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Honeybees Might Prompt Faster Internet Server Technology

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the heard-the-buzz-about-it dept.

The Internet 131

coondoggie writes "The Georgia Institute of Technology is working on the theory that honeybees can give us hints about how to improve the speed and efficiency of Internet servers. Honeybees somehow manage to efficiently collect a lot of nectar with limited resources and no central command. Such swarm intelligence of these amazingly organized bees can also be used to improve the efficiency of Internet servers faced with similar challenges." This has some similarities to the rules of the swarm discussion we had last week.

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Oblig (4, Funny)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404867)

I for one welcome our new swarming server overlords!

Similar to collecting nectar? (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405431)

Such swarm intelligence of these amazingly organized bees can also be used to improve the efficiency of Internet servers faced with similar challenges."

... for example it will help our local apiarists' internet servers to organize honey collections so much more efficiently. Sweet!

Re:Oblig (4, Funny)

digitig (1056110) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405715)

"Bzz"

"What's that, Bumbly?"

"Bzz"

"Network bottleneck at the 4th-floor router? How did that happen?"

"Bzz"

"Faulty ethernet card in room 402? Quick! We'd better get down there and save them!"

Re:Oblig (1)

Pollardito (781263) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406697)

and that smoke rising from the webservers of our overlords is just an attempt to calm down the swarm

Re:Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21406925)

It boggles my mind that this canned statement is _still_ continually moderated as funny.

Re:Oblig (1)

jimbojw (1010949) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407301)

There was nothing obligatory about that, you insensitive clod!

Bees flee (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21404875)

All the researchers now need to do is to sell the technology to Microsoft and IIS will fly away from the net into the unknown.

clusters ? (4, Interesting)

jacquesm (154384) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404915)

I think bees (or ants) should get the all-time patent rights to clustering a number of not so intelligent nodes into something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence.

It's still quite hard to come up with stuff that is not in some way already present in nature. If you are prepared to accept a certain level of metaphor.

Re:clusters ? (1)

crowbarsarefornerdyg (1021537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404927)

Microsoft probably already tried; the text of the patent is simply 1 Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA.

See: MUTE (4, Interesting)

trawg (308495) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405183)

MUTE is a privacy-protecting p2p application: MUTE's routing mechanism is inspired by ant behavior. [sourceforge.net]

Re:See: MUTE (1)

jacquesm (154384) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405223)

thank you, that was a very interesting read.

Nope. Humans won that one years ago (2, Insightful)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405343)

I think bees (or ants) should get the all-time patent rights to clustering a number of not so intelligent nodes into something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence.
The human brain is by far the best example of that.

 

Re:Nope. Humans won that one years ago (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405503)

yes, but bees predate homo pseudo-sapiens pseudo-sapiens, Probably by 200 million years.

Re:Nope. Humans won that one years ago (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405573)

Sorry, that should read 'at least 80 million years' (oldest bee-fossil found: Cretotrigona prisca)

Re:Nope. Humans won that one years ago (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405847)

clustering a number of not so intelligent nodes into something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence.
The human brain is by far the best example of that.
So you've clustered a number of unintelligent human brains to build something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence?

I, for one, welcome our fungus from Yuggoth overlord.

Re:Nope. Humans won that one years ago (1)

TuringTest (533084) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407451)

So you've clustered a number of unintelligent human brains to build something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence?
I thought he was talking about Wikipedia.

Re:Nope. Humans won that one years ago (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407647)

So you've clustered a number of unintelligent human brains to build something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence?
I thought he was talking about Wikipedia.
No, that would be using a number of human brains that exhibit a higher degree of intelligence to build something that exhibits.

(Probably, in soviet russia)

ACO for corpse recovery (2, Interesting)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405435)

I used an ACO algorithm in a system to direct cow corpse recovery trucks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant_colony_optimization [wikipedia.org]

I wonder if the people at the The Georgia Institute of Technology (git?) has nightmares with bees running through a series of tubes as I had about giant cow-corpse-eating zombie ants.

