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HP Skin Patch May Replace Needles

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the you-may-feel-a-slight-pinch dept.

Biotech 190

Iddo Genuth writes "HP and Crospon have developed a skin patch employing microneedles that barely penetrate the skin. The microneedles can replace conventional injections and deliver drugs through the skin without causing any pain. The skin patch technology also enables delivery of several drugs by one patch and the control of dosage and of administration time for each drug. It has the potential to be safer and more efficient than injections."

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Well... (2, Insightful)

F-3582 (996772) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502045)

I'd like to see someone draw blood through one of those... Should get you the clearest serum ever.

Forget drawing blood... we're turning into pussies (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503569)

Painless injections too now? Great, now I can watch my generation further deteriorate into a blabbering collection of pussies, unable to deal with any sort of physical hardship or pain. The next big leap forward will be when they can administer open-heart surgery in convenient chewable-tablet form.

In speculative fiction for a while (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502063)

Micro-needles have been part of science fiction for at least 15 years. In Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash [amazon.com] , one character has a sedative-filled needle implanted on her cervix in order to incapcitate a rapist.

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502087)

one character has a sedative-filled needle implanted on her cervix in order to incapcitate a rapist.

Wouldn't a cheese-grater be quicker?

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (2)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502235)

To slow. Should go for the bear trap instead.

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (4, Funny)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502089)

Ah, yes. The Vagina Dentata. Making scary Freudian dreams come to life for over 15 years!

For example: http://pbfcomics.com/?cid=PBF051-Zarflax.jpg [pbfcomics.com]

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (2, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502127)

http://www.rapestop.net/ [rapestop.net] got to wonder the type of person that would leave one of those in all the time

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502157)

I know several police, and they're all terrified to be without a firearm, even off-duty or on furlough, sometimes going so far as to plan their vacations around which states have police gun treaties that will allow them to carry. Some people are just paranoid, I guess.

Although I don't see how this thing will help, it seems like a bleeding dick would not incapacitate the attacker enough to prevent him from beating the shit out of his victim instead of raping her.

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (0)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502187)

that thing is the worst fucking idea i've ever seen.

the inventor is just a fucking lab tech, which is nothing but a bozo off the street who got taught how to stick needles into someone. She attempts to talk her skills up saying she is a "blood technician", but i assure you there is no such qualification.(to qualify, i have worked in pathology labs)

read the FAQ, it's hilarious and disgusting at the same time, since it's full of stupid idea's but prey's on peoples fears at the same time.

some prize bits of the faq are " What motivated you to create this device?" (money) and "Won't the man initially feel this?" - yes he will feel the hooks digging into his cock, then he will bash the crap out of you, possibly turning a rape into a murder.

moronic devices like this aren't needed. there's things you can do to avoid rape that won't cost you a cent or involve shoving anything up your twat, such as don't put yourself in situations you KNOW are going to be risky eg. walking down a dark street at night dressed like a hooker

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503103)

yes he will feel the hooks digging into his cock, then he will bash the crap out of you
I'm betting that a man with hooks in his jimmy would be too distracted to be beating anybody. Hell, just thinking about it brings me to my knees.

don't put yourself in situations you KNOW are going to be risky eg. walking down a dark street at night dressed like a hooker
Timmarhy, it sounds like you have some issues with women. You didn't by any chance have a bad experience with one of these Rapex devices, did you?

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (4, Insightful)

jotok (728554) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503529)

It takes some people a while to separate "risk management" and "fault" or "blame." I can't pin down why, though I have some ideas.

I think the issue has to do with separating morally important acts with moral content from morally unimportant acts: rape has moral content, wearing this clothing or walking down that street does not.

Here's an example using street gangs: they wear different colors to identify themselves. So if you wear a red sweatshirt and the blue shirt gang shoots you, they did an immoral act, whereas your act cannot be construed as "immoral" and therefore you can't be blamed for your own shooting.

If you're going to allow such morally unimportant and therefore arbitrary factors when assigning blame, then you get a slippery slope where things that are not only unimportant but also beyond a person's control are used...such as your gender. So we find people saying, essentially, the man who raped the woman was not guilty--it was the woman's fault for A) being female and B) being around men, who cannot be expected to control themselves.

The obvious remedy is not for the law to enforce women's rights, nor for women to exercise their right as human beings to defend themselves, but rather to blame the women.

