Jersey from a project in Colombia via remote connections.

*/me shudders with the thought of the new DST and patching all the Sun boxes earlier this year*

Really are great tools Integrated Lights Out Management is , I have to say one of the best inventions that they have made. I love being able to even flash the bios on a new Sun x86_64 server from home in my boxers and t with my mountain dew in hand.

Now if they have damaged hardware they just keep using the undamaged hardware until they can get to it or until it all fails and then they got some more value from it. Typical IT department rules.

Re:Are they crush proof? (4, Funny)

Brickwall (985910) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394963)

Really are great tools Integrated Lights Out Management is

Thanks, Yoda.

Re:Are they crush proof? (1)

iRegister (1173203) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395369)

Oh my god why did they dig coal mines in the first place? This is an earthquake prone country we're speaking of! (/sarcasm)

Must have gotten the idea from Cryptonomicon... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393539)

They must have gotten the idea from Cryptonomicon. Epiphyte builds the data haven in a cave.

Cheaper labor... (3, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393549)

Since this is a basement dweller's dream job come true, Sun won't have to pay too much for labor.

Re:Cheaper labor... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394005)

And easy access to Japanese porn & freaky tentacle hentai

Reverse geo-exchange (1)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393565)

So...essentially, they're using the same process as (what Wikipedia refers to as) Geo-exchange, [wikipedia.org] only instead of bringing the constant-temperature (hot or cold, depending on surface temperature) to a building on the surface with heat exchangers, they are bringing the 'building' to be cooled underground.

I guess that's... cool?

- RG>

which whoreabully infactdead blog(s) will fail? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393647)

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Poor choice for cheap cooling (1)

throatmonster (147275) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393651)

...especially in Japan, where there is literally a sea of coolant all around. At least leave the computing equipment at the surface and do heat exchange with the cave climate.

Re:Poor choice for cheap cooling (1)

mstromb (869949) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393715)

I guess you don't live near the sea. Salt water is extremely corrosive, which would seem to me to present some problems when it comes to cooling a datacenter.

Re:Poor choice for cheap cooling (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393989)

what about setting up water cooled servers, with water running on a closed circuit, through a stainless steel sink at sea? no corrosion there. The coasts of my country (Argentina) face the antarctic currents of the Atlantic ocean, and keeps it COLD all year long.

From the double-take department ... (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393695)

Damn flu medicine makes my head feel like its full of glue. I could have sworn the title was "Sun To Create Underground Japanese Detector". I had to go read the article to try and figure out what underground Japanese are, and why you would want to detect them.

Re:From the double-take department ... (1)

kabloom (755503) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394593)

I had to go read the article to try and figure out what underground Japanese are, and why you would want to detect them.
They're like secret Asians.

Somebody (4, Funny)

woot account (886113) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393709)

has been reading Cryptonomicon.

Hardware Failure (1)

RManning (544016) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393755)

From TFA...

The containers will be lowered 100m into the mine and linked to power, water cooling and network lines via external connectors.

Sun has been developing its Blackbox concept for three years and a typical one has 250 servers mounted in seven racks inside a standard 20-foot shipping container.

Not to be thick-headed here, but what happens when they have a hardware failure? I'm not sure what the failure rate is on their hardware, but it must be greater than zero, right?

Re:Hardware Failure (1)

BrainInAJar (584756) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394497)

failover to a good machine, swap out the bad one during annual maintenance. Sun already has a product for dealing with that particular issue ( Sun Cluster ) and it's open-source

Blackbox v2 (1)

erKURITA (1114707) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393779)

Coal-powered cooling scheme for your datacenter!

That's genius

But who will work there? Gojira? (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 6 years ago | (#21393827)

I remember the last San Fran Earthquake and we had to get a warm site up and running using all the backup tapes from our offsite storage company. The storage vault was 100% ok, the warm site was 100% ok and I couldn't get anyone to drive the truck through a post apocalyptic thunder dome. I suspect that getting a bunch of nerds to work in an abandoned coal mine will be greeted by dumbstruck looks when you see a giant fire breathing dinosaur.

Re:But who will work there? Gojira? (1)

securityfolk (906041) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394545)

Well, either that or mushroom people [imdb.com] ...

Save on Heating? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393967)



Putting the servers in a deep dark hole is one way to save on heating costs. The other is to not heat your servers.

Re:Save on Heating? (1)

g0dsp33d (849253) | more than 6 years ago | (#21396717)

Putting the servers in a deep dark hole is one way to save on heating costs. The other is to not heat your servers.
And risk them freezing? Never!

Conspiracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21393969)

Remember the stories about the underground Japanese city? Hmm they need a supercomputer, so what they use as a ruse to get one? UNDERGROUND DATACENTER! I need assist from fellow internet matlocks!

air humidity (1)

chaos421 (531619) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394015)

I agree that it's always cool underground (in the 50s F range) however a problem they might run into is the humidity. Depending on the cave/mine the air can be quite humid and could pose a problem for the machinery. Seems like a tough thing space to "air condition" the water content.