Re:clusters ? (1)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405491)

"I think bees (or ants) should get the all-time patent rights to clustering a number of not so intelligent nodes into something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence."

Actually I think their "higher intelligence" isn't actually higher, I think it is combined by sheer "raw ability" of each individual bee to optimally find the correct path along a geometry. In my mind it's actually a function of little minds, navigating a geometric space optimally.

Re:clusters ? (1)

G-News.ch (793321) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405773)

So, if I spray some pheromones onto my servers, will they work together much better?

Re:clusters ? (4, Funny)

poot_rootbeer (188613) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407045)

I think bees (or ants) should get the all-time patent rights to clustering a number of not so intelligent nodes into something that exhibits a higher degree of intelligence.

Which is not to say that there isn't any room for improvement. There's a lot to be learned from wolves, for example, where each member of the pack serves a unique and important role.

It's quite likely that by combining aspects of many of these ecologies, we could create a system even more efficient than any individual one.

Imagine a Bee-Wolf cluster...

Re:clusters ? (1)

Bat Country (829565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407795)

Imagine a Bee-Wolf cluster...


That is the single best pun-based abuse of a /. meme that I have yet seen.

Bravo!

Re:clusters ? (2, Interesting)

daem0n1x (748565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21408141)

Very much the opposite of humans who are very intelligent but, as a crowd, behave in a very stupid way.

Compulsory Comcast comment (4, Funny)

BestNicksRTaken (582194) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404957)

Its not good making a new internet protocol, Comcast will only block it!

Round Robin and Bittorrent (1)

shawn443 (882648) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404969)

Combining them is now called a virtual dance floor. Either that or I don't get this article.

Nanny nanny boo boo. (4, Funny)

rice_burners_suck (243660) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404983)

heh heh. This so-called "swarm intelligence" will do nothing to teach us how to make efficient web servers. The hive and the swarm of bees operate efficiently but not because they have some sort of innate intelligence that allows them to do so. They operate in this manner because they are programmed to do so. The actions of each bee are based on something akin to a computer program. This program is designed in such a manner that when many units are executing it in parallel, with each unit operating on its own timer, so that statistically all parts of the program are being executed simultaneously across the bees in the swarm, the result is the efficient overall operation that we witness. However the point is that the individual program is designed so that the overall program will execute efficiently, regardless of where any particular instance of the individual program might be in its program code. Who did this programming? God. And the crazy thing is that beehives are only one tiny part of it. The overall program encompasses the entire universe. So ha ha ha... cuz you can study those bees all day long and it won't make you a better web programmer.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (0, Flamebait)

jacquesm (154384) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405191)

I was following you until the 'god' bit... somehow that is a turn-off for me in any argument.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405363)

was following you until the 'god' bit... somehow that is a turn-off for me in any argument.
Doesn't believe in science you see... Observations aren't relevant to him...

So ha ha ha... cuz you can study those bees all day long and it won't make you a better web programmer.
Even though the results of science keep smacking him round the head every day.

 

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405911)

Hey, nobody's perfect.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (5, Funny)

stranger_to_himself (1132241) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405237)

cuz you can study those bees all day long and it won't make you a better web programmer.

No, but you'll be a web programmer who knows a lot about bees. Think of the possibilities!

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405311)

yeah, a bee-owulf cluster of those !

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

ch0ad (1127549) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405411)

The hive and the swarm of bees operate efficiently but not because they have some sort of innate intelligence that allows them to do so. They operate in this manner because they are programmed to do so.
is that not a complete contradiction?

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

Derosian (943622) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405765)

You of course realize, people reverse engineer software all the time, right?

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (5, Funny)

arevos (659374) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406001)

Who did this programming? God. And the crazy thing is that beehives are only one tiny part of it. The overall program encompasses the entire universe. So ha ha ha... cuz you can study those bees all day long and it won't make you a better web programmer.
I'll say. This God character has put together something pretty impressive in only a week, but it's all indecipherable spaghetti code. Where are the comments? The well-named functions? The bloody documentation? We're stuck with this system, and working out what the hell is does is pretty much a full time job for millions of experts. You think you've seen bad COBOL systems? Take a look at Universe 1.0; it's got so many quirks and undocumented features that it'll make your head spin just trying to understand what the hell it's doing half the time. I mean, sure, maybe quantum superposition made sense as an optimization feature at the time, but some, any, documentation on it might help!