If this kind of reasoning makes sense to you, then you might be a Saudi judge.

Now, it is perfectly reasonable to advise people on risky behaviors: watch what you wear to reduce your chances of getting shot. Don't go get so drunk you can't stand up when you're all alone. Don't hold hands walking down Crime Alley in Gotham City. And so forth. But "being vulnerable" is still not an immoral act.

Some people do think it is, but they only want to justify their position of strength--alas, power doesn't justify itself, though powerful people wish it did.

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502205)

I think readers might be more familiar with this [wikipedia.org] version of the Vagina Dentata [wikipedia.org] .

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502115)

Implanting such thing into the cervix (or near its opening) is at the least very risky for the subject herself because when not sexually aroused there is almost no cavity present causing the subject to be injeected with the sedative unless she had some kind of antidote in her blood stream... oh wait.. this is /. ... no no.. forget what I said, I don't know anything about such things...

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502155)

what if she actually WANTED to have a fuck?

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502165)

that exact thing happens in the book. YT engages in somewhat spontaneous consensual sex, then remembers the thing when the guy's passed out.

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502483)

So that explains why my husband always passes out during sex...

Re:In speculative fiction for a while (1)

Ddalex (647089) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502807)

It's called falling asleep...

Did someone say hypospray? (3, Funny)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502067)

Finally, the most important star trek technology comes to the real world! Forget all that transporter, holodeck, or warp drive crap; we've got painless injections! woo!

Re:Did someone say hypospray? (3, Informative)

selex (551564) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502145)

Jet Injector. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jet_injector [wikipedia.org] Already exist. From what I heard from military people who had it used on them it f**king hurts.

Now the question is HP? Really? The people who built my printer? And laptop? I guess that development of the inkjet has other applications.

Selex

Really?

Re:Did someone say hypospray? (1)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502589)

not to mention that it could rip your skin open if you moved during application

Re:Did someone say hypospray? (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502801)

They were pretty common in the 70's, I got more than a few vaccinations using them. Oddly enough, when I was in the Navy in the 80's I rarely saw them.

me too... (1)

hummassa (157160) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502891)

And I remember vividly that it hurts like hell. So, no Star Trek here.

Re:Did someone say hypospray? (1)

hagnat (752654) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503173)

these were pretty common here in Brazil in the 80's and 90's. I still have my vaccine mark in my arm. As far as i remember, it hurt like hell.

Drug Dealers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502069)

Take note!

Consider the potential abuses (2, Interesting)

Bozzio (183974) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502075)

If this patch is reusable it could become the method of choice for heroin addicts.

On the other hand, it would be much safer than using needles.
You can't really share these, I assume.

Re:Consider the potential abuses (1)

ResidntGeek (772730) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502093)

Only for the advanced addicts, I'd think. This is a subcutaneous injection, if I'm not mistaken, which heroin users only turn to after they've used up their veins (slower absorption, you see - not as intense or immediate).

Re:Consider the potential abuses (2, Interesting)

blind monkey 3 (773904) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502179)

Could this method be used to "wean them" off drugs? Controlled dosage and all that....

Re:Consider the potential abuses (2, Informative)

ResidntGeek (772730) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502195)

It could, certainly, but it wouldn't add anything new. The problems with heroin addiction and the defeat thereof are properties of the drug itself, and can't really be mitigated. Many drugs cause users to develop tolerance, but heroin is so much stronger that continually taking the same dose won't even bring you back to normal - you have to increase the dose just to get back to normal after cravings, never mind feeling the same effects for repeated highs. The withdrawal is severe and physically dangerous, and it can be near-impossible to go cold turkey (or anywhere close) and survive if you're in too deep. Continuous subcutaneous absorption wouldn't do anything a controlled methadone drip wouldn't do, as far as breaking addiction.

None of this is firsthand information, of course, so the usual warnings about salt and its grains apply.

Re:Consider the potential abuses (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503299)

All(?) of the opioids (heroin, oxycodone, etc.), benzodiazepans (valium, klonopin, ambien), barbiturates, and alcohol all cause attenuation over time (less effect for same amount of drug), physical withdrawal symptoms when discontinued (a majority of them can be lethal if withdrawn too quickly from a high usage scenario), and overdoses can be lethal. Nasty stuff.

You would never inject heroin (or meth, coke etc.) in anything but a vein, though, because it would feel like someone stabbed you with a red-hot-poker, and it would take ages to get a high.