Re:air humidity (2, Insightful)

WoLpH (699064) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394191)

Since the computers produce a lot of heat the humidity wouldn't be much of a problem, try putting a computer in a humid garage, the computer will be just about the only thing dry in there.

I do wonder how much this thing will really save, I wouldn't be so surprised if the costs are comparable to the normal installation (remember, the normal installation costs for these things is near 0, they just need a power, network and water plug). If they'd just put the server somewhere with some other cooling source available (a lake for example?) it would probably be even cheaper.

Safe from above, but.... (1)

securityfolk (906041) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394073)

I know they want to be safe from Godzilla, but is it safe from Megalon's powerful digging drill hands??? I think not!

I know where this is going to lead... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394149)

"But they delved too greedily and too deep, awakening the ancient evil."

You can do lots with an old mine (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394161)

A couple of examples come to mind.

The Government of Canada marijuana farm is located in an old copper mine in Manitoba. You can't beat the security, which is something mentioned in tfa. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2001/08/02/marijuana_010802.html [www.cbc.ca]

A solar neutrino observatory is installed in an old mine in Sudbury, Ontario, Canads. It has the advantage of being impervious to almost all kinds of radiation, except of course for neutrinos. http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/ [queensu.ca]

As I look at the other posts, I see lots of naysayers. Well there are at least a couple of cases where old mines have been used successfully for other things.

Re:You can do lots with an old mine (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395587)

Remember seeing a documentary on an ultra-deep salt mine in Utah, now largely played out. Big empty space, no light except for what you bring with you. Lots of worn out machinery that's just abandoned because its value as scrap is less than the cost of bringing it back up. Creepy.

One other use: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Vo4vEgxHtI [youtube.com]

one thing... (1)

sohp (22984) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394345)

Old mines have a nasty tendency to flood, or at least slowly get a few inches of water over the years from seepage.

Re:one thing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394801)

That is why you use this thing called a "pump".

Uh-Oh (1)

Simply Curious (1002051) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394427)

I think I've been watching too many cheesy movies.
I read that as "Sun to Create Underground Japanese Dictator"

It was the year 2007... (1)

ScaryMonkey (886119) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394487)

Is it just me, or does this sound like the opening setup of a FPS game?

"Deep in an underground laboratory, something has gone wrong... terribly wrong."

Re:It was the year 2007... (1)

DeadChobi (740395) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394939)

Hang on, I'll go get the crowbar and the hazmat suit.

Neal Stephenson (1)

medge_42 (173874) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394565)

Isn't this Neal Stephenson's idea?

Unforseen Expense (2, Funny)

Pooua (265915) | more than 6 years ago | (#21394663)

They save a bundle in HVAC costs, but now they face the prospect of black lung disease...

All major corporations store data underground (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21394877)

Why is this news? Individuals can even pay a company to store data like a home network backup or workstation ghosts underground in case of disaster or solar flare.

I guess a working network underground is a little different and the next step. Oh crap wait, does that mean if I work for a big corporation now I have to live six floors underground? Cause it used to be only cold war scientists had to do that. GIBSON!!!! (shakes fist)

I guess when the robot zombies learn how to spray your house with benezene it may be time...

NERV??!? (2, Funny)

Hercynium (237328) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395091)

If they name the systems in that facility the MAGI, I think it's time I move a few hundred miles inland.

Re:NERV??!? (1)

MsGeek (162936) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395175)

Wow. It took 80 some-odd posts before someone made an Evangelion reference.

Re:NERV??!? (1)

leejc (1179763) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395261)

Agreed. My first thought was: "Sun to build Tokyo-3"?

All this because... (1)

JackMeyhoff (1070484) | more than 6 years ago | (#21395557)

the technology is too problematic, runs too hot, requires a narrowband of operating conditions and so on. Why not invest in the technology rather than workarounds?

It's just a cover story (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 6 years ago | (#21396195)

This is Japan after all. Clearly, they will be building a secret base where they will build an army of giant robots to either
a) defend against extra-terrestrial attacks,
b) attack Microsoft.

why do i say shit twice in this post? (1)

rice_burners_suck (243660) | more than 6 years ago | (#21396213)

duh how the hell does this reduce heating problems and shit? it seems to me if you build the darn thing where the sun don't shine as an earlier poster said, then it would get hotter not colder cuz the cottonpickin earth all around would serve as an insulator and cause the datacenter to fry itself and shit.

Dr. Evil (1)

hey (83763) | more than 6 years ago | (#21396343)

Data center - right!
Its going to be Dr. Evil's lair.
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