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

egamma (572162) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406313)

Documentation? Haven't you heard of the Bible? It may not cover HOW Universe 1.0 was created, or how it works, but then again, neither does Science. The Bible does cover the WHO (God), What (Universe 1.0), and WHY (a God of love needs somebody to love) questions. We've been given a Manual, because we're the Users, not the programmers.

Science can't tell you WHY H20 becomes less dense as it approaches 0 degrees Celcius, when H and 0 separately do become denser as they get colder. Science can't tell you WHY 1 proton equals hydrogen, a gas, and 3 protons equals Lithium, a metal. Science can't even tell you WHY different numbers of protons create liquids, gases, and solids--it just says that "at X temp, Y element is in state Z."

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (2, Insightful)

McD (209994) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406601)

This God character has put together something pretty impressive in only a week, but it's all indecipherable spaghetti code.

In Lisp or Perl? [xkcd.com]

I have a theory: As time goes on, the odds of any slashdot thread becoming an XKCD comic, or vice-versa, approaches one.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406613)

"I'll say. This God character has put together something pretty impressive in only a week, but it's all indecipherable spaghetti code."

Actually, if (hypothetically) a god exists, we all know it's not the christian god. If the universe is spaghetti code, (indistinguishable, not distinct, not equal to anything) then it can't exist. Even if the code is "bad" you cannot judge if the code is bad if you are inside the simulation because you don't have access to the code.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (1)

Polymorphic_X (895055) | more than 6 years ago | (#21408175)

we all know it's not the christian god. We do? Speak for yourself.

Re:Nanny nanny boo boo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21406771)

> The bloody documentation?

http://www.biblegateway.com/ [biblegateway.com]

spaghetti code (3, Funny)

jefu (53450) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407037)

Obviously if the universe is mostly spaghetti code, it is a clear indication that the Creator must have been somehow involved in, well, spaghetti. Like say the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Talk about Occam's Razor - there is no simpler hypothesis available. Pasta -> Pasta. QED.

God didn't program a thing (1)

hlomas (1010351) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407485)

Natural selection programmed bees.

no central command ? (4, Interesting)

permaculture (567540) | more than 6 years ago | (#21404997)

Don't tell that to the queen.

Re:no central command ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405313)

As far as I know, the queeen does nothing more than starting a nest, produces fertile eggs and get fed by workers. Thats all. No central commanding involved.

Re:no central command ? (3, Funny)

Nazlfrag (1035012) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405597)

You forgot the part where she controls their mind them from birth to become virtual extensions of her hive mind and assimilate all the nectar in the cosmos to build more Hive Cubes.

Re:no central command ? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405671)

I know that's supposed to be funny, but lest someone take it seriously, the queen isn't supposed to (and she doesn't) command anyone or anything - she exists for reproduction purposes only. The workers seem to "serve" her because of her unique function on the colony, that is necessary for the colony continued existence. After all, the workers are just doing their part for the survival of the colony, as much as the queen is. There's no such thing as an hierarchy on a colony, everyone works for everyone.

Re:no central command ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21407209)

Bloody communists!

Bees (2, Funny)

archeopterix (594938) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405015)

Honeybee method? Now that's a good buzzword.

Re:Bees (1)

pwilli (1102893) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405147)

We need a new buzzword for those heavy, google page rank increasing, spam link invested websites. I vote for "honeypot"

After all... (4, Funny)

Burpmaster (598437) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405037)

The Internet is basically a series of bees.

Re:After all... (2, Funny)

FinchWorld (845331) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405049)

Forced through tubes? So basically too many bee's cause the tubes to jam up? So bascally what we are trying to avoid is bees in swarms entirely? Because as far as I can tell I've avoided contact with swarms of bees due to a healthy regard for my own well being...