With meth (the only one I have personal experience with), you'll occasionally have users getting high midway through an injection, losing control over the needle and pushing some of the drug into the surrounding tissue -- this is never intentional though.

Meth doesn't have the withdrawal issues of e.g. heroin (and I don't believe it's possible to lethally OD on it based on available literature), but it destroys your life in so many other ways. The last time I looked, the recidivism rate was 94% for people who wanted to quit. Skip this one if you haven't tried it. (If you're using, you won't listen to me anyways, besides you've got this thing under control, right? ;-)

M.L.
(clean since Jan 1, 2006)

Re:Consider the potential abuses (3, Funny)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502207)

If it's anything like their inkjet cartridges, it won't be reusable (or cheap).

Re:Consider the potential abuses (1)

djupedal (584558) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502351)

The patch is DNA matched and will only dispense when coupled with the prescriptionee. In addition, the patch allows for cross-marketing opportunities where the clinic/pharmacy owners can also choose to dose the recipient with a compound triggering a Starbucks or Taco Bell purchase. "Mocha grande, please."

Re:Consider the potential abuses (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502515)

One of the largest addiction factors is the "come up" when heroin is injected. Sex really does pale to the opiate rush of IVed heroin. Yeah, the dreams are vivid, but no more than oxycodone.

Posted AC so google doesn't come back to haunt me one day.

Re:Consider the potential abuses (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502547)

We're talking a printer manufacturer here. I bet those things have some kind of chip inside that makes dead sure you can't refill them.

one more brick in the wall (2, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502077)

The skin patch technology also enables delivery of several drugs by one patch and the control of dosage and of administration time for each drug.

Excellent. So when does Soma come out?

Wuh? (1)

scatters (864681) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502079)

Ok, so I'm confused. Didn't HP get out of medical research and products when it divested Agilent in order to focus on its core computer/printer business?

Re:Wuh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503265)

It's probably a fruit of those sell-your-soul-for bread employment contracts giving company right on anything (no matter how remote to company's core business) novel their employees make up while employed there.

Previously on Slashdot (3, Informative)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502091)

Last we heard [slashdot.org] this was in the prototype phase. Btw, the search function is terrible.

Re:Previously on Slashdot (2, Informative)

Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502219)

I'm glad someone else noticed. Does anyone know if there is anything new in this post, or are we just rehashing old news?


Oh, and next time just use Google (site:SlashDot.org "YourPhraseHere"), it is a thousand times easier.

Re:Previously on Slashdot (1)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502437)

Thats actually how I ended up finding it. Didn't get it from Slashdot's search on any of the phrases: "HP", "patch", "drugs", "microneedles", "printers", etc.

Niccotine patch did it already? (0)

shoolz (752000) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502107)

If I remember correctly from one of my quit-smoking tries, this is exactly how the nicotine patches worked. Nicotine delivered my thousands of miniature needles. So... what's new here exactly?

Re:Niccotine patch did it already? (4, Informative)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502119)

Those work through the skin. Transdermal patch [wikipedia.org]

This ones enter through micro needles.

Now we need sensors in those patches (4, Insightful)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502109)

If this technology triumphs, the next addition should be sensors that control the release of chemicals taking the current situation into consideration.

For example, a patch could sense the cardiac rhythm and control it chemically. Another could control blood sugar, etc.

What I imagine is someone witnessing a car accident, taking four patches from his car's medikit putting them in different parts of the hurt person and calling an ambulance while the patches stabilize the patient.

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (1)

devjj (956776) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502135)

The lawyers are going to have a field day with that one.

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (4, Informative)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502147)

If this technology triumphs, the next addition should be sensors that control the release of chemicals taking the current situation into consideration.



No company wants to open that bag of liability issues. If your device makes medical decisions (instead of leaving them to a physician), you make yourself a big fat blinking glowing target for all sorts of legal trouble. Current example: Infusion pumps. While studies show that feedback-controlled infusion pumps lead to better patient outcomes, no company wants to make them because they don't want to get slapped with a multi-million-dollar lawsuit for the one patient in a thousand who thinks he might have had a better outcome with a standard infusion pump.

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (5, Insightful)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502181)

Ok, we need sensors in the patches and a better legal system that doesn't bind the minds and souls of men with ropes of fear.