Re:After all... (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405145)

So now we know why site admins fear botnet attacks...

Re:After all... (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405459)

Forced through tubes? So basically too many bee's cause the tubes to jam up?
Actually, I think the correct terminology is 'honey up'. Maybe the internet is a bunch of honeypots and we're all like Winnie the Pooh trying to get up at them with balloons and.. uhh.. ohh look.. it's past my bed time.

Almost historical concept ... (3, Interesting)

foobsr (693224) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405073)

Quote [wikipedia.org] (Lem, The Invincible, paraphrased):
"A powerful military space ship a "second-class cruiser" called Invincible, lands on the planet Regis III to investigate the loss of sister ship, Condor. During the investigation, the crew finds evidence of a new form of life, born through evolution of autonomous, self-replicating machines. The evolution was controlled by "robot wars", and the only form that survived were swarms of minuscule, insect-like machines. Individually, or in small groups, they are quite harmless to humans and capable of only very simple behavior. However, when bothered, they can assemble into huge swarms displaying complex behavior arising from self-organization, and are able to defeat an intruder by--what could have been called today--a powerful surge of EMI. Some members of the spacecraft crew suffered a complete memory wipe-out as consequence. The angered crew attempts to fight the enemy, but eventually recognizes the meaninglessness of their efforts in the most direct sense of the word." (emphasis mine)

Hint for a scientific career; Revive old stuff!

CC.

Re:Almost historical concept ... (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405877)

So they translated it wrong to English too, it seems.

The book's name should be "The Unvanquished", not "The Invincible". There's quite a difference.

Re:Almost historical concept ... (1)

foobsr (693224) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406087)

So they translated it wrong to English too, it seems.

http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/server/show/nav.1278 [royal-navy.mod.uk]

http://www.dict.pl/plen?word=Niezwyci%EA%BFony&lang=EN [www.dict.pl]

??

CC.

Re:Almost historical concept ... (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406137)

Niezwyciezony i inne opowiadania / The unvanquished and other stories, Warsaw: MON, 1964

Webster offers both translations.
http://www.websters-dictionary-online.org/translation/Polish/niezwyci%25C4%2599%25C5%25BCony [websters-d...online.org]

I think we would need a polish slashdotter to clarify if they understand Niezwyciezony as "the one who never lost" or "the one who'll never lose".

Re:Almost historical concept ... (2, Funny)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406603)

We need Polish pros to polish Polish prose?

Re:Almost historical concept ... (1)

foobsr (693224) | more than 6 years ago | (#21408097)

I think we would need a polish slashdotter to clarify

Seems so (my family's Polish got lost somewhere in the course of time :)

CC.

Re:Almost historical concept ... (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406305)

come to think of it - Mr Stanislaw L. (the author of the story) has invented many things. One of the inventions which I am still waiting for are washing machines you can have sex with. When this becomes true mr. Stanislaw can be officially pronounced as a (_working_) oracle.

Not going to work outside of individual systems (4, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405093)

Honeybees, and swarm intelligence in general assumes that the other members are working towards the good of the swarm. That is the polar opposite of what we need for a robust internet.

Rogue nodes would be able to disrupt the swarm in the same way that scientists are able to wreak havoc on hives, ants, and other 'swarms' by deliberately injecting fake disruptive markers/signals etc.

This technology sounds about as bright as cooperative multitasking. Suitable for a closed system (e.g. a single application) but an utter disaster if applied in an environment where some threads are just defective, or worse, hostile.

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (1)

elmartinos (228710) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405367)

the individuals don't necessarily need to work toward the good of the swarm. In fact they usually just act selfish, but the resulting emergent behavior is good for the whole swarm. For example, when huge locust swarms run out of food, they begin to eat each other. The effect is that each bird tries to fly away from its followers and eat the one flying before him, which results in the whole swarm moving to a new area where they can find more food.

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (1)

RSA7474 (1163263) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405633)

It may be for the good of the swarm however there is still several behaviors to observe.. such as when we observe ants, generally each ant is involved with a specific "job", and they are required to do for the good of the hive. They drop pheromones along the path they choose and eventually the paths that contain the most amount of pheromones become the most desirable and taken, eventually finding the most optimal path (this happens because pheromones disappear after time, so the longer path gradually becomes less favorable as the shorter).

We can observe this same behavior with bees and finding pollen. We can observe how they communicate individually and as a whole, how they find the most optimal paths to pollen, and how they know how to get back directly and efficiently.

There does not necessarily have to include rogue nodes to gain benefit from studying this phenomenon. But even then, what if you were to create several smaller hives, and a single large hive to control them all, and one smaller hive gets "killed", it would be interesting to see how the "bees" would respond in finding the other hives, or rebuilding process; and if they would bring new information to the others. Think of comparing this with to a cell phone company with several hot spots.

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21407669)

... and a single large hive to control them all ...

Or a one ring!

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406237)

All you need is giant Bee Overseers to police the workers, and kill off any rouge nodes. The actual implementation of the killings is left as an exercise for the reader.

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21407793)

"kill off any rouge nodes"

Rouge as in commie red or as in cheek blush?

Re:Not going to work outside of individual systems (1)

Dr. Smoove (1099425) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406593)

I totally agree with this- I think Innarwebs is not the place for this theory to be tested. Believe it or not, I've had a similar idea for some time now, but I am not in academia, so it'd be tough for me to work it out. I think they could some up with something if they moved the idea elsewhere in computing.

Someone has to say it. (0)

greenguy (162630) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405123)

Sweet!

Re:Someone has to say it. (1)

greenguy (162630) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407411)

Or, as I should have said...

This gives a whole new meaning to office sweet!

Obligatory (2, Funny)

sw155kn1f3 (600118) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405193)

So it's a lot like beowulf cluster of bees, right?

Two bees or not two bees (1)

Guerilla* Napalm (762317) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405197)

That is the question

Re:Two bees or not two bees (1)

background image (1001510) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405769)

Surely it must be either one bee or zero bees? Good god, I've just invented Beenary!

This will go nicely with my upcoming suite of organic IT products that already includes the bean array (which can double as an alternate fuel source, but which is not well suited to use in cubicles...)

I have no idea where all that came from. Sorry. Please move on to the next comment.

Lies! (0)

SmlFreshwaterBuffalo (608664) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405221)

This is all just a clever trick to gain publicity for Buzz [wikipedia.org] and possibly even to provide more work for the mascot during the off season!

New protocol to bee named "TCB/IB" (1)

Eternal Vigilance (573501) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405277)

Better hope the RIAA/MPAA don't hear about it, though, or in four years we'll all be dead....

"Silly bunt."

Doomed (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405333)

Given the current problems ( mentioned on /. somewhere previously ) with bee colonies mysteriously disappearing I'm not sure its a good idea to base something as serious as web servers on their behaviour. It's all well and good whilst they behave themselves and work away as they should but what happens when they decide to mysteriously vanish ? What then ?

I say that nature and technology do not mix and only disaster awaits for mankinds foolish attempts to dally in that which it cannot understand.

Company Intelligence (4, Insightful)

zaydana (729943) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405369)

This sounds like the opposite to today's corporate culture, where a whole lot of smart people are part of a swarm, and the end product is utter stupidity...

"None of us is as stupid as all of us".

7frist psot (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405427)

suf7ering *BSD [goat.cx]

The post to end all posts (0, Offtopic)

doyoulikeworms (1094003) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405453)

Sweet! There certainly is a buzz around this technology, but I'll beelieve it when a beowulf cluster of linux-running overlords, with questionable Vista support, is welcomed by, for one, me in Soviet Russia.

Flux capacitor.

Sometimes swarm behavior is inefficient (2, Interesting)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405457)

Several times I've seen flocks of birds flying in circles. One time I watched this for several minutes. The birds were flying really fast but going nowhere.

that's what you think... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405551)

that's what you think...

Re:Sometimes swarm behavior is inefficient (1)

Channing (514228) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405631)

perhaps they were herding insects or gaining altitude on thermals?