Oh please... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502417)

Yes, there will be some liability concerns but with proper testing and FDA approval, only an actual fuck up is going to really expose a company to liability. Meanwhile, the possible benefits of such sensor injectors are immense.

1. Sensors could detect the presence of substances which cause problems when combined with a given medication (e.g. alcohol, other medications). It can then abort the injection and alert the patient. This could save lives and would be especially useful for non-critical medications (i.e. missing a dose won't kill you).
2. Medications could be properly loaded into the system and levels could be properly maintained. Not only can this keep the system at a more constant level, but it means patients will not have to worry about forgetting to take their medication.
3. Diabetics. Blood sugar levels could be properly maintained in real time.
4. Emergency response. Imagine a pack that checks for certain conditions and responds accordingly. Probably not for every day use, but could save lives during disasters.
5. Zillions of military uses.
6. Making sure people take all their freakin' antibiotics.

Well, sorry. (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502649)

Yes, there will be some liability concerns but with proper testing and FDA approval, only an actual fuck up is going to really expose a company to liability.



That changes when your device starts making decisions which are usually left to a physician. There's only a very small number of devices out there that do so right now (AEDs, implantable defibrillators and such), and they base their decisions on fairly trivial parameters and only act when the likely outcome of not doing so is a dead patient.



Meanwhile, the possible benefits of such sensor injectors are immense.



Companies don't exist for immense benefits for humanity. They exist for immense profits for their shareholders, and hence have to try to avoid anything that could cut into these profits. Like multi-million-dollar lawsuits.



Oh, and I do work in the medical devices industry.

Re:Well, sorry. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503495)

I would consider the "decisions" an ICD makes to be no more severe than those of a drug patch. The most feedback you can expect is to detect a stimulus and respond with a release. Modern ICDs have the potential to have a lot of control over a heart, if chosen, and I don't see how this is any different.

Anyway, as a worker in the medical device industry, you should be aware that a combination device is going to be under much higher scrutiny in the FDA at the moment, especially after the mess with drug eluting stents. I would say the normal regulatory system can handle such a product safely.

(For those not in the industry, drug-eluting stents turned out to increase the risk of late thrombosis over bare metal stents. This was not detected in clinical trials, and the risk of such an event now must be weighed against the risk of restinosis they were intended to fix. Personally, I would go with the restinosis, but that isn't medical advice.)

I also work in the medical device industry.

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (2, Interesting)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503195)

When you talk about administering chemicals according to the situation I think of the futuristic body armor suits in many sci-fi writings. Most recently in Mass Effect where your suit can have first aid upgrades that inject you with all sorts of stuff. I would like to see performance enhancing drugs administered. Maybe when adrenaline spikes in your body (from imminent car accident or even someone tries to attack you) some drugs that increase reaction times and pain killers or whatever get shot into your blood stream.

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503301)

And then if you see someone you don't like you just take two-three of these cardiac rhythm patches and places them on him pretty quickly and flee the scene. He'd never see it coming!

Re:Now we need sensors in those patches (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503321)

Or fill a syringe with whatever chemical poison you've got at home and stick it into him; it's faster, cheaper and can go through thick clothes.

Tattoos (4, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502123)

I could imagine instant tattoos -- patches with designs on them, subcutaneous injection of inks.

Just add alcohol.

Re:Tattoos (1)

Woogiemonger (628172) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503335)

I could imagine instant tattoos -- patches with designs on them, subcutaneous injection of inks.

Off-topic, but, tattoo technology *is* improving this year. Dye will be stored in small capsules, that can be burst open by laser and thus removed easily with a single laser treatment: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19845335/ [msn.com] So yes, maybe it'll be easier to get tattoos as well.

Re:Tattoos (1)

Nocterro (648910) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503351)

Actually, forget about the ink.

A bit late... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502133)

HP is a little slow on this one. I've been replacing things with skin patches for years now. The Sims, Oblivion...

Pain? (1)

PrinceAshitaka (562972) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502149)

I just recently had my flu immunization. Those needles are small. I barely felt it. Is this really a pain reduction breakthrough?

Re:Pain? (1)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502177)

It's a breakthrough for pussies.

Re:Pain? (2, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502183)

It's a breakthrough for pussies.
No, the needles are too small to go through the fur.