Re:Sometimes swarm behavior is inefficient (2, Interesting)

TheGoodSteven (1178459) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406273)

Those birds you speak of are doing something called "updrafting". Basically, they find a spot where warm air is rising from the ground and glide around in circles in order to attain a higher altitude using much less energy. You might see this over highways quite often, since the black pavement sometimes causes warm air drafts. I think the best demonstration of inefficient swarm behavior is when it arises in humans.

Re:Sometimes swarm behavior is inefficient (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21406397)

This is a common scheme you'll often see played out in subways and other heavily trafficated areas.
You'll have a group of birds (the 'flock') flying over you in circles, trying to get your attention. Meanwhile, while you're not paying attention, an accomplice on the ground (the 'duck') will swipe your wallet.
This happened to me while visiting London, and while it sucked to be stranded in the city without any cash, it is a very good example of how so-called 'gang behaviour' can show considerable street smarts even though each individual member isn't very intelligent. (A lot of these birds were hatched on the street, and never even learned to read and write.)

Re:Sometimes swarm behavior is inefficient (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21408039)

You are assuming that the birds share your objective, that they want to go somewhere, or worse, that they want to go where you think they think they want to go.

Good also for politics and economy (1)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405479)

Honeybees somehow manage to efficiently collect a lot of nectar with limited resources and no central command.
This sounds good also in applications other than internet and datacenters. Like politcs and economy.
Maybe someday we'll get ruled by bees or ants.

Potential optimization (1)

jpfed (1095443) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405569)

Could this process be accelerated by allowing the bees to shoot from the mouths of barking dogs?

I don't get what the buzz is... (0, Redundant)

FeebleOldMan (1089749) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405729)

...isn't this article a bit beehind? I mean, don't we already have BEEttorrent?

Okay mods, don't let this bug you too much, but somebody has to stick out his nectar entertain the crowds.

*gets bricked*

The basis of these ideas (1)

shungi (977531) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405733)

has been around for a while. See for example discussion in the book Out Of Control, http://www.kk.org/outofcontrol/contents.php [kk.org] . Kinda brings to mind the matrix movies.

p2p (1)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#21405779)

Isn't this kind of what bittorrent does for us? Instead of 1 strained server we have one person or thousands of people that we download the information from.

pffff. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405871)

...but then again, it might not. I'm getting bored to death with these 'might' attention attacking press releases. funny:5 is heavily overrated

RFC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21405965)

Is there an RFC for IP over Apian carriers?

Maybe not (1)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406117)

Then again, honeybees unexpectedly disappeared/died this year in large quantities, an event that I would not like to see our servers duplicate.

Re:Maybe not (0, Troll)

canUbeleiveIT (787307) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406173)

Insert standard Slashdot comment here:
OMG!!! GWB and Dick Cheney kilt teh honeybeez.
done.

Honeypots? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21406443)

There's gotta be a joke about honeypots hidden in there somewhere, if anyone can find it...

sounds like danger to me.... (1)

pablo_max (626328) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406881)

I mean really, can you imagine how many people would be killed when you have billions of honeybees employed to carry data packets around. Also, I dont think it would be faster either. Just imagine the lag time when you connect to a server 1000 miles away. You would keep saying, "Oh man, hurry up you shitty bees!!"

The manual says "Let's BEE Friends!" (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 6 years ago | (#21406949)

And there's a picture of a bee!

Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21407009)

Google has set the precedent of using the animal kingdom to improve technology. Their PigeonRank technology is second to none! http://www.google.com/technology/pigeonrank.html [google.com]

Honeybees, honeypots. Where is Winnie? (1)

Mathness (145187) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407071)

Honeybees? About time really, we have had honeypots for ages, and they don't fill themselves on their own you know.

Now all we need is to figure out some tech based on Winnie the pooh, so we can get to the honey. Mmmmm, honey.

I'm sure nobody finds it surprising... (1)

foxtrot (14140) | more than 6 years ago | (#21407835)

...that the school whose mascot is Buzz [wikipedia.org] would think bees might be the solution for, well, anything...

-Proud Georgia Tech alum
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