Re:Pain? (2, Funny)

garbletext (669861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502303)

No, the needles are too small to go through the fur.
actually, I prefer them shaved

Re:Pain? (2, Funny)

rts008 (812749) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502381)

You prefer shaved cats? Man, that's kinky.
How do you get the cat to hold still?

Re:Pain? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502509)

It is estimated that about 10% of people (including me) have a phobia of needles (trypanophobia). For many people, this phobia is associated with a sudden drop in blood pressure, causing fainting and such, at the time of injection. I know that I am perfectly capable of being fairly calm before getting a shot, and generally don't feel terribly afraid, but will still end up nauseous and probably faint afterwards. So I'm interested in this not so much for the pain reduction, but because this probably wouldn't cause that reaction for me. I'd love not to have to worry about fainting after getting an injection.

Re:Pain? (1)

nahdude812 (88157) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503009)

From a pain perspective, I find it unlikely there'll be any real advancement here. You're right, certain shots have such tiny needles that most of the pain felt is actually imagined.

It won't replace all needles. Blood drawing and intramuscular shots won't be able to be delivered this way, and they are definitely more painful than IV or subcutaneous shots. I doubt even IV shots would be replaceable with this.

Also not even all subcutaneous shots can be administered with a small needle; some of them have a high viscosity base and need a wider needle to deliver; I doubt they are able to be converted to nano needles.

It does increase safety since there's no sharp needle with patient blood on it for the nurse to worry about.

Some shots though could result in a substantially smaller dose if administered this way. Research in this area is still emerging but it has been shown, for example, that if properly applied, the Flu shot (among other vaccines) is just as effective, or even more effective if delivered properly subcutaneously at very small doses. Unfortunately it is challenging to delivery correctly with conventional needles, and the consequence of not delivering it correctly is greatly reduced or no protection at all. A patch might make that delivery easy. This research is still in trials though, so although it looks promising, it's too early to tell if it's viable for normal use.

Stinging nettle (3, Interesting)

lmpeters (892805) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502159)

This actually sounds kind of like how stinging nettle works. I recently touched some by accident, and I can assure you, the needles on the surface of that leaf are so small that I couldn't feel them at all.

The cocktail of formic acid and histamines contained within the needles, on the other hand, were quite noticeable (ouch!). Of course, I'm assuming that HP is not planning to use this invention to deliver anything that's painful by design.

Re:Stinging nettle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502397)

You can be sure that that's exactly what the bush administration will do.

Re:Stinging nettle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502409)

Interesting, the histamine reaction from stinging nettle is used for treatment of allergies, particularly seasonal, breathing-related allergies like wheezing/asthma. A double-blind study shows it works, although I'm too lazy to find a link. I'm not sure exactly how it's supposed to work, since the nettle actually causes an allergic response on its own... but anyway, the stinging nettle can be ingested as a tea or in taken in capsules.

Note- IANAD.

Re:Stinging nettle (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502661)

Urtica, a prominent genus of the stinging nettle has been used medicinally. I don't know about the asthma link, but nettle tea is an astringent used as a wash (externally) or as a method to mitigate bleeding (taken internally). It is known that the plants bind immunoglobin G and, therefore, reduce sensitivity to food allergies (and possibly asthma).

The formic acid mentioned by the GP is destroyed by boiling. The leaves are high in vitamins and minerals (A, C, D, calcium, phosphorous, iron, silica and others).

Sorry I didn't answer your question, but it is a useful plant nonetheless... actually all genera in the family are useful in similar ways. I'd like also to know about a link to a credible source that indicates that the plants are useful as an asthma curative.

Re:Stinging nettle (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502623)

You can actually eat the stinging nettle; boiling the leaves in water "decomposes" all those pesky hyperdermic needles that inject you with the histamines and other substances. I wonder how the technology begin developed by HP holds up under extreme heat conditions... probably better than the nettle.

Re:Stinging nettle (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502785)

I don't imagine it's a big deal - unless you want to eat HP skin patches.

Depends. (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503431)

Of course, I'm assuming that HP is not planning to use this invention to deliver anything that's painful by design.



Depends on what kind of government contracts they're getting. I bet some agencies out there are just drooling at the prospect of having ready-made, pre-packaged units of pain that do not leave any permanent marks or damage at their disposal.

changelog (1)

Carbon016 (1129067) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502209)

CHANGELOG for Skin Patch 1:
  • Epidermis: fixed issue with insensitivity to ultraviolet radiation resulting in annoying burns (also partially fixes bug tracker issue #450 with cancerous cells)
  • Epidermis: code related to debugging disease that causes red blotches ("rashes") replaced with more descriptive dialog box
  • General: Scabies can no longer burrow
  • General: Reduced frequency of infection of hair follicles
  • General: Severe wounds now result in core dump rather than scar tissue, related output logged to %\dump.txt

Something similiar. (1)

dunezone (899268) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502237)

Back in 1998 I had surgery on one of my kidneys. Because theres usually a wait and you have to be at the hospital several hours before the surgery they tried this method of numbing my skin so it wouldn't hurt when they put the needles in. Basically all they did was put cream down and put a clear patch on top of it, needless to say it still hurt and was useless.

Re:Something similiar. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502505)

I had the exact same thing when I was younger. I needed some blood taken and for some reason they wanted to get it from my hand. They slapped on a bit of that cream stuff with the clear patch, and like you said, it did nothing! Hurt like hell.

Re:Something similiar. (1)

Palpitations (1092597) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502629)

Chances are that was EMLA [rxmed.com] cream (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics). Basically a lido/prilocaine topical. According to the linked article, it numbs around 3-5mm deep after being in place for 60-120 minutes. Less for thicker skin, or anything deeper then the dermis. I'm guessing they slapped it on there, had you wait a few minutes (far less than an hour I'm sure), and then did the draw.

Why the hell they would bother is beyond me. The only reasons I can think of would be to help someone who was nervous think they'd be numb, or to add another thing to bill for. Applied properly, it does help a bit - takes things down from a sharp sting to more of a dull one in my experience. Nothing amazing in any case.

Re:Something similiar. (1)

penthouseplayah (454492) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502723)

Thats for children. The gel (lidocain, localanastethic) has to be in contact for at least an hour to work. Adults generelly don't need that, unless they're mentally ill, or the hospital charges for the patch. If done correctly its possible to stitch 2 year old children in the lips this way.

For anestethic below the dermis, infiltration analgesia is used via an thin needle.

Beware (3, Funny)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502247)

The new technology is similar to the technology employed in HP's patented process for its inkjet cartridges.

I foresee scores of people walking around with the HP logo tattooed where the patch was. Later the advertising space will be sold to other companies. Attempts to sue will be stymied by the fact that the devices will come with an EULA that clearly states that your skin doesn't belong to you while using the device, and the device can leave residues there. You will be forced to accept the EULA or else die from your sickness, but HP's lawyers will insist that was you "free and informed decision".

Just wait.

Thank god... (1)

moondo (177508) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502251)

I nearly passed out because of the anxiety of having a needle stuck in my arm. But then, when the nurse stuck the needle in, and it actually hurt like hell I knew I was going to pass out. The nurse started asking me all these random questions to stop me from passing out. 'What a pussy!' you must be thinking, but I swear this nurse didn't know how to insert a needle... oh the horror.

Re:Thank god... (4, Funny)

muffel (42979) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502393)

'What a pussy!' you must be thinking
Correct.

Re:Thank god... (1)

DeeQ (1194763) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502395)

Biggest mistake you can make is watching it go in. Other than that needles are not that bad. Only when they have to do it multiple times because they miss the spot makes me sick.

Re:Thank god... (1)

Solra Bizna (716281) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502599)

I have unusually, inhumanly low body fat. I'm just about as underweight as it's possible to be without there being an immediate medical danger.

Last time I was immunized, they had to pinch my arm to get enough muscle to inject into. On their first four tries, the needle stabbed me in the bone.

IT HURT.

-:sigma.SB

Re:Thank god... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502511)

I once committed DUI.
I was taken to hospital for blood test and the handless nurse didn't know what the hell she was doing. I tell her first "Take the right arm, there's no visible veins on the left". Despite this, she stabbed my left arm a couple of times before giving up. Then she finally tried the other arm. Still couldn't hit the vein properly even thou I showed her where to stick the damn needle.
When she finally managed to hit the vein I was pissed off enough to drop my heart rate on purpose so she had to drip the blood drop by drop.

Re:Thank god... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502581)

Tell me about it. Every time they try to draw blood from me it's like a trial drilling for oil.

It's not so much the pain, it's more that my ellbow pit looks like I'm a junkie or something for days. Now try to wear a t-shirt to work.

Re:Thank god... (1)

vorpal22 (114901) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503505)

I have to admit that I was this way when I was younger... needles would give me panic attacks.

A few colonoscopies [wikipedia.org] really put things in perspective, though. Now needles - even the massively long needled B12 injection my partner has to give me every month, which requires a few pre-injection beers - are generally a walk in the park.

I guess that's why I read this article and though, "Huh. What a waste of research time."

Types of injection (5, Insightful)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502255)

So this is great for stuff that you can put in subcutaneously. What about intravenous injections? What about intramuscular? Intraperitoneal? What about substances that are made up of large (several micron) particles, such as the sufur colloid injections used by nuclear medicine studies? Those could get stuck in superfine-gauge needles.

I think it's a little premature to say that this patch will replace conventional injections entirely. It might seem obvious that a patch couldn't really hope to deliver injections into the muscles without penetrating all the layers of skin, but I think it at least bears mentioning.

Re:Types of injection (1)

aadvancedGIR (959466) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502321)

Moreover, it will probably only work for very small volumes, so don't expect that technology to totally replace the good old needle. The only goal of this is to extend the range of medecines someone can inject himself whithout needing a nurse or special training.
Classic patches, such as nicotine ones, work because the skin is porous to that chemical, so there are strong limitations to what can be done with them, but for a diabetic, it could be awesome: instead of injecting himself a large dose of insulin now and then, he could use a patch and have his insulin slowly and regulary injected. Too much insulin, remove the patch for a couple of hours, too little, add a second one for a couple of hours. Simple, painless and safe.

Hands of blue.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502319)

Did anyone else notice that the researchers hands - were 'hands of blue'?
Hmmmm...

Never mind that... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502689)

Didn't you see the part of the Roswell UFO in the upper left corner of that photo?

I say... Kids these days. Brains fried by MTV, don't see the important bits any more.

Bad headline (1)

quigonn (80360) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502323)

should be "...may replace canulas" (canulae?). A needle is something you use for sewing, but you use a canula for an injection.

Re:Bad headline (2, Informative)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502387)

Hypodermic needle. Hypo ("under") dermic ("the skin"). Pretty commonplace tool, actually. Cannulae, on the other hand, are used for IVs.

Re:Bad headline (1)

quigonn (80360) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503109)

No. It's a canula as soon as it's hollow. A hypodermic "needle" is just a special type of canula. And after all, luer tapers are pretty much standardized, and thus, canulae can be attached to both IVs and syringes.

Novelty? (2, Interesting)

$pearhead (1021201) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502373)

How is this microneedle-thing different, from eg. this [diva-portal.org] ?

Slap patches are wiz man! (1)

akerasi (1076913) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502469)

But will these leave me with an aftertaste of olives? I sure hope not...

Hmmmmm (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21502521)

Ya know, im not so sure that this is want i want. HP gets enough under my skin as it is ;)

tiny (1)

avalean (1176333) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502543)

With a needle that small i would imagine it would take a while to administer a certain dosage. Doc : "Nurse, 20cc of Toradol" Nurse : "It will take a few hours!"

Old news? (1)

fanboyslayer (794752) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502559)

I remember reading about this as a preteen in MUSE magazine... oh, probably eight to ten years ago. I don't remember all the details, but the article mentioned attaching a sort of syringe to deal with larger volumes of medication..

Re:Old news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503105)

That's where all those old HP ink cartridges come in. Those with the patch on the bottom

I can see a drawback though (1)

AndyTayl0r (804872) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502675)

The skin patch technology also enables delivery of several drugs by one patch and the control of dosage and of administration time for each drug.
So as it is an HP product, when one drug runs out, you will have to change the whole patch.

One TLA bears to mind... (1)

mach1980 (1114097) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502835)

ESD getting the patch to release all its contents in one go... Instant trip to choir invisible.

iSummer of Love (1)

nerdyalien (1182659) | more than 6 years ago | (#21502865)

With this new invention, people find it more less-painful to inject hard drugs to the blood stream and get high !!!

See you there in San Francisco with my Caravan, hippie clothes, vintage guitar and Flowers !!!

Can this be true? (1)

thogard (43403) | more than 6 years ago | (#21503277)

Is HP turning back into the type of company it was decades ago?

Stimpacks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21503287)

1) Invent micro-needle patch thing
2) Make a caffeine patch
3) Profit

*t*
CHHHHHHHT AWWWWWW YEAH.